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Keyword: glaciation

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  • Is Global Warming a Hoax?

    01/06/2015 7:14:56 PM PST · by Coleus · 35 replies
    The New American ^ | 01.06.15 | Ed Hiserodt and Rebecca Terrell
    In our information age, we’re bombarded with statistics on every danger the number crunchers can conjure — people struck by lightning, airplane vs. automotive deaths, and even drownings in bathtubs. But one statistic is curiously missing from the list. Even though President Obama and other global-warming alarmists warn of a looming climate apocalypse, they avoid giving a metric to prove their claims. They blame man-made climate change for a vast array of ills, including floods, droughts, wildfires, and tornados. But they never quantify what they say is the driving force behind it all: temperature.They have a very good reason. Actual...
  • Last Ice Age happened in less than year say scientists

    08/02/2008 2:28:28 PM PDT · by Renfield · 78 replies · 261+ views
    The Scotsman ^ | 8-02-08 | angus howarth
    THE last ice age 13,000 years ago took hold in just one year, more than ten times quicker than previously believed, scientists have warned. Rather than a gradual cooling over a decade, the ice age plunged Europe into the deep freeze, German Research Centre for Geosciences at Potsdam said. Cold, stormy conditions caused by an abrupt shift in atmospheric circulation froze the continent almost instantly during the Younger Dryas less than 13,000 years ago – a very recent period on a geological scale. The new findings will add to fears of a serious risk of this happening again in the...
  • Archaeologists Discover 13,800-Year-Old Underwater Site at Haida Gwaii

    12/27/2014 9:47:30 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Indian Country ^ | Thursday, December 18, 2014 | Alex Jacobs
    An archaeological discovery from this past September could put the earliest inhabitation in Canada at around 13,800 years ago, reported CBC News. Right now it's all on sonar images captured by an underwater robotic vehicle. Archaeologist Quentin Mackie from the University of Victoria (UVIC) and his team returned from a research trip to the Haida Gwaii archipelago in August, where they used an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) to scan the sea floor in search of evidence of ancient human inhabitation. His team has been looking for proof of the earliest human presence in North America for decades, and what they...
  • Earth Is Undergoing True Polar Wander, Scientists Say

    10/03/2012 3:31:34 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies
    EarthSky.org ^ | October 2012 | Deborah Byrd
    Scientists based in Germany and Norway today published new results about a geophysical theory known as true polar wander. That is a drifting of Earth's solid exterior -- an actual change in latitude for some land masses -- relative to our planet's rotation axis. These scientists used hotspots in Earth's mantle as part of a computer model, which they say is accurate for the past 120 million years, to identify four possible instances of true polar wander in the past. And, they say, true polar wander is happening now... The scientists -- including Pavel V. Doubrovine and Trond H. Torsvik...
  • Gondwana Supercontinent Underwent Massive Shift During Cambrian Explosion

    08/11/2010 5:32:45 AM PDT · by decimon · 51 replies · 1+ views
    Yale University ^ | August 10, 2010 | Unknown
    New Haven, Conn. — The Gondwana supercontinent underwent a 60-degree rotation across Earth’s surface during the Early Cambrian period, according to new evidence uncovered by a team of Yale University geologists. Gondwana made up the southern half of Pangaea, the giant supercontinent that constituted the Earth’s landmass before it broke up into the separate continents we see today. The study, which appears in the August issue of the journal Geology, has implications for the environmental conditions that existed at a crucial period in Earth’s evolutionary history called the Cambrian explosion, when most of the major groups of complex animals rapidly...
  • 'Snowball Earth': Glaciers, ice packs once met at Equator

    03/05/2010 12:55:48 PM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 49 replies · 1,056+ views
    The Register ^ | 5th March 2010 12:47 GMT | Lewis Page
    American boffins say they have discovered evidence that almost the entire world was covered in sea ice and glaciers at certain points in the remote past, during so-called "snowball Earth" periods where the polar ice sheets met at the Equator. It were grim in the old days. Geologists probing conditions seen in the ancient world have long considered that there was a cold spell known as the Sturtian Glaciation about 716 million years ago. However there has been disagreement in boffinry circles as to just how severe this glaciation was. Now, researchers from Harvard uni in the States, funded by...
  • Caltech scientists predict greater longevity for planets with life [CO2 not so bad]

