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  • Who Owns the Past? The federal government should fix or drop new regulations that throttle scient...

    04/17/2012 6:51:06 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Scientific American ^ | March 27, 2012 | The Editors
    The original intention of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), passed in 1990, was to facilitate the return of Native American bones and sacred objects to descendants and culturally affiliated groups. NAGPRA sought to balance the rights of Native Americans to reclaim ancestral remains with the right of society as a whole to learn about our collective past. By and large, the law was succeeding. In recent years scientists and representatives of Native peoples have been working together to everyone's gain. For example, archaeologist Alston Thoms of Texas A&M University has been consulting with Native Americans about...
  • Marco Polo was not a swindler -- he really did go to China

    04/17/2012 6:38:08 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    AlphaGalileo ^ | Monday, April 16, 2012 | Universitaet Tübingen
    It has been said that Marco Polo did not really go to China; that he merely cobbled together his information about it from journeys to the Black Sea, Constantinople and Persia and from talking to merchants and reading now-lost Persian books. But in Marco Polo was in China: New Evidence from Currencies, Salts and Revenues, (Brill Verlag) Hans Ulrich Vogel, Professor of Chinese Studies at the University of Tübingen, puts paid to such rumors. He begins with a comprehensive review of the arguments for and against, and follows it up with evidence from relevant Chinese, Japanese, Italian, French, German and...
  • Scientists Find Runes on Ancient Comb

    04/16/2012 9:55:56 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies
    The Local: Germany's news in English ^ | Friday, April 13, 2012 | unattributed
    Archaeologists have found the oldest engravings of letters ever to be discovered in central Germany, officials from the area announced on Thursday. The ancient letters, called runes, were scratched onto a 12.5 centimetre-long comb by Germanic settlers in the second century, scientists working on the site in Saxony-Anhalt believe. The letters spell out "Kama", meaning comb, the president of the state Heritage and Archaeology Management Office, Sven Ostritz, said on Thursday. It is the oldest ever example of runic writing to be found in that part of the country, he added. Germanic languages used the runic alphabet to write before...
  • Burmese treasure:'We've done some pretty silly things but the silliest was burying the Spitfires'

    04/16/2012 1:58:33 PM PDT · by Theoria · 27 replies
    Canberra Times ^ | 16 April 2012 | Adam Lusher
    EXTRAORDINARY plans to raise a lost ''squadron'' of Spitfires that have lain buried in Burma since the end of World War II were revealed at the weekend as David Cameron, Britain's Prime Minister, visited Rangoon. A Lincolnshire farmer who devoted 15 years of his life to finding the planes has spoken about his quest to recover them and get them airborne. David Cundall, 62, has spent £130,000 ($200,000) of his money, visited Burma 12 times, persuaded its secretive regime to trust him, and all the time sought testimony from a dwindling band of Far East veterans in order to locate...
  • Lost And Found: Rare Paul Revere Print Rediscovered

    04/16/2012 4:32:00 PM PDT · by Theoria · 10 replies
    NPR ^ | 15 April 2012 | NPR
    The 237th anniversary of Paul Revere's famous midnight ride during the Revolutionary War falls on Wednesday. But long before Henry Wadsworth Longfellow made him famous, Revere was known as an engraver and a silversmith in Boston.Brown University announced this week that it had found a rare engraved print by Revere, one of only five in existence. The print was tucked inside an old medical book that had been donated by physician Solomon Drowne, a member of Brown University's class of 1773."It was an engraving, not a terribly large one," Richard Noble, Brown University's rare books cataloguer tells weekends on All...
  • The explorer who made Lewis and Clark look like tourists.

    04/15/2012 7:48:33 PM PDT · by Rebelbase · 64 replies ^ | Old Article | TIMOTHY HARPER
    D avid Thompson was a monumental figure in North American history. A fur trader, an explorer and perhaps the greatest land geographer ever, he led expeditions through incredible hardship and danger to safety. His 77 journals made important contributions to our understanding of culture, history and everyday life in North America before Europeans brought horses, guns, alcohol and disease. And he and his American Indian wife lived one of the great love stories of all time. So why havenÂ’t you heard of 19th-century frontiersman David Thompson? No doubt one reason is that he spent most of his long life in...
  • Last Living Veterans of America's Wars

