HOME/ABOUT  Prayer  SCOTUS  ProLife  BangList  Aliens  StatesRights  ConventionOfStates  WOT  HomosexualAgenda  GlobalWarming  Corruption  Taxes  Congress  Fraud  MediaBias  GovtAbuse  Tyranny  Obama  ObamaCare  Elections  Layoffs  NaturalBornCitizen  FastandFurious  OPSEC  Benghazi  Libya  IRS  Scandals  TalkRadio  TeaParty  FreeperBookClub  HTMLSandbox  FReeperEd  FReepathon  CopyrightList  Copyright/DMCA Notice  Donate

Dear FRiends, Your loyal support makes Free Republic possible and your continuing participation makes FR the number one grassroots pro-life conservative forum on the planet! If you have not yet made your donation, please click here and do so now. Thank you very much, Jim Robinson

Or by mail to: Free Republic, LLC - PO Box 9771 - Fresno, CA 93794
Free Republic 2nd Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $30,306
34%  
Woo hoo!! And the first 34% is in!! Thank you all very much!!

Keyword: godsgravesglyphs

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Will Liquid Mercury Show The Way To King's Tomb In Mysterious City Of Teotihuacan?

    04/25/2015 12:33:02 PM PDT · by Beowulf9 · 43 replies
    http://www.messagetoeagle.com ^ | 25 April, 2015 | unknown
    MessageToEagle.com - A Mexican archeologist hunting for a royal tomb in a deep, dark tunnel beneath a towering pre-Aztec pyramid has made a discovery that may have brought him a step closer: liquid mercury,' according to Reuters' report. In the bowels of Teotihuacan, a mysterious ancient city that was once the largest in the Americas, Sergio Gomez this month found "large quantities" of the silvery metal in a chamber at the end of a sacred tunnel sealed for nearly 1,800 years. "It's something that completely surprised us," Gomez said at the entrance to the tunnel below Teotihuacan's Pyramid of the...
  • Did Halley's Comet Convert the Irish to Christianity?

    04/25/2015 3:57:38 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Smithsonian (video) ^ | circa 2014 | unattributed
  • Tulane scientists say tiny 'pocket shark' reveals secrets in depths of Gulf of Mexico

    04/24/2015 6:12:53 PM PDT · by BBell · 24 replies
    NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune ^ | 4/24/15 | Benjamin Alexander-Bloch
    A rare, tiny "pocket shark" found about 190 miles off the Louisiana coast is only the second of its kind ever discovered, according to Tulane University and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration scientists. The fish was caught five years ago during a Gulf of Mexico research expedition, frozen and then sent to Tulane researchers in 2013. They ultimately identified the species and compiled a study that was published this week in Zootaxa, the international journal of taxonomy. The 5 ˝-inch male juvenile is unique because of the twin pockets next to its front fins. Those pockets are believed to...
  • 170-year-old champagne recovered from shipwreck still delicious, tasters say

    04/20/2015 7:38:06 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 35 replies
    sciencerecorder.com ^ | Delila James
    Biochemist Phillipe Jeandet.... who has analyzed the early 19-century bubbly, says there were surprising amounts of copper and iron in the wine. The copper most likely came from copper sulfate, which vintners used to kill mildew and fungus on growing grape vines, the report said. The nails used to hold the wooden storage barrels together probably account for the liquid’s high iron content, he said. Even after 170 years lying some 165 feet deep in the ancient sunken cargo vessel, the champagne corks had not deteriorated because, scientists say, there was liquid both inside and out. And, according to Andrew...
  • South Iceland Cave Made before Settlement

    04/20/2015 1:42:26 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Iceland Review ^ | April 17, 2015 | Eyglo Svala Arnarsdottir
    Archaeologist Kristján Ahronson has concluded that Kverkarhellir, a manmade cave between waterfall Seljalandsfoss and farm Seljaland in South Iceland, was partly created around 800 AD, before the settlement of Iceland, which, according to sources, began in 874... “Kverkahellir, along with Seljalandshellir, is remarkable as it is part of a number of cave sites in southern Iceland, manngerđir hellar [‘manmade caves’], that are marked by cross sculpture.” ... Ahronson would not state that theories that the crosses may have been made by papar, monks from the British Isles who were said to have lived in Iceland before the Norse settlers, may...
  • Columbus critics miss the boat

