Free Republic 4th Quarter Fundraising Target: $85,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $72,152
84%  
Woo hoo!! And now less than $12.9k to go!! We can do this. Thank you all very much!!

Keyword: godsgravesglyphs

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • "Great Surprise"—Native Americans Have West Eurasian Origins

    11/27/2014 11:09:18 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 40 replies
    nationalgeograph ^ | November 20, 2013 | By Brian Handwerk
    Nearly one-third of Native American genes come from west Eurasian people linked to the Middle East and Europe, rather than entirely from East Asians as previously thought, according to a newly sequenced genome. Based on the arm bone of a 24,000-year-old Siberian youth, the research could uncover new origins for America's indigenous peoples, as well as stir up fresh debate on Native American identities, experts say. The study authors believe the new study could also help resolve some long-standing puzzles on the peopling of the New World, which include genetic oddities and archaeological inconsistencies
  • Mysterious Roman God Baffles Experts

    11/26/2014 10:07:06 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 47 replies
    livescience.com ^ | | November 25, 2014 10:05am ET | Tia Ghose, Staff Writer
    sculpture of a mysterious, never-before-seen Roman deity has been unearthed in an ancient temple in Turkey. The 1st century B.C. relief, of an enigmatic bearded god rising up out of a flower or plant, was discovered at the site of a Roman temple near the Syrian border. The ancient relief was discovered in a supporting wall of a medieval Christian monastery. "It's clearly a god, but at the moment it's difficult to say who exactly it is," said Michael Blömer, an archaeologist at the University of Muenster in Germany, who is excavating the site. "There are some elements reminiscent of...
  • Tourist fined €20,000 for carving initial on Rome’s Colosseum

    11/25/2014 2:22:58 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 20 replies
    theguardian.com ^ | Sunday 23 November 2014 14.47 EST | Rosie Scammell in Rome
    In the latest episode of tourists behaving badly in Rome, a Russian has been fined €20,000 (Ł15,800) for carving his initial into the Colosseum. The 42-year-old tourist used a stone to carve a 25cm “K” into a wall inside the ancient amphitheatre. He was caught in the act by a guard and arrested by police, before being fined and given a four-month suspended prison sentence. The director of the Colosseum, Rossella Rea, said the €20,000 fine was justified as the visitor had damaged “a magnificent and symbolic monument”. “You cannot write on a historic wall, it’s absolutely forbidden,” she said....
  • Global Cooling versus Global Warming: Cold is more deadly than heat.

    10/23/2013 7:15:36 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 14 replies
    American Thinker ^ | 10/23/2013 | Jerold Levoritz
    It is well-established science that the cooling of the earth has been in the past and would be in the future more disruptive to human existence than atmospheric warming. If we are quite quiet, we may yet hear the sound of extreme irony laughing its head off at our efforts to lower carbon dioxide emissions and, thus, initiating or strengthening cooler weather conditions that would bring massive hunger and movements of populations, precisely the opposite condition wished for by the anthropogenic global warming crowd. However, no one may be able to spend their waking hours smirking if it turns out...
  • Global warming: What comes around goes around

    11/23/2008 12:30:43 PM PST · by kathsua · 18 replies · 806+ views
    The Hutchinson News ^ | 11/23/08 | Vance Ehmke
    Here's another way of looking at things: Global warming is good. And if there's any bad news at all about global warming, it's that it might be about over. The debate about global warming will go on forever. But while we may spend the rest of eternity trying to figure out where our weather is headed, one of the best ways of finding out where we're going is to simply look at where we came from. Some years ago I stumbled onto Charles Perry, with the U.S. Geological Survey in Lawrence, when I was trying to track down some information...
  • Climate Change Not a Cause of Bronze Age Collapse

    11/25/2014 5:49:56 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Monday, November 17, 2014 | University of Bradford press release
    "Our evidence shows definitively that the population decline in this period cannot have been caused by climate change," says Ian Armit, Professor of Archaeology at the University of Bradford, and lead author of the study. Graeme Swindles, Associate Professor of Earth System Dynamics at the University of Leeds, added, "We found clear evidence for a rapid change in climate to much wetter conditions, which we were able to precisely pinpoint to 750BC using statistical methods." According to Professor Armit, social and economic stress is more likely to be the cause of the sudden and widespread fall in numbers. Communities producing...
  • Turkish & Italian Archaeologists Dig at Karkemish

