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  • Oldest textile dyed indigo blue found [6200 yrs]

    09/14/2016 8:25:25 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 28 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 09/13/2016 | Staff
    George Washington University researcher has identified a 6,200-year-old indigo-blue fabric from Huaca, Peru, making it one of the oldest-known cotton textiles in the world and the oldest known textile decorated with indigo blue. Credit: Lauren Urana The discovery marks the earliest use of indigo as a dye, a technically challenging color to produce. According to Jeffrey Splitstoser, lead author of a paper on the discovery and assistant research professor of anthropology at the George Washington University, the finding speaks to the sophisticated textile technology ancient Andean people developed 6,200 years ago. "Some of the world's most significant technological achievements were...
  • 6th Century Roman Law Text Discovered ... Inside Parchment Recycled as Medieval Bookbinding [tr]

    10/17/2018 10:10:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Ancient Origins ^ | July 25, 2017 | Theodoros Karasavvas
    By combining two imaging techniques (visible hyperspectral imaging and x-ray fluorescence), a diverse team of Northwestern University researchers has developed a new technology that gives access to medieval texts hidden in parchment re-used for ancient book-bindings, as Live Science reported. The new technology is seen by researchers as truly innovative, as it can be used to help decipher the text under the surface of other bookbinding materials. "For generations, scholars have thought this information was inaccessible, so they thought, 'Why bother?'" the study's senior researcher, Marc Walton, a senior scientist at the Northwestern University-Art Institute of Chicago Center for Scientific...
  • A Timeworn Scroll Reveals King Henry VII's Interests in New World Colonization

    10/17/2018 9:49:40 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Ancient Origins ^ | October 6, 2018 | Ashley Cowie
    In AD 1499 England launched its very first English-led expedition to "Terra Nova" (New World) and now researchers studying a 16th century scroll have found King Henry VII awarded William Weston, one the explorers, with... the payment of 30 British pounds sterling... equivalent of a laborers salary for six years... The information was discovered on a huge parchment dating back more than 500 years and ultraviolet light was required to reveal the hidden text said study co-researcher Evan Jones, a senior lecturer in economic and social history at the University of Bristol in a report in Live Science. In 2009,...
  • LA Noir: Color film footage of night time Los Angeles street scenes

    10/07/2018 12:10:11 PM PDT · by NRx · 24 replies
    YouTube ^ | 05-15-2014 | devroshart
    Color film footage of night time Los Angeles street scenes (appx 3 mins)
  • Video of Los Angeles 1940s - LA Noire?

    10/14/2018 1:02:31 PM PDT · by Jamestown1630 · 34 replies
    Someone recently posted a link to a YouTube video of film from 1940s Los Angeles - it was a night time drive through the city, in color, featuring music from the composers who did the soundtrack to LA Noire. I've tried my best to find this again - even bookmarked what I thought was the video, but it's not. Does anyone recall this and have a link?
  • A 16th-Century Guide to Pooping at King Henry VIII's Hampton Court Palace

    10/17/2018 9:04:18 AM PDT · by C19fan · 36 replies
    Mental Floss ^ | October 9, 2018 | Lucas Reilly
    In King Henry VIII’s pleasure palace, Hampton Court, there was no escaping class—not even in the loo. The King, of course, had a luxurious place to squat. According to the Hampton Court Palace website, he and other royals sat atop a padded chair "covered in sheepskin, black velvet, and ribbons" lofted above a pewter chamber pot. This toilet was private, located in a so-called "stool room" that was attended to by a high-ranking courtier known as the Groom of the Stool. It was a privileged, well-respected gig to handle the monarch's waste. (Apparently the groom would even take notes on...
  • Ancient beheading site found in Jerusalem, evidence of ‘holy’ king’s bloody rule

    10/16/2018 6:29:26 PM PDT · by SJackson · 38 replies
    Times of Israel ^ | 12 October 2018 | Amanda Borschel-Dan 
    Archaeologists now know whodunnit — the Hasmonean king Alexander Jannaeus — after uncovering a 2,000-year-old mass burial ground in the municipality’s backyard Evidence of a mass slaying, including cruel beheadings, committed during the bloody reign of the Hasmonean king Alexander Jannaeus (103-76 BCE) was recently uncovered in a courtyard next to the Jerusalem municipality during excavations of an ancient water cistern. “We removed from the pit more than 20 neck vertebrae which were cut by a sword,” said Dr. Yossi Nagar, an anthropologist at the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA). “We discovered in the pit, bodies and body parts of infants...
  • Today is the anniversary of the eruption of Mount Vesuvius and destruction of Pompeii in A.D. 79.