    10/07/2004 10:45:40 AM PDT · by aynrandy · 40 replies · 1,104+ views
    Denver Post ^ | October 07, 2004 | David Harsanyi
    Columbus Day is again upon us. A parade. Balloons. Cops. Violence. Recrimination. Pseudo-historical ranting. You know - fun for the kids. A few Native Americans and the usual suspects in the Coalition of Progressives Against All Western Culture will again attempt to intimidate local Italian-Americans as they celebrate the legacy of an important, if somewhat imprecise, explorer. Christopher Columbus is often compared to Adolf Hitler or Joseph Stalin. The Genoese explorer doesn't belong in any conversation that includes genocidal dictators. Quite the opposite. But Vernon Bellecourt, the principal spokesman for the American Indian Movement, has fought against Columbus Day for...
  • A New Theory On Mapping The New World

    10/08/2002 8:42:57 AM PDT · by blam · 30 replies · 523+ views
    Washington Post ^ | 10-7-2002 | Guy Gugliotta
    A New Theory on Mapping the New World By Guy Gugliotta Washington Post Staff Writer Monday, October 7, 2002; Page A07 In 1507, a group of scholars working in France produced an extraordinary map of the world, the first to put the still-recent discoveries of Columbus and others into a new continent separate from Asia, and to call that continent "America." With the Waldseemuller map, the New World was born. But there was something else. What would later come to be called South America and Central America were surprisingly well-shaped, not only on the east coast, where explorers had already...
  • Australians call for return of nation's 'birth certificate' from Britain

    01/25/2011 11:05:25 PM PST · by bruinbirdman · 10 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 1/25/2011 | Bonnie Malkin, Sydney
    Australians have started a campaign calling for Britain to hand over the first map ever to refer to the nation by the word "Australia", claiming that the document is country's "birth certificate". Captain Matthew Flinders Matthew Flinders, a British explorer and cartographer, drew the map in 1804 after becoming the first European to circumnavigate Australia. It was the first time a navigator used the name "Australia" to describe the continent, which had previously been referred to as New Holland or Terra Australis. Flinders, who hailed from Lincolnshire and spent several years charting the coast of Australia, wrote a book about...
  • MERKEL'S PACT WITH AMERICA: Germany Rediscovers the US as a Partner

    04/30/2007 11:50:45 AM PDT · by wolf78 · 17 replies · 1,043+ views
    SPIEGEL Online ^ | April 30, 2007 | Ralf Beste, Jan Fleischhauer, Georg Mascolo, Christian Reiermann, Matthias Schepp, Gabor Steingart
    German Chancellor Angela Merkel has reoriented Germany away from Russia and toward the United States. Expanded economic ties are just one area of renewed cooperation. But could Germany get burned like the British did? The gift brought by a guest says a lot about his or her intentions. The love-sick romantic shows up with a dozen red roses. A box of Cohiba cigars is the classic gift between men in the West. Purebred horses and trained falcons, on the other hand, are the gift of choice among men in the Arab world. When German chancellors travel, their hosts usually receive...
  • America put on the map; First document to name country makes its debut

    07/24/2003 8:12:50 AM PDT · by Ed Straker · 5 replies · 129+ views
    Greeley Tribune ^ | July 24, 2003 | Associated Press
    Article Published July 24, 2003 America put on the map First document to name country makes its debut Story by Associated Press WASHINGTON — The earliest map using "America" to label part of the New World is going on display in America for the first time. The 496-year-old Martin Waldseemueller map, sometimes called America's birth certificate, will be on public view at the Library of Congress starting today. The library recently completed the $10 million purchase of the 12-panel map covering 36 square feet, the most expensive single item it has ever acquired. It was owned by Prince Johannes Waldburg-Wolfegg,...
  • The Oldest Map With The Word 'America' On It Was Just Found Between Two Geometry Books

    07/03/2012 6:23:06 PM PDT · by blam · 19 replies
    The Oldest Map With The Word 'America' On It Was Just Found Between Two Geometry Books The Daily Telegraph Jul. 3, 2012, 7:44 PM A version of a 500-year-old world map that was the first to mention the name "America" has been discovered in a German university library. Experts did not even know about the existence of a fifth copy of the map by German cartographer Martin Waldseemueller until it showed up a few days ago, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich said. The discovery is much smaller and thought to have been made after the 1507 original version, which Germany...
  • Well! Who did name the place?