    06/12/2009 5:58:07 PM PDT · by Moonman62 · 13 replies · 364+ views
    Eurekalert ^ | 06/12/09 | California Institute of Technology
    PASADENA, Calif.— Roughly a billion years from now, the ever-increasing radiation from the sun will have heated Earth into inhabitability; the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere that serves as food for plant life will disappear, pulled out by the weathering of rocks; the oceans will evaporate; and all living things will disappear. Or maybe not quite so soon, say researchers from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), who have come up with a mechanism that doubles the future lifespan of the biosphere—while also increasing the chance that advanced life will be found elsewhere in the universe. A paper describing their...
  • Volcanic shutdown may have led to 'snowball Earth'

    05/10/2009 6:46:26 PM PDT · by neverdem · 22 replies · 1,074+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 09 May 2009 | David Shiga
    A 250-million-year shutdown of volcanic activity which is thought to have occurred early in Earth's history may be what turned the planet into a glacier-covered snowball. It could also have helped give rise to our oxygen-rich atmosphere. Previous studies have noted that very little volcanic material has been dated to between 2.45 and 2.2 billion years ago, but it was widely assumed the gap would vanish as more samples were dated. Now an analysis of thousands of zircon minerals collected from all seven continents indicates that the gap may be real after all. Zircons provide a record of past volcanic...
  • 35.5m yr old global cooling caused by sharp decline in CO2 (Maybe cooling caused a drop in CO2?)

    02/28/2009 10:46:55 PM PST · by neverdem · 21 replies · 1,460+ views
    The Economic Times ^ | 27 Feb 2009 | NA
    WASHINGTON: A new research has found that prehistoric global cooling that started in Antarctica about 35.5 million years ago, was caused by a sharp drop in the carbon dioxide (CO2) levels. Even after the continent of Antarctica had drifted to near its present location, its climate was subtropical. Then, 35.5 million years ago, ice formed on Antarctica in about 100,000 years, which is an "overnight" shift in geological terms. "Our studies show that just over thirty-five million years ago, 'poof,' there was an ice sheet where there had been subtropical temperatures before," said Matthew Huber, assistant professor of earth and...
  • A Much Earlier Start for Animals

    02/04/2009 8:07:59 PM PST · by neverdem · 20 replies · 754+ views
    ScienceNOW Daily News ^ | 4 February 2009 | Phil Berardelli
    Enlarge ImageMolecular fingerprints. Sedimentary rock formations in Oman, like this one, contain chemical evidence of the planet's first animals, which appeared at least 635 million years ago. Credit: David Fike, Nature Where did all the animals come from? The fossil record is virtually animal-free up until the Cambrian Explosion 540 million years ago, and then--boom--thousands of critters of all shapes and sizes show up. The mystery has plagued scientists for more than a century and a half, beginning with Charles Darwin. Now, with a brilliant bit of detective work, researchers have located our missing ancestors. The problem with the...
  • CO2, Temperatures, and Ice Ages

    02/02/2009 8:58:29 PM PST · by neverdem · 36 replies · 906+ views
    Watts Up With That? ^ | 30/01/2009 | Frank Lansner
    Guest post by Frank Lansner, civil engineer, biotechnology. (Note from Anthony - English is not Frank’s primary language, I have made some small adjustments for readability, however they may be a few passages that need clarification. Frank will be happy to clarify in comments) It is generally accepted that CO2 is lagging temperature in Antarctic graphs. To dig further into this subject therefore might seem a waste of time. But the reality is, that these graphs are still widely used as an argument for the global warming hypothesis. But can the CO2-hypothesis be supported in any way using the data...
  • The Sun Proves an Embarassment to Climate Orthodoxers and Carbon Hysterics

    11/09/2008 4:35:17 PM PST · by I got the rope · 19 replies · 283+ views
    Al Fin ^ | 8 NOV 08 | Al Fin Blogspot
    The climate orthodoxy of carbon hysteria has never understood the intricacies of causative interaction in Earth's climate. Led by fanatics such as James Hansen and Al Gore, the orthodoxy decided early on to assign responsibility for "climate change" to human generated CO2. Orthodoxers reduced the complex system of climate to a single parameter--CO2--to make their job easier. Unfortunately, the orthodoxy failed to recruit (bribe and cudgel) large numbers of mathematically and scientifically trained men and women who remain curious about the underlying complexity of climate. Curious enough to continue studying climate as a multi-causative system. The distribution of sunlight, rather...
  • Melting ice caps could suck carbon from atmosphere

