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Keyword: glaciation

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  • Mars Used To Look More White Than Red

    05/26/2016 12:49:12 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 27 replies
    popularmechanics.com ^ | 05/26/2016 | William Herkewitz
    Had you searched the sky with a telescope just a few hundred thousand years ago, you would have struggled to find a red planet. Instead, you would have seen a gleaming-white ice ball where Mars should be. A team of astronomers led by Isaac Smith, an astrophysicist at the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado, has collected the first concrete evidence that Mars has just exited an extreme ice age, one so intense it would have put Earth's recent frosty foray to shame. Using cameras and a radar-pinging device on board NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, Smith's team deduced this history...
  • Mystery invaders conquered Europe at the end of last ice age

    03/23/2016 6:35:44 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 36 replies
    New Scientist ^ | February 4, 2016 | Colin Barras
    Europe went through a major population upheaval about 14,500 years ago, at the end of the last ice age, according to DNA from the bones of hunter-gatherers. Ancient DNA studies published in the last five years have transformed what we know about the early peopling of Europe. The picture they paint is one in which successive waves of immigration wash over the continent, bringing in new people, new genes and new technologies. These studies helped confirm that Europe's early hunter-gatherers - who arrived about 40,000 years ago - were largely replaced by farmers arriving from the Middle East about 8000...
  • Explosive volcanoes ended Earth's time as a snowball: Huge eruptions broke our planet's deep freeze

    01/18/2016 9:00:01 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 33 replies
    MailOnline ^ | 01/18/2016 | Ryan O'Hare for
    In our planet's early history, 720 to 640 million years ago, thick sheets of ice covered the majority of the surface, as the Earth was locked in a deep freeze. But explosive underwater volcanoes changed the chemistry of the Earth's oceans and were key to breaking the planet from its icy state, according to a new study. Researchers at the University of Southampton believe underwater volcanoes helped to thaw out "Snowball Earth", and even led to runaway chemical chain reactions, which created the conditions for an explosion of life on Earth. While much of the driving forces behind glaciation during...
  • Jordan’s Black Desert may hold key to Earth’s first farmers

    06/09/2015 2:07:02 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    EuroNews ^ | June 8, 2015 | unattributed
    The team found 14,000-year-old evidence that could lead to a new understanding of culture and the environment at the dawn of human civilization in the region. At that time, this area used to get much more rain and was able to sustain human settlement... Underneath the volcanic basalt on the windswept, arid and rocky plain, within sight of the Syrian border, the bones of a child and adult are slowly coming to the surface after at least 14,000 years entombed in the desert. By analysing bones, seeds and other remains scientists hope to discover that in this area, 14.000 years...
  • NASA Admits That Winters are Going to Get Colder…Much Colder

    03/03/2015 9:48:29 AM PST · by Perseverando · 67 replies
    D.C. Clothesline ^ | November 18, 2014 | Chris Carrington
    The Maunder Minimum (also known as the prolonged sunspot minimum) is the name used for the period roughly spanning 1645 to 1715 when sunspots became exceedingly rare, as noted by solar observers of the time. Like the Dalton Minimum and Spörer Minimum, the Maunder Minimum coincided with a period of lower-than-average global temperatures. During one 30-year period within the Maunder Minimum, astronomers observed only about 50 sunspots, as opposed to a more typical 40,000-50,000 spots. (Source) Climatologist John Casey, a former space shuttle engineer and NASA consultant, thinks that last year’s winter, described by USA Today as “one of...
  • Global Warming: A Chilling Perspective

    03/02/2015 6:34:18 AM PST · by rickmichaels · 15 replies
    For more than 2 million years our earth has cycled in and out of Ice Ages, accompanied by massive ice sheets accumulating over polar landmasses and a cold, desert-like global climate. Although the tropics during the Ice Age were still tropical, the temperate regions and sub-tropical regions were markedly different than they are today. There is a strong correlation between temperature and CO2 concentrations during this time. Historically, glacial cycles of about 100,000 years are interupted by brief warm interglacial periods-- like the one we enjoy today. Changes in both temperatures and CO2 are considerable and generally synchronized, according to...
  • Is Global Warming a Hoax?