    05/24/2003 6:27:48 AM PDT · by scouse · 8 replies · 225+ views
    BBC History page ^ | 5/24 | Macdonald
    There are two key characters in this story, John Cabot, a sailor, and Richard Amerike, a Bristol business man. Unfortunately, neither left much of themselves for us to see or read: no portrait, nothing in their own writing, no detailed contemporary record of themselves or their work. There is, however, enough recorded to know that they both achieved things of lasting importance; one very directly, the other less obviously but in its way even more portentous: Cabot awakened the world to the existence of the North American continent, and Amerike gave his name and badge to what, in time, was...
  • How America Got Its Name (not who you think!)

    10/10/2002 6:20:44 AM PDT · by Tancred · 10 replies · 849+ views
    The Natal Witness ^ | October 10, 2002 | Leslie Walford
    There isn't a Man in the Moon, pigeons won't stand still if you put a pinch of salt on their tails and Christopher Columbus didn't discover America. How many childhood certainties have proved false over the years?. Now Peter Macdonald, writing for the BBC, has claimed that America was named not after a Florentine navigator called Amerigo Vespucci but after an Anglicised Welshman called Richard Amerike. Although North America was visited by Leif Ericsson, or "Leif the Lucky", nearly 1 000 years before the birth of Christ, Europeans were generally unaware of its existence until the Genoese Giovanni Caboto, who...
  • Something to declare: America named after Welsh Customs man

    04/28/2002 8:37:13 PM PDT · by aculeus · 15 replies · 8+ views
    The Observer [UK] ^ | Sunday April 28, 2002 | Amelia Hill
    America was named after a British Customs officer and not, as historians have long believed, the Italian explorer Amerigo Vespucci, who participated in Christopher Columbus's voyages to the New World. Martin Waldseemuller, whose 1507 map of the world was the first to show the so-called Unknown Territory as a separate continent, has long been credited with naming the new land after the Florentine nobleman. But according to a new book by Rodney Broome - Amerike, The Briton Who Gave America its Name - the country was named in 1496, years before Vespucci's voyage, by John Cabot - the Bristol-based explorer...
  • Palaeolithic remains show cannibalistic habits of human ancestors

    04/19/2015 4:41:17 AM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 34 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | April 16, 2015 | Natural History Museum
    Analysis of ancient cadavers recovered at a famous archaeological site confirm the existence of a sophisticated culture of butchering and carving human remains, according to a team of scientists from the Natural History Museum, University College London, and a number of Spanish universities.
  • French frigate to recreate Lafayette's voyage to US

    04/19/2015 4:16:16 AM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 23 replies
    France 24 ^ | 2015-04-18 | Video by FRANCE 3; Text by NEWS WIRES
    A replica of the French navy frigate Hermione that brought General Lafayette to America to rally rebels fighting Britain in the US war of independence, will set sail for the United States again on Saturday, 235 years after the original crossing.
  • Volcano responsible for one of the worst eruptions in last 2000 years set to explode again

    04/18/2015 10:12:44 PM PDT · by concernedcitizen76 · 40 replies
    The Weather Network ^ | April 15, 2015 | Rodrigo Cokting
    / Mount Baekdu is set to explode according to experts and if that isn't shocking enough, keep in mind that Baekdu is responsible for one of the worst eruptions in the last 2,000 years. Professor Yoon Seong-hyo from Pusan National University urged officials to keep a close eye on the highest peak of the Korean peninsula. Baekdu is an active volcano located on the border between North Korea and China. The caldera or cauldron of the Baekdu volcano, which is sometimes called Paektu or Changbai, has risen a centimetre since July, according to new research. "The mountains's height has risen...
  • Evidence of Pre-Columbus Trade Found in Alaska House

    04/17/2015 5:39:17 PM PDT · by Rebelbase · 61 replies
    Live Science ^ | April 16, 2015 | Owen Jarus
    Archaeologists working at the Rising Whale site at Cape Espenberg, Alaska, have discovered several artifacts that were imported from East Asia. Bronze artifacts discovered in a 1,000-year-old house in Alaska suggest trade was occurring between East Asia and the New World centuries before the voyages of Columbus.
  • Sixth extinction, rivaling that of the dinosaurs, should join the big five, scientists say