    09/20/2008 8:48:29 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies · 364+ views
    New Scientist ^ | September 10, 2008 | Catherine Brahic
    The findings, from two separate research groups... say the process of carbon sequestration is already underway. Even so, the new carbon sink is unlikely to make a significant dent in the huge amounts of CO2 pumped into the atmosphere by industrial activities... Phytoplankton produce chlorophyll to obtain energy from the sun and assimilate CO2, and so increased phytoplankton productivity would remove more carbon from the atmosphere... From one year to the next, the phytoplankton grew more in areas where the ice had disappeared: less ice meant more open water for longer, allowing the plankton to soak up more energy from...
  • Earth's Core, Magnetic Field Changing Fast, Study Says

    07/10/2008 1:53:24 PM PDT · by hripka · 138 replies · 298+ views
    National Geographic Society ^ | June 30, 2008 | Kimberly Johnson
    Rapid changes in the churning movement of Earth's liquid outer core are weakening the magnetic field in some regions of the planet's surface, a new study says. "What is so surprising is that rapid, almost sudden, changes take place in the Earth's magnetic field," said study co-author Nils Olsen, a geophysicist at the Danish National Space Center in Copenhagen. The findings suggest similarly quick changes are simultaneously occurring in the liquid metal, 1,900 miles (3,000 kilometers) below the surface, he said. The swirling flow of molten iron and nickel around Earth's solid center triggers an electrical current, which generates the...
  • Geologists push back date basins formed, supporting frozen Earth theory (basins in India)

    07/03/2008 11:08:44 AM PDT · by decimon · 27 replies · 78+ views
    University of Florida ^ | Jul 3, 2008 | Unknown
    GAINESVILLE, Fla. --- Even in geology, it's not often a date gets revised by 500 million years. But University of Florida geologists say they have found strong evidence that a half-dozen major basins in India were formed a billion or more years ago, making them at least 500 million years older than commonly thought. The findings appear to remove one of the major obstacles to the Snowball Earth theory that a frozen Earth was once entirely covered in snow and ice – and might even lend some weight to a controversial claim that complex life originated hundreds of million years...
  • Runaway Global Warming 635 Million Years Ago

    05/28/2008 8:35:51 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 25 replies · 1,718+ views
    A sudden and extreme case of runaway global warming 635 million years ago was caused by an abrupt release of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, scientists said today. The methane seeped from ice sheets that covered much of the planet toward the end of a frigid era called Snowball Earth. The gas escaped gradually at first and then very quickly from clathrates, or methane ice that forms and stabilizes beneath water ice sheets. As the water ice melted, pressure was relieved on the clathrates and they began to de-gas. The transition represents one of the earliest known cases of what...
  • Arguments that Prove that Climate Change is driven by Solar Activity and not by CO2 Emission

    05/26/2008 4:09:08 PM PDT · by Delacon · 45 replies · 228+ views
    Canada Free Press ^ | May 26, 2008 | Dr. Gerhard Löbert
    <p>Conveyor of a super-Einsteinian theory of gravitation that explains, among many other post-Einstein-effects, the Sun-Earth-Connection and the true cause of the global climate changes.</p> <p>As the glaciological and tree ring evidence shows, climate change is a natural phenomenon that has occurred many times in the past, both with the magnitude as well as with the time rate of temperature change that have occurred in the recent decades. The following facts prove that the recent global warming is not man-made but is a natural phenomenon.</p>
  • Ancient Imbalances Sent Earth's Continents "Wandering"

    04/09/2008 3:28:18 PM PDT · by blam · 29 replies · 88+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | Continents "Wandering"
    Ancient Imbalances Sent Earth's Continents "Wandering" Anne Minard for National Geographic NewsApril 7, 2008 A new study lends weight to the controversial theory that Earth became massively imbalanced in the distant past, sending its tectonic plates on a mad dash to even things out. Bernhard Steinberger and Trond Torsvik, of the Geological Survey of Norway, analyzed rock samples dating back 320 million years to hunt for clues in Earth's magnetic field about the history of plate motions. The researchers found evidence of a steady northward continental motion and, during certain time intervals, clockwise and counterclockwise rotations. That pattern matches the...
  • Sea floor records ancient Earth

    03/23/2007 11:06:03 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 66 replies · 4,679+ views
    BBC ^ | Friday, 23 March 2007, 09:09 GMT | Jonathan Fildes Science and technology reporter, BBC News
    The ancient sea floor was discovered in southwest Greenland A sliver of four-billion-year-old sea floor has offered a glimpse into the inner workings of an adolescent Earth.The baked and twisted rocks, now part of Greenland, show the earliest evidence of plate tectonics, colossal movements of the planet's outer shell. Until now, researchers were unable to say when the process, which explains how oceans and continents form, began. The unique find, described in the journal Science, shows the movements started soon after the planet formed. "Since the plate tectonic paradigm is the framework in which we interpret all modern-day geology,...
  • Ancient Rocks Show How Young Earth Avoided Becoming Giant Snowball

