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  • The Taj Mahal is wasting away, and it may soon hit the point of no return

    08/13/2018 8:55:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    The Conversation UK ^ | August 10, 2018 | Carolyn Roberts, Keele University
    The saying goes that the Taj Mahal is pinkish in the morning, milky white in the evening, and golden when the moon shines. Though this may once have been true for the famously pristine marble monument, a mixture of pollution and poor management has now burdened the Taj with a 24-hour layer of yellowy-brown. Condemning the "lethargy" of restoration efforts, India's Supreme Court recently told the government to restore the Taj or demolish it. Located in Agra, in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh, the Taj Mahal is one of the most iconically beautiful buildings in the world. Built...
  • Over 2000 years later: Ancient gold earring discovered in City of David

    08/13/2018 8:48:44 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Jerusalem Post ^ | August 8, 2018 | Tamara Zieve
    A Hellenistic-era golden earring that features the image of a horned animal was discovered in the Givati parking lot of the City of David National Park that encircles the Old City walls, the City of David announced Wednesday. The discovery was made during archaeological digs carried out by the Antiquities Authority and Tel Aviv University... The hoop earring bears the head of a horned animal with large eyes and a mouth... Close to the place where the earring was found, excavators also found a gold bead with intricate embroidered ornamentation resembling a thin rope pattern, dividing the beads into two...
  • Scarlet macaw DNA points to ancient breeding operation in Southwes

    08/13/2018 7:37:17 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 8 replies
    phys.org ^ | August 13, 2018, | Pennsylvania State University
    Historically, scarlet macaws lived from South America to eastern coastal Mexico and Guatemala, thousands of miles from the American Southwest. Previously, researchers thought that ancestral Puebloan people might have traveled to these natural breeding areas and brought birds back, but the logistics of transporting adolescent birds are difficult. None of the sites where these early macaw remains were found contained evidence of breeding—eggshells, pens or perches. "We were interested in the prehistoric scarlet macaw population history and the impacts of human direct management," said George. "Especially any evidence for directed breeding or changes in the genetic diversity that could co-occur...
  • Carbon Dioxide ‘Leak’ in Southern Ocean May Have Warmed Earth for 11,000 Years

    08/13/2018 3:01:24 PM PDT · by ETL · 40 replies
    Sci-News ^ | Aug 1, 2018 | News Staff / Source
    “We think we may have found the answer. Increased circulation in the Southern Ocean allowed carbon dioxide to leak into the atmosphere, working to warm the planet,” said Princeton University’s Professor Daniel Sigman, co-author of the study. For years, researchers have known that growth and sinking of phytoplankton pumps carbon dioxide deep into the ocean, a process often referred to as the ‘biological pump.’ “The biological pump is driven mostly by the low latitude ocean but is undone closer to the poles, where carbon dioxide is vented back to the atmosphere by the rapid exposure of deep waters to the...
  • From Palos de la Frontera, Westward Bound

    08/03/2018 7:23:10 PM PDT · by jfd1776 · 7 replies
    Illinois Review ^ | August 3, 2018 A.D. | John F. Di Leo
    On August 3, 1492, Cristoforo Colombo (yes, you non-Italians spell it Christopher Columbus) set sail from Palos de la Frontera, Spain, with three ships – the Nina, the Pinta, and the Santa Maria – headed for Asia. And he might have made it, too, eventually… if the Western Hemisphere hadn’t been in the way. As it was, he gets the credit for discovering the Americas (even if a clever cartographer named Amerigo Vespucci grabbed up the naming rights first). Would some other European eventually have had the same idea, twenty, fifty or a hundred years later? Certainly. Eventually, the Europeans...
  • Russian Ministry: Only Non-Political Gulag Records have been Destroyed

    07/13/2018 7:31:38 AM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 10 replies
    Moscow Times ^ | July 2018 | Reuters
    The Gulag Museum in Moscow alleged last month that Russian officials permanently destroyed cards with the personal information and the release dates of former inmates. In response to concerns that authorities were attempting to erase the history of Soviet repression, the Interior Ministry noted that physical copies of the records were digitized for permanent storage. The Interior Ministry now admits it does delete some records of gulag survivors, but only those who were not convicted of committing political crimes against the Soviet Union, Russia’s Kommersant business daily reported Wednesday. In a letter sent to gulag historian Sergei Prudovsky, who originally...
  • 40,000-yo foal unearthed in Siberia’s ‘Gateway to the Underworld’ in perfect condition