    03/06/2005 4:35:09 PM PST · by BulletBobCo · 24 replies · 2,935+ views
    Info Please ^ | March 6, 2005
    Last Living Veterans of America's Wars American Revolution (1775–1783) Last veteran, Daniel F. Bakeman, died 4/5/1869, age 109 Last widow, Catherine S. Damon, died 11/11/06, age 92 Last dependent, Phoebe M. Palmeter, died 4/25/11, age 90 War of 1812 (1812–1815) Last veteran, Hiram Cronk, died 5/13/05, age 105 Last widow, Carolina King, died 6/28/36, age unknown Last dependent, Esther A. H. Morgan, died 3/12/46, age 89 Indian Wars (c. 1861–1898) Last veteran, Fredrak Fraske, died 6/18/73, age 101 Mexican War (1846–1848) Last veteran, Owen Thomas Edgar, died 9/3/29, age 98 Last widow, Lena James Theobald, died 6/20/63, age 89 Last...
  • Civil War authority Shelby Foote dead

    06/28/2005 10:45:07 AM PDT · by Moose4 · 165 replies · 6,117+ views
    AP via ^ | 28 June 2005 | Unattributed
    MEMPHIS, Tennessee (AP) -- Novelist and Civil War historian Shelby Foote, whose appearances on a PBS-TV documentary series helped America better understand one of the most defining periods of its past, has died, his family said Tuesday. Foote's widow, Gwen, said her husband, who was 88, died Monday night.
  • U.S. Civil War Took Bigger Toll Than Previously Estimated

    04/03/2012 11:07:36 PM PDT · by U-238 · 125 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 11/21/2012 | Science Daily
    The Civil War -- already considered the deadliest conflict in American history -- in fact took a toll far more severe than previously estimated. That's what a new analysis of census data by Binghamton University historian J. David Hacker reveals. Hacker says the war's dead numbered about 750,000, an estimate that's 20 percent higher than the commonly cited figure of 620,000. His findings will be published in December in the journal Civil War History. "The traditional estimate has become iconic," Hacker says. "It's been quoted for the last hundred years or more. If you go with that total for a...
  • 'Who, What, Why: How many soldiers died in the US Civil War?'

    04/04/2012 6:34:20 AM PDT · by the scotsman · 43 replies
    BBC News ^ | 4th April 2012 | BBC News
    'A study suggests a previously widely accepted death toll of the US Civil War may actually be way under the mark. How many did perish in this conflict, fought before the era of modern record-keeping and DNA identification? The US Civil War was incontrovertibly the bloodiest, most devastating conflict in American history, and it remains unknown - and unknowable - exactly how many men died in Union and Confederate uniform. Now, it appears a long-held estimate of the war's death toll could have undercounted the dead by as many as 130,000. That is 21% of the earlier estimate - and...
  • George Washington named Britain's greatest ever foe

    04/15/2012 3:20:17 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 57 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 4-14-12 | Jason Copping
    The American was voted the winner in a contest run by the National Army Museum to identify the country's most outstanding military opponent. He was one of a shortlist of five leaders who topped a public poll and on Saturday was selected as the ultimate winner by an audience of around 70 guests at a special event at the museum, in Chelsea, west London. In second place was Michael Collins, the Irish leader, ahead of Napoleon Bonaparte, Erwin Rommel and Mustafa Kemal Atatürk. At the event, each contender had their case made by a historian giving a 40 minute presentation....
  • Oxford University, Vatican libraries to digitize works

    04/14/2012 5:52:01 AM PDT · by iowamark · 6 replies
    Reuters ^ | 04/11/2012 | Paul Casciato
    The Bodleian Libraries of the University of Oxford and the Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana (BAV) said on Thursday they intended to digitize 1.5 million pages of ancient texts and make them freely available online. The libraries said the digitized collections will centre on three subject areas: Greek manuscripts, 15th-century printed books and Hebrew manuscripts and early printed books. The areas have been chosen for the strength of the collections in both libraries and their importance for scholarship in their respective fields... The initiative has been made possible by a 2 million pound ($3.17 million) award from the Polonsky Foundation. "The service...
  • George Washington named Britain's greatest ever foe

    04/15/2012 11:48:38 AM PDT · by AnotherUnixGeek · 92 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 14 Apr 2012 | Jasper Copping
    The American was voted the winner in a contest run by the National Army Museum to identify the country's most outstanding military opponent.
  • Why were 10 dead bodies found in Benjamin Franklin’s basement? (Ambassador's London residence)