    02/05/2007 2:38:10 PM PST · by blam · 31 replies · 765+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 2-5-2007 | University Of Chicago
    Source: University of Chicago Date: February 5, 2007 Ancient Rocks Show How Young Earth Avoided Becoming Giant Snowball Science Daily — A greenhouse gas that has become the bane of modern society may have saved Earth from completely freezing over early in the planet's history, according to the first detailed laboratory analysis of the world's oldest sedimentary rocks. A rock from a banded iron formation in northern Quebec, Canada. The bands vary in thickness from approximately 10 microns (less than the width of a human hair), to 10 meters (30 feet). This sample is measures a few inches across. At...
  • Bacteria froze the Earth, researchers say ~~ CO2 saved it....

    08/02/2005 9:27:19 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 23 replies · 980+ views
    Marketwatch CNET ^ | August 2, 2005, 5:15 PM PDT | Michael Kanellos Staff Writer, CNET News.com
    Bacteria froze the Earth, researchers say By Michael Kanellos http://marketwatch-cnet.com.com, marketwatch-cnet.com.com/Bacteria+froze+the+Earth%2C+researchers+say/2100-7337_3-5815965.html Story last modified Tue Aug 02 17:15:00 PDT 2005 Humans apparently aren't the first species to change the climate of the planet. Bacteria living 2.3 billion years ago could have plunged the planet into deep freeze, researchers at the California Institute of Technology claim in a new report. Several graduate students, along with supervising professor Joe Kirschvink, have released a paper presenting their explanation of what caused "Snowball Earth," a periodic deep freeze of Earth's atmosphere that has been theorized for years. The Caltech team argues that 2.3 billion...
  • How it happened: The catastrophic flood that cooled the Earth

    02/25/2008 2:36:06 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 62 replies · 1,079+ views
    Breitbart ^ | February 24, 2008
    Canadian geologists say they can shed light on how a vast lake, trapped under the ice sheet that once smothered much of North America, drained into the sea, an event that cooled Earth's climate for hundreds of years. During the last ice age, the Laurentide Ice Sheet once covered most of Canada and parts of the northern United States with a frozen crust that in some places was three kilometres (two miles) thick. As the temperature gradually rose some 10,000 years ago, the ice receded, gouging out the hollows that would be called the Great Lakes. Beneath the ice's thinning...
  • 'Snowball Earth' theory melted

    01/11/2011 7:05:08 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 47 replies
    BBC ^ | Wednesday, March 6, 2002
    Geoscientists in Scotland say they have evidence to disprove the controversial "Snowball Earth" theory - the idea that the planet was completely encased in ice just over 600 million years ago.We are claiming that in reality there was not a totally frozen snowball Earth and that even during the coldest conditions large regions remained ice-free -- Dr Dan CondonThe team, from the University of St Andrews, has published its findings in the scientific journal Geology, after studying rocks in the west of Scotland, Ireland, Namibia and California. Drs Dan Condon, Tony Prave and Doug Benn say they have found evidence...
  • Ice Ages Blamed On Tilted Earth

    04/30/2006 4:35:48 PM PDT · by blam · 77 replies · 1,750+ views
    Live Science ^ | 3-30-2005
    Ice Ages Blamed on Tilted Earth By Michael Schirber LiveScience Staff Writer posted: 30 March 2005 In the past million years, the Earth experienced a major ice age about every 100,000 years. Scientists have several theories to explain this glacial cycle, but new research suggests the primary driving force is all in how the planet leans. The Earth’s rotation axis is not perpendicular to the plane in which it orbits the Sun. It's offset by 23.5 degrees. This tilt, or obliquity, explains why we have seasons and why places above the Arctic Circle have 24-hour darkness in winter and constant...
  • Cave reveals Southwest's abrupt climate swings during Ice Age

    01/20/2010 2:11:19 PM PST · by decimon · 22 replies · 972+ views
    University of Arizona ^ | Jan 20, 2010 | Unknown
    Ice Age climate records from an Arizona stalagmite link the Southwest's winter precipitation to temperatures in the North Atlantic, according to new research. The finding is the first to document that the abrupt changes in Ice Age climate known from Greenland also occurred in the southwestern U.S., said co-author Julia E. Cole of the University of Arizona in Tucson. "It's a new picture of the climate in the Southwest during the last Ice Age," said Cole, a UA professor of geosciences. "When it was cold in Greenland, it was wet here, and when it was warm in Greenland, it was...
  • African Ice Core Analysis Reveals Catastrophic Droughts, Shrinking Ice Fields, Civilization Shifts