    04/16/2015 10:10:24 PM PDT · by Utilizer · 25 replies
    American Association for the Advancement of Science ^ | 16 April 2015 5:15 pm | Eric Hand
    Earth has seen its share of catastrophes, the worst being the “big five” mass extinctions scientists traditionally talk about. Now, paleontologists are arguing that a sixth extinction, 260 million years ago, at the end of a geological age called the Capitanian, deserves to be a member of the exclusive club. In a new study, they offer evidence for a massive die-off in shallow, cool waters in what is now Norway. That finding, combined with previous evidence of extinctions in tropical waters, means that the Capitanian was a global catastrophe. “It’s the first time we can say this is a true...
  • World's Oldest Stone Tools Found, Predate Homo Genus By 500,000 Years

    04/16/2015 12:03:51 PM PDT · by Fractal Trader · 30 replies
    io9 ^ | 15 April 2015 | Robbie Gonzalez
    Researchers working in Kenya's archaeologically prolific Lake Turkana region claim to have uncovered a set of 3.3-million-year-old stone tools. That's 700,000 years older than the previous record, and predates evidence for the evolutionary origins of the genus Homo by half a million years. Above: A satellite image of Lake Turkana, where the stone tools – and many other artifacts and fossils of human ancestors – have been recovered NPR's Chris Joyce reports on the findings of Stony Brook University archaeologist Sonia Harmand and her colleagues, which were announced Tuesday at the annual meeting of the Paleoanthropology Society in San Francisco:...
  • Islamist Turkish President Erdogan Says A 'Mastermind' Is Plotting Against Turkey...

    04/14/2015 4:47:03 PM PDT · by markomalley · 24 replies
    Memri ^ | 4/14/15
    Since October 2014, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has regularly referred to the concept of a "Mastermind" (ust akil, "supra-intellect," in Turkish) that, he says, is plotting against Turkey. This concept has been applauded by the Islamist pro-AKP media. Erdogan's December 12, 2014 speech, which focused on this "mastermind" concept, inspired the production of a two-hour "documentary" by one of the leading Turkish television channels, the pro-AKP A Haber. The film, titled "The Mastermind," first aired on March 15, 2015 and has been broadcast repeatedly since then; in addition, the Turkish Islamist pro-AKP media are circulating the film on their...
  • Record dive rescues $50m wartime silver from ocean floor

    04/15/2015 7:38:36 PM PDT · by Citizen Zed · 26 replies
    bbc ^ | 4-15-2015
    The SS City of Cairo was torpedoed 772km south of St Helena by a German U-boat and sank to 5,150m. The 100 tonnes of coins, recovered in the deepest salvage operation in history, belonged to HM Treasury. The silver rupees had been called in by London to help fund the war effort. But they never made it. The steamship's tall plume of smoke was spotted by a U-boat on 6 November 1942 and it was torpedoed. Ten minutes later, amid efforts to abandon ship, the City of Cairo was hit with a second torpedo which sealed its fate. The ship...
  • Centuries of Italian History Are Unearthed in Quest to Fix Toilet

    04/14/2015 5:54:37 PM PDT · by yuffy · 22 replies
    nytimes ^ | APRIL 14, 2015 | By JIM YARDLEY
    LECCE, Italy — All Luciano Faggiano wanted when he purchased the seemingly unremarkable building at 56 Via Ascanio Grandi was to open a trattoria. He could run the trattoria on the ground floor and live upstairs with his wife and youngest son. The only problem was the toilet. Sewage kept backing up. So Mr. Faggiano enlisted his two older sons to help him dig a trench and investigate the underground sewage pipe. He predicted the job would take about a week, and soon after he would open his trattoria. If only. “We found underground corridors and other rooms, so we...
  • Man says photo at center of Civil War mystery is a 30-year-old hoax he did as a teen