    08/24/2017 6:38:33 AM PDT · by harpygoddess · 25 replies
    VA Viper ^ | 08/23/2017 | Harpygoddess
    Today is the anniversary of the catastrophic eruption of Mount Vesuvius in A.D. 79 and the death of Pliny the Elder (born A.D. 23) in that event. The eruption, which followed several years of precursor ground movements, buried the cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum and is thought to have killed as many as 15,000 people. Subsequent major eruptions occurred in 1631, 1906, and 1944, the last just after the Allies had taken the city of Naples in World War II. Pliny the Elder is remembered primarily for his "Natural History," a comprehensive compendium of ancient knowledge of the natural world....
  • Pompeii: Vesuvius eruption may have been later than thought

    10/17/2018 12:27:06 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies
    BBC ^ | October 16, 2018 | unattributed
    The inscription discovered in the new excavations is nothing more than a scrawl in charcoal, likely made by a worker renovating a home. But it is dated to 16 days before the "calends" of November in the old Roman calendar style - which is 17 October in our modern dating method. "Since it was done in fragile and evanescent charcoal, which could not have been able to last long, it is highly probable that it can be dated to the October of AD 79," the archaeology team said in a statement. They believe the most likely date for the eruption...
  • Ancient 'grand lady' skeleton uncovered in Chinese tomb

    10/16/2018 10:30:05 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 7 replies
    fox news ^ | Krysia Lenzo |
    he remains of the body were uncovered in a water-filled coffin within a tomb at Tieguai Village in China. The skeleton was buried with various other artifacts, such as a model house with miniature furniture inside and a silver pendant decorated with dragons. A sign found on the coffin said the tomb belonged to the "Grand Lady" who lived in "Ankang Commandery." While her actual name was difficult to read on the sign, the archaeologists believe it could be née Jian, LiveScience reports. One indication of the Grand Lady’s age came from the 200 bronze coins located within her coffin...
  • Oklahoma’s Choctaw horses connect to Mississippi [Spanish Explorer's Horses Descendants]

    10/16/2018 11:31:14 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 14 replies
    AP ^ | 10/16/2018 | By JANET McCONNAUGHEY
    <p>POPLARVILLE, Miss. (AP) — Six foals sired by a cream-colored stallion called DeSoto scamper across a pasture in southwest Mississippi — the first new blood in a century for a line of horses brought to America by Spanish conquistadors and bred by Choctaw Indians who were later forced out of their ancestral homelands.</p>
  • Ohio's Serpent Mound, an archaeological mystery, still the focus of scientific debate

    10/16/2018 12:04:05 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    The Plain Dealer ^ | October 11, 2018, Updated October 12, 2018 | Susan Glaser
    On a lush hilltop deep in Southern Ohio, a giant snake slithers through the grass, its intentions a mystery. Despite more than a century of study, we still don't know who built the Great Serpent Mound, or why. That's part of what makes a visit here so fascinating, and also a little bit frustrating. There are still questions that can't be answered through a Google search or more than a century of research. This much is known: At 1,348 feet long, the serpent is the largest effigy mound in the world -- that is, an earthen creation in the shape...
  • Important new finds discovered at Akrotiri prehistoric settlement on Santorini island

    10/15/2018 11:43:46 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    TornosNews.gr ^ | October 12, 2018 | unattributed
    Situated in the building known as 'House of Desks' -- near the spot where the exquisite golden ibex was found in 1999 -- the finds include a marble protocycladic female figurine, two small marble protocycladic collared jars, a marble vial and an alabaster vase, which were found inside clay chests of rectangular shape. According to a culture ministry statement, the finds were made under rubble inside a large and probably public building that is south of Xeste 3, near where the golden ibex now on display at the Museum of Prehistoric Thira was also found in a clay chest beside...
  • Reconstructing the history of mankind with the help of fecal sterols -- first test on the Maori