    10/18/2002 7:41:36 AM PDT · by blam · 23 replies · 420+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 10-18-2002 | OSU
    African Ice Core Analysis Reveals Catastrophic Droughts, Shrinking Ice Fields, Civilization Shifts COLUMBUS, Ohio – A detailed analysis of six cores retrieved from the rapidly shrinking ice fields atop Tanzania's Mount Kilimanjaro shows that those tropical glaciers began to form about 11,700 years ago. The cores also yielded remarkable evidence of three catastrophic droughts that plagued the tropics 8,300, 5,200 and 4,000 years ago. Lastly, the analysis also supports Ohio State University researchers' prediction that these unique bodies of ice will disappear in the next two decades, the victims of global warming. These findings were published today in the journal...
  • Flowers regenerated from 30,000-year-old frozen fruits, buried by ancient squirrels

    02/21/2012 12:42:13 PM PST · by Free ThinkerNY · 20 replies
    discovermagazine.com ^ | Feb. 20, 2012 | Ed Yong
    Fruits in my fruit bowl tend to rot into a mulchy mess after a couple of weeks. Fruits that are chilled in permanent Siberian ice fare rather better. After more than 30,000 years, and some care from Russian scientists, some ancient fruits have produced this delicate white flower. These regenerated plants, rising like wintry Phoenixes from the Russian ice, are still viable. They produce their own seeds and, after a 30,000-year hiatus, can continue their family line. The plant owes its miraculous resurrection to a team of scientists led by David Gilichinsky, and an enterprising ground squirrel. Back in the...
  • Russians revive Ice Age flower from frozen burrow

    02/20/2012 8:05:56 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 49 replies · 3+ views
    AP ^ | 2/20/12 | VLADIMIR ISACHENKOV
    MOSCOW (AP) -- It was an Ice Age squirrel's treasure chamber, a burrow containing fruit and seeds that had been stuck in the Siberian permafrost for over 30,000 years. From the fruit tissues, a team of Russian scientists managed to resurrect an entire plant in a pioneering experiment that paves the way for the revival of other species. The Silene stenophylla is the oldest plant ever to be regenerated, the researchers said, and it is fertile, producing white flowers and viable seeds. The experiment proves that permafrost serves as a natural depository for ancient life forms, said the Russian researchers,...
  • Earth could plunge into sudden ice age

    12/03/2009 1:49:11 AM PST · by CSA Rebel · 33 replies · 1,361+ views
    In the film, "The Day After Tomorrow," the world gets gripped in ice within the span of just a few weeks. Now research now suggests an eerily similar event might indeed have occurred in the past. Looking ahead to the future, there is no reason why such a freeze shouldn't happen again — and in ironic fashion it could be precipitated if ongoing changes in climate force the Greenland ice sheet to suddenly melt, scientists say. Starting roughly 12,800 years ago, the Northern Hemisphere was gripped by a chill that lasted some 1,300 years. Known by scientists as the Younger...
  • Appalachians Triggered Ancient Ice Age (Smoky Mountains)

    10/28/2006 11:42:19 PM PDT · by Dallas59 · 31 replies · 2,918+ views
    Scientific American ^ | 10/25/2006 | JR Minkel
    The rise of the Appalachian Mountains seems to have triggered an ice age 450 million years ago by sucking CO2 from the atmosphere. Researchers report evidence that minerals from the mountain range washed into the oceans just before the cold snap, carrying atmospheric carbon dioxide with them. The result clarifies a long standing paradox in the historical relationship between CO2 and climate, experts say. At the start of the so-called Ordovician ice age, about 450 million years ago, the planet went from a state of greenhouse warmth to one of glacial cold, culminating in mass extinctions of ocean life. This...
  • Massive Eltanin Meteor 2.5 million years ago set off mass tsunami, changed the climate?