    11/24/2014 4:02:47 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | Monday, November 17, 2014 | unattributed
    Nicolo Marchetti of the University of Bologna is project director of the excavation at Karkemish, a 5,000-year-old city located along the Turkey-Syria border. About one-third of the site lies inside Syria and is off-limits. The site is also very close to Jarablous, a Syrian city that is now ISIS-controlled territory. “Still, we have had no problem at all.…We work in a military area. It is very well protected,” Marchetti told the Associated Press. This year his team has recovered sculptures from the palace of King Katuwa that date to 900 B.C., and a 700 B.C. mosaic floor in the palace...
  • Details of the so-called Arthur Stone Discovery at Tintagel

    11/24/2014 3:56:15 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Britannia.com ^ | 1990s | David Nash Ford
    A small piece of slate was discovered during excavations on Tintagel Island inscribed with the name "Artognov". Is this the first real proof of King Arthur's existence? Was he really born at Tintagel as legend insists? On 6th August 1998, English Heritage revealed that during the last week of digging on the Eastern terraces of Tintagel Island, a broken piece of Cornish slate (8" by 14") was discovered bearing the name "Artognov". It was excavated on July 4th, by Kevin Brady, an archaeologist working with a team from Glasgow University. "As the stone came out, when I saw the letters...
  • Could rare sword have belonged to Ivan the Terrible?

    11/24/2014 3:37:22 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Siberian Times ^ | 21 November 2014 | Anna Liesowska and Derek Lambie
    Intrigue over how German-made 12th century blade, adorned in Sweden, reached Siberia... An exciting new theory has now emerged that it could have belonged to Tsar Ivan the Terrible, and came from the royal armoury as a gift at the time of the conquest of Siberia. The hypothesis, twinning an infamous Russian ruler and a revered battle hero, could turn it into one of the most interesting archaeological finds in Siberian history, though for now much remains uncertain. What Siberian experts are sure about is that the beautifully engraved weapon was originally made in central Europe, and most likely in...
  • Incredible skeletal remains of 'Catholic saints' dug up, still dripping in gems and jewellery

    09/06/2013 7:15:37 AM PDT · by Alex Murphy · 504 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 6 September 2013 | Daily Mail Reporter
    A relic hunter dubbed 'Indiana Bones' has lifted the lid on a macabre collection of 400-year-old jewel-encrusted skeletons unearthed in churches across Europe. Art historian Paul Koudounaris hunted down and photographed dozens of gruesome skeletons in some of the world's most secretive religious establishments. Incredibly, some of the skeletons, said to be the remains of early Christian martyrs, were even found hidden away in lock-ups and containers. They are now the subject of a new book, which sheds light on the forgotten ornamented relics for the first time. Thousands of skeletons were dug up from Roman catacombs in the 16th...
  • Second Temple Era Military Outpost Discovered, Possibly Destroyed By Alexander the Great

    11/24/2014 9:35:06 AM PST · by SJackson · 6 replies
    Jewish Press ^ | November 23rd, 2014 | Tzvi Zucker
    Archaeological excavations in Netiv Haasarah have uncovered a Persian era military installation. Netiv Haasarah is a town in the "Gaza envelope" with a population of about 700. The dig, being headed by Dr. Yael Abadi Rice, found a fortified town and a military tower, from approximately 2,100 years ago. This time period was when the Second Temple was standing in Jerusalem. "It seems this was a military outpost", Dr. Rice told Tazpit News Agency. "Besides for the army stationed there, people were sent there to work the area on the road from Ashkelon to Gaza." The outpost had the military...
  • Stanford archaeologist leads the first detailed study of human remains at... Deir el-Medina

    11/23/2014 3:17:22 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Stanford Report ^ | November 17, 2014 | Barbara Wilcox
    In many bodies Austin saw evidence of stress from the hard climb – today it's a thousand stone steps – from Deir el-Medina to the Valley of the Kings and back again. As Austin found, incidence of arthritis in the knees and ankles of the men at Deir el-Medina was significantly higher than for working populations from other Egyptian cemeteries. The bones also revealed clues that corroborate other scholars' findings that severely disabled Egyptians were well cared for. "I found the remains of a man who died at the age of 19 or 20 and was born without a useful...
  • Thousands of ancient artifacts uncovered at awesome Mexican temple