    01/06/2015 7:14:56 PM PST · by Coleus · 36 replies
    The New American ^ | 01.06.15 | Ed Hiserodt and Rebecca Terrell
    In our information age, we’re bombarded with statistics on every danger the number crunchers can conjure — people struck by lightning, airplane vs. automotive deaths, and even drownings in bathtubs. But one statistic is curiously missing from the list. Even though President Obama and other global-warming alarmists warn of a looming climate apocalypse, they avoid giving a metric to prove their claims. They blame man-made climate change for a vast array of ills, including floods, droughts, wildfires, and tornados. But they never quantify what they say is the driving force behind it all: temperature.They have a very good reason. Actual...
  • Last Ice Age happened in less than year say scientists

    08/02/2008 2:28:28 PM PDT · by Renfield · 78 replies · 261+ views
    The Scotsman ^ | 8-02-08 | angus howarth
    THE last ice age 13,000 years ago took hold in just one year, more than ten times quicker than previously believed, scientists have warned. Rather than a gradual cooling over a decade, the ice age plunged Europe into the deep freeze, German Research Centre for Geosciences at Potsdam said. Cold, stormy conditions caused by an abrupt shift in atmospheric circulation froze the continent almost instantly during the Younger Dryas less than 13,000 years ago – a very recent period on a geological scale. The new findings will add to fears of a serious risk of this happening again in the...
  • Archaeologists Discover 13,800-Year-Old Underwater Site at Haida Gwaii

    12/27/2014 9:47:30 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Indian Country ^ | Thursday, December 18, 2014 | Alex Jacobs
    An archaeological discovery from this past September could put the earliest inhabitation in Canada at around 13,800 years ago, reported CBC News. Right now it's all on sonar images captured by an underwater robotic vehicle. Archaeologist Quentin Mackie from the University of Victoria (UVIC) and his team returned from a research trip to the Haida Gwaii archipelago in August, where they used an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) to scan the sea floor in search of evidence of ancient human inhabitation. His team has been looking for proof of the earliest human presence in North America for decades, and what they...
  • Earth Is Undergoing True Polar Wander, Scientists Say

    10/03/2012 3:31:34 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies
    EarthSky.org ^ | October 2012 | Deborah Byrd
    Scientists based in Germany and Norway today published new results about a geophysical theory known as true polar wander. That is a drifting of Earth's solid exterior -- an actual change in latitude for some land masses -- relative to our planet's rotation axis. These scientists used hotspots in Earth's mantle as part of a computer model, which they say is accurate for the past 120 million years, to identify four possible instances of true polar wander in the past. And, they say, true polar wander is happening now... The scientists -- including Pavel V. Doubrovine and Trond H. Torsvik...
  • Gondwana Supercontinent Underwent Massive Shift During Cambrian Explosion

    08/11/2010 5:32:45 AM PDT · by decimon · 51 replies · 1+ views
    Yale University ^ | August 10, 2010 | Unknown
    New Haven, Conn. — The Gondwana supercontinent underwent a 60-degree rotation across Earth’s surface during the Early Cambrian period, according to new evidence uncovered by a team of Yale University geologists. Gondwana made up the southern half of Pangaea, the giant supercontinent that constituted the Earth’s landmass before it broke up into the separate continents we see today. The study, which appears in the August issue of the journal Geology, has implications for the environmental conditions that existed at a crucial period in Earth’s evolutionary history called the Cambrian explosion, when most of the major groups of complex animals rapidly...
  • 'Snowball Earth': Glaciers, ice packs once met at Equator

    03/05/2010 12:55:48 PM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 49 replies · 1,056+ views
    The Register ^ | 5th March 2010 12:47 GMT | Lewis Page
    American boffins say they have discovered evidence that almost the entire world was covered in sea ice and glaciers at certain points in the remote past, during so-called "snowball Earth" periods where the polar ice sheets met at the Equator. It were grim in the old days. Geologists probing conditions seen in the ancient world have long considered that there was a cold spell known as the Sturtian Glaciation about 716 million years ago. However there has been disagreement in boffinry circles as to just how severe this glaciation was. Now, researchers from Harvard uni in the States, funded by...
  • Caltech scientists predict greater longevity for planets with life [CO2 not so bad]

    06/12/2009 5:58:07 PM PDT · by Moonman62 · 13 replies · 364+ views
    Eurekalert ^ | 06/12/09 | California Institute of Technology
    PASADENA, Calif.— Roughly a billion years from now, the ever-increasing radiation from the sun will have heated Earth into inhabitability; the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere that serves as food for plant life will disappear, pulled out by the weathering of rocks; the oceans will evaporate; and all living things will disappear. Or maybe not quite so soon, say researchers from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), who have come up with a mechanism that doubles the future lifespan of the biosphere—while also increasing the chance that advanced life will be found elsewhere in the universe. A paper describing their...
  • Volcanic shutdown may have led to 'snowball Earth'

    05/10/2009 6:46:26 PM PDT · by neverdem · 22 replies · 1,074+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 09 May 2009 | David Shiga
    A 250-million-year shutdown of volcanic activity which is thought to have occurred early in Earth's history may be what turned the planet into a glacier-covered snowball. It could also have helped give rise to our oxygen-rich atmosphere. Previous studies have noted that very little volcanic material has been dated to between 2.45 and 2.2 billion years ago, but it was widely assumed the gap would vanish as more samples were dated. Now an analysis of thousands of zircon minerals collected from all seven continents indicates that the gap may be real after all. Zircons provide a record of past volcanic...
  • 35.5m yr old global cooling caused by sharp decline in CO2 (Maybe cooling caused a drop in CO2?)

