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  • Freeper SunkenCiv

    09/10/2017 9:36:31 AM PDT · by Cincinnatus.45-70 · 123 replies
    Vanity | Cincinnatus.45-70
    Freeper SunkenCiv used to regularly post fascinating and learned articles on archeologicy and history topics. But no posts from SunkenCiv that I can remember for many months. Does anyone here know what happened?
  • Scientists Uncover Lost Ancient Languages In Egyptian Monastery

    08/28/2017 6:59:08 PM PDT · by marshmallow · 8 replies
    International Business Times ^ | 8/28/17 | Elena Glowatz
    Scientists have uncovered lost ancient writings on parchment in Egypt, including ones jotted down in rare languages, that could give them a window into the past. The Times reported that researchers used imaging technology to illuminate words that were written onto parchment before the ink was washed and wiped away and new text written over it. The hidden text included words written in Caucasian Albanian, a language that had previously only been found on some stone inscriptions. Three medical texts written in ancient Greek were also brought to light, including some written by Hippocrates, the groundbreaking ancient Greek physician for...
  • The Mystery of Viking Ruler Rollo Continues-- Surprising Discovery in Ancient Grave

    04/27/2017 2:50:32 PM PDT · by SteveH · 29 replies
    messagetoeagle ^ | January 22, 2017 | messagetoeagle
    (restricted; link only)
  • Mysterious Village Discovered In Canada Is 10,000 Years Older Than The Pyramids

    04/20/2017 12:23:40 PM PDT · by smokingfrog · 63 replies
    Graze Me ^ | 4-19-17 | Theo
    A new settlement has been discovered by researchers from the Hakai Institute, University of Victoria and local First Nations members, and it changes everything scientists thought they knew about early civilization in North America. The 14,000-year-old village contains artifacts that date all the way back to the Ice Age and is believed to be one of the oldest human settlements ever uncovered in North America. It’s even suspected to be older than the Giza pyramids! As IFL Science reports, the discovery lines up with the oral history of the Heiltsuk Nation. For generations, stories have been handed down that tell...
  • Rabbit hole leads to incredible 700-year-old Knights Templar cave complex

    03/08/2017 4:18:02 PM PST · by NYer · 41 replies
    Fox News ^ | March 7, 2017
    A rabbit hole in the UK conceals the entrance to an incredible cave complex linked to the mysterious Knights Templar.New photos show the remarkable Caynton Caves network, which looks like something out of the movie “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade.” The shadowy Knights Templar order is said to have used the caves.The Sun reports that the caves are hidden beneath a farmer’s field in Shropshire. The site was visited by photographer Michael Scott after he saw a video of the caves online. “I traipsed over a field to find it, but if you didn’t know it was there you...
  • Ancient Skulls May Belong To Elusive Humans Called Denisovans

    03/07/2017 4:00:40 PM PST · by blam · 31 replies
    Science Magazine ^ | 3-7-2017 | Ann Gibbons
    Since their discovery in 2010, the ex­tinct ice age humans called Deniso­vans have been known only from bits of DNA, taken from a sliver of bone in the Denisova Cave in Siberia, Russia. Now, two partial skulls from eastern China are emerging as prime candidates for showing what these shadowy people may have looked like. In a paper published this week in Science, a Chinese-U.S. team presents 105,000- to 125,000-year-old fossils they call “archaic Homo.” They note that the bones could be a new type of human or an eastern variant of Neandertals. But although the team avoids the word,...
  • Lake Sediments Record Climate Change At Cahokia

    02/15/2017 8:36:43 AM PST · by fishtank · 35 replies
    archaeology.org ^ | Monday, February 13 | archaeology.org
    Lake Sediments Record Climate Change At Cahokia INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA —National Public Radio reports that climatologist Broxton Bird of Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and colleagues analyzed layers of calcite crystals interspersed with layers of mud on the bottom of Indiana’s Martin Lake in order to learn about historic rainfall levels at Cahokia. The study suggests that beginning in the 900s, the Central Mississippi Valley received more rain than usual. And carbon isotopes found in skeletons at Mississippian cities indicate that people ate a lot of corn. “That comes at right around 950, and that’s around the time the population at Cahokia...
  • 2,000-year-old clay doll dug up in one piece at Osaka ruins site