    11/23/2014 2:24:32 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 47 replies
    Houston Chronicle ^ | November 5, 2014 | Heather Alexander
    Mexican archaeologists exploring one of the country's most spectacular ancient temples have uncovered a stash of thousands of artifacts that are estimated to date back as far as 200 A.D. The Temple of the Feathered Serpent sits on the outskirts of Mexico City. The new Lazgo Hal Tladocan project to explore tunnels beneath it is one of the most important archaeological investigations Mexico has ever seen. Sculptures carved in stone, ornamented with pre-Columbian jewelry and elaborate jade and greenstone were found. Unique objects made of amber and thousands of wooden artifacts were also uncovered, hidden along with remains of animals,...
  • The Gettysburg Address

    11/23/2014 1:51:47 PM PST · by aMorePerfectUnion · 51 replies
    Archives ^ | November 19,1863 | Abraham Lincoln
    The Gettysburg Address November 19, 1863 Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether...
  • Erdogan: Muslims Discovered America

    11/15/2014 2:30:53 PM PST · by Eleutheria5 · 105 replies
    Arutz Sheva ^ | 15/11/14 | Gil Ronen
    Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said Saturday that the Americas were discovered by Muslims in the 12th century, nearly three centuries before Genoese explorer Christopher Columbus claimed the discovery in the name of Spain. "Contacts between Latin America and Islam date back to the 12th century. Muslims discovered America in 1178, not Christopher Columbus," the president said in a televised speech during an Istanbul summit of Muslim leaders from Latin America. "Muslim sailors arrived in America from 1178. Columbus mentioned the existence of a mosque on a hill on the Cuban coast," Erdogan said. Erdogan said that Ankara was even...
  • Turkey's Erdogan: Muslims discovered Americas

    11/17/2014 12:41:00 AM PST · by WhiskeyX · 29 replies
    Fox News ^ | November 16, 2014 | Associated Press (AP)
    ISTANBUL – Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is claiming that Muslim sailors reached the Americas more than 300 years before explorer Christopher Columbus. Speaking Saturday at a gathering of Muslim leaders from Latin America, Erdogan said that contact between Islam and Latin America dates to the 12th century. "It is alleged that the American continent was discovered by Columbus in 1492," Erdogan said. "In fact, Muslim sailors reached the American continent 314 years before Columbus, in 1178."
  • NATO ally's president: Muslims discovered America

    Some historians and political observers were surprised over the weekend when Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, chief of America’s NATO ally, said Muslims discovered the Americas more than 300 years before Christopher Columbus. But the Islamic leader was doing nothing more than stating publicly what Islamic historians have said, including some who believe Native Americans who spoke Arabic greeted Muslim adventurers hundreds of years before the Nina, Pinta and Santa Maria sailed. Among those reporting Erdogan’s statement was the BBC, which noted his AK Party “is rooted in political Islam.” Erdogan said, “Muslim sailors arrived in America in 1178,” but...
  • Turkey to Teach Muslim Discovery of America in Schools

    11/21/2014 8:56:33 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 12 replies
    FrontPage Mag ^ | 11/21/2014 | Daniel Greenfield
    The USSR claimed to have invented absolutely everything. Soviet children were taught that everything from the locomotive to the airplane had been invented in Russia. Muslims can’t seem to stop jumping headlong into the same xenophobic delusional propaganda. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Tuesday hit back at ridicule of his claim that Islamic explorers discovered the Americas three centuries before Columbus, accusing his Muslim critics of lacking “self-confidence”.In an aggressive rebuttal of the criticism heaped in some quarters on his comments, Erdogan also suggested that the purported “discovery” of the Americas by Muslims should be taught in schools.“A big...
  • Archaeologists Unearth Three Ancient Greek Mosaics in the Ongoing Excavation in Zeugma, Turkey

    11/20/2014 11:15:08 PM PST · by ApplegateRanch · 18 replies
    Laughing Squid ^ | November 18, 2014 | Rebecca Escamilla
    The Zeugma excavation project conducted by Oxford Archaeology and supported by Packhard Humanities Institute and the Ministry of Culture of Turkey has recently unearthed three ancient Greek mosaics in the Turkish city of Zeugma. Zeugma had received some press and support in 2000 after flooding caused by construction began to bury and damage artifacts in the region. The mosaics, created in the 2nd century BC, are constructed of boldly colored glass and are being covered for protection until excavation is complete. The head of the project, Professor Kutalmis Görkay, recently gave the Hurriyet Daily News more details about the plan...
  • Movie for a Sunday afternoon: "Land of the Pharaohs"(1955) in two parts

