Keyword: grapes

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  • French wine makers fear 'worst harvest for 40 years'

    11/06/2016 4:42:43 PM PST · by Olog-hai · 50 replies
    TheLocal.fr ^ | 06 Nov 2016 08:42 GMT+01:00
    This isnt so much a harvest, as a hunt for grapes, said French winemaker Jean-Jacques Robert, with a rueful laugh as he unloaded grapes still warm from his vineyards around Fuisse in Burgundy. Its a catastrophe, the worst harvest for 30 or 40 years, said the normally cheery 64-year-old owner of Domaine Robert-Denogent. The organic winemaker lost between two-thirds and three-quarters of his harvest in one hailstorm in April. He is not alone. For thousands of French winemakers, 2016 will go down as an annus horribilis, with vines destroyed by frost, heavy rain, hailstones as big as ping pong balls,...
  • How Methodists Invented Your Kid's Grape Juice Sugar High

    09/24/2016 9:04:55 AM PDT · by NRx · 31 replies
    Christianity Today ^ | 09-23-2016 | Luke T. Harrington
    Its weird to think about, but a lot of the things we take for granted are almost shockingly recent inventions. The can opener didnt exist until 1870nearly a full century after canned food was first produced (people ate so much canned food that year, you guys). Doors have been around forever, but doorknobs werent invented until 1878 (and people were finally able to leave their houses). And grape juice?
  • Vintner mentor needed.

    06/19/2016 6:49:49 PM PDT · by killermosquito · 34 replies
    Killermosquito
    I've started a vineyard, 7 vines in 42 feet of space. All seedless and I'm in NC. I'm trying to decide what wire and post configuration to use. So far I have 3 eight feet posts that are 2 feet deep. Should I go with T on top of each or just 2 wires at 5.5 feet ant a second wire about 18 inches beneath it. Suggestions?
  • Open Borders Gowdy Says Marco Rubio More Conservative Than Jeff Sessions

    Pro-amnesty and mass migration advocate Rep. Trey Gowdy (R-SC) 86% tried to argue that Florida Senator Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) 79% is more conservative than Alabama Senator Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-AL) 80% . As South Carolina’s Post and Courier Deanna Pan reports via twitter: “Gowdy notes that Rubio has higher Heritage ratings than Jeff Sessions and Rep. Steve King (R-IA) 79% . ‘There is no one more conservative than Marco Rubio.'” Jeff Sessions has been the fiercest opponent of Sen. Rubio’s open borders trade and immigration agenda. By contrast, in 2013— at a time when illegal minors were continuing to...
  • Chemical terror plot foiled in London

    11/21/2003 10:51:54 PM PST · by Jackson Brown · 6 replies · 161+ views
    Reuters ^ | November 21, 2003
    Chemical terror plot foiled in London Fri November 21, 2003 11:43 PM ET LONDON (Reuters) - An attempt by a London-based terror group to buy half a tonne of toxic chemicals was foiled after the supplier became suspicious and alerted police, the Financial Times has reported.It said the group had attempted to buy 500 kgs (1,102 lb) of the toxin saponin from Amersham Biosciences late last year but the sale was refused after staff became concerned about the size of the order. A spokesman for London's Metropolitan Police told Reuters on Saturday that police were "not prepared to discuss the...
  • Michigan woman finds black widow spider in Walmart grapes

    09/10/2015 4:59:55 AM PDT · by JoeProBono · 97 replies
    upi ^ | Sept. 9, 2015 | Ben Hooper
    TROY, Mich., - A Michigan woman who bought grapes from a Walmart store said she discovered a venomous black widow spider in the package. Ariel Jackson, 25, said she bought the perforated package of grapes from a Walmart Supercenter in Troy and she discovered the spider when she started washing the fruit. "She was screaming about a huge spider, and everyone was like, 'Calm down, it's probably nothing,'" Jackson's boyfriend, Michal Frank, 26, told ABC News. "But we took a closer look and lo and behold, it's a black widow. It had the red hourglass-shaped spot on its belly." Jackson...
  • Will climate change kill off Pinot Noir? Vineyards are ditching grape varieties that can't cope...