    01/30/2017 9:54:24 AM PST · by fishtank · 24 replies
    Asahi ^ | January 27, 2017 at 17:00 JST | By TAKASHI YOSHIKAWA
    2,000-year-old clay doll dug up in one piece at Osaka ruins site IBARAKI, Osaka Prefecture--A moon-faced clay doll from the mid-Yayoi Pottery Culture period (300 B.C.-A.D. 300) has been unearthed in near perfect condition at an archaeological site here, the first discovery of its kind in the prefecture. The charming doll, of a kind very rarely found intact, was unearthed at the Kori ruins, the Osaka Center for Culture Heritage announced Jan. 26.
  • Top 10 Discoveries of 2016

    01/04/2017 11:12:28 PM PST · by YCTHouston · 11 replies
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | 12/12/2016 | The Editors
    The largest and most significant collection of Roman waxed writing tablets is providing an intriguing glimpse into life in early Roman London. More than 400 wooden tablets were unearthed by archaeologists from Museum of London Archaeology (MOLA) during excavations at the site of the Bloomberg company’s new European headquarters. Roman London (called Londinium) was founded around A.D. 50, and the recovered texts, written by ordinary residents, record various names, as well as events and transactions that took place during the settlement’s first few decades.
  • Major Evolutionary Blunders: Neanderthals Were Subhuman in Imagination Only

    01/04/2017 8:56:48 AM PST · by fishtank · 42 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | Jan. 2017 | Randy J. Guliuzza, P.E., M.D.
    Major Evolutionary Blunders: Neanderthals Were Subhuman in Imagination Only by Randy J. Guliuzza, P.E., M.D. * Evidence for Creation “So easy, a caveman could do it” is the witty slogan of a company hoping to lure customers to switch car insurance. The humorous catch to the commercial was the brutish-looking, yet endearing, Neanderthals living among us who found the slogan stereotyping them as dimwits to be “not cool” or “hurtful.” The fact that viewers could readily spot the standard view of Neanderthals shows how pervasive it is and how it dominates the popular perception.
  • New Dead Sea Scrolls Fragments Found in Judean Desert

    12/23/2016 8:15:27 AM PST · by Red Badger · 11 replies
    www.haaretz.com ^ | 12-21-2016 | Philippe Bohstrom
    New fragments of the Dead Sea Scrolls have been found in the Cave of the Skulls by the Dead Sea in Israel, in a salvage excavation by Israeli authorities. The pieces are small and the writing on them is too faded to make out without advanced analysis. At this stage the archaeologists aren't even sure if they're written in ancient Hebrew, Aramaic or another language. “The most important thing that can come out of these fragments is if we can connect them with other documents that were looted from the Judean Desert, and that have no known provenance," says Dr....
  • Scans give 3D look at Coughton Court’s priest hole

    12/01/2016 2:00:42 PM PST · by fishtank · 22 replies
    Stratford-upon-Avon Herald ^ | 30th November 2016 | Chris Smith
    Scans give 3D look at Coughton Court’s priest hole By Chris Smith - 30th November 2016 1 1694 One of the 3D images of the priest hole at Coughton Court which have been produced by researchers at the University of Nottingham. THE first 3D images of a hiding-hole at Coughton Court that was used by 17th-century Catholic priests escaping religious persecution have been created by university researchers. The priest hole was first discovered in the 1850s in Coughton – a key building in the Gunpowder Plot of 1605 – hidden in a turret of the main gatehouse, concealed between the...
  • Huge, Mysterious Settlement Discovered Near Stonehenge

    11/22/2016 10:14:10 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 13 replies
    Seeker.com ^ | Nov 22, 2016 02:40 PM ET | ROSSELLA LORENZI
    A vast, mysterious complex dating back more than 5,600 years has been unearthed just 1.5 miles from Stonehenge, British archaeologists have announced. The finding in Wiltshire reinforces the theory that Stonehenge was a sacred monument and suggests the entire region was ritually active hundreds of years before the enigmatic stone circle was erected. Found during excavations ahead of the construction of a new Army Service family accommodation, the 650-foot-diameter complex is known as a "causewayed enclosure." It consists of more than 3,100 feet of segmented ditches arranged in two concentric circles. According to archaeologists at Wessex Archaeology, the remains date...
  • You Are What You Eat: The Israelite Diet and Archaeology. Pig bones as an ethnic marker?