    04/14/2012 11:25:49 AM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 22 replies
    IO9 ^ | April 14, 2012 | Lauren Davis
    Why were 10 dead bodies found in Benjamin Franklin’s basement? In 1998, a group called the Friends of Benjamin Franklin House began renovations on Franklin's London residence, No. 36 Craven Street, and discovered a nasty surprise: 1,200 pieces of bone from 10 bodies, six of which were children. And the bodies were buried in the basement around the time Franklin was living in the house. No, Franklin didn't engage in a murder spree in between penning Poor Richard's Almanack and flying kites in lightning storms. In fact, it's unlikely that the bodies were murder victims at all. The bones were...
  • Judge: Time to unseal Nixon's Watergate testimony

    07/29/2011 12:26:44 PM PDT · by Hunton Peck · 15 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Friday, July 29, 2011 2:42 PM EDT | NEDRA PICKLER
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Thirty-six years after Richard Nixon testified to a grand jury about the Watergate break-in that drove him from office, a federal judge on Friday ordered the secret transcript made public. But the 297 pages of testimony won't be available immediately, because the government gets time to decide whether to appeal. The Obama administration opposed the transcript's release, chiefly to protect the privacy of people discussed during the ex-president's testimony who are still alive. Nevertheless, U.S. District Judge Royce Lamberth agreed with historians who sued for release of the documents that the historical significance outweighs arguments for secrecy,...
  • Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria Found In Four Million-Year-Old Cave

    04/12/2012 5:42:31 PM PDT · by blam · 38 replies
    Global Post ^ | 4-12-2012 | Alexander Besant
    Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria Found In Four Million-Year-Old CaveThe bacteria, found in the isolated Lechuguilla Cave in New Mexico, over 1300 feet below the earth, may hold the secret to understanding drug resistance. Alexander BesantApril 12, 2012 17:19 Researchers said they discovered ancient bacteria resistant to both natural and synthetic antibiotics while investigating a 4-million-year-old cave in New Mexico. The finding, may have implications for both the understanding of drug resistance and ways of preventing it. The scientists involved collected 93 strains of bacteria from Lechuguilla cave, approximately 1300 feet deep, and found that all the strains collected were resistant to...
  • Civil War vet to be laid to rest -- 88 years after death

    04/12/2012 5:33:09 AM PDT · by smokingfrog · 15 replies ^ | 11 April 2012 | Kohr Harlan
    PORTLAND, Ore. -- A Civil War veteran who died years ago will finally be laid to rest this Friday in Portland. He was the youngest of 13 children, and the last one to die. And so, after he passed away, his remains laid unclaimed for 88 years. Alice Knapp's curiosity about her own family tree led her to Peter Knapp's remains. She still remembers taking possession of the box Peter's remains are in. "It was a gold box -- both he and his wife were placed in this gold box," Alice Knapp said. "It had a ribbon around it and...
  • Viking-era 'piggy bank' yields silver treasure

    04/12/2012 6:07:47 PM PDT · by Engraved-on-His-hands · 7 replies
    The Local [Sweden] ^ | April 11, 2012 | David Landes
    A bronze, Viking-era "piggy-bank" containing thousands silver coins dating from the 11th century has been unearthed on the Baltic island of Gotland in what Swedish archaeologists have described as a "fantastic" treasure find. The silver treasure was found last Thursday during an archaeological examination of a field in Rone, on southern Gotland. "We had an expert out there with a metal detector who got a signal that he's found something pretty big," Per Widerström, an archaeologist with the Gotland Museum, told The Local. The same field has yielded previous treasure finds, including a well-known discovery from the 1880s, when a...
  • In defense of Moses-Egyptians may sue Jews over the Exodus.