    04/13/2015 11:02:03 AM PDT · by dware · 43 replies
    Fox News ^ | 04.13.2015 | Fox News
    A photograph that has posed a Civil War mystery, puzzling historians for three decades, appears to be a long-surviving hoax. The mysterious photograph of what appeared to be a far older photo — showing a figure in a coat and hat and the blurred image of a warship — surfaced in 1986. Some historians believed it might be a photo of the CSS Georgia, a Confederate ironclad that sank 150 years ago in Georgia as Union troops captured Savannah.
  • Free Kindle Downloads of the Official Biography of Winston Churchill (8 volumes)

    04/10/2015 9:22:02 PM PDT · by Auntie Mame · 54 replies
    Hillsdale College/Amazon ^ | Winston Churchill
    Winston Churchill Day Share By Hillsdale College Apr 8, 2015 5:57:00 PM As the publisher of the Official Biography of Winston Churchill, Hillsdale College plans to host a celebration on April 9 in honor of national Winston Churchill Day!To mark the anniversary of Churchill's honorary US citizenship, Hillsdale College and RosettaBooks are offering free Kindle downloads of all 8 volumes of the official biography on April 9-11 – An $80 value, absolutely free!Download your free copies here:  Youth, 1874–1900 (Volume I)Young Statesman, 1901–1914 (Volume II)The Challenge of War, 1914–1916 (Volume III)World in Torment, 1916–1922 (Volume IV)The Prophet of Truth, 1922–1939...
  • Isil video shows destruction of 3,000-year-old Assyrian city of Nimrud

    04/12/2015 8:00:22 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 25 replies
    Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant has released a video showing jihadists smashing, bulldozing and blowing up 3,000-year-old artefacts in the ancient Assyrian capital of Nimrud. The video depicting the destruction at the Iraqi site shows jihadists using sledgehammers and drills to smash huge alabaster reliefs and a bulldozer to bring down walls. The jihadists are then shown placing barrels apparently filled with explosives before blowing up three separate areas of the site, one of Iraq's greatest archaeological treasures.
  • UCD archaeologists seek to recreate the world of our ancestors

    04/11/2015 9:05:16 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 19 replies
    The Irish Times ^ | April 11, 2015 | Ronan McGreevy
    Centre for Experimental Archaeology on Belfield campus is only one of its kind in the world.Brendan O’Neill at work on his early medieval round house on the UCD campus. How did our ancestors create the world they lived in? How did they survive without the modern accoutrements that make our lives easy? The question is at the heart of archaeology and forms the basis of a unique project in a quiet corner of University College Dublin’s sprawling Belfield campus. UCD is the only university in the world with a centre for experimental archaeology. It is not made of bricks and...
  • A New History of the Crusades Obama Should Read

    04/10/2015 1:07:36 PM PDT · by Biggirl · 22 replies
    Crisis Magazine ^ | April 10, 2015 | Stephanie Pacheco
    Steve Weidenkopf, lecturer at Christendom College’s graduate program, has written a readable, story-like book that provides a blow-by-blow account of the Crusades that simultaneously counters many of the myths that have sprung up around them.
  • The Black Pharaoh in Denmark

    04/10/2015 9:57:00 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Friday, April 10, 2015 | editors
    It has been said that the period between 760 BCE to 656 BCE in Egypt was the 'age of the black pharaohs'. It was during this time that ancient Egypt was ruled by a dynasty or succession of kings from Nubia, the Kingdom of Kush, a rival African kingdom just to its south in what is today northern Sudan. Beginning with king Kashta's successful invasion of Upper Egypt, what became known as the 25th Dynasty achieved the reunification of Lower Egypt, Upper Egypt, and also Kush (Nubia), the largest Egyptian empire since the New Kingdom. They introduced new Kushite cultural...
  • Warwick Castle cannonball show sets fire to medieval boathouse (Ooops)

    04/10/2015 1:54:31 PM PDT · by NRx · 42 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 04-10-2015 | Nicola Harley
    Hundreds of tourists have been evacuated from Warwick Castle after a burning cannonball fired from the world's largest working siege machine destroyed a medieval boathouse by fire.
  • Hawaii museum set to unveil artifacts lost in shipwreck 191 years ago