    11/16/2014 11:15:53 AM PST · by ReformationFan · 22 replies
    Daily Motion ^ | 1955 | Howard Hawks
    Part 1 http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2210qr_land-of-the-pharaohs-1955-1-2_lifestyle Part 2 http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x221665_land-of-the-pharaohs-1955-2-2_lifestyle
  • US scientists may have resolved 'Darwin's dilemma'

    11/16/2014 8:04:49 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 269 replies
    Fox News ^ | 11/15/2014 | By Matt Cantor
    Charles Darwin worried about a possible hole in his theory of evolution, but some American scientists may just have plugged it. For about a billion years after the dawn of life on Earth, organisms didn't evolve all that much. Then about 600 million years ago came the "Cambrian explosion." Everything changed relatively quickly, with all kinds of plants and animals emerging—which doesn't quite seem to fit with Darwin's theory of slow change, hence "Darwin's dilemma." Now, within a few days of each other, two new studies have appeared that could explain the shift, ABC News reports. One, by scientists at...
  • Hallucinogenic Plants May Be Key to Decoding Ancient Southwestern Paintings, Expert Says

    11/16/2014 9:42:34 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 48 replies
    Western Digs ^ | October 17, 2014 | Blake de Pastino
    Dozens of rock art sites in southern New Mexico, recently documented for the first time, are revealing unexpected botanical clues that archaeologists say may help unlock the meaning of the ancient abstract paintings. Over a swath of the Chihuahuan Desert stretching from Carlsbad to Las Cruces, at least 24 rock art panels have been found bearing the same distinctive pictographs: repeated series of triangles painted in combinations of red, yellow, and black. And at each of these sites, archaeologists have noticed similarities not just on the rock, but in the ground. Hallucinogenic plants were found growing beneath the triangle designs,...
  • Archaeologists unearth 5,000-year-old footprints [Denmark]

    11/15/2014 5:07:29 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Copenhagen Post ^ | November 10, 2014 | Magnus Strřyer Rasmussen
    Archaeologists working on the excavations for the Femern Bćlt Tunnel have discovered several well-preserved footprints dating back to the Stone Age. The prints were left by fishermen looking to safeguard their weirs (river barriers used for fishing) in a storm 5,000 years ago, announced Lolland-Falster Museum. "It is quite surreal to have found human footprints," said archaeologist Terje Stafseth in a press release. "We normally find historical clues in the form of human waste, but here we have found an entirely different clue and a first in Danish archaeology: a physical print left behind by a human." Prints belonged to...
  • Mycenean artifacts found in Bodrum [Halicarnassus]

    11/15/2014 4:54:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Hürriyet Daily ^ | Saturday, November 15 2014 | Mugla -- Anadolu Agency
    New artifacts have been found during excavations in Bodrum’s Ortakent and Gümüşlük neighborhoods. The artifacts will shed light on the history of Bodrum Peninsula, according to officials. The Bodrum Underwater Archaeology Museum Director Emel Özkan said that they had discovered 49 artifacts from the Mycenean era. “The number of Mycenean artifacts increased to 248 with these ones. This made our museum the richest one in terms of Mycenean artifacts among the Turkish museums,” she said. Özkan said that the artifacts, which date back to 3,500 years ago, were very important for Anatolian history, adding, “The amphora and gifts found in...
  • Archaeologists Investigate Underground Pyramidal Structure Beneath Orvieto, Italy

    11/15/2014 4:41:42 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Tue, Nov 11, 2014 | editors
    Calling it the "cavitá" ('hole' or 'hollow' in Italian), or hypogeum, the archaeologists have thus far excavated about 15 meters down. They marked their third year at the site in 2014. By then they had uncovered significant amounts of what they classify as Gray and Black bucchero, commonware, and Red and Black Figure pottery remains. They have dated deposits to the middle to the end of the 6th century BCE. "We know that the site was sealed toward the end of the 5th century BCE," George, et al. continue. "It appears to have been a single event. Of great significance...
  • Who built this Siberian summer palace… and why?