    09/28/2012 11:55:36 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 13 replies
    JoNova ^ | September 21st, 2012 | Joanne
    From the file of “Things that would really be catastrophic”. Did a meteor have a role in a major shift in Earth’s Climate?The start of the Quaternary period (2.588 million years ago, where the Pliocene became Pleistocene) coincides with evidence of a mega tsunami in the South Pacific.The Eltanin Meteor fell into the South Pacific 2.5 million years ago setting off a (likely) tsunami that was hundreds of meters high and theoretically pushed mass material into the atmosphere which may have contributed to the cooling the globe had already started on. This meteor was hard to detect because it hit...
  • Ice Age Survivors Found In Iceland

    07/20/2007 3:39:11 PM PDT · by blam · 67 replies · 1,670+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 7-20-2007 | University Of Chicago
    Source: University of Chicago Date: July 20, 2007 Ice Age Survivors Found In Iceland Science Daily — Many scientists believe that the ice ages exterminated all life on land and in freshwater in large parts of the Northern Hemisphere, especially on ocean islands such as Iceland. Crymostygius thingvallensis, the only species in a recently described family of groundwater amphipods Crymostygidae. (Credit: photograph by Thorkell Heidarsson) Scientists at Holar University College and the University of Iceland have challenged that belief, at least when looking at groundwater animals. They have discovered two species of groundwater amphipods in Iceland that are the only...
  • Ice ages: Why North America is key to their coming and going

    08/11/2013 6:07:09 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 39 replies
    Christian Science Monitor ^ | August 7, 2013 | Pete Spotts
    Scientists have long tried to figure out what causes the ebb and flow of ice ages. New data suggests a novel explanation for why the mile-thick blankets of ice retreat so quickly: They become too heavy. For the last 900,000 years, mile-thick ice sheets have waxed and waned in the Northern Hemisphere with remarkable regularity – building over periods of about 100,000 years and retreating in the space of only a few thousand years, only to repeat the cycle. Now, a team of scientists from Japan, the US, and Switzerland suggests that the North American continent is the breeding ground...
  • Geochemical 'Fingerprints' Leave Evidence That Megafloods Eroded Steep Gorge

    07/28/2013 3:01:55 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Science Daily ^ | July 22, 2013 | University of Washington
    The Yarlung-Tsangpo River in southern Asia drops rapidly through the Himalaya Mountains on its way to the Bay of Bengal, losing about 7,000 feet of elevation through the precipitously steep Tsangpo Gorge. For the first time, scientists have direct geochemical evidence that the 150-mile long gorge, possibly the world's deepest, was the conduit by which megafloods from glacial lakes, perhaps half the volume of Lake Erie, drained suddenly and catastrophically through the Himalayas when their ice dams failed at times during the last 2 million years... In this case, the water moved rapidly through bedrock gorge, carving away the base...
  • Visit 50,000 Year Old Underwater Primeval Forest Found in Gulf of Mexico (VIDEO)

    07/13/2013 6:53:35 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 67 replies
    Hispanically Speaking ^ | Wednesday, July 10, 2013 | unattributed
    Imagine swimming in an underwater primeval forest that nature has preserved for over 50,000 years. Now you can if you are willing to dive 60 feet below the surface of the Gulf of Mexico, 10 miles offshore of Alabama. Experts believe 2005's Hurricane Katrina unveiled what had been buried under ocean sediment for centuries. And it took some curious fishermen to discover it by questioning why there so many fishing congregating in one area. The discovery was made in 2012 but only recently became public knowledge. The find was confirmed when a dive team and experts from Louisiana State University...
  • Did a Pacific Ocean meteor trigger the Ice Age?

    09/20/2012 5:02:02 AM PDT · by Renfield · 37 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | 9-19-2012
    (Phys.org)—When a huge meteor collided with Earth about 2.5 million years ago in the southern Pacific Ocean it not only likely generated a massive tsunami but also may have plunged the world into the Ice Ages, a new study suggests. A team of Australian researchers says that because the Eltanin meteor – which was up to two kilometres across - crashed into deep water, most scientists have not adequately considered either its potential for immediate catastrophic impacts on coastlines around the Pacific rim or its capacity to destabilise the entire planet's climate system. "This is the only known deep-ocean impact...
  • The Eltanin Impact Crater

    10/17/2004 9:46:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies · 1,736+ views
    Geological Society of America ^ | October 27-30, 2002 | Christy A. Glatz, Dallas H. Abbott, and Alice A. Nunes
    An impact event occurred at 2.15±0.5 Ma in the Bellingshausen Sea. It littered the oceanic floor with asteroidal debris. This debris is found within the Eltanin Impact Layer. Although the impact layer was known, the crater had yet to be discovered. We have found a possible source crater at 53.7S,90.1W under 5000 meters of water. The crater is 132±5km in diameter, much larger than the previously proposed size of 24 to 80 km.
  • Ancient human and animal remains are melting out of glaciers, a bounty of a warming world

    09/20/2002 10:29:33 AM PDT · by vannrox · 41 replies · 563+ views
    US News ^ | Science & Technology 9/16/02 | BY ALEX MARKELS
    Science & Technology 9/16/02 Defrosting the past Ancient human and animal remains are melting out of glaciers, a bounty of a warming world BY ALEX MARKELS As he hiked near Colorado's Continental Divide in the summer of 2001, Ed Knapp noticed a strange shape jutting from a melting ice field at 13,000 feet. "It looked like a bison skull," the building contractor and amateur archaeologist recalls. "I thought, 'That's strange. Bison don't live this high up.' " Knapp brought the skull to the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, where scientists last month announced that it was indeed from a...
  • Himalayan glaciers gone by 2035? IPCC mistaken.