    01/03/2015 1:57:57 PM PST · by Libloather · 64 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 1/02/15 | Jonathan O'Callaghan
    If global temperatures continue to rise, the taste of your favourite wine could either drastically change, or the drink could be off the menu completely. A wine expert has warned that fine wines in particular, such as Pinot Noir, are having their flavour significantly altered due to climate change. And, as a result, vineyard owners are ditching these grape varieties in favour of those that are better equipped to handle the increases in global temperature.
  • Baboons gobble grapes in South African wine region

    03/25/2010 3:31:52 PM PDT · by SJackson · 32 replies · 680+ views
    AP ^ | Mar 23, 2010 | NASTASYA TAY
    JOHANNESBURG Baboons, it seems, prefer pinot noir. They also like a nice chardonnay. Largely undeterred by electric fences, hundreds of wild baboons in South Africa's prized wine country are finding the vineyards of ripe, succulent grapes to be an "absolute bonanza," said Justin O'Riain of the University of Cape Town. Winemakers have resorted to using noisemakers and rubber snakes to try to drive the baboons off during harvest season. "The poor baboons are driven to distraction," said O'Riain, who works in the university's Baboon Research Unit. "As far as baboons are concerned, the combination of starch and sugar is...
  • A Raccoon Eating Grapes at the Dinner Table Is Almost Adorable (Video)

    11/09/2013 7:29:49 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 26 replies
    There's only one flaw in this otherwise cute video of a button-eyed raccoon dexterously eating grapes like he's people: the audio. The sounds of slurping and chomping in this video apparently uploaded by a Russian YouTuber
  • French wine 'has Italian origins' [Etruscans]

    06/08/2013 7:40:59 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    BBC News ^ | Monday, June 3, 2013 | Jason Palmer
    The earliest known examples of wine-making as we know it are in the regions of modern-day Iran, Georgia, and Armenia -- and researchers believe that modern winemaking slowly spread westward from there to Europe... The Etruscans, a pre-Roman civilisation in Italy, are thought to have gained wine culture from the Phoenicians -- who spread throughout the Mediterranean from the early Iron Age onward -- because they used similarly shaped amphoras... Dr McGovern's team focused on the coastal site of Lattara, near the town of Lattes south of Montpellier, where the importation of amphoras continued up until the period 525-475 BC....
  • A serving of Philistine culture: Boar, dog and fine wine

    09/03/2007 8:38:36 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies · 259+ views
    Ha'aretz ^ | Monday, September 3, 2007 | Ofri Ilani
    Research into the dispersal of Philistine cooking methods among various populations in Israel shows that the Philistines spread their culture beyond the areas under their control... Unlike most of the peoples living in the region in the biblical era, the Philistines were not Semites... They prepared meals in a characteristic sealed pottery vessel suited to long cooking times at low heat, while most inhabitants of Canaan at the time used open pots and faster cooking methods. The bones found at the Philistine cities showed that... the Philistines ate mainly pork, with an occasional meal of dog meat. The Philistines' wine...
  • Brewing Stone Age beer

    08/05/2012 7:33:03 AM PDT · by Renfield · 50 replies
    sciencenordic.com ^ | 7-20-2012 | Asle Rnning
    Beer enthusiasts are using a barn in Norway’s Akershus County to brew a special ale which has scientific pretensions and roots back to the dawn of human culture. The beer is made from einkorn wheat, a single-grain species that has followed humankind since we first started tilling the soil, but which has been neglected for the last 2,500 years. “This is fun − really thrilling. It’s hard to say whether this has ever been tried before in Norway,” says Jørn Kragtorp. He started brewing as a hobby four years ago. He represents the fourth generation on the family farm of...
  • Paphos excavation reveals Bronze Age malting kiln

    12/01/2012 3:41:09 PM PST · by Renfield · 95 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | 11-29-2012
    Between 2007 and 2012 a team led by Dr Lindy Crewe from the University of Manchester have been excavating a Cypriot Bronze Age site at the south-western settlement of Kissonerga-Skalia near Paphos.Excavation of a malting kiln The team excavated a two by two metre domed mud-plastered structure and have now demonstrated by means of experimental archaeology and various other evidence that it was used as a kiln to dry malt for beer making three-and-a half-thousand years ago.The form of this construction suggests that the most likely function was as a drying-kiln, and that one of the primary uses of this...
  • Did early Southwestern Indians ferment corn and make beer?

    12/04/2007 12:35:33 PM PST · by Red Badger · 50 replies · 970+ views
    www.physorg.com ^ | 12/04/07 | Sandia National Laboratory
    Sandia researcher Ted Borek used gas chromatography and mass spectrometry to analyze vapors produced by mild heating of pot samples. (Photo by Randy Montoya) The belief among some archeologists that Europeans introduced alcohol to the Indians of the American Southwest may be faulty. Ancient and modern pot sherds collected by New Mexico state archeologist Glenna Dean, in conjunction with analyses by Sandia National Laboratories researcher Ted Borek, open the possibility that food or beverages made from fermenting corn were consumed by native inhabitants centuries before the Spanish arrived. Dean, researching through her small business Archeobotanical Services, says, Theres been...
  • 3,800-year-old Babylonian tablets contain recipe!