    08/28/2003 5:42:12 AM PDT · by SJackson · 18 replies · 654+ views
    Jerusalem Post ^ | 8-28-03 | Moshe Kohn
    The dean of Al-Zaqaziq University's School of Law, Dr. Nabil Hilmi, and a group of Egyptian expatriates in Switzerland are preparing to sue "all the Jews of the world and the Jews of Israel in particular" for compensation for the wealth the Bible says the Jews "stole" when Moses led them out of Egypt 34 centuries ago (Jerusalem Post, August 22). Hilmi kindly offered to let us pay in installments over 1,000 years with interest, of course. It seems that where it suits Bible-deniers like Muslims who deny that the Jews have a history whose first stages are described in...
  • Jews sued for 'stealing' gold in Exodus

    08/22/2003 5:35:19 PM PDT · by yhwhsman · 32 replies · 276+ views ^ | August 22, 2003 | Joseph Farah
    LAW OF THE LANDJews sued for 'stealing' gold in Exodus Egyptians to seek compensation for 'tons' allegedly taken Posted: August 22, 2003 5:00 p.m. Eastern © 2003 As attorneys and politicians grapple over the validity of slave reparations, a group of Egyptians have trumped the debate with a claim against Jews that dates back thousands of years. Dr. Nabil Hilmi, a dean at the University of Al-Zaqaziq, said Egyptian expatriates in Switzerland are mounting a massive lawsuit against "all Jews around the world" that seeks compensation for "tons" of gold they claim was stolen during the Jews' exodus out...
  • Moses Was a Muslim Who Led Palestinian Muslims Out of Egypt. No Joke.

    04/12/2012 5:02:22 AM PDT · by SJackson · 44 replies
    Algemeiner ^ | 4-10-12 | David Ha'ivri
    A few years ago, while visiting the Temple Mount in Jerusalem, I had a very disturbing conversation with a member of the Islamic Wakf who was escorting me to make sure that I didn’t pray on the holy mountain. I asked him if he could tell me when the Al Aqsa mosque was built. He looked at me with a straight face and responded that it was always there. I hadn’t expected that, and of course was surprised and asked him again. I thought that maybe he didn’t understand my question and meant that the mountain was always there. So...
  • Life on the edge: Inside the world's largest STONE forest, where tropical rain has eroded rocks...

    04/10/2012 7:41:23 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Daily Mail / Nat Geog ^ | Sunday, April 8, 2012 | Chris Parsons
    Inhospitable: The Grand Tsingy may look uninhabitable, but there are thought to be 11 species of lemur, 100 types of bird and 45 kinds of reptile living there Perilous: An explorer climbs among the razor-sharp peaks of the stone forest, where the eroded limestone rocks extend for 230-square miles Intrepid: Climbers Luke Padgett and John Benson scale another dangerous-looking peak in the Grand Tsingy, thought to be the world's largest stone forest Forest of life: Various forms of greenery can be spotted within the Grand Tsingy stone forest, despite the apparently inhospitable environmental conditions It's like a cave without...
  • Dig it! Volunteers can sign up to excavate at Topper site

    04/08/2012 6:08:03 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Times and Democrat ^ | Thursday, April 5, 2012 | Albert Goodyear (probably)
    The University of South Carolina is accepting registrations from volunteers to help excavate archaeological sites along the Savannah River April 30-June 2. The expedition will be led by archaeologist Albert Goodyear, whose discoveries at the Topper site in Allendale County have captured international media attention. Volunteers will learn excavation techniques and how to identify Clovis and pre-Clovis artifacts in several prehistoric chert quarries. This year, some volunteers may also be involved in the excavation of a nearby Paleoamerican site known as the Charles site. The cost is $488 per week ($400 is tax-deductible) and includes evening lectures and programs, lunch...
  • Study Says DNA’s Power to Predict Illness Is Limited

    04/07/2012 9:16:19 PM PDT · by neverdem · 16 replies
    NY Times ^ | April 2, 2012 | GINA KOLATA
    If every aspect of a person’s DNA is known, would it be possible to predict the diseases in that person’s future? And could that knowledge be used to forestall the otherwise inevitable? The answer, according to a new study of twins, is, for the most part, “no.” While sequencing the entire DNA of individuals is proving fantastically useful in understanding diseases and finding new treatments, it is not a method that will, for the most part, predict a person’s medical future. So, the new study concludes, it is not going to be possible to say that, for example, Type 2...
  • Coral Links Ice Sheet Collapse to Ancient 'Mega Flood'

    04/07/2012 12:01:22 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | April 3, 2012 | U of Oxford
    Previous research could not accurately date the sea-level rise but now an Aix-Marseille University-led team, including Oxford University scientists Alex Thomas and Gideon Henderson, has confirmed that the event occurred 14,650-14,310 years ago at the same time as a period of rapid climate change known as the Bølling warming... During the Bølling warming high latitudes of the Northern hemisphere warmed as much as 15 degrees Celsius in a few tens of decades. The team has used dating evidence from Tahitian corals to constrain the sea level rise to within a period of 350 years, although the actual rise may well...
  • Mixed Martial Arts Celebrity Recruited for Ancient Roman Army