    08/13/2018 1:53:32 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 40 replies
    RT ^ | Edited time: 13 Aug, 2018 17:45 | staff
    © North-Eastern Federal University ==================================================================== A three-month-old horse that lived up to 40,000 years ago has been discovered in the mysterious Batagai depression in Russia’s Yakutia region, nicknamed the ‘Gateway to the Underworld.’ The North-Eastern Federal University in Yakutsk published the first photo of the “unique” discovery, which was made together with scientists from Kindai University in Japan along with a crew from Fuji TV. The horse was unearthed in perfect condition with its mane, tail and hair well preserved, as it was trapped in the permafrost for 30,000-40,000 years, scientists say. The discovery can help scientists to learn...
  • The Nastiest Feud in Science

    08/12/2018 7:56:38 PM PDT · by DUMBGRUNT · 56 replies
    The Atlantic ^ | Sept 2018 | BIANCA BOSKER
    ...But Keller doesn’t buy any of it. “It’s like a fairy tale: ‘Big rock from sky hits the dinosaurs, and boom they go.’ And it has all the aspects of a really nice story,” she said. “It’s just not true.” ...Keller’s resistance has put her at the core of one of the most rancorous and longest-running controversies in science. “It’s like the Thirty Years’ War,” says Kirk Johnson, the director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. Impacters’ case-closed confidence belies decades of vicious infighting, with the two sides trading accusations of slander, sabotage, threats, discrimination, spurious data, and...
  • Eating Habits in Ancient Greece

    08/12/2018 4:32:50 PM PDT · by SamAdams76 · 33 replies
    Greek Reporter ^ | Philip Chrysopoulos
    The eating habits of ancient Greeks were developed after a deep and detailed study of the needs of the body and the spirit. Their diet, which was an important part of their philosophical vision, was based on rules that combined enjoyment with well-being. Unlike what many modern nutritionists believe about the benefits of a hearty breakfast, the ancient Greeks, and especially the Athenians, used to start their day with a very frugal meal that included “akratisma“, a little barley bread dipped in wine. Sometimes they were adding olives and figs. More often, however, their breakfast was limited to a boiled...
  • Reclining and Dining (and Drinking) in Ancient Rome

    08/12/2018 4:49:25 PM PDT · by SamAdams76 · 31 replies
    The Iris ^ | Shelby Brown
    The ancient Greeks had a recumbent approach to their (male-only) dinner parties, as I discussed in a previous post: elite men reclined, propped on pillows, to drink, converse, and—sometimes—overindulge. The practice of reclining and dining continued into ancient Rome, but with a few additions—for one, respectable women were invited to join the party, and for another, drinking was not a separate, post-dinner event, but became part of the dining experience. An association of dining with luxury led to 19th-century depictions, like the one above, of Roman diners leading the soft life (here, without reclining). The Greeks used single couches onto...
  • What did King Louis XIV of France eat and How did the Sun King dine?

    08/12/2018 5:03:55 PM PDT · by SamAdams76 · 34 replies
    Zippy Facts ^ | Karen Hill
    From the moment the Sun King arose from his sumptuous gold bed, aligned with the rising sun at the centerpiece of his beloved Versailles, the château was alive with activity. The life of every courtier, minister, lovely lady, doctor, and cook was finely tuned to the rituals of the King, his dressing, shaving, dining, meetings, and evening comedie, dancing or appartement when the halls were flooded with light and the courtiers played billiards, gambled, and ate sweets. Living under a pretense of usefulness to Louis XIV and the government of France, the courtiers were largely a source of amusement...
  • 99-Million-Year-Old Snake Hatchling Found Encased in Burmese Amber

    08/12/2018 9:05:43 AM PDT · by ETL · 23 replies
    Sci-News.com ^ | Jul 19, 2018 | News Staff / Source
    The newly-reported specimen was obtained from an amber deposit in the Angbamo area in Myanmar’s Kachin province.The fossil is a 1.6-inch (4.75 cm) long postcranial skeleton made up of 97 vertebrae; the snake’s head is missing. It dates from the Late Cretaceous epoch, approximately 99 million years ago.“This snake, named Xiaophis myanmarensis, is linked to ancient snakes from Argentina, Africa, India and Australia,” said University of Alberta’s Professor Michael Caldwell.“It is an important — and until now, missing — component of understanding snake evolution from southern continents, that is Gondwana, in the mid-Mesozoic.” “At 99 million years old, it dates...
  • Florida construction workers unearth prehistoric bone fragment, likely from mammoth