    11/16/2001 1:21:02 PM PST · by Libloather · 38 replies · 910+ views
    Yahoo News ^ | 11/12/01
    Monday November 12 10:18 AM ET Ancient Tablets Offer Beer Primer DAMASCUS, Syria (AP) - A Syrian-Belgian-British archaeological mission unearthed 3,800-year-old Babylonian beer-making instructions on cuneiform tablets at a dig in northern Syria. Abdel-Massih Baghdo, director of the Hassakeh Archaeological Department, told The Associated Press in a telephone call that the 92 tablets were found in the 14th layer of Tell Shagher, a site just north of Hassakeh. He said the tablets showed beer-making methods and tallied quantities of beer produced and distributed in the region.'' Hassakeh, 400 miles northeast of Damascus, is known these days for its wheat production. ...
  • 500 years ago, yeast's epic journey gave rise to lager beer

    08/22/2011 8:03:21 PM PDT · by allmost · 30 replies
    Physorg.com ^ | August 22, 201 | Terry Devitt
    In the 15th century, when Europeans first began moving people and goods across the Atlantic, a microscopic stowaway somehow made its way to the caves and monasteries of Bavaria. The stowaway, a yeast that may have been transported from a distant shore on a piece of wood or in the stomach of a fruit fly, was destined for great things. In the dank caves and monastery cellars where 15th century brewmeisters stored their product, the newly arrived yeast fused with a distant relative, the domesticated yeast used for millennia to make leavened bread and ferment wine and ale. The resulting...
  • Ancient Brewery Discovered On Mountain Top In Peru

    07/28/2004 7:51:19 PM PDT · by blam · 14 replies · 543+ views
    Eurekalert ^ | 7-27-2004 | Greg Borzo
    Public release date: 27-Jul-2004 Contact: Greg Borzo gborzo@fieldmuseum.org 312-665-7106 Field Museum Ancient brewery discovered on mountain top in Peru Field Museum online expedition still in progress describes discovery of 'Beer of Kings' Archaeologists discover a 1,000-year-old brewery from the Wari Empire's occupation of Cerro Bal, a mountaintop city in the Andes. Remains of the brewery were well preserved because a fire set when the brewery was closed made the walls collapse over the materials. Photo by Patrick Ryan Williams, courtesy of The Field Museum CHICAGO--Archaeologists working in southern Peru found an ancient brewery more than 1,000 years old. Remains of...
  • Unraveling the Etruscan Enigma

    10/15/2010 10:02:40 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Archaeology mag ^ | November/December 2010 | Rossella Lorenzi
    They taught the French to make wine and the Romans to build roads, and they introduced writing to Europe, but the Etruscans have long been considered one of antiquity's great enigmas. No one knew exactly where they came from. Their language was alien to their neighbors. Their religion included the practice of divination, performed by priests who examined animals' entrails to predict the future. Much of our knowledge about Etruscan civilization comes from ancient literary sources and from tomb excavations, many of which were carried out decades ago. But all across Italy, archaeologists are now creating a much richer picture...
  • Home Away From Rome: Excavations of villas where Roman emperors escaped the office...

    06/02/2010 5:36:18 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies · 502+ views
    Smithsonian magazine ^ | June 2010 | Paul Bennett
    We know what became of Marcus Aurelius -- considered the last of the "Five Good Emperors." He ruled for nearly two decades from A.D. 161 to his death in A.D. 180, a tenure marked by wars in Asia and what is now Germany. As for the Villa Magna, it faded into neglect. Documents from the Middle Ages and later mention a church "at Villa Magna" lying southeast of Rome near the town of Anagni, in the region of Lazio. There, on privately owned land, remains of Roman walls are partially covered by a 19th-century farmhouse and a long-ruined medieval monastery....
  • Ancient ale: Prehistoric yeast takes beer drinkers back millions of year