    11/15/2014 4:35:03 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Siberian Times ^ | 12 November 2014 | Derek Lambie
    Outer walls standing 10 metres tall and 12 metres wide formed a rectangular shape... Walls on the inside were smaller, at about one metre-tall, forming the outline of buildings, with a large building in the centre of the site. Some of the walls and panels were covered with lime plaster painted with horizontal red striped... 'The building was most likely of the post-and-beam construction characteristic of Chinese architecture from the T’ang Dynasty,' wrote head archaeologist Irina Arzhantseva in a report published in The European Archaeologist in 2011. 'Finds of burnt timber fragments point to the use of the typical Chinese...
  • Scientists: Glass dish unearthed in Nara came from Roman Empire

    11/15/2014 4:26:09 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    The Asahi Shimbun ^ | November 13, 2014 | Kazuto Tsukamoto
    -A glass dish unearthed from a burial mound here is the first of its kind confirmed to have come to Japan from the Roman Empire, a research team said... The dish and bowl were retrieved together from the No. 126 tumulus of the Niizawa Senzuka cluster of ancient graves, a national historic site. The No. 126 tumulus dates back to the late fifth century... According to the team’s analysis, the chemical composition of the clear dark blue dish is almost identical to glasswork unearthed in the area of the Roman Empire (27 B.C.-A.D. 395). Measuring 14.1 to 14.5 centimeters in...
  • Ears of Ancient Chinese Terra-Cotta Warriors Offer Clues to Their Creation

    11/15/2014 12:13:49 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 13 replies
    nationalgeographic.com ^ | November 14, 2014 | Heather Pringle
    Since then, archaeologists have puzzled over how ancient artisans produced the estimated 7,000 lifelike clay soldiers, right down to their stylish goatees and plaits of braided hair. Some have suggested that the statues were modeled after real, individual soldiers; others think they were assembled from standard clay ears, noses, and mouths, similar to the Mr. Potato Head toy. Photograph by O. Louis Mazzatenta, National Geographic Creative Recently, in a project known as Imperial Logistics: The Making of the Terracotta Army, a team of archaeologists from University College London (UCL) in Britain and from Emperor Qin Shi Huang's Mausoleum Site Museum...
  • Insects were the first creatures to fly: study

    11/09/2014 4:52:04 AM PST · by Bettyprob · 27 replies
    Uncover California ^ | November 09, 2014 | Andrea Cordell
    An evolutionary insect family tree created by a team of 100 researchers revealed that insects were the first creatures to fly around 400 million years ago. The comprehensive insect family tree covering insects from all around the globe was created as part of a project called 1K Insect Transcriptome Evolution (1KITE). According to researchers involved in the 1KITE project, insects came into existence around 500 million years ago, around the same time when plants started to emerge on Earth's surface. And, it was roughly 406 million years ago, in the early part of Devonian era, when insects got wings and...
  • Low Oxygen on Earth May Have Held Up Animal Evolution

    11/07/2014 9:54:01 AM PST · by JimSEA · 19 replies
    Washington Post ^ | Rachel Feltman
    Why did complex life evolve precisely when it did? According to a new study, simpler life forms may have been waiting on a proper oxygen supply -- for as long as a billion years.
  • First Europeans 'weathered Ice Age'

    11/07/2014 2:56:57 AM PST · by Natufian · 14 replies
    BBC ^ | 11/6/2014
    The genetic ancestry of the earliest Europeans survived the ferocious Ice Age that took hold after the continent was initially settled by modern people. That is the suggestion of a study of DNA from a male hunter who lived in western Russia 36,000 years ago. His genome is not exactly like those of people who lived in Europe just after the ice sheets melted 10,000 years ago. But the study suggests the earliest Europeans did contribute their genes to later populations.
  • Roman skeletons found in Worcestershire

    11/13/2014 5:00:56 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    Worcester News ^ | Friday 31 October 2014 | James Connell
    The two incomplete adult skeletons, an adult female and a younger adult male, during building works at Overbury Primary School, near Bredon in February this year. Experts from the Worcestershire County Council Archives and Archaeology Service have now confirmed that remains are from Roman times. The adult female, aged over 50, was found with hobnails, which are associated with rural Roman agricultural burials. The other was an adult male, aged 25 to 30 who had signs of degenerative joints and osteoarthritis. Also found were a selection of Roman pots. Archaeologist Tom Vaughan said: "The remains have been thoroughly examined and...
  • Amphipolis skeleton from Alexander's time found in Greece