    11/16/2016 8:54:25 AM PST · by fishtank · 34 replies
    Biblical Archaeology dot org ^ | 11/14/2016 | Marek Dospěl
    You Are What You Eat: The Israelite Diet and Archaeology Pig bones as an ethnic marker? Jews don’t eat pork. Every kid knows that. Much fewer people know that the abstinence from swine’s flesh is rooted in the Biblical prohibition in Leviticus 11:7 and Deuteronomy 14:8, which means that for the ancient Israelites, pork was also off the menu. Only specialists, however, are aware of the fact that the Biblical ban on pork consumption from the Israelite diet can be interpreted from the archaeological or (more specifically) zooarchaeological record. In short: If people didn’t eat pork, they likely didn’t raise...
  • Mysterious Roman remains uncovered in Swiss town

    11/16/2016 8:29:18 AM PST · by fishtank · 16 replies
    The Local (Switzerland) ^ | Published: 15 Nov 2016 10:06 GMT+01:00 | Staff author
    Archaeologists are puzzled over the discovery of a Roman-era earthenware pot filled with oil lamps and bronze coins in the commune of Windisch, in the northern Swiss canton of Aargau.
  • Genes of This Tribe Carry A DNA of A Third Unknown

    10/31/2016 2:51:36 AM PDT · by Jacob Kell · 33 replies
    spasique.com ^ | October 29, 2016
    New evidence found by scientists has started to suggest that the people living on the islands of Melanesia could have human DNA the world has never seen. The theory is that the DNA does not come from a Neanderthal or Denisovan (which are the two ancient species we most closely relate humans with). Scientists believe that they come from a new undiscovered species that derived from the South Pacific, northeast of Austrailia.
  • Ancient Beverage Brewed In Milwaukee

    10/28/2016 9:51:13 AM PDT · by fishtank · 27 replies
    Archaeology ^ | 10-25-16 | NPR
    ANCIENT BEVERAGE BREWED IN MILWAUKEE MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN — NPR reports that archaeologist Bettina Arnold of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and her research team worked with Lakefront Brewery to try to re-create an alcoholic beverage that had been placed in a bronze cauldron and buried in a grave sometime between 400 and 450 B.C. in what is now Germany. The recipe was based upon the research of paleobotanist Manfred Rösch, who analyzed the residues in the Iron Age cauldron. He found evidence of honey, meadowsweet, barley, and mint—ingredients in a type of beverage known as a braggot.
  • Roman coins ID'd in Japanese ruins, but their origin baffles

    10/18/2016 7:08:04 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 14 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Oct 18, 2016 9:18 PM EDT | Mari Yamaguchi
    The eyes of a visiting archaeologist lit up when he was shown the 10 tiny, tarnished discs that had sat unnoticed in storage for two and a half years at a dig on a southern Japan island. He had been to archaeological sites in Italy and Egypt, and recognized the “little round things” as old coins, including a few likely dating to the Roman Empire. “I was so excited I almost forgot what I was there for, and the coins were all we talked about,” said Toshio Tsukamoto of the Gangoji Institute for Research of Cultural Property in Nara, an...
  • Badger Unearthed 4,200-Year-Old Bones In Ireland

    10/18/2016 7:29:53 AM PDT · by fishtank · 26 replies
    archaeology.org ^ | Thursday, October 13 | archaeology.org
    Badger Unearthed 4,200-Year-Old Bones In Ireland COUNTY CAVAN, IRELAND — The Irish Times reports that a badger unearthed ancient human remains at a burial site in Cavan Burren Park, known for its prehistoric monuments, megalithic tombs, rock art, and dwelling sites. A group of historians and archaeologists found the small pieces of cremated human bone and charcoal near a collapsed tomb. “Our badger just threw out the bones,” said historian Séamus Ó hUtlacháin. “They were no bigger than my nail, just scraps of bone. It is the oldest discovery in this region, a wonderful discovery.” Part of a femur from...
  • Vindolanda Roman Fort Yields Hundreds of Shoes

    10/11/2016 3:09:01 PM PDT · by fishtank · 15 replies
    Archeology ^ | Tuesday, October 11, 2016 | Chronicle Live
    Vindolanda Roman Fort Yields Hundreds of Shoes Tuesday, October 11, 2016 NORTHUMBERLAND, ENGLAND—Chronicle Live reports that more than 400 shoes sized for men, women, and children, were recovered at the Roman fort of Vindolanda over the summer, bringing the total of shoes from the site to more than 7,000. The 1,800-year-old shoes included ones made solely for indoor wear, boots, sandals, and bath clogs. The footwear was found in a defensive ditch, along with pottery and the remains of cats and dogs. Andrew Birley, director of Vindolanda’s excavations, thinks the contents of the ditches may have been discarded when the...