    09/25/2009 12:49:00 PM PDT · by Nikas777 · 28 replies · 1,367+ views
    chicagotribune.com ^ | Sep 24, 2009‎ | Suzanne Bohan
    Ancient ale Prehistoric yeast takes beer drinkers back millions of yearsBy Suzanne Bohan Contra Costa Times Sep 24, 2009‎ GUERNEVILLE, Calif. - Inside a stainless-steel tank at a brew pub here overlooking the redwood-rimmed Russian River, a 45-million-year-old yeast proves its mettle. And the remarkably resilient prehistoric microbe hasn't just garnered a devoted pack of Fossil Fuels Beer fans, it's also providing palpable proof of the tenacity of life on this planet. When the Australian-born owner of Stumptown Brewery, Peter Hackett, first learned of the ancient yeast, he doubted this long-extinct strain would ferment anything drinkable. It took the urging...
  • Rare Pre-Greek Site To Be Explored (Italy)

    03/23/2006 3:12:34 PM PST · by blam · 1 replies · 224+ views
    Ansa ^ | 3-23-2006
    Rare pre-Greek site to be exploredEnotrians ('wine lovers') renamed their kingdom 'Italia' (ANSA) - Palinuro, March 20 - A very rare example of surviving pre-Greek settlement in southern Italy is to be excavated and explored. The site, at Molpa in the hills above Palinuro south of Naples, is believed to contain the remains of a large village of the Enotrians, the earliest known inhabitants of Calabria and southern Campania. The Greeks who settled across southern Italy from 700BC to create Magna Graecia had an idealised vision of the Enotrians ("wine lovers") as coming from the Eden-like land of Arcadia ....
  • Czech Archaeologists Excavate Ancient Greek Town Flattened By Bohemian Celts

    09/24/2005 6:50:32 PM PDT · by blam · 17 replies · 804+ views
    Radio Czech ^ | 9-23-2005
    Czech archaeologists excavate Ancient Greek town flattened by Bohemian Celts [20-09-2005] By Pavla Horakova Listen 16kb/s ~ 32kb/s For twelve years, Czech archaeologists have been helping their Bulgarian colleagues in the excavations of an Ancient Greek market town in central Bulgaria. The twelve years of work has yielded valuable results, including a hoard of coins, and discovered a surprising connection between the ancient town and the Czech Lands. PistirosThe river port of Pistiros was founded in the 5th century BC by a local Thracian ruler. From the excavations we know that wine from Greece was imported to the town in...
  • Brewers concoct ancient Egyptian ale.

    08/11/2002 3:28:50 PM PDT · by vannrox · 4 replies · 347+ views
    BBC News ^ | Saturday, 3 August, 2002, 10:06 GMT 11:06 UK | Editorial Staff
    Saturday, 3 August, 2002, 10:06 GMT 11:06 UK Brewers concoct ancient Egyptian ale Did King Tut sup on the Old Kingdom recipe? A Japanese beer maker has taken a 4,400-year-old recipe from Egyptian hieroglyphics and produced what it claims is a brew fit for the Pharaohs. The Kirin Brewery Co. has called the concoction Old Kingdom Beer. It has no froth, is the colour of dark tea and carries an alcohol content of 10% - about double most contemporary beers. Sakuji Yoshimura, an Egyptologist at Waseda University in Tokyo, helped transcribe the recipe from Egyptian wall paintings. Kirin spokesman Takaomi...
  • Scientists discover Neolithic wine-making

    11/29/2005 3:38:40 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies · 671+ views
    UNLV Rebel Yell ^ | 11/28/2005 | Lora Griffin
    The discovery that Stone Age humans were interested in growing fruit and developing fermentation processes provides many clues into the lifestyle of early Homo sapiens. The production of wine requires a relatively "stable base of operations," McGovern stated. His research suggests that these early Near East and Egyptian communities would have been more permanent cultures with a stable food supply and domesticated animals and plants. With this abundance of food came the need for containers that were durable and made from a material that was easily pliablelike clay. The porous structure of these clay vessels is what has made it...
  • Brewers Concoct Ancient Egyptian Ale ("..tastes very different from today's beer.")

    08/03/2002 8:09:31 AM PDT · by yankeedame · 19 replies · 587+ views
    BBC On-Line | Saturday, 3 August, 2002 | staff writer
    Saturday, 3 August, 2002, 10:06 GMT 11:06 UK Brewers concoct ancient Egyptian aleDid King Tut sup on the Old Kingdom recipe?A Japanese beer maker has taken a 4,400-year-old recipe from Egyptian hieroglyphics and produced what it claims is a brew fit for the Pharaohs. The Kirin Brewery Co. has called the concoction Old Kingdom Beer. It has no froth, is the colour of dark tea and carries an alcohol content of 10% - about double most contemporary beers. Sakuji Yoshimura, an Egyptologist at Waseda University in Tokyo, helped transcribe the recipe from Egyptian wall paintings. Kirin spokesman Takaomi Ishii said:...
  • Ancient beer may serve as future model

