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Keyword: gigo

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  • The System Is About to Burst Open: TRILLIONS In Unfunded Pensions “Foreshadow A Bleak Future”

    For millions of public sector workers in the U.S., state-run pension funds are the only chance left for a comfortable retirement. In the hopes of providing a stable future for their families, an entire generation was duped into putting decades of their earnings into these supposedly ‘risk-free’ investments. Unfortunately, those who have entrusted the government to manage their life savings may end up destitute as a result. Budgetary shortfalls that have plagued Detroit for years are now spreading to other municipalities. Since 2008, six local governments have been forced to renegotiate their debts in bankruptcy court, with many others on...
  • Farming Invented Twice In Middle East, Genomes Study Reveals

    06/22/2016 11:55:17 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Nature ^ | June 20, 2016 | Ewen Callaway
    Study of 44 ancient Middle Eastern genomes supports idea of independent farming revolutions in the Fertile Crescent. Two Middle Eastern populations independently developed farming and then spread the technology to Europe, Africa and Asia, according to the genomes of 44 people who lived thousands of years ago in present-day Armenia, Turkey, Israel, Jordan and Iran. ...the research supports archaeological evidence about the multiple origins of farming, and represents the first detailed look at the ancestry of the individuals behind one of the most important periods in human history — the Neolithic revolution. Some 11,000 years ago, humans living in the...
  • Moody's Analytics: Hillary Clinton Will Win Presidency

    05/23/2016 1:46:06 PM PDT · by Roos_Girl · 73 replies
    Newsmax ^ | May 23, 2016 | Joe Crowe
    Moody's Analytics has released its election model and is predicting that Hillary Clinton will be the next president of the United States.  Moody's Analytics has correctly predicted the winner of the presidency since 1980, basing its predictions on a two-year change in economic data in home prices, income growth, and gasoline prices, according to an NPR report.  Moody's analyst, Dan White, said that those three things affect a person's daily life the most.  "Things that affect marginal voter behavior most significantly are things that the average American is going to run into on an almost daily basis," White said.  The Moody's analyst told NPR...
  • Ancient DNA shows European wipe-out of early Americans

    04/02/2016 10:27:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 48 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | April 1, 2016 | University of Adelaide
    The first largescale study of ancient DNA from early American people has confirmed the devastating impact of European colonisation on the Indigenous American populations of the time. Led by the University of Adelaide's Australian Centre for Ancient DNA (ACAD), the researchers have reconstructed a genetic history of Indigenous American populations by looking directly into the DNA of 92 pre-Columbian mummies and skeletons, between 500 and 8600 years old. Published today in Science Advances, the study reveals a striking absence of the pre-Columbian genetic lineages in modern Indigenous Americans; showing extinction of these lineages with the arrival of the Spaniards. "Surprisingly,...
  • First Ancient African DNA Sequenced

    10/08/2015 2:10:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | Thursday, October 08, 2015 | unattributed
    Science reports that the first prehistoric genome from Africa has been sequenced. The DNA was obtained from the inner ear bones of a 4,500-year-old skeleton discovered in Mota Cave by John and Kathryn Arthur of the University of South Florida. Located in the highlands of Ethiopia, Mota Cave’s cool temperatures helped to preserve the hunter-gatherer’s rare genetic material. Andrea Manica and Marcos Gallego Llorente of the University of Cambridge found that the man, who has been dubbed “Mota,” had brown eyes, dark skin, and three gene variants associated with living at high altitudes. Mota’s genome was compared with samples from...
  • Danube Delta Holds Answers to ‘Noah’s Flood’ Debate [science]

    01/23/2009 8:15:56 PM PST · by Coyoteman · 53 replies · 735+ views
    Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution ^ | January 22, 2009 | Media Relations
    Did a catastrophic flood of biblical proportions drown the shores of the Black Sea 9,500 years ago, wiping out early Neolithic settlements around its perimeter? A geologist with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and two Romanian colleagues report in the January issue of Quaternary Science Reviews that, if the flood occurred at all, it was much smaller than previously proposed by other researchers. Using sediment cores from the delta of the Danube River, which empties into the Black Sea, the researchers determined sea level was approximately 30 meters below present levels—rather than the 80 meters others hypothesized. “We don’t...
  • A Simple Truth; Computer Climate Models Cannot Work

    10/17/2014 3:59:00 AM PDT · by Rocky · 13 replies
    Watts Up With That ^ | October 16, 2014 | Tim Ball
    The acronym GIGO, (Garbage In, Garbage Out) reflects that most working around computer models knew the problem. Some suggest that in climate science, it actually stands for Gospel In, Gospel Out. This is an interesting observation, but underscores a serious conundrum. The Gospel Out results are the IPCC predictions, (projections), and they are consistently wrong. This is no surprise to me, because I have spoken out from the start about the inadequacy of the models. I watched modelers take over and dominate climate conferences as keynote presenters. It was modelers who dominated the Climatic Research Unit (CRU), and through them,...
  • Can MIT Help Solve the Mystery of Bigfoot?