    04/07/2012 9:49:40 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    LiveScience ^ | Thursday, March 29, 2012 | Owen Jarus
    A newly translated inscription, dating back about 1,800 years, reveals that Oinoanda, a Roman city in southwest Turkey, turned to a mixed martial art champion to recruit for the Roman army and bring the new soldiers to a city named Hierapolis, located hundreds of miles to the east, in Syria. His name was Lucius Septimius Flavianus Flavillianus and he was a champion at wrestling and pankration, the latter a bloody, and at times lethal, mixed martial art where contestants would try to pound each other unconscious or into submission. Flavillianus proved to be so successful as a military recruiter that...
  • Ancient Egyptian Cotton Unveils Secrets of Domesticated Crop Evolution

    04/07/2012 8:24:26 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Scientists studying 1,600-year-old cotton from the banks of the Nile have found what they believe is the first evidence that punctuated evolution has occurred in a major crop group within the relatively short history of plant domestication. The findings offer an insight into the dynamics of agriculture in the ancient world and could also help today's domestic crops face challenges such as climate change and water scarcity. The researchers, led by Dr Robin Allaby from the School of Life Sciences at the University of Warwick, examined the remains of ancient cotton at Qasr Ibrim in Egypt's Upper Nile using high...
  • Empuries: The Ancient Greek Town of Spain

    04/07/2012 8:17:56 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    EU Greek Reporter ^ | March 29, 2012 | Stella Tsolakidou
    The most western ancient Greek colony documented in the Mediterranean is revealing its secrets through the development of a Document Centre on Greek trade and presence in Iberia, according to the creators of the Iberia Graeca centre. Empúries, formerly known by its Spanish name Ampurias, was a town on the Mediterranean coast of the Catalan comarca of Alt Empordà in Catalonia, Spain. It was founded in 575 BC by Greek colonists from Phocaea with the name of Emporion, meaning "market". It was later occupied by the Romans, but in the Early Middle Ages, when its exposed coastal position left it...
  • DNA analysis shakes up Neandertal theories

    04/06/2012 10:21:33 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies ^ | April 4, 2012 | Gail Glover
    Focusing on mitochondrial DNA sequences from 13 Neandertal individuals, including a new sequence from the site of Valdegoba cave in northern Spain, the research team found some surprising results. When they started looking at the DNA, a clear pattern emerged. Neandertal individuals from Western Europe that were older than 50,000 years and individuals from sites in western Asia and the Middle East showed a high degree of genetic variation, on par with what might be expected from a species that had been abundant in an area for a long period of time. In fact, the amount of genetic variation was...
  • Well preserved mammoth from Siberia shows signs of early man stealing from lions

    04/05/2012 7:24:06 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 21 replies ^ | 04-05-2012 | Bob Yirka
    An exceedingly well preserved juvenile mammoth carcass has been found in Siberia near the Arctic Ocean and it shows signs of having been attacked by a cave lion and then partially butchered by humans. Dubbed Yuka by the Mammuthus organization, which is studying the remains, the six foot long creature was believed to have been a year and a half to perhaps three or four years old at the time of its death. The mammoth was found by tusk hunters in Northern Siberia, who then turned it over to scientists with the Mammuthus organization. The BBC and Discovery have been...
  • Preserved in the ice for 10,000 years: Ginger-haired baby mammoth shows signs of death struggle

    04/04/2012 2:45:19 PM PDT · by C19fan · 29 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | April 4, 2012 | Rob Waugh
    A ginger-haired mammoth baby found in Siberia could have been snatched by hungry human hunters from the jaws of a lion 10,000 years ago. The body of the beast - the first ever found with its distinctive 'strawberry blonde' hair - has been described as being of 'huge' significance. It's could be evidence that ancient humans attacked and fed on mammoths in Siberia, with the body of 'Yuka' showing wounds consistent with an attack by lions AND people.
  • Dressed to kill: A feathered tyrannosaur is discovered in China