    02/10/2011 5:39:47 AM PST · by Red Badger · 56 replies
    www.wthitv.com ^ | 2-8-11 | MATTI HUUHTANEN
    HELSINKI - Finnish scientists are analyzing a golden, cloudy beverage found in a 19th century shipwreck at the bottom of the Baltic Sea, hoping new beers can be modeled on an ancient brew. The VTT Technical Research Center of Finland said Tuesday that through chemical analysis it aims to determine the ingredients and possibly the recipe used in brewing what it called "one of the world's oldest preserved beers." VTT scientist Arvi Vilpola said he had "the honorable task" of being the one on the research team to sample the brew. "It was a little sour and you could taste...
  • Archaeological Discovery in Bulgaria Clue to Ancient Mystery

    02/14/2003 1:30:45 PM PST · by vannrox · 20 replies · 773+ views
    www.novinite.com ^ | 2003-02-13 | Novinite editorial Staff
    Subscribe for free at www.novinite.com Archaeological Discovery in Bulgaria Clue to Ancient Mystery2003-02-13Bulgarian archaeologists discovered an oval ritual hall fitting the description that ancient historians gave to the Dionysus Temple in the Rhodope range famous for its splendor and mysteriousness in antique times and for the many failed attempts to determine its exact location in modernity. During an expedition in 2002, the team of archeologist Nikolay Ovcharov unearthed the hall inside of an ancient Thracian palace, some 250km southeast of Bulgaria's capital Sofia. The temple-palace is part of the dead city of Perpericon in Bulgaria's Eastern Rhodope Mountain that...
  • Grog of the Greeks [ barley beer, honey mead, retsina wine ]

    10/20/2008 5:05:51 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies · 1,097+ views
    New Scientist ^ | November 27, 1999 | Stephanie Pain
    Scholars have always suspected that the ancients had odd tastes. If you believe Homer, wise old Nestor, veteran of the Trojan War, enjoyed a few scrapings of goat's cheese and a dollop of honey in his wine. And Homer might have been right: archaeologists often find little bronze cheese graters in later Greek graves which they think were part of a drinking kit. But until now there has been no good evidence that the Minoans and their mainland neighbours the Mycenaeans knew how to brew beer or mead, let alone mixed them into cocktails. After painstaking chemical analysis of cups,...
  • Tutankhamen Liked His White Wine

    02/16/2006 10:23:56 AM PST · by blam · 18 replies · 372+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 2-16-2006
    Tutankhamen liked his wine white 16 February 2006 From New Scientist Print Edition IT SEEMS that Tutankhamen, the teenage king of ancient Egypt, sloped off to the afterlife with a good supply of fine white wine. It's a surprising discovery, considering there is no record of white wine in Egypt until the 3rd century AD, 1600 years after the young pharaoh died. Rosa Lamuela-Ravents and her colleagues from the University of Barcelona, Spain, used liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry to analyse the residue from six of the jars in Tutankhamen's tomb. All contained tartaric acid, a chemical characteristic of grapes,...
  • Message in a Bottle [History of wine snobbery]

    12/26/2005 11:56:44 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 7 replies · 414+ views
    New York Times ^ | 12/24/05 | Tom Standage
    [ . . . ] The Romans were the first to use wine as a finely calibrated social yardstick - and thus inaugurated centuries of wine snobbery . . . Pliny the Younger, writing in the late first century A.D., described a dinner at which the host and his friends were served fine wine, second-rate wine was served to other guests, and third-rate wine was served to former slaves. [ . . . ] Just how seriously the Romans took the business of wine classification can be seen from the story of Marcus Antonius, a Roman politician who in 87...
  • In a rich corner of antiquity: gold, wine, plenty of luxury [Colchis, the Vani]

    12/29/2007 6:17:59 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies · 73+ views
    Register-Guard ^ | December 27, 2007 | Blake Gopnik, Washington Post
    Since Colchis was famous in antiquity for gold and precious metal -- it's where the Greek hero Jason went to grab the legendary Golden Fleece -- you'd be wearing gold-spangled robes while pouring and drinking your famous Colchian wine from gold or silver vessels. You'd also be so rich you could afford to bury your wine service with you... A fascinating exhibition, "Wine, Worship & Sacrifice: The Golden Graves of Ancient Vani" at the Smithsonian's Sackler Gallery in Washington, D.C., through Feb. 24, gives a thrilling image of the plenty that nobility enjoyed in that far corner of the ancient...
  • Italy owes wine legacy to Celts, history buffs say

