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  • 50,000 year old tiara made of woolly mammoth ivory found in world famous Denisova Cave

    01/20/2019 5:53:42 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 49 replies
    Siberian Times ^ | Wednesday, December 12 2018 | reporter
    ...and it was worn by a man! The suspicion is that the tiara - or diadem - was made by Denisovans who are already known to have had the technology 50,000 or so years ago to make elegant needles out of ivory and a sophisticated and beautiful stone bracelet. The tiara maybe the oldest of its type in the world. It appears to have had a practical use: to keep hair out of the eyes; it's size indicates it was for male, not female, use. Another theory, although related to tiaras made 20,000 years later by people living around river...
  • Flooding of ancient Salton Sea linked to San Andreas earthquakes

    06/27/2011 8:31:32 PM PDT · by decimon · 22 replies
    University of California - San Diego ^ | June 26, 2011 | Unknown
    Study finds that faults beneath the Salton Sea ruptured during Colorado River floods and may have triggered large earthquakes on the southern San Andreas FaultSouthern California's Salton Sea, once a large natural lake fed by the Colorado River, may play an important role in the earthquake cycle of the southern San Andreas Fault and may have triggered large earthquakes in the past. Researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the University of Nevada, Reno, discovered new faults in the Salton Sea near the southern end of the San Andreas Fault. By examining...
  • A Mysterious Cluster of Neatly Decapitated Skeletons Have Been Unearthed in England

    01/19/2019 3:07:07 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 63 replies
    Science Alert ^ | January 8, 2019 | Michelle Starr
    An archaeological dig in Suffolk, England has yielded up a Roman-era cemetery treasure: 52 beautifully preserved skeletons dating back to the 4th century. And of those skeletons, many had been decapitated, their disembodied heads placed neatly at their sides or feet for burial, or buried without bodies altogether. Only 17 skeletons had been buried normally... It's known that Great Whelnetham was a Roman settlement, starting around the mid- to late- first century CE, and occupied for nearly 2,000 years; but, because the ground is fine sand, it was expected that any skeletons would have long disintegrated. So when the team...
  • Scientists find...carcasses...in mysterious Antarctic lake...buried under 3,500 feet of ice

    01/18/2019 9:23:31 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 56 replies
    Daily Mail UK ^ | 18 January 2019 | Mark Prigg
    Full Title: "Scientists find preserved animal carcasses in mysterious Antarctic lake 'twice the size of Manhattan' buried under 3,500 feet of ice" Scientists in Antarctica have found preserved carcasses of tiny animals in a mysterious lake buried under more than 3,500 feet of ice. Mercer Subglacial Lake is a hydraulically active lake that lies more 1000m beneath the Whillans Ice Plain, a fast moving section of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Researchers managed to drill into the lake for the first time earlier this year, and have now revealed they found signs of life. According to Nature, researchers found the...
  • The 11 Best History Podcasts That Will Take You Back in Time

    01/17/2019 9:38:08 AM PST · by C19fan · 27 replies
    Popular Mechanics ^ | January 17, 2019 | Eleanor Hildebrandt
    Whether you're a history buff or just want a break from the present, there's a fascinating podcast out there for you. They say that those who fail to study history are doomed to repeat it—or maybe they're just missing out on some really great stories. These 11 podcasts take a look at the weird, complex, fascinating people and events that have shaped the world in ways big and small.
  • Money Doesn’t Stink-Don’t blame the market for the wages of secularism.

    01/15/2019 4:38:06 PM PST · by SJackson · 15 replies
    Frontpagemagazine ^ | January 15, 2019 | Bruce Thornton
    In his biographies of the Roman emperors, Suetonius describes a conversation between Vespasian and his son Titus, who disapproved of his father taxing the urine that tanners and other industries collected from public restrooms: “When Titus found fault with him for contriving a tax upon public conveniences, [Vespasian] held a piece of money from the first payment to his son’s nose, asking whether its odor was offensive to him. When Titus said ‘No,’ he replied, ‘Yet it comes from urine.’” This sentiment has been summarized in the proverb, “Money doesn’t stink.” Currency, in other words, is morally neutral. Its buying...
  • Flecks of Blue on Old Teeth Reveal a Medieval Surprise

    01/15/2019 4:54:41 PM PST · by SJackson · 35 replies
    Newser ^ | 1*10*19 | John Johnson
    Discovery suggests women worked as top artists in Middle Ages more often than thought They couldn't figure out the blue. Scientists studying tartar from the teeth of medieval skeletons hoped to learn a thing or two of about diets of the Middle Ages. But when they put the teeth and jaw of one woman under a microscope, they were surprised to see hundreds of tiny flecks of blue, reports the BBC. After much sleuthing, they figured out that the blue came from lapis lazuli, a rare and expensive stone ground into powder to make dye for sacred manuscripts. Typically, male...
  • SJWs Outraged White Actress Will Play African Queen Cleopatra (RUH ROH!)