    11/12/2014 10:41:24 AM PST · by Red Badger · 17 replies
    BBC ^ | 11/12/2014 | By Giorgos Christides
    Archaeologists in northern Greece have found a skeleton inside a tomb from the time of Alexander the Great, during a dig that has enthralled the public. The burial site at Amphipolis is the largest ever discovered in Greece. The culture ministry said the almost intact skeleton belonged to a "distinguished public figure", given the tomb's dimensions and lavishness. Chief archaeologist Katerina Peristeri said "the tomb in all probability belongs to a male and a general". The excavation has fascinated Greeks ever since Prime Minister Antonis Samaras visited the site in August 2014 and announced it amounted to "an exceptionally important...
  • Children of Civil War Veterans Still Walk Among Us, 150 Years After the War

    11/13/2014 5:52:24 AM PST · by Gamecock · 20 replies
    National Geographic ^ | November 11, 2014 | David A. Lande
    How many people alive today can say that their father was a Civil War soldier who shook hands with Abraham Lincoln in the White House? Fred Upham can. Despite sounding like a tall tale and a mathematical impossibility, it's documented truth. Fred's father, William, was a private in the Union Army's Second Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry Regiment. He was severely wounded at the First Battle of Bull Run, in 1861, and later personally appointed by President Lincoln to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. Fred's in exclusive company—the dwindling group of children of soldiers who fought, North against South, 150...
  • "Amazing" Bronze Age burial in Buckinghamshire contained skeletons of two children...

    11/09/2014 2:53:04 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    Culture24 ^ | November 05, 2014 | Ben Miller
    The skeletons of two pre-pubescent children have been discovered by archaeologists during an “amazing” dig at the back of an antiques shop which has also revealed pottery suggesting their bones could come from a Bronze Age burial. The bodies, whose teeth pinpointed their owners’ ages to between ten and 12, contained 250 bones and fragments. Experts in Marlow say the pit they were found in, which was originally opened up in March 2013, included a burial mound disturbed during the 12th century. “Local historians will know that the earliest recording of the town of Marlow dates from 1015AD, where it...
  • Magnificent Ancient Roman Silver Treasure Revealed

    11/09/2014 2:36:20 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Fri, Oct 31, 2014 | editors
    While the treasure – consisting of about 90 silver objects weighing more than 50 pounds – was first discovered in 1830, it was not until 1861 and again in 1896 that the site was extensively surveyed and excavated, uncovering the foundations of a Gallo-Roman fanum, a square colonnaded precinct with two temples. One was dedicated to Mercury Canetonensis (of Canetonum), while the other was devoted to his mother Maia or his consort Rosmerta. A theater-shaped gathering space was also found nearby... The most impressive objects in the Berthouville Treasure bear Latin inscriptions stating that they were dedicated to Mercury by...
  • Complete 9,000-year-old frozen bison mummy found in Siberia

    11/09/2014 2:17:15 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 52 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | November 06, 2014 | Anthony Friscia
    Many large charismatic mammals went extinct at the end of the Ice Age (approx 11,000 years ago), including the Steppe bison, Bison priscus. A recent find in Eastern Siberia has uncovered one of these bison, literally, frozen in time. The most complete frozen mummy of the Steppe bison yet known, dated to 9,300 years before present, was recently uncovered in the Yana-Indigirka Lowland and a necropsy was performed to learn about how this animal lived and died at the end of the Ice Age. The Yukagir bison mummy, as it is named, has a complete brain, heart, blood vessels and...
  • Population boom, droughts contributed to collapse of ancient Assyrian Empire

    11/09/2014 1:06:55 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Phys Spam Org ^ | November 05, 2014 | unattributed
    In the 9th century BC, the Assyrian Empire of northern Iraq relentlessly started to expand into most of the ancient Near East. It reached its height in the early 7th century BC, becoming the largest of its kind in the Near East up to that time. The Assyrian Empire's subsequent quick decline by the end of the 7th century has puzzled scholars ever since. Most ascribe it to civil wars, political unrest, and the destruction of the Assyrian capital, Nineveh, by a coalition of Babylonian and Median forces in 612 BC.... Recently published paleoclimate data show that conditions in the...
  • Archaeologists Uncover Massive Fortifications in Ancient City of King Midas