    04/09/2015 9:58:56 AM PDT · by dware · 15 replies
    Fox News ^ | 04.09.2015 | Fox News
    A Hawaii museum is getting ready to open an exhibit of artifacts from the shipwreck of a royal yacht that sank off the coast of Kauai 191 years ago. Hawaii shipwreck chaser Richard Rogers has worked with scientists from the Smithsonian Institution to dredge up the treasures from the ship owned by King Kamehameha II, the second king of Hawaii.
  • Russian Hunters Discover 10,000-year-old Frozen Woolly Rhino in River

    04/09/2015 10:06:56 AM PDT · by Utilizer · 41 replies
    OutdoorHub ^ | 2/27/15 | Daniel Xu
    Paleontologists are calling a recent find in the Russian region of Yakutia a “sensation.” Last September, Aleksandr Banderov and his hunting party were traveling near the Semyulyakh River when they uncovered the preserved carcass of an adolescent wholly rhinoceros, a species that roamed the frozen landscapes of Europe and northern Asia during the last Ice Age. The hunters initially thought it was a reindeer frozen in the ice, but quickly realized it was something much older. “We were sailing past a ravine and noticed hair hanging on the top of it,’ Alexander told The Siberian Times. “At first we thought...
  • Civil War: 150th Anniversary of Lee Surrender at Appomattox

    04/09/2015 10:03:31 AM PDT · by Leaning Right · 39 replies
    US News and World Report ^ | APRIL 9, 2015 | STEVE SZKOTAK
    The surrender of Confederate Robert E. Lee to Union Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant 150 years ago Thursday was the definitive milestone of the end of the Civil War.
  • Bells to ring marking end of Civil War

    04/09/2015 9:55:17 AM PDT · by smokingfrog · 35 replies
    News Advance ^ | 4-8-15 | staff report
    Bells will ring across the country and in Lynchburg on Thursday to mark the 150th anniversary of Gen. Robert E. Lee’s surrender to Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Appomattox, the symbolic end of four years of bloodshed. A historic bell will be rung at Appomattox Court House National Historical Park at 3 p.m., the time the surrender occurred. People at historic sites, schools, parks, government buildings and within communities throughout Lynchburg and the country will join in at 3:15 p.m., ringing bells for four continuous minutes, representing the four years of fighting.
  • John Switzer commentary: Serpent Mound continues to confound

    04/08/2015 10:00:16 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Columbus Dispatch ^ | Sunday April 5, 2015 | John Switzer
    There’s something new about the very old Great Serpent Mound, the earthen snake effigy that stretches a quarter of a mile along the terrain in Adams County in southern Ohio... What is new about Serpent Mound is that it might be far more ancient than currently thought. Some archaeologists have recently discovered evidence that it was constructed around 300 B.C. by the Adena culture. That contrasts with the prevailing school of thought that it is about 920 years old and was built by the Fort Ancient culture... For instance, the massive head of the snake effigy points to where the...
  • Brontosaurus Finally Validated as a Distinct Dinosaur

    04/08/2015 4:11:18 AM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 18 replies
    ABC News ^ | Apr 7, 2015, 10:43 AM ET | ALYSSA NEWCOMB
    On the edge of the solar system, the dwarf planet Pluto, which knows what it feels like to be banished from an exclusive club, may be cheering for the brontosaurus. While the long-necked dinosaur's name may be known by legions of fans and even made it on to a postage stamp in the 1980s, most paleontologists would be quick to correct people that the brontosaurus is not a dinosaur. But the iconic dinosaur name may finally be reinstated more than a century after researchers found the long-necked brontosaurus and apatosaurus likely belonged to the same genus, according to an analysis...
  • Ghostly Faces and Invisible Verse Found in Medieval Text

    04/07/2015 7:04:57 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 14 replies
    Live Science ^ | Jeanna Bryner,
    "The Black Book of Carmarthen," dating to 1250, contains texts from the ninth through 12th centuries, including some of the earliest references to Arthur and Merlin. "It's easy to think we know all we can know about a manuscript like the 'Black Book,' but to see these ghosts from the past brought back to life in front of our eyes has been incredibly exciting," Myriah Williams, a doctoral student at the University of Cambridge, said in a statement. "The drawings and verse that we're in the process of recovering demonstrate the value of giving these books another look." ... "The...
  • Archeologists Detect Ancient Pyramid Buried in Bolivia