    01/15/2019 10:47:13 AM PST · by rktman · 175 replies
    pjmedia.com ^ | 1/15/2019 | Tyler O'Neil
    On Sunday, Britain's Daily Star reported that Lady Gaga and Angelina Jolie — two white actresses — are competing for the role of Cleopatra, sparking outrage across social media. Social Justice Warriors (SJWs) demanded that the African queen should be played by a woman of color, even though the historical Cleopatra was Greek, not black. "Stop whitewashing Cleopatra!!!" tweeted Kendra James, a writer and editor at Shondaland.com. "Film the story of literally any other queen on the vast African continent."
  • Biblical site tied to Ark of the Covenant unearthed at convent in central Israel [long]

    01/14/2019 5:17:02 AM PST · by SJackson · 19 replies
    Times of Israel ^ | 10 January 2019 | Amanda Borschel-Dan
    Excavation uncovers a unique, monumental structure previously unknown in the region. Was it a shrine — or the site of David’s triumphant parade of the legendary ark? Facebook Twitter linkedin email 4,229 shares Amanda Borschel-Dan is The Times of Israel's Jewish World and Archaeology editor. In the upper terrace at Kiriath-jearim, a massive wall was unearthed some 15 cm below topsoil. The well-preserved wall is circa 3 m broad and preserved to 2.15 m on its outer face. (Shmunis Family Excavations at Kiriath-jearim) Illustration from the 13th century Morgan Bible of David bringing the Ark into Jerusalem (2 Samuel 6)....
  • Stalin’s NKVD and Hitler’s Gestapo Cooperated Closely Even Before Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact

    01/13/2019 1:57:56 PM PST · by CondoleezzaProtege · 23 replies
    Eurasia - New Series ^ | Jan 12, 2019
    Perhaps the only thing that outrages Russian defenders of Stalin more than the obvious parallels between his regime and Hitler’s is any reference to the alliance the two dictators formed in 1939 with the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact, one that opened the way to war in Europe and lasted until Hitler turned on his former ally in June 1941. But now there may be something even more offensive to such defenders of Stalin and his system: the discovery of documents which confirm that the NKVD cooperated closely with the Gestapo well before the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact was signed and that may have paved...
  • Oldest Egyptian writing on papyrus displayed for first time

    07/14/2016 3:35:11 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 16 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | 7/14/16 | AFP
    Cairo (AFP) - The Egyptian Museum in Cairo is showcasing for the first time the earliest writing from ancient Egypt found on papyrus, detailing work on the Great Pyramid of Giza, antiquities officials said Thursday. The papyri were discovered near Wadi el-Jarf port, 25 kilometres (15 miles) south of the Gulf of Suez town of Zafarana, the antiquities ministry said. The find by a French-Egyptian team unearths papers telling of the daily lives of port workers who transported huge limestone blocks to Cairo during King Khufu's rule to build the Great Pyramid, intended to be his burial structure. One document...
  • Flat Earther & Sovereign Citizen Meets Veteran Cop

    01/12/2019 8:10:17 PM PST · by NRx · 13 replies
    YouTube ^ | 12-13-2018 | Inside The Badge Channel
    If stupidity were a virtue this guy would become the first man to be declared a saint while still alive.
  • The Fall of the Aztecs, The Bloody Path to Tenochtitlan

    01/09/2019 10:35:33 PM PST · by vannrox · 103 replies
    War History Online ^ | 15NOV17 | Greg Jackson
    Tenochtitlan was an absolutely amazing city. The city was larger than any in Europe at the time and held approximately 200,000 people with some estimates as high as 350,000. Built over 100 years or so on Lake Texcoco, the city was impressively organized. Being built on the lake meant that land platforms were created as needed in an orderly fashion leaving clean canal streets for canoe traffic and multiple bridges and paths for pedestrians. Each neighborhood was distinct and had its required services from schools to garbage collectors. The city also had fabulous amenities befitting a great city. Huge gardens...
  • Blue tooth reveals unknown female artist from medieval times

    01/09/2019 11:28:27 AM PST · by rdl6989 · 27 replies
    BBC ^ | Jan 9, 2019 | Matt McGrath
    he weird habit of licking the end of a paintbrush has revealed new evidence about the life of an artist more than 900 years after her death. Scientists found tiny blue paint flecks had accumulated on the teeth of a medieval German nun. The particles of the rare lapis lazuli pigment likely collected as she touched the end of her brush with her tongue. The researchers say it shows women were more involved in the illumination of sacred texts than previously thought.
  • The first evidence in Europe that man was hunting mammoths discovered