    11/08/2014 11:06:07 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Wednesday, November 05, 2014 | unattributed
    A team of archaeologists have unearthed new evidence of massive, monumental defensive works at the Citadel Mound site of ancient Gordion in Turkey. Excavations have also revealed ancient industrial activity dating back to the 11th century BCE... Brian Rose of the University of Pennsylvania and colleagues have uncovered massive defensive walls, part of a road, and industrial work spaces dated back to some of the earliest periods of the site... "Gordion’s historical significance derives from its very long and complex sequence of occupation, with seven successive settlements spanning a period of nearly 4500 years," says Rose. "What we discovered was...
  • Archeology: Evidence scant for ancient Muslims in America

    11/08/2014 10:50:08 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 60 replies
    Columbus Post-Dispatch ^ | Saturday November 1, 2014 | Bradley Lepper
    Francaviglia does not dispute that Muslims could have beaten Columbus to the New World. They certainly possessed the technological expertise to have done so; but, so far, there is no reliable evidence that they did. There are, however, very good reasons for thinking that they didn't. Arab maps were the best in the world, but none of the existing early maps demonstrates any knowledge of the Americas. Arabs also were prolific writers. Francaviglia thinks it’s virtually impossible that Arab explorers discovered the Americas and made no mention of the fact. Why then is the supposed pre-Columbian Muslim discovery of America...
  • Ancient and Modern Europeans Have Surprising Genetic Connection

    11/08/2014 4:01:30 PM PST · by robowombat · 24 replies
    Live Science ^ | November 06, 2014 | Charles Q. Choi
    Ancient and Modern Europeans Have Surprising Genetic Connection by Charles Q. Choi, Live Science Contributor | November 06, 2014 There is a surprising genetic unity between the earliest known Europeans and contemporary Europeans, ancient DNA reveals. This finding suggests that a complex network of sexual exchange may have existed across Europe over the past 50,000 years, and also helps to pinpoint when modern humans interbred with Neanderthals, the closest extinct relatives of modern humans, the researchers said. The origin of contemporary Europeans continues to be debated. The modern human ancestors of contemporary Eurasians are believed to have left Africa about...
  • Ancient DNA shows earliest European genomes weathered the Ice Age

    11/07/2014 1:36:13 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 12 replies
    phys.org ^ | Nov 06, 2014
    The study also uncovers a more accurate timescale for when humans and Neanderthals interbred, and finds evidence for an early contact between the European hunter-gatherers and those in the Middle East – who would later develop agriculture and disperse into Europe about 8,000 years ago, transforming the European gene pool. Scientists now believe Eurasians separated into at least three populations earlier than 36,000 years ago: Western Eurasians, East Asians and a mystery third lineage, all of whose descendants would develop the unique features of most non-African peoples - but not before some interbreeding with Neanderthals took place. Led by the...
  • New mosaics unearthed in ancient city of Zeugma

    11/06/2014 7:49:04 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Hurriyet Daily News ^ | November 4, 2014 | Anadolu Agency
    Three new mosaics have been unearthed during the Muzalar House excavations in the ancient city of Zeugma in Turkey's southern province of Gaziantep. The uncovered mosaics were displayed at a press conference attended by Gaziantep Mayor Fatma Şahin and the head of the excavations, Professor Kutalmış Görkay... “There are still unexcavated areas. There are rock-carved houses here. We have reached one of these houses and the house includes six spaces. We have also unearthed three new mosaics in this year’s excavations,” he said. Görkay added that with the end of the excavation season, the most important stage had now started....
  • Ancient Greek Port Revealed Near Corinth, Peloponnese

    11/06/2014 7:39:05 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Greek Reporter ^ | October 31, 2014 | Daphne Tsagari
    An ancient Greek port was revealed and recorded at the location of the Ancient Lechaion harbor, in the area of the modern Corinth Gulf, in the Peloponnese. The submerged ancient port covered a total area of 2,750 square meters. It ran 911 meters along the modern Corinth Gulf coastline and the entrance channel to the port lay on the harbor’s eastern part. The channel is 8.9 meters wide while a western and a middle mole were also found west of it. The port played a pivotal role in Corinthian history, as it was located about 3 km west of Ancient...
  • Children from lost civilisation 'helped build' geoglyph some 6,000 years ago