    04/06/2015 11:01:12 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 39 replies
    Costa Rican Star ^ | 03-27-2015 | Staff
    La Paz, Mar 27 (EFE).- The government of Bolivia announced it will start exploratory excavations this year at the ancient fortress of Tiahuanaco after a buried pyramid was detected. Ludwing Cayo, director of the Tiahuanaco Archeological Research Center, told Efe that the formation is located in the area of Kantatallita, east of the Akapana pyramid. In a presentation for the media, Cayo outlined a five-year for further research at Tiahuanaco, an archaeological site 71 kilometers (44 miles) west of La Paz that was the cradle of an ancient civilization predating the Incas. Excavations may start in May or June, depending...
  • Ice age polarity reversal was global event:

    04/06/2015 5:26:46 AM PDT · by ckilmer · 52 replies
    scienceheathen.com ^ | October 16, 2012 | Helmholtz Centre Potsdam - GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences
    Ice Age Magnetic Reversal Was Global Event And Linked With Super Volcano Eruption And Rapid Climate Variability, Says New Research October 17, 2012 in Geology & Climate During the last ice age, around 41,000 years ago, there was a very rapid and complete reversal of the Earth’s geomagnetic field, according to new research. There was already localized evidence of polarity reversals during this time, but with the new research, the theory that it was a global event is now strongly supported. And very interestingly, it is one that nearly coincided with the very fast, short-term climate variability of the last...
  • Research findings back up Aboriginal legend on origin of Central Australian palm trees

    04/06/2015 10:26:08 AM PDT · by Theoria · 13 replies
    ABC ^ | 03 April 2015 | ABC
    The scientific world is stunned by research which backs an Aboriginal legend about how palm trees got to Central Australia. Several years ago Tasmanian ecologist David Bowman did DNA tests on palm seeds from the outback and near Darwin. The results led him to conclude the seeds were carried to the Central Desert by humans up to 30,000 years ago. Professor Bowman read an Aboriginal legend recorded in 1894 by pioneering German anthropologist and missionary Carl Strehlow, which was only recently translated, describing the "gods from the north" bringing the seeds to Palm Valley. Professor Bowman said he was amazed....
  • The First President Of the United States Was A Black Man (John Hanson)

    01/22/2007 2:38:46 PM PST · by mcg2000 · 70 replies · 114,327+ views
    The TMB ^ | January 2007 | Thaddeus Matthews
    Let me start black history month a few weeks early. Barack Obama has plans of running for President of the United States, But will he be the first Black President or the 8th Black President? I know this posting will stir controversty but George Washington was not the first President of the U.S. Let's take a look at history. A "Black" Man, A Moor, John Hanson Was the First President of the United States! 1781-1782 A.D.??? George Washington was really the 8th President of the United States! George Washington was not the first President of the United States. In fact,...
  • Presidents of the United States (POTUS)

    04/04/2015 3:42:30 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    ipl2 ^ | April 04, 2015 | unatt
    On this day, in POTUS history, In 1841, William H. Harrison died.
  • A Pre-Columbian population was poisoned

    04/04/2015 6:22:45 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Friday, April 03, 2015 | unattributed
    Much of a Pre-Columbian population in ancient Chile was poisoned by arsenic, say researchers. According to a recent study conducted by Jaime Swift of the Australian National University and colleagues from several other institutions in Australia and Chile, a significant part of a pre-Columbian population in northern Chile suffered from slow poisoning due to the intake of arsenic from water sources. The researchers performed plasma mass spectrometry trace element analysis of human bone and tooth samples from 21 burials excavated at the site of Caleta Vitor on the Pacific coast of northern Chile, a part of the ultra-dry Atacama Desert...
  • Altamura Man yields oldest Neanderthal DNA sample

    04/04/2015 6:12:41 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | Friday, April 03, 2015 | Bob Yirka
    A team of researchers working in Italy has confirmed that Altamura Man was a Neanderthal and dating of pieces of calcite which were on the remains has revealed that the bones are 128,000 to 187,000 years old. In their paper published in the Journal of Human Evolution, the team describes how they extracted a small bone sample and examined it and what they found by doing so. Altamura Man was discovered in a cave in southern Italy in 1993 by cave explorers. The finding was reported to researchers at the University of Bari. The remains were embedded in rock and...
  • DNA can't explain all inherited biological traits, research shows