    04/05/2012 4:39:12 AM PDT · by Renfield · 14 replies
    Christian Science Monitor ^ | 4-4-2012 | Pete Spotts
    It's not often you see a dinosaur with a girth and toothy grimace reminiscent of Tyrannosaurus rex yet covered in a downy winter coat worthy of L.L. Bean. But that's what a team of paleontologists in China reports. They've dubbed their find Yutyrannus huali (beautiful feathered tyrant), a creature that stretched 30 feet from tail-tip to snout and weighed 1.5 tons. It's the largest dinosaur yet to host feather-like features all over its body – features well preserved on three nearly complete, mostly intact fossil skeletons the team found....
  • Warm and fuzzy T. rex? New evidence surprises

    04/04/2012 12:03:18 PM PDT · by SatinDoll · 37 replies
    Xfinity ^ | 04/04/2012 | Alicia Chang
    LOS ANGELES — The discovery of a giant meat-eating dinosaur sporting a downy coat has some scientists reimagining the look of Tyrannosaurus rex. With a killer jaw and sharp claws, T. rex has long been depicted in movies and popular culture as having scaly skin. But the discovery of an earlier relative suggests the king of dinosaurs may have had a softer side. The evidence comes from the unearthing of a new tyrannosaur species in northeastern China that lived 60 million years before T. rex. The fossil record preserved remains of fluffy down, making it the largest feathered dinosaur ever...
  • Perfectly Preserved Woolly Mammoth Discovered in Siberia

    04/05/2012 10:22:55 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 11 replies
    Yahoo! News ^ | April 5, 2012 | Melissa Knowles
    Scientists in search of ancient tusks made a startling discovery. They uncovered the nearly perfectly preserved remains of a woolly mammoth in northern Siberia. The juvenile mammoth is believed to be more than 10,000 years old, but was only 3 to 4 years old when it died. It is unlike any other mammoth that has been unearthed before. The scientists reveal their discovery, which they named "Yuka," in a BBC documentary. Yuka has strawberry blond hair, unlike the dark hair that other mammoths have been found to have. Plus, Yuka's footpads are incredibly well preserved, but some of his bones...
  • Young Mammoth Likely Butchered by Humans

    04/04/2012 3:32:01 PM PDT · by Renfield · 16 replies
    Discovery News ^ | 4-4-2012 | Jennifer Viegas
    A juvenile mammoth, nicknamed "Yuka," was found entombed in Siberian ice near the shores of the Arctic Ocean and shows signs of being cut open by ancient people. The remarkably well preserved frozen carcass was discovered in Siberia as part of a BBC/Discovery Channel-funded expedition and is believed to be at least 10,000 years old, if not older. If further study confirms the preliminary findings, it would be the first mammoth carcass revealing signs of human interaction in the region. The carcass is in such good shape that much of its flesh is still intact, retaining its pink color. The...
  • Researchers Say Gardom’s Edge Monolith Is Astronomical Marker (Dates Back To 2000 B.C.)

    04/03/2012 9:11:24 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 14 replies ^ | Thu, Mar 29th, 2012 | John Shanks
    Researchers Say Gardom’s Edge Monolith Is Astronomical Marker A team of researchers from the Nottingham Trent University has suggested that a 4000-year-old unique triangular shaped monolith, known as the Gardom’s Edge monolith, was aligned to be an astronomical marker. The 2.2 meter high monolith, located in the Peak District National Park near Manchester, UK, has a striking, right-angled triangular shape that slants up towards geographic south. The orientation and inclination of the slope is aligned to the altitude of the Sun at mid-summer. The team believes that the monolith was set in place to give symbolic meaning to the location...
  • Clovis Comet Gets Second Look

    04/06/2012 9:21:52 AM PDT · by baynut · 17 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | March 16, 2012 | Matt Ridley
    Scientists, it's said, behave more like lawyers than philosophers. They do not so much test their theories as prosecute their cases, seeking supportive evidence and ignoring data that do not fit—a failing known as confirmation bias. They then accuse their opponents of doing the same thing. This is what makes debates over nature and nurture, dietary fat and climate change so polarized. But just because the prosecutor is biased in favor of his case does not mean the defendant is innocent. Sometimes biased advocates are right. An example of this phenomenon is now being played out in geology over the...
  • The 'Islamic Art' Hoax