    01/21/2010 2:14:53 PM PST · by AKSurprise · 6 replies · 350+ views
    Christian Science Monitor ^ | 01/21/10 | Ben Arnoldy
    First, the good news: Himalayan glaciers are not likely to disappear by 2035, as originally claimed by a widely-publicized United Nations report. The bad news? Scientists did not challenge the spurious date for years and some now warn that, in fact, our understanding about Himalayan glaciers rests on thin data. Over the past week, it emerged that the doomsday date found its way into a 2007 report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) not from a peer-reviewed study but from an interview published in the New Scientist 10 years ago. That article attributed the prediction to Syed Iqbal...
  • Warming to devastate glaciers, Antarctic icesheet - studies

    01/10/2011 3:34:31 AM PST · by moonshinner_09 · 15 replies · 1+ views
    Yahoo News ^ | Jan 9, 2011 | AFP via Yahoo! News
    PARIS (AFP) – Global warming may wipe out three-quarters of Europe's alpine glaciers by 2100 and hike sea levels by four metres (13 feet) by the year 3000 through melting the West Antarctic icesheet, two studies published on Sunday said. The research places the spotlight on two of the least understood aspects of climate change: how, when and where warming will affect glaciers on which many millions depend for their water, and the problems faced by generations in the far distant future. The glacier study predicts that mountain glaciers and icecaps will shrink by 15-27 percent in volume terms on...
  • Himalayan glaciers not melting because of climate change, report finds

    01/27/2011 2:19:58 PM PST · by MamaDearest · 22 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 27 Jan 2011 | Dean Nelson, New Dehli and Richard Alleyne
    Excerpt only website: Himalayan glaciers are actually advancing rather than retreating, claims the first major study since a controversial UN report said they would be melted within quarter of a century. Researchers have discovered that contrary to popular belief half of the ice flows in the Karakoram range of the mountains are actually growing rather than shrinking. The discovery adds a new twist to the row over whether global warming is causing the world's highest mountain range to lose its ice cover. It further challenges claims made in a 2007 report by the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change that...
  • Himalayan glaciers melting deadline 'a mistake' [Disappearance Himalayan Glaciers: A Great Hoax]

    12/06/2009 9:43:34 PM PST · by bongosantan · 15 replies · 1,396+ views
    BBC News ^ | December 5 2009 | Pallava Bagla
    The UN panel on climate change warning that Himalayan glaciers could melt to a fifth of current levels by 2035 is wildly inaccurate, an academic says. J Graham Cogley, a professor at Ontario Trent University, says he believes the UN authors got the date from an earlier report wrong by more than 300 years. He is astonished they "misread 2350 as 2035". The authors deny the claims.
  • Big freeze plunged Europe into ice age in months

    12/02/2009 9:26:07 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies · 6,409+ views
    European Science Foundation ^ | November 30, 2009 | AlphaGalileo
    William Patterson, from the University of Saskatchewan in Canada, and his colleagues have shown that switching off the North Atlantic circulation can force the Northern hemisphere into a mini 'ice age' in a matter of months. Previous work has indicated that this process would take tens of years. Around 12,800 years ago the northern hemisphere was hit by a mini ice-age, known by scientists as the Younger Dryas, and nicknamed the 'Big Freeze', which lasted around 1300 years. Geological evidence shows that the Big Freeze was brought about by a sudden influx of freshwater, when the glacial Lake Agassiz in...
  • Scientists Pinpoint Polar Cataclysm Date (Global warming 12 million years ago)

    08/30/2006 7:56:30 PM PDT · by FairOpinion · 39 replies · 1,083+ views
    PhysOrg.com ^ | Aug. 30, 3007 | AP
    A 30-mile maze canyons in Antarctica was carved out of bedrock by the catastrophic draining of subglacial lakes during global warming between 12 million and 14 million years ago, according to university researchers who warn a similar event today could have serious environmental consequences. Although scientists have previously theorized that the Labyrinth region in southern Victoria Land was created by water released from lakes that had formed under glaciers, researchers at Syracuse University and Boston University say they found geological evidence to bracket the timing of the last major flooding and link it to a global warming trend at the...
  • Scientists reopen one of world's only urban Ice Age dig sites in Los Angeles