    02/28/2009 10:46:55 PM PST · by neverdem · 21 replies · 1,460+ views
    The Economic Times ^ | 27 Feb 2009 | NA
    WASHINGTON: A new research has found that prehistoric global cooling that started in Antarctica about 35.5 million years ago, was caused by a sharp drop in the carbon dioxide (CO2) levels. Even after the continent of Antarctica had drifted to near its present location, its climate was subtropical. Then, 35.5 million years ago, ice formed on Antarctica in about 100,000 years, which is an "overnight" shift in geological terms. "Our studies show that just over thirty-five million years ago, 'poof,' there was an ice sheet where there had been subtropical temperatures before," said Matthew Huber, assistant professor of earth and...
  • A Much Earlier Start for Animals

    02/04/2009 8:07:59 PM PST · by neverdem · 20 replies · 754+ views
    ScienceNOW Daily News ^ | 4 February 2009 | Phil Berardelli
    Enlarge ImageMolecular fingerprints. Sedimentary rock formations in Oman, like this one, contain chemical evidence of the planet's first animals, which appeared at least 635 million years ago. Credit: David Fike, Nature Where did all the animals come from? The fossil record is virtually animal-free up until the Cambrian Explosion 540 million years ago, and then--boom--thousands of critters of all shapes and sizes show up. The mystery has plagued scientists for more than a century and a half, beginning with Charles Darwin. Now, with a brilliant bit of detective work, researchers have located our missing ancestors. The problem with the...
  • CO2, Temperatures, and Ice Ages

    02/02/2009 8:58:29 PM PST · by neverdem · 36 replies · 906+ views
    Watts Up With That? ^ | 30/01/2009 | Frank Lansner
    Guest post by Frank Lansner, civil engineer, biotechnology. (Note from Anthony - English is not Frank’s primary language, I have made some small adjustments for readability, however they may be a few passages that need clarification. Frank will be happy to clarify in comments) It is generally accepted that CO2 is lagging temperature in Antarctic graphs. To dig further into this subject therefore might seem a waste of time. But the reality is, that these graphs are still widely used as an argument for the global warming hypothesis. But can the CO2-hypothesis be supported in any way using the data...
  • The Sun Proves an Embarassment to Climate Orthodoxers and Carbon Hysterics

    11/09/2008 4:35:17 PM PST · by I got the rope · 19 replies · 283+ views
    Al Fin ^ | 8 NOV 08 | Al Fin Blogspot
    The climate orthodoxy of carbon hysteria has never understood the intricacies of causative interaction in Earth's climate. Led by fanatics such as James Hansen and Al Gore, the orthodoxy decided early on to assign responsibility for "climate change" to human generated CO2. Orthodoxers reduced the complex system of climate to a single parameter--CO2--to make their job easier. Unfortunately, the orthodoxy failed to recruit (bribe and cudgel) large numbers of mathematically and scientifically trained men and women who remain curious about the underlying complexity of climate. Curious enough to continue studying climate as a multi-causative system. The distribution of sunlight, rather...
  • Melting ice caps could suck carbon from atmosphere

    09/20/2008 8:48:29 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies · 364+ views
    New Scientist ^ | September 10, 2008 | Catherine Brahic
    The findings, from two separate research groups... say the process of carbon sequestration is already underway. Even so, the new carbon sink is unlikely to make a significant dent in the huge amounts of CO2 pumped into the atmosphere by industrial activities... Phytoplankton produce chlorophyll to obtain energy from the sun and assimilate CO2, and so increased phytoplankton productivity would remove more carbon from the atmosphere... From one year to the next, the phytoplankton grew more in areas where the ice had disappeared: less ice meant more open water for longer, allowing the plankton to soak up more energy from...
  • Earth's Core, Magnetic Field Changing Fast, Study Says

    07/10/2008 1:53:24 PM PDT · by hripka · 138 replies · 298+ views
    National Geographic Society ^ | June 30, 2008 | Kimberly Johnson
    Rapid changes in the churning movement of Earth's liquid outer core are weakening the magnetic field in some regions of the planet's surface, a new study says. "What is so surprising is that rapid, almost sudden, changes take place in the Earth's magnetic field," said study co-author Nils Olsen, a geophysicist at the Danish National Space Center in Copenhagen. The findings suggest similarly quick changes are simultaneously occurring in the liquid metal, 1,900 miles (3,000 kilometers) below the surface, he said. The swirling flow of molten iron and nickel around Earth's solid center triggers an electrical current, which generates the...