    04/24/2006 8:55:46 AM PDT · by sully777 · 19 replies · 626+ views
    Reuters ^ | Fri Apr 21, 2006 9:04am ET | by Svetlana Kovalyova
    ROBBIO, Italy (Reuters) - Wine conjures up the image of cultured drinkers sipping their way delicately through a full-bodied vintage. But for two history buffs with a passion for the tipple, northern Italy has the barbarians to thank for its long wine-making tradition. Luca Sormani, from Como, and Fulvio Pescarolo, from the tiny town of Robbio near Milan, have traced the region's wine culture all the way back to its Celtic roots and have started making it according to ancient methods. Celtic tribes from farther north -- known to the Romans as "Barbari" -- conquered northern parts of Italy about...
  • King Tut liked Red Wine Best

    10/30/2005 2:38:20 AM PST · by nickcarraway · 16 replies · 753+ views
    LONDON -- A University of Barcelona research team has discovered Egypt's King Tutankhamen was partial to wine, preferring red over white. The mystery of exactly what was kept inside jars found in the tomb of the Egyptian king (1336-1327 BC) was solved by the Spanish scientists who analyzed scrapings from eight jars found in Tutankhamen's tomb. They presented their findings on Wednesday at the British Museum in London, The Times of London reported. "Wine jars were placed in tombs as funerary meals," Maria Rosa Guasch-Jane, a master in Egyptology at the university, told The Independent. "The ... wine jars were...
  • King Tut Liked Red Wine

    03/15/2004 5:41:55 PM PST · by blam · 20 replies · 406+ views
    Eureka Alert ^ | 3-15-2004 | Allison Byrum
    Contact: Allison Byrum a_byrum@acs.org 202-872-4400 American Chemical Society King Tut liked red wine Ancient Egyptians believed in properly equipping a body for the afterlife, and not just through mummification. A new study reveals that King Tutankhamun eased his arduous journey with a stash of red wine. Spanish scientists have developed the first technique that can determine the color of wine used in ancient jars. They analyzed residues from a jar found in the tomb of King Tut and found that it contained wine made with red grapes. This is the only extensive chemical analysis that has been done on a...
  • King Tut Drank Red Wine, Researcher Says

    10/26/2005 3:39:02 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 54 replies · 994+ views
    ap on Yahoo ^ | 10/26/05 | JENN WIANT - ap
    LONDON - King Tutankhamen was a red wine drinker, according to a researcher who analyzed traces of the vintage found in his tomb. Maria Rosa Guasch-Jane told reporters Wednesday at the British Museum that she made her discovery after inventing a process that gave archaeologists a tool to discover the color of ancient wine. "This is the first time someone has found an ancient red wine," she said. Wine bottles from King Tut's time were labeled with the name of the product, the year of harvest, the source and the vine grower, Guasch-Jane said, but did not include the color...
  • Did the Ancient Israelites Drink Beer?

    09/02/2010 6:53:45 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 74 replies
    BAR 36:05 ^ | Sep/Oct 2010 | Michael M. Homan
    Ancient Israelites, with the possible exception of a few teetotaling Nazirites and their moms, proudly drank beer -- and lots of it. Men, women and even children of all social classes drank it. Its consumption in ancient Israel was encouraged, sanctioned and intimately linked with their religion. Even Yahweh, according to the Hebrew Bible, consumed at least half a hin of beer (approximately 2 liters, or a six-pack) per day through the cultic ritual of libation, and he drank even more on the Sabbath (Numbers 28:7-10). People who were sad were advised to drink beer to temporarily erase their troubles...
  • Chinese archaeologists discover ancient red wine

    11/21/2007 10:32:04 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies · 75+ views
    Topnews ^ | November 20th, 2007 | unattributed (ANI)
    Chinese archaeologists have claimed to have unearthed a sealed bronze pot containing two kilograms of red liquid during an excavation of an ancient tomb built in the Warring States Period (475 BC - 221 BC). Wafts of the ancient vintage greeted the archaeologists after they opened the pot, The China Daily reports. The find has been sent to Beijing for tests and verification.
  • Ancient Greeks introduced wine to France, Cambridge study reveals [Prof Paul Cartledge]