    06/30/2006 11:57:28 AM PDT · by annie laurie · 52 replies · 1,134+ views
    OhMyNews ^ | 2006-06-30 | ANDREW GLAZER
    Scientists went to work digging for fossils at La Brea Tar Pits, digging the tooth of a 5-foot (1.5-meter) dire wolf and the toe of a sabertooth tiger from the sticky prehistoric asphalt near downtown Los Angeles. About 10,000 years before the arrival of mammoth traffic jams in the second-largest U.S. city, the two beasts likely got stuck in the goo while hunting a camel, horse or ground sloth, said John Harris, chief curator and head of vertebrate studies at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, which oversees the site. ''It's one of the, if not the, richest...
  • Thousands of barges could save Europe from deep freeze

    02/06/2006 11:34:58 PM PST · by snarks_when_bored · 56 replies · 1,460+ views
    Science Blog ^ | February 6, 2006 | BJS
    Thousands of barges could save Europe from deep freeze By BJS Created 02/06/2006 - 13:47 It is ironic that one consequence of global warming is that Europe might plunge into a deep freeze. This possibility stimulated an unusual research project at the University of Alberta.Dr. Peter Flynn, the Poole Chair in Management for Engineers in the U of A Department of Mechanical Engineering, has studied whether down-welling ocean currents can carry more dissolved carbon into the deep ocean. He learned they can't, but in the course of this research he found some evidence that the ocean currents that bring...
  • Ice ages linked to earth's travels through galaxy

    08/02/2005 4:00:39 PM PDT · by Graybeard58 · 53 replies · 1,362+ views
    Waterbury Republican-American ^ | August 2, 2005 | Keay Davidson (A.P.)
    It might sound preposterous, like astrology, to suggest that galactic events help determine when North America is or isn't buried under immense sheets of ice taller than skyscrapers. But new research suggests the coming and going of major ice ages might result partly from our solar system's passage through immense, snakelike clouds of exploding stars in the Milky Way galaxy. Resembling the curved contrails of a whirling Fourth of July pinwheel, the Milky Way's spiral arms are clouds of stars rich in supernovas, or exploding stars. Supernovas emit showers of charged particles called cosmic rays. Theorists have proposed that when...
  • 'Lost River' Could Rewrite History Books

    02/21/2002 6:22:38 AM PST · by blam · 9 replies · 1,223+ views
    IOL ^ | 2-19-2002
    'Lost river' could rewrite history books February 19 2002 at 08:33AM Madras India, - The discovery of an ancient city on the seabed off India's western coast has scientists salivating at the prospect of a fundamental rewrite in the chronology of ancient human society. Preliminary tests have suggested the site in the Gulf of Cambay off Gujarat state could date as far back as 7 500 BC, several thousand years older than what were previously known to be the first significant urban settlements. The discovery was made purely by chance last year as oceanographers from the National Institute of ...
  • Update on Underwater Megalithic

    11/21/2001 11:08:00 AM PST · by callisto · 169 replies · 10,024+ views
    EarthFiles ^ | 11.19.01 | Linda Moulton Howe
    In May 2001, engineer Paulina Zelitzky, President, ADC Corporation, Victoria, B. C., Canada and Havana, Cuba, announced the discovery of megalithic structures 2,200 feet down at the western tip of Cuba. November 19, 2001 Havana, Cuba - The story about a possible megalithic site half a mile down off the western tip of Cuba first broke this past May when a Reuters News Service reporter interviewed the deep ocean engineer who first reported unusual sidescan sonar of the discovery. Her name is Paulina Zelitsky. Ms. Zelitsky was born in Poland, studied engineering in the Soviet Union, was assigned to ...
  • Northern sea baffles archaeologists

    03/24/2004 5:37:29 PM PST · by vannrox · 22 replies · 1,134+ views
    Pravda ^ | 03/11/2004 12:50 | Grigory Donskov
    Remains of an ancient civilization discovered in the depths of the Northern sea While some scientists spend all their time and efforts in search of Atlantis, others have already discovered remains of an ancient civilization that had existed on the same territory as present-day Northern sea. With the help of modern technology, archaeologists were able to get a better glimpse of the ancient world. Approximately 10 000 years ago the entire bottom of the Northern sea had been a blossoming valley, inhabited by ancestors of modern-day Europeans. Scientists from the Birmingham University were able to reach such conclusion after reconstructing...