    03/27/2014 10:36:11 AM PDT · by Theoria · 68 replies
    Boston Magazine ^ | 26 Mar 2014 | Steve Annear
    Matt Knapp thinks that Bigfoot research is a mess right now.“The facts are that in terms of progress, the Bigfoot research community has ultimately made none. We are no closer now to proving these creatures exist than we were 40 years ago,” Knapp told Boston. Knapp blames the setbacks on the digital age, and the amount of misinformation being spread in the form of photos and videos online. That, and the fact that more people seem to be trying to cash in on what they claim are legitimate Bigfoot sightings. “Self admittedly, up to this point, we have not had anything...
  • Climate Craziness ... : only the ‘cooler’ models are wrong – the rest say 4şC of warming by 2100

    12/31/2013 2:58:20 PM PST · by CedarDave · 27 replies
    Watts Up With That? ^ | December 31, 2013 | Anthony Watts
    From the University of New South Wales and Dr. Steven Sherwood: “Climate sceptics like to criticise climate models for getting things wrong, and we are the first to admit they are not perfect,” said Sherwood. “But what we are finding is that the mistakes are being made by the models which predict less warming, not those that predict more.” Yeah…right:
  • Obama: I'd fix HealthCare.gov myself, "but I don't write code"

    11/08/2013 12:51:16 PM PST · by Zakeet · 121 replies
    CBS News ^ | November 8, 2013 | Lindsey Boerma
    President Obama wanted to go in himself and fix glitches that have plagued HealthCare.gov since its rollout last month, he told a crowd Friday at the Port of New Orleans, "but," he added, "I don't write code." The president couldn't ignore altogether lingering dissatisfaction with the botched health insurance exchanges, despite that the crux of the speech was intended to move back on the offensive with other aspects of his second-term agenda - specifically, job growth through investments in infrastructure and increasing U.S. exports.
  • Southern Europeans More African Than Thought

    06/05/2013 9:10:12 AM PDT · by Renfield · 28 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | 6-3-2013 | Tia Ghose
    Southern Europeans get a significant portion of their genetic ancestry from North Africa, new research suggests. The findings are perhaps not surprising, given that the Romans occupied North Africa and set up extensive trade routes in the region, and the Moors, a North African people, ruled a medieval territory called El-Andalus on the Iberian Peninsula. But the findings, published today (June 3) in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggest the impact of these connections went beyond culture and architecture, and may explain why Southern Europeans have more genetic diversity than their northern counterparts. "The higher level...
  • HAHAHAHAHA Washington Post Swing State Poll was 161 People

    10/01/2012 4:25:28 PM PDT · by Perdogg · 21 replies
    I may just poll my comment section and pass that off as a Battleground State poll. The Washington Post explained that rather curious “Swing State” subsection in today’s national poll where Obama had an incredible 11-point lead relative to his national lead of only 2-points: The WaPo-ABC ‘swing state’ poll numbers, explained Monday’s Washington Post-ABC News poll adds to the evidence of an emerging, important dynamic in the presidential contest showing closer parity nationally than in key battleground states, where President Obama has had clear leads.
  • Ancient DNA Reveals Lack Of Continuity - Neolithic Hunter-Gatherers And Contemporary Scandinavians

    01/02/2012 6:33:58 AM PST · by blam · 42 replies
    Science Direct ^ | Department of Evolutionary Biology, Uppsala University, SE-11863 Uppsala, Sweden
    Ancient DNA Reveals Lack Of Continuity Between Neolithic Hunter-Gatherers And Contemporary Scandinavians September 24, 2009. Summary The driving force behind the transition from a foraging to a farming lifestyle in prehistoric Europe (Neolithization) has been debated for more than a century [1] , [2] and [3] . Of particular interest is whether population replacement or cultural exchange was responsible [3] , [4] and [5] . Scandinavia holds a unique place in this debate, for it maintained one of the last major hunter-gatherer complexes in Neolithic Europe, the Pitted Ware culture [6]. Intriguingly, these late hunter-gatherers existed in parallel to early...
  • Genetic Study Uncovers New Path to Polynesia