    01/09/2019 12:41:48 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 43 replies
    Science in Poland ^ | January 7, 2019 | szz/ zan/ kap/ tr. RL
    In the ice age, the inhabitants of today`s Europe were hunting mammoths with javelins. The first direct evidence of this is a fragment of a 25,000 years old flint head discovered in Kraków, stuck in a mammoth rib... archaeologists have discovered the remains of at least 110 mammoths from approx. 25,000 years ago. "Among tens of thousands of bones, during a detailed analysis of the remains, I came across a damaged mammoth rib. It turned out that a fragment of a flint arrowhead was stuck in it. This is the first such find from the Ice Age in Europe!" -...
  • Edinburgh scientists discover mammoth secret in ivory DNA

    01/09/2019 12:35:30 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    BBC Scotland ^ | 4 January 2019 | Kenneth Macdonald & Marc Ellison
    Scientists based at Edinburgh Zoo are cooperating to create a genetics laboratory in Cambodia to fight the illegal ivory trade. While trying to save elephants, they have found ivory from another animal that is now extinct. In the WildGenes laboratory of the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland, Dr Alex Ball is drilling what sounds like a giant tooth. Which is in effect what it is: an ornately carved elephant tusk... Together they are building Cambodia's scientific capacity to preserve its wildlife and combat the ivory trade which passes through it.
  • Ancient Inscription Identifies Gargilius Antiques as Roman Ruler on Eve of Bar Kochva Revolt

    12/02/2016 4:30:23 AM PST · by SJackson · 19 replies
    Jewish Press ^ | December 1st, 2016
    University of Haifa researchers have made an important discovery underwater: a rare inscription from the period preceding the Bar Kochva revolt offers for the first time the definite identification of Gargilius Antiques as the Roman prefect of Judea at that time. The inscription was found in a University of Haifa underwater excavation at Tel Dor, on Israel’s Mediterranean coast, about 20 miles south of Haifa. “For the first time, we can state with certainty the name of the Roman prefect of Judea during the critical period leading up to the Bar Kochva revolt,” stated Prof. Assaf Yasur-Landau of the University...
  • 6 Amazing Artifacts with Ancient Greek Mythology Scenes Discovered in Bulgaria

    01/07/2019 10:59:01 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    Archaeology in Bulgaria ^ | April 12, 2018 | Ivan Dikov
    #1. This Ancient Thracian Aristocrat's War Helmet Depicting Trojan War / Iliad Scenes 1st - 2nd century AD, Brestovitsa, Central South Bulgaria Discovered: 2013 A very rare war helmet of a Thracian aristocrat from the 1st-2nd century AD featuring motifs from the story of the Trojan War - made world famous through the Iliad by Ancient Greek poet Homer - was discovered during emergency excavations in Southern Bulgaria in 2013. The Thracian war helmet was found in an Ancient Thracian tumulus (burial mound) known as Pamuk Mogila in Bulgaria's Brestovitsa, and was shown to the public for the first time...
  • How climate change caused the world's first empire to collapse

    01/07/2019 10:15:43 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies
    Phys dot org (relying on non-science source for science article) ^ | January 3, 2019 | Vasile Ersek, The Conversation
    Gol-e-Zard Cave lies in the shadow of Mount Damavand, which at more than 5,000 metres dominates the landscape of northern Iran. In this cave, stalagmites and stalactites are growing slowly over millennia and preserve in them clues about past climate events. Changes in stalagmite chemistry from this cave have now linked the collapse of the Akkadian Empire to climate changes more than 4,000 years ago... It appears that the empire became increasingly dependent on the productivity of the northern lands and used the grains sourced from this region to feed the army and redistribute the food supplies to key supporters....
  • Catapult ball fired at Edinburgh Castle in 13th century siege discovered in hotel site dig

    01/07/2019 8:11:30 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 61 replies
    The Scotsman ^ | Saturday 29 December 2018 | Brian Ferguson
    An archaeological dig has unearthed new evidence of a three-day attack on Edinburgh Castle - on a site earmarked for a luxury hotel by Sir Richard Branson. Experts believe they have found a carved stone which would have been fired from a giant catapult during the pivotal siege in 1296. It led to Edward I seizing control of the medieval fortress, plundering its treasures and shipping them to London, and the castle being held under English rule for 18 years. Archaeologists made the discovery at the site of the proposed new Virgin Hotel, which is earmarked for a large swathe...