    04/03/2015 11:57:35 AM PDT · by Citizen Zed · 14 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 4-2-2015 | University of Edinburgh
    Characteristics passed between generations are not decided solely by DNA, but can be brought about by other material in cells, new research shows. Scientists studied proteins found in cells, known as histones, which are not part of the genetic code, but act as spools around which DNA is wound. Histones are known to control whether or not genes are switched on. Researchers found that naturally occurring changes to these proteins, which affect how they control genes, can be sustained from one generation to the next and so influence which traits are passed on. The finding demonstrates for the first time...
  • Fact or Fiction?: Dark Matter Killed the Dinosaurs

    04/02/2015 10:15:04 PM PDT · by grundle · 58 replies
    Scientific American ^ | March 25, 2015 | Lee Billings
    A new out-of-this-world theory links mass extinctions with exotic astrophysics and galactic architecture Every once in a great while, something almost unspeakable happens to Earth. Some terrible force reaches out and tears the tree of life limb from limb. In a geological instant, countless creatures perish and entire lineages simply cease to exist. The most famous of these mass extinctions happened about 66 million years ago, when the dinosaurs died out in the planet-wide environmental disruption that followed a mountain-sized space rock walloping Earth. We can still see the scar from the impact today as a nearly 200-kilometer-wide crater in...
  • What would Jesus drink? Experts guess what wine was like in ancient times and what modern ones ...

    04/02/2015 2:21:42 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 172 replies
    Orange County Register ^ | April 2, 2015 | Anne Valdespino
    Full title: What would Jesus drink? Experts guess what wine was like in ancient times and what modern ones are similar Christ was a vintner. And if you heed the Scriptures, quite a good one, according to the maitre d' at the wedding in Cana. "... the headwaiter called the bridegroom and said to him, 'Everyone serves good wine first, and then when people have drunk freely, an inferior one; but you have kept the good wine until now.'" (John 2:9-10). In ancient times, wine was precious and revered, mentioned more than 140 times in the Bible. As Easter and...
  • New instrument dates old skeleton—'Little Foot' 3.67 million years old

    04/01/2015 1:25:58 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 24 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 04-01-2015 | Provided by Purdue University
    A skeleton named Little Foot is among the oldest hominid skeletons ever dated at 3.67 million years old, according to an advanced dating method. Little Foot is a rare, nearly complete skeleton of Australopithecus first discovered 21 years ago in a cave at Sterkfontein, in central South Africa. The new date places Little Foot as an older relative of Lucy, a famous Australopithecus skeleton dated at 3.2 million years old that was found in Ethiopia. It is thought that Australopithecus is an evolutionary ancestor to humans that lived between 2 million and 4 million years ago. Stone tools found at...
  • Thousand-year-old Anglo-Saxon recipe kills MRSA superbug

    03/31/2015 5:42:06 PM PDT · by MinorityRepublican · 50 replies
    CNN ^ | March 31st, 2015 | Nick Thompson and Laura Smith-Spark
    It might sound like a really old wives' tale, but a thousand-year-old Anglo-Saxon potion for eye infections may hold the key to wiping out the modern-day superbug MRSA, according to new research. The 10th-century "eyesalve" remedy was discovered at the British Library in a leather-bound volume of Bald's Leechbook, widely considered to be one of the earliest known medical textbooks. Christina Lee, an expert on Anglo-Saxon society from the School of English at the University of Nottingham, translated the ancient manuscript despite some ambiguities in the text. "We chose this recipe in Bald's Leechbook because it contains ingredients such as...
  • Medieval parasite-filled poop found in Jerusalem latrine

    03/30/2015 5:52:59 PM PDT · by SJackson · 31 replies
    Fox News ^ | 3-30-15 | Laura Geggel
    The excavation of a roughly 500-year-old latrine in Jerusalem has uncovered thousands of eggs from human parasites, including some that may have come from Northern Europe, a new study finds. The people who used the latrine may have been long-distance traders or on a pilgrimage, likely from Northern Europe, where these parasites were common, the researchers said. "While we will never know for sure why they made this journey, pilgrims and traders would be a plausible explanation," said the study's senior researcher, Piers Mitchell, a lecturer of biological anthropology at the University of Cambridge in England. [See Images of the...