    10/27/2009 5:04:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 41 replies · 813+ views
    Telegraph ^ | Friday, October 23, 2009 | Andrew Hough
    The original makers of Ctes-du-Rhne are said to have descended from Greek explorers who settled in southern France about 2500 years ago... The study, by Prof Paul Cartledge, suggested the world's biggest wine industry might never have developed had it not been for a "band of pioneering Greek explorers" who settled in southern France around 600 BC. His study appears to dispel the theory that it was the Romans who were responsible for bringing viticulture to France. The study found that the Greeks founded Massalia, now known as Marseilles, which they then turned into a bustling trading site, where local...
  • Ancient Beer, Wine Jars Found in Egypt

    05/18/2005 7:01:35 PM PDT · by TFFKAMM · 54 replies · 1,232+ views
    AP/SF Chronicle ^ | 5/18/05 | AP
    (05-18) 18:18 PDT CAIRO, Egypt (AP) -- Archaeologists digging in a 5,000-year-old site in southern Egypt have unearthed 200 rough ceramic beer and wine jars and a second mud-brick mortuary enclosure of King Hur-Aha the founder of the First Dynasty, Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities said Wednesday. A joint American excavation mission from Yale University, Institute of Fine Arts, the Pennsylvania University Museum and New York Universities found the treasure Wednesday at Shunet El-Zebib, north of Abydos in the Upper Egyptian city of Sohag.
  • Bulgarian Archaeologists Discover Ancient Winery

    08/06/2010 6:51:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    Novinite ^ | Thursday, August 5, 2010 | unattributed
    The "winery" consisted of two stone buildings connected with an wooden passage. One of the buildings was filled up with grapes, which was then pressed with large rectangular stones. According to the archaeological team, similar wineries have been found the Caucasus, the Crimean Peninsula, Serbia, Israel. Yotov... said the last such "winery" was found in Israel at the beginning of 2009, and is believed to have been the largest in the Byzantine Empire. Yotov thinks the winery of the fortress near Byala was part of a monastery... The fortress near Byala is located on an area of 38-40 decares, and...
  • Digs may throw more light on ancient wine production [ Malta ]

    08/10/2010 8:15:09 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Times of Malta ^ | Friday, August 6th, 2010 | unattributed
    The excavation being carried out at Tal-Log'g'a in Mg'arr ix-Xini. An archaeological site being excavated at Mg'arr ix-Xini has further enforced the notion that viticulture and wine production have been an important part of the Maltese economy since the Classical period. The excavation site, at Tal-Log'g'a, is in a field next to where two troughs dug into the rock were found and is believed to have been used for grape pressing. The field is being excavated in a bid to shed more light on the troughs' use. Some 15 sets of troughs have been found in Mg'arr ix-Xini valley to...
  • Gozo rock holds ancient wine presses [ Malta ]

    01/14/2010 7:33:31 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies · 367+ views
    Times of Malta ^ | January 12, 2010 | Claudia Calleja
    Centuries ago, come September, galleys would be rowed into Mg˙arr ix-Xini harbour and loaded with amphorae filled with wine that had been pressed in the valley. Winemakers would fill shallow basins with grapes and, once pressed, the juice would flow through holes and channels into a deeper collecting holder, all carved into the rock. These wine presses, said to date back to 500 BC, can still be seen embedded in the Gozitan valley and are being studied and documented in a project carried out by the Superintendence of Cultural Heritage and the Sannat and Xewkija local councils with the support...
  • Archaeologists Rewrite Timeline Of Bronze And Iron Ages, Alphabet

    12/24/2001 5:04:31 AM PST · by blam · 21 replies · 613+ views
    Cornell University ^ | 12-19-2001 | Blaine P. Friedlander Jr.
    Archaeologists rewrite timeline of Bronze and Iron Ages, including early appearance of alphabet FOR RELEASE: Dec. 19, 2001 Contact: Blaine P. Friedlander Jr. Office: 607-255-3290 E-Mail: bpf2@cornell.edu ITHACA, N.Y. -- Using information gleaned from the sun's solar cycles and tree rings, archaeologists are rewriting the timeline of the Bronze and Iron Ages. The research dates certain artifacts of the ancient eastern Mediterranean decades earlier than previously thought. And it places an early appearance of the alphabet outside Phoenicia at around 740 B.C. Writing in two articles in the forthcoming issue of the journal Science (Dec. 21), archaeologists from Cornell University ...
  • Dionysian ecstatic cults in early Rome

    06/22/2010 6:04:02 PM PDT · by decimon · 16 replies
    University of Gothenburg ^ | June 21, 2010 | Unknown
    A new doctoral thesis from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, shows that, in contrast to traditional scholarly claims, Dionysian cultic activities may very well have occurred in archaic Rome in the decades around 500 BC. A strong scholarly tradition rooted in the 19th century denies the presence of Dionysian ecstatic rites, cults, and satyr plays in Roman society. Although people in nearby societies evidently engaged in such behaviour around the same time in history, the Romans simply did not, according to early scholars. British scholars often stressed how much their people had in common with the Romans, not least as...
  • The art of wine in ancient Persia [Shiraz]