    02/05/2011 4:22:23 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies · 1+ views
    ScienceDaily ^ | Thursday, February 3, 2011 | University of Leeds
    The islands of Polynesia were first inhabited around 3,000 years ago, but where these people came from has long been a hot topic of debate amongst scientists. The most commonly accepted view, based on archaeological and linguistic evidence as well as genetic studies, is that Pacific islanders were the latter part of a migration south and eastwards from Taiwan which began around 4,000 years ago. But the Leeds research -- published February 3 in The American Journal of Human Genetics -- has found that the link to Taiwan does not stand up to scrutiny. In fact, the DNA of current...
  • Researchers find a 'liberal gene'

    10/27/2010 2:41:55 PM PDT · by decimon · 59 replies
    University of California -- San Diego ^ | October 27, 2010 | Unknown
    Liberals may owe their political outlook partly to their genetic make-up, according to new research from the University of California, San Diego, and Harvard University. Ideology is affected not just by social factors, but also by a dopamine receptor gene called DRD4. The study's authors say this is the first research to identify a specific gene that predisposes people to certain political views. Appearing in the latest edition of The Journal of Politics published by Cambridge University Press, the research focused on 2,000 subjects from The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. By matching genetic information with maps of the...
  • The culture of building confidence in climate models

    10/27/2010 12:08:24 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 22 replies · 1+ views
    Climate Etc. ^ | October 10, 2010 | Judith Curry
    As climate models become increasingly relevant to policy makers,  they are being criticized  for not undergoing a formal verification and validation (V&V) process analogous to that used in engineering and regulatory applications. Further, claims are being made that climate models have been falsified by failing to predict specific future events.To date, establishing confidence in climate models has targeted the scientific community that develops and uses the models.  As the climate models become increasingly policy relevant, it is critically important to address the public need for high-quality models for decision making and to establish public confidence in these models.  An important element...
  • Mitochondrial genome analysis revises view of the initial peopling of North America

    07/09/2010 7:49:08 PM PDT · by neverdem · 84 replies · 2+ views
    EurekAlert ^ | 28-Jun-2010 | NA
    Contact: Peggy Calicchia calicchi@cshl.edu 516-422-4012 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Mitochondrial genome analysis revises view of the initial peopling of North America June 29, 2010 – The initial peopling of North America from Asia occurred approximately 15,000-18,000 years ago, however estimations of the genetic diversity of the first settlers have remained inaccurate. In a report published online today in Genome Research (www.genome.org), researchers have found that the diversity of the first Americans has been significantly underestimated, underscoring the importance of comprehensive sampling for accurate analysis of human migrations. Substantial evidence suggests that humans first crossed into North America from Asia over...
  • Penn Researchers Add Genetic Data to Archaeology and Linguistics to Get Picture of African Popu...

    06/02/2010 5:50:50 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies · 310+ views
    Univ of Penn ^ | May 26, 2010 | unattributed
    genetic variation in Africa is structured geographically, and to a lesser extent, linguistically. The findings are consistent with the notion that populations in close geographic proximity that speak linguistically similar languages are more likely to exchange genes. Furthermore, genetic variation in Africa appears consistent with the natural, geographic barriers that limit gene flow. In particular, there are geographic, and therefore genetic, distinctions between northern African and sub-Saharan African populations due to the vast desert that limited migration. "Focusing on particular exceptions to these broad patterns will enable us to discern and fully appreciate the complex population histories that have contributed...
  • To Denmark, From Russia, With Lies (CRU's Tree Ring Circus)

    12/18/2009 4:32:00 PM PST · by raptor22 · 19 replies · 1,698+ views
    Investors Business Daily ^ | December 18, 2009 | IBD Editorial Staff
    Global Warming: Russian analysts accuse Britain's Meteorological Office of cherry-picking Russian temperature data to "hide the decline" in global temperatures. Is Copenhagen rooted in a single tree in Siberia? Michael Mann, a Penn State meteorologist, wrote in Friday's Washington Post that "stolen" e-mails from the University of East Anglia's Climate Research Unit still don't alter the evidence for climate change. Mann, a creator of the discredited hockey-stick graph used in reports from the U.N.'s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change to show man-made warming, attacks climate skeptics, including former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, saying they "confuse the public." Chutzpah has been...
  • Rise of sea levels is 'the greatest lie ever told'

    12/07/2009 7:30:32 PM PST · by Vince Ferrer · 56 replies · 2,432+ views
    telegraph.co.uk ^ | 28 Mar 2009 | Christopher Booker
    One of his most shocking discoveries was why the IPCC has been able to show sea levels rising by 2.3mm a year. Until 2003, even its own satellite-based evidence showed no upward trend. But suddenly the graph tilted upwards because the IPCC's favoured experts had drawn on the finding of a single tide-gauge in Hong Kong harbour showing a 2.3mm rise. The entire global sea-level projection was then adjusted upwards by a "corrective factor" of 2.3mm, because, as the IPCC scientists admitted, they "needed to show a trend".