    04/01/2012 1:35:44 PM PDT · by WPaCon · 86 replies
    American Thinker ^ | 4/1/2012 | Jessica Rubin
    Talking about Islamic art is rather like talking about the art of the Khanates. The Imperial Kingdom of Genghis Khan was the largest contiguous empire on earth. But just because different lands and cultures were conquered by Genghis Khan doesn't mean that there is a significance to grouping their art. The sphere of power of the Muslim Empire stretched from the borders of China and the Indian subcontinent across Central Asia, the Middle East, North Africa, Sicily, and the Iberian Peninsula, and on to the Pyrenees. There needs to be a further rationale for calling art collections from lands conquered...
  • Unearthed cities in Southern Siberia could rewrite Aryan history

    10/04/2010 7:10:56 PM PDT · by James C. Bennett · 26 replies · 1+ views
    Sify News ^ | Sify News
    A new study has suggested that recently unearthed cities in Southern Siberia could rewrite Aryan history-as they are believed to be the original home of the Aryans. Twenty of the spiral-shaped settlements, believed to be the original home of the Aryan people, have been identified, and there are about 50 more suspected sites. They all lie buried in a region more than 640km long near Russia's border with Kazakhstan. The cities are apparently 3500-4000 years ago and are about the same size as several of the city-states of ancient Greece. If archaeologists confirm the cities as Aryan, they could be...
  • Cultural heritage: Takht Bhai offers a glimpse of life under Kanishka {Kushan Empire}

    04/02/2012 4:33:51 AM PDT · by Cronos · 5 replies
    The Tribune ^ | 10 Mar 2012 | Mahwish Qayyam
    A visit to Takht Bhai offers the chance to explore ruins dating back to the time of Kanishka, a Kushan emperor, famous for his military, political and spiritual feats.Buddhists offered prayers at the site and left statues to mark their gratitude once their wishes had been fulfilled, said Dr Shah Nazar Khan, from the Directorate of Archeology and Museums, K-P, while speaking to The Express Tribune. People visited the place in the final stages of life to meditate.Since the site is situated on top of a hill, it escaped the devastation wrought by successive invasions and is still well preserved,...
  • Human ancestors used fire one million years ago, archaeologist find

    04/02/2012 2:43:04 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 54 replies ^ | 04-02-2012 | Provided by University of Toronto
    An international team led by the University of Toronto and Hebrew University has identified the earliest known evidence of the use of fire by human ancestors. Microscopic traces of wood ash, alongside animal bones and stone tools, were found in a layer dated to one million years ago at the Wonderwerk Cave in South Africa. "The analysis pushes the timing for the human use of fire back by 300,000 years, suggesting that human ancestors as early as Homo erectus may have begun using fire as part of their way of life," said U of T anthropologist Michael Chazan, co-director of...
  • Unicorn Cookbook Found at the British Library

    04/01/2012 5:12:33 AM PDT · by Méabh · 59 replies
    The British Library ^ | 01 April 2012 | The British Library
    A long-lost medieval cookbook, containing recipes for hedgehogs, blackbirds and even unicorns, has been discovered at the British Library. Professor Brian Trump of the British Medieval Cookbook Project described the find as near-miraculous. "We've been hunting for this book for years. The moment I first set my eyes on it was spine-tingling."
  • Archaeologist: Reign of Egyptian Pharaoh Thutmose II Suggests Crisis

    04/01/2012 8:50:39 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 38 replies
    HeritageDaily ^ | March 19, 2012 | Paleontological Research Corporation
    Harvard University educated archaeologist and president of the Paleontological Research Corporation, Dr. Joel Klenck, states an array of archaeological discoveries evidence a crisis during the reign of the Egyptian Pharaoh Thutmose II... in the Eighteenth Dynasty. An inscription by the succeeding Pharaoh Hatshepsut... in her Underground Temple at Speos Artemidos states that Egypt was "ruined" and "had gone to pieces" before the beginning of her reign. Hatshepsut's inscription also states that a population of "vagabonds" emerged from former Asiatic populations that once controlled northern Egypt and caused this ruination. Hatshepsut notes these vagabonds were responsible for "overthrowing that which had...
  • Ancient Foot Suggests How Man Gave Up Treehouses