    11/10/2005 11:25:03 AM PST · by Cyrus the Great · 43 replies · 882+ views
    Iranian ^ | 11/10/05 | Iranian
    I could drink much wine and yet bear it well -- Darius the Great, King of Persia (6th BCE), Athenaeus 10.45 The history of wine making and wine drinking is an old one in Persia, and today the Darioush vineyard in the Napa Valley which has become renowned in the art of wine making, is attempting to revive this tradition in the United States. Wine connoisseurs today may be familiar with the word Shiraz, the name of a town in southwest Persia famed for its grapes. Whether or not the Shiraz grape was the source of the Medieval Syrah, brought...
  • Researchers Shed New Lights On Origin Of Ancient Chinese Civilization

    01/02/2006 11:47:34 AM PST · by blam · 14 replies · 998+ views
    China.org ^ | 1-2-2006
    Researchers Shed New Lights on Origin of Ancient Chinese Civilization Chinese ancients living 3,500 to 4,500 years ago already had many choices for meal, including millet, wheat and rice, which are still the staple food of the Chinese. They also compiled calendars according to their astronomical observation, which is regarded as one of the symbols of the origin of civilization. They made exquisite bronze vessels to hold wine and food, and some of the bronze vessels were later developed into symbol of the supreme imperial power. But how the Chinese civilization started and evolved remains a magnetic topic that has...
  • Wine grape genome decoded, flavour genes found

    08/27/2007 3:57:09 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 13 replies · 491+ views
    Yahoo | AFP ^ | 8/26/07 | Marlowe Hood
    PARIS (AFP) - Scientists in France and Italy have deciphered the complete genetic code for the plant producing wine grapes, according to a study published Sunday. While the findings will do nothing to enhance the mystique of winemaking, they could pave the way for gene-based manipulations to boost flavour and improve resistance against disease. Dozens of researchers analyzing the Pinot Noir varietal of Vitis vinifera, the core species from which virtually all grape wine is made, found twice as many genes contributing to aroma than in other sequenced plants, suggesting that wine flavours could be traced to the genome level....
  • Ancient Christian "Holy Wine" Factory Found in Egypt

    06/19/2008 7:37:44 AM PDT · by NYer · 18 replies · 222+ views
    Nat Geo ^ | June 18, 2008 | Andrew Bossone
    Two wine presses found in Egypt were likely part of the area's earliest winery, producing holy wine for export to Christians abroad, archaeologists say. Egyptian archaeologists discovered the two presses with large crosses carved across them near St. Catherine's Monastery, a sixth-century A.D. complex near Mount Sinai on the Sinai Peninsula. (See a map of the area.) More presses are likely to be found in the area, which was probably an ancient wine-industry hub, according to Tarek El-Naggar, director for southern Sinai at Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities. Weeks after discovering the first wine press, excavators unearthed a nearly identical...
  • 9000 Years Old Oriental Wine Found

    09/03/2005 9:02:03 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies · 496+ views
    The Epoch Times ^ | August 30, 2005 | David James
    An international team of researchers have discovered after chemical analyses, that organics absorbed and preserved in pottery jars from the Neolithic village of Jiahu, in Henan province, Central China contained a beverage of rice, honey, and fruit made as early as 9,000 years ago... According to Dr. McGovern, the analysis of these liquids point to their being fermented and filtered rice or millet wines known as jiu or chang according to Shang Dynasty oracle inscriptions.
  • Italy owes wine legacy to Celts, history buffs say

    04/22/2006 7:56:23 PM PDT · by Pharmboy · 130 replies · 1,635+ views
    Reuters via Wash. Post ^ | April 21, 2006 | Svetlana Kovalyova
    ROBBIO, Italy (Reuters) - Wine conjures up the image of cultured drinkers sipping their way delicately through a full-bodied vintage. But for two history buffs with a passion for the tipple, northern Italy has the barbarians to thank for its long wine-making tradition. Luca Sormani, from Como, and Fulvio Pescarolo, from the tiny town of Robbio near Milan, have traced the region's wine culture all the way back to its Celtic roots and have started making it according to ancient methods. Celtic tribes from farther north -- known to the Romans as "Barbari" -- conquered northern parts of Italy about...