    08/12/2018 10:53:25 AM PDT · by ETL · 29 replies
    FoxNews.com/Science ^ | Aug 11, 2018 | Madeline Farber
    A construction crew in Cape Coral, Fla., in June discovered what is believed to be a bone fragment from a mastodon or mammoth, a report released Friday said.  The fragment was discovered underground by  crews working on the city’s utilities expansion project, The Fort Myers News-Press reported. It is believed to be a part of the animal’s humerus bone, according to The Cape Coral Daily Breeze.  It is not entirely clear how old the find is; The News-Press reported it could be more than two million years old, while NBC2 put it at somewhere between 12,000 and 250,000 years. What’s more, archaeologists think there could...
  • Egyptian Papyrus Reveals Israelite Psalms [Papyrus Amherst 63]

    08/11/2018 9:25:51 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    BAR ^ | August 6, 2018 | Marek Dospel
    Containing about 35 literary texts in Aramaic that date to the seventh and sixth centuries B.C.E., Papyrus Amherst 63 is written in a cursive Egyptian script known as Demotic. This unusual combination of the Aramaic language and the Demotic script was among the main reasons why the decipherment took more than 120 years. Karel van der Toorn (University of Amsterdam), who recently published a new edition and translation of Papyrus Amherst 63, argues that besides the forerunner of Psalm 20, the Egyptian papyrus contains two other Israelite psalms... “The two other psalms of the Amherst papyrus are not in the...
  • Fabled 'Atlantis Alloy' Recovered in Greater Numbers From Ancient Shipwreck

    03/01/2017 3:42:58 PM PST · by ameribbean expat · 52 replies
    More ingots of orichalcum, the ancient metal that was purported to be mined at the mythical island of Atlantis, have emerged from the seas of Sicily.
  • Unknown metal ingots on shipwreck offer hint that Atlantis might be real

    01/10/2015 12:01:29 PM PST · by the scotsman · 38 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | 9th January 2015 | Rob Waugh
    'An unknown metal said to have been used in the sunken city of Atlantis has been found on 2,600-year-old shipwreck near the coast of Sicily. The 39 ingots of ‘orichalcum’ - described by Plato in his writings about Atlantis - are utterly unique. 'Nothing similar has ever been found,' an expert said. Plato described Atlantis as glittering ‘with the red light of orichalcum’, and he claimed that it was mined there, and used to build huge, glinting temples to the sea god Poseidon.'
  • Lost Ancient High Technology In Egypt: Saw Marks And Drill Holes

    02/25/2017 7:31:07 PM PST · by combat_boots · 71 replies
    YT ^ | 2/25/2017 | Brien Foerster
    There are many examples in Egypt where we can see that very advanced high technology once existed. To learn more about this, from my 4 trips to Egypt, check out this link: https://hiddenincatours.com/?s=egypt
  • Archaeologists Discover Ancient Greek Ship in Black Sea

    08/10/2018 8:24:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 43 replies
    Greek Reporter ^ | August 7, 2018 | Kerry Kolasa-Sikiaridi
    Off the coast of the Black Sea in the Mykolaiv region, archaeologists have discovered a sunken ancient Greek shipwreck dating back more than 2.5 thousand years. The ship, discovered during a joint expedition of the Institute of Archaeology of NAS of Ukraine and the Warsaw Institute of Archaeology, is believed to be one of the oldest of its kind discovered in the region. According to the head of the black sea international underwater archaeological expedition, Vyacheslav Gerasimov, it may have possibly sailed ancient trade routes to Olbia or Chersonesos. “This ship is one of the oldest known in the Northern...
  • Mega-shark teeth dating back 25 million years discovered at Australian beach

    08/09/2018 1:22:16 PM PDT · by ETL · 34 replies
    FoxNews.com ^ | Aug 9, 2018 | Chris Ciaccia
    An Australian teacher and fossil enthusiast stumbled upon the finding of a lifetime when he uncovered a set of fossilized 3-inch teeth from an extinct shark, known as the great jagged narrow-toothed shark or Carcharocles angustidens. Phillip Mullaly said that he couldn't believe what he saw, as he walked along Jan Juc, a beach town and well-known fossil site along Victoria’s Surf Coast in Australia. “I was walking along the beach looking for fossils, turned and saw this shining glint in a boulder and saw a quarter of the tooth exposed," Mullaly said in a statement. "I was immediately excited,...
  • Early Roman 'horseshoes' dug up from Vindolanda fort ditch

    08/09/2018 12:59:36 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    BBC ^ | August 4, 2018 | unattributed
    Early Roman "horseshoes" unearthed during an excavation at a fort near Hadrian's Wall are to go on display. Barbara Birley, curator at Vindolanda, near Hexham, in Northumberland, said it was "incredibly rare" to find a full set of four iron hipposandals. She said the hoof protectors were so well preserved that their tread to stop horses slipping was clearly visible. The haul was found by a volunteer - one of 250 who carry out digs at the fort every year. Because the Romans were in Britain for between 400 and 500 years, Ms Birley said, teams could dig at the...