    03/31/2012 11:33:41 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 39 replies
    LiveScience ^ | Wednesday, March 28, 2012 | Charles Choi
    Ancient foot bones from a recently discovered pre-human species, which had opposable big toes like a gorilla's, could shed light on how the ancestors of humanity came to walk upright, researchers say. Humans dominate the planet partly because walking upright frees their hands for tool use. Among the earliest known relatives of humanity to walk upright was Australopithecus afarensis, the species including the famed "Lucy." This hominin is a leading candidate for direct ancestor of the human lineage, living about 2.9 million to 3.8 million years ago in East Africa. Although Lucy and her kin were bipedal, there is debate...
  • Skye cave find western Europe's 'earliest string instrument'

    03/31/2012 10:44:01 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    BBC News ^ | Saturday, March 31, 2012 | unattributed
    Archaeologists believe they have uncovered the remains of the earliest stringed instrument to be found so far in western Europe. The small burnt and broken piece of carved piece of wood was found during an excavation in a cave on Skye. Archaeologists said it was likely to be part of the bridge of a lyre dating to more than 2,300 years ago. Music archaeologist Dr Graeme Lawson said the discovery marked a "step change" in music history... The remains, which were unveiled in Edinburgh, were found in High Pasture Cave, where Bronze and Iron Age finds have been made previously......
  • 1940 Census Records to be release April 2, 2012

    03/31/2012 3:24:19 AM PDT · by SMGFan · 10 replies ^ | April 2, 2012 | National Archives
    The 1940 census will be released online on April 2, 2012. Please bookmark this page: This is where you will be able to access the digitized census records starting on April 2. The digital images will be accessible free of charge at NARA facilities nationwide through our public access computers as well as on personal computers via the internet. Part 1: General Information FAQs about the 1940 Census 1940 Census Forms Questions Asked on the 1940 Census Selected List of Codes 1940 Census Lectures by NARA staff nationwide Part 2: How to Start Your 1940 Census Research
  • [From 1995] A Stone-Age Horse Still Roams a Tibetan Plateau

    03/30/2012 7:17:50 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 27 replies
    nyt ^ | November 12, 1995 | MARLISE SIMONS
    Deep in Tibet... the explorers came upon the first of the enigmatic creatures. They saw one, and then three of them grazing in the open forest. Soon, to their astonishment, a whole herd of the unusual horses appeared. "They looked completely archaic, like the horses in prehistoric cave paintings," said Michel Peissel, a French ethnologist and the expedition leader. "We thought it was just a freak, then we saw they were all alike." A team of French and British explorers, who have just returned here from a six-week expedition in Tibet, say they believe that they found an ancient breed...
  • Report from Former U.S. Marine Hints at Whereabouts of Long-Lost Peking Man Fossils

    03/29/2012 9:18:28 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Scientific American 'blogs ^ | March 22, 2012 | Kate Wong
    In the 1930s archaeologists working at the site of Zhoukoudian near Beijing recovered an incredible trove of partial skulls and other bones representing some 40 individuals that would eventually be assigned to the early human species Homo erectus. The bones, which recent estimates put at around 770,000 years old, constitute the largest collection of H. erectus fossils ever found. They were China's paleoanthropological pride and joy. And then they vanished. According to historical accounts, in 1941 the most important fossils in the collection were packed in large wooden footlockers or crates to be turned over to the U.S. military for...
  • From foraging to farming: the 10,000-year revolution

    03/29/2012 4:46:05 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | March 26, 2012 | U of Cambridge
    The moment when the hunter-gatherers laid down their spears and began farming around 11,000 years ago is often interpreted as one of the most rapid and significant transitions in human history -- the 'Neolithic Revolution'. By producing and storing food, Homo sapiens both mastered the natural world and took the first significant steps towards thousands of years of runaway technological development. The advent of specialist craftsmen, an increase in fertility and the construction of permanent architecture are just some of the profound changes that followed. Of course, the transition to agriculture was far from rapid. The period around 14,500 years...
  • Papua New Guineans Among World's First Farmers

    06/20/2003 8:09:05 AM PDT · by blam · 15 replies · 291+ views
    News In Science ^ | 6-20-2003
    Papua New Guineans among world's first farmers Friday, 20 June 2003 Papua New Guinea's highlands are one of the places where farming first began (Pic: ANU) Papua New Guinea's highlands was one of the cradles of farming, where some of the world's staple food plants were first domesticated, researchers have confirmed. The region now joins five others as a core area in which the agricultural revolution - the world's most dominant landuse - had its origins, report a team led by archaeologist Dr Tim Denham of Adelaide's Flinders University in today's issue of the journal Science. "Until recently, the evidence...