    10/15/2018 9:48:30 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | October 10, 2018 | Università Ca' Foscari Venezia
    It is now possible to tell the story of mankind's presence and evolution on the planet by analyzing trends in soil and sediment accumulation of fecal sterols, chemical compounds which are crucial in human physiology. Scientists at Ca' Foscari University of Venice and the Institute for the Dynamics of Environmental Processes of the National Research Council (CNR-IDPA) have identified and dated traces of sterols within the sediments of two New Zealand lakes, thus proving the presence of the Maori people who, starting from around 1280, colonized the two oceanic islands and cleared them of forests in just a few decades...
  • Bombshell: Sen. Hatch Claims He’s 1/1032 T-Rex

    10/15/2018 6:52:24 PM PDT · by Helicondelta · 71 replies
    dailycaller.com ^ | 10/15/2018
    Utah Republican Senator Orrin Hatch released his own DNA test on Twitter Monday evening in response to Massachusetts Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren doing the same to prove she has Native American ancestry. Hatch, 84, tweeted, “DNA Test Results 1/1032 T-Rex. The rest: other dinosaurs.” The Boston Globe originally claimed on Monday that the DNA test revealed Warren was somewhere between 1/32 and 1/512 Native American, however they then corrected their story saying the numbers are actually between 1/64 and 1/1,024. Warren’s claims of Native American heritage have long been a point of contention between the Massachusetts Democrat and President Trump....
  • Finding DNA results in Germanic People

    10/15/2018 6:17:51 PM PDT · by aft_lizard · 27 replies
    DNA Explained ^ | Not Listed
    I'm on my phone so I can't really paste the article. In Warren's so called DNA profile released they used admixture results to determine Native American ancestry. The problem is, almost everyone in Eastern Europe can do that with similar results to Warren. https://dna-explained.com/2014/05/21/finding-native-american-ethnic-results-in-germanic-people/
  • Bones of Civil War dead found on a battlefield tell their horror stories

    10/14/2018 11:53:42 PM PDT · by robowombat · 26 replies
    Stars and Stripes ^ | June 20, 2018 | MICHAEL E. RUANE
    <p>The bullet probably hit the Union soldier as he was fleeing. It may have struck his cartridge box first, which sent it tumbling through the muscle of his right buttock, broke his right leg and buried itself sideways in his thigh bone just below the hip.</p>
  • Viking Ship and Cemetery Found Buried in Norway

    10/15/2018 12:06:18 PM PDT · by rdl6989 · 21 replies
    Live Science ^ | October 15, 2018 | Owen Jarus
    Archaeologists using radar scans have detected a Viking ship buried beneath a cemetery in Norway. The Norwegian Institute for Cultural Heritage Research (NIKU) said that the archaeologists discovered the anomaly using radar scans of an area in Østfold County. The ship seems to be about 66 feet (20 meters) long and buried about 1.6 feet (50 centimeters) beneath the ground, they said in a statement.
  • Archeologists unearth 2000-year-old Hebrew 'Jerusalem' inscription

    10/12/2018 11:56:50 AM PDT · by SJackson · 8 replies
    The find is the first written evidence of the name "Jerusalem" found on a column drum dating from the Herodian period. The earliest written inscription of the word Jerusalem written in Hebrew on a 2,000 year old column drum was unveiled on Tuesday at a press conference at The Israel Museum in Jerusalem. The limestone column drum that dates back to the Second Temple period, was discovered 10 months ago on an excavation site near the International Convention Center in Jerusalem. The words: “Hanania son of Dudolos from Jerusalem” was etched on the column which was part of a building...
  • Medieval Knight Re-enactor Killed After Accidentally Impaling Himself with His Lance

    10/11/2018 6:27:33 PM PDT · by 11th_VA · 44 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | Oct 10, 2018
    Friends and family of a beloved Medieval knight re-enactor have been left “stunned” after the Virginia man accidentally impaled himself with his lance during a re-enactment event over the weekend. Peter Barclay, 53, was competing in an equestrian game in front of a crowd in Williamstown, Kentucky Saturday when he was fatally injured. Participating in events under the knight name of Master Terafan Greydragon, Peter went to spear a paper plate while on horseback when something went wrong and his lance impaled him under his sternum, WLWT confirms. Peter, a military veteran, was airlifted to a hospital but died en...