    11/06/2014 7:27:03 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    Siberian Times ^ | 3 November 2014 | Anna Liesowska
    Remarkable new details about giant moose released as archaeologists confirm stone structure is world's oldest. Children were involved in the construction of a geoglyph in the Urals which was only discovered thanks to images taken from space. It predates Peru's famous Nazca Lines by thousands of years, archaeologists have announced. But they are no nearer answering why ancient man made it, nor can they yet fathom which group built the geoglyph; archeological traces found so far in the area do not show a culture with sufficient refinement... Located near Lake Zyuratkul in the Ural Mountains, it stretches for about 275...
  • Mega wave hit Oman's coast 4,500 years ago

    11/06/2014 5:01:20 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 68 replies
    Times of Oman ^ | November 03, 2014 | Sarah MacDonald
    Geologists from GUtech, in cooperation with archeologists from the Ministry of Heritage and Culture, have dug up evidence of a tsunami or severe storm that hit Ras Al Hadd about 4,500 years ago...The fact that there were two settlement phases, the first of which was marked by buildings made of sand brick, and the second by mud brick, suggests the village was destroyed at one point and rebuilt. The remains date back to between 3,100 and 2,700 BC, and the evidence suggests they were built one after the other, meaning the people didn't leave the area despite having their homes...
  • Archaeologists studied 6 thousand years old settlement

    11/06/2014 8:51:37 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    Naukaw Polsce ^ | 2 November 2014 | PAP - Science and Scholarship in Poland
    Archaeologists in Browina (Kujawsko-Pomorskie) discovered objects attesting to far-reaching contacts of the first farmers living in the area of todayÂ’s Poland... It turned out that within the settlement of first farmers, people had also lived in the Iron Age - 1st millennium BC. The latest fragments of ceramic vessels come from that period. Researchers focused their efforts on the analysis of the oldest objects. In addition to storage pits, inside which food had been stored, archaeologists discovered numerous fragments of vessels, flint and stone tools and animal bones. These objects belonged to the agricultural communities, known as Linear Pottery culture...
  • Hippos-Sussita excavation: Silent evidence of the earthquake of 363 CE

    11/03/2014 3:59:15 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | October 23, 2014 | University of Haifa
    The city of Hippos-Sussita, which was founded in the second century BCE, experienced two strong and well-documented earthquakes. The first was in the year 363 CE and it caused heavy damage. The city, did, however, recover. The great earthquake of 749 CE destroyed the city which was subsequently abandoned completely. Evidence of the extensive damage caused by the earthquake of 363 was found in earlier seasons... [This year, to] the north of the basilica... the dig's senior area supervisor Haim Shkolnik and his team unearthed the remains of several skeletons that had been crushed by the weight of the collapsed...
  • 6,000-Year-Old Temple with Possible Sacrificial Altars Discovered

    11/02/2014 8:37:53 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    LiveScience ^ | October 20, 2014 | Owen Jarus
    A 6,000-year-old temple holding humanlike figurines and sacrificed animal remains has been discovered within a massive prehistoric settlement in Ukraine. Built before writing was invented, the temple is about 60 by 20 meters (197 by 66 feet) in size. It was a "two-story building made of wood and clay surrounded by a galleried courtyard," the upper floor divided into five rooms, write archaeologists Nataliya Burdo and Mykhailo Videiko... Inside the temple, archaeologists found the remains of eight clay platforms, which may have been used as altars, the finds suggested. A platform on the upper floor contains "numerous burnt bones of...
  • Ancient Europeans remained intolerant to lactose for 5,000 years after they adopted agriculture

    11/02/2014 8:20:13 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    University College Dublin ^ | 22 October 2014 | UCD University Relations
    By analysing DNA extracted from the petrous bones of skulls of ancient Europeans, scientists have identified that these peoples remained intolerant to lactose (natural sugar in the milk of mammals) for 5,000 years after they adopted agricultural practices and 4,000 years after the onset of cheese-making among Central European Neolithic farmers. The findings published in the scientific journal Nature Communications (21 Oct) also suggest that major technological transitions in Central Europe between the Neolithic, Bronze Age and Iron Age were also associated with major changes in the genetics of these populations. For the study, the international team of scientists examined...