Keyword: greatsandsea

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  • Archaeologists discover Pharaonic temple in Western Desert

    03/18/2003 6:17:25 AM PST · by vannrox · 10 replies · 489+ views
    The Egyptian State News ^ | March 15, 2003 | Editorial Staff
    March 15, 2003 Archaeologists discover Pharaonic temple in Western Desert     Archaeologists discovered the ruins of a Pharaonic temple in Egypt?s Western Desert that will help increase their knowledge of oases in ancient times. ?Now destroyed and buried in sand in the middle of the desert, this temple which was about 20 meters (66 feet) long is located 140 kilometers (85 miles) from Siwa on the banks of an ancient abandoned oasis,? Italian Egyptologist Paolo Gallo told AFP.     "The major deities of the Egypt and Egyptian pantheon are represented in very beautiful painted relief on blocks from the...
  • Maltese claims extraordinary discovery in Sahara desert

    12/29/2007 8:01:23 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 74 replies · 176+ views
    Independent Online ^ | Saturday, December 29, 2007 | unattributed
    Mark Borda and Mahmoud Marai, from Malta and Egypt respectively, were surveying a field of boulders on the flanks of a hill deep in the Libyan desert some 700 kilometres west of the Nile Valley when engravings on a large rock consisting of hieroglyphic writing, Pharaonic cartouche, an image of the king and other Pharaonic iconography came into view. Mr Borda would not reveal the precise location in order to protect the site... "The consensus among Egyptologists is that the Egyptians did not penetrate this desert any further than the area around Djedefre's Water Mountain. This is a sandstone hill...
  • Huge Crater Found in Egypt - Kebira

    03/03/2006 8:58:45 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 68 replies · 3,449+ views
    Space.com ^ | 3/3/06 | Robert Roy Britt
    Scientists have discovered a huge crater in the Saharan desert, the largest one ever found there. The crater is about 19 miles (31 kilometers) wide, more than twice as big as the next largest Saharan crater known. It utterly dwarfs Meteor Crater in Arizona, which is about three-fourths of a mile (1.2 kilometers) in diameter. In fact, the newfound crater, in Egypt, was likely carved by a space rock that was itself roughly 0.75 miles wide in an event that would have been quite a shock, destroying everything for hundreds of miles. For comparison, the Chicxulub crater left by a...
  • Tut's gem hints at space impact

    07/20/2006 5:48:59 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 10 replies · 272+ views
    bbc ^ | Last Updated: Wednesday, 19 July 2006, 19:09 GMT 20:09 UK
    In 1996 in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, Italian mineralogist Vincenzo de Michele spotted an unusual yellow-green gem in the middle of one of Tutankhamun's necklaces. The jewel was tested and found to be glass, but intriguingly it is older than the earliest Egyptian civilisation. Working with Egyptian geologist Aly Barakat, they traced its origins to unexplained chunks of glass found scattered in the sand in a remote region of the Sahara Desert. But the glass is itself a scientific enigma. How did it get to be there and who or what made it? Thursday's BBC Horizon programme reports an...
  • Danish Bronze Age glass beads traced to Egypt

    12/09/2014 5:22:24 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Science Nordic ^ | December 8, 2014 | Jeanette Varberg, Flemming Kaul, Bernard Gratuze, tr by Michael de Laine
    ...The analyses revealed that the glass originate from the same glass workshops in Egypt that supplied the glass that the Egyptian Pharaoh Tutankhamun took with him to his grave in 1323 BC... Globalisation in the Bronze Age Twenty-three glass beads from Denmark were analysed using plasma-spectrometry. Without destroying the fragile beads, this technique makes it possible to compare the chemical composition of trace elements in the beads with reference material from Amarna in Egypt and Nippur in Mesopotamia, about 50 km south east of Baghdad in Iraq. The comparison showed that the chemical composition of the two sets of trace...
  • Ancient Egyptian Glassmaking Recreated

    12/14/2007 7:23:57 PM PST · by blam · 15 replies · 175+ views
    Eureka Alert ^ | 12-14-2007 | Dr Paul Nicholson
    Contact: Dr. Paul Nicholson NicholsonPT@cardiff.ac.co.uk 44-292-087-4582 Cardiff University Ancient Egyptian glassmaking recreated 3000-year-old furnace rebuilt by archaeologist The reconstructed kiln built by Dr. Paul Nicholson of Cardiff University and Dr. Caroline Jackson of Sheffield University. A team led by a Cardiff University archaeologist has reconstructed a 3,000-year-old glass furnace, showing that Ancient Egyptian glassmaking methods were much more advanced than previously thought. Dr Paul Nicholson, of the University’s School of History and Archaeology, is leader of an Egypt Exploration Society team working on the earliest fully excavated glassmaking site in the world. The site, at Amarna, on the banks of...
  • Cray Supercomputer... Discover Origin Of Mysterious Glass Found In King Tut's Tomb

    08/02/2007 10:47:08 AM PDT · by blam · 37 replies · 2,416+ views
    Cray Supercomputer at Sandia Helps Researchers Discover Origin of Mysterious Glass Found in King Tut's Tomb Released : Tuesday, July 31, 2007 7:26 AM Global supercomputer leader Cray Inc. (NASDAQ: CRAY) today announced that researchers running simulations on the Cray supercomputer at Sandia National Laboratories have re-created what could have happened 29 million years ago when an asteroid explosion turned Saharan sand into glass. The greenish natural glass, which can still be found scattered across remote stretches of the desert, was used by an artisan in ancient Egypt to carve a scarab that decorates one of the bejeweled breastplates buried...
  • Mysterious Egyptian Glass Formed By Meteorite Strike, Study Says

    12/22/2006 11:19:39 AM PST · by blam · 35 replies · 1,558+ views
    National Geographic ^ | 12-21-2006 | Stefan Lovgren
    Mysterious Egyptian Glass Formed by Meteorite Strike, Study Says Stefan Lovgren for National Geographic News December 21, 2006 Strange specimens of natural glass found in the Egyptian desert are products of a meteorite slamming into Earth between 100,000 and 200,000 years ago, scientists have concluded. The glass—known locally as Dakhla glass—represents the first clear evidence of a meteorite striking an area populated by humans. At the time of the impact, the Dakhla Oasis, located in the western part of modern-day Egypt, resembled the African savanna and was inhabited by early humans, according to archaeological evidence (see Egypt map.) "This meteorite...
  • King Tut's Necklace Shaped By Fireball

    06/26/2006 4:32:58 PM PDT · by blam · 43 replies · 1,742+ views
    The Australian ^ | 6-26-2006
    King Tut's necklace shaped by fireball June 26, 2006 LONDON: Scientists believe they have solved the mystery surrounding a piece of rare natural glass at the centre of an elaborate necklace found among the treasures of Tutankhamun, the boy pharaoh. They think a fragile meteorite broke up as it entered the atmosphere, producing a fireball with temperatures over 1800C that turned the desert sand and rock into molten lava that became glass when it cooled. Experts have puzzled over the origin of the yellow-green glass -- carved into the shape of a scarab beetle -- since it was excavated in...
  • Adventurer crosses sands that conquered a king

    01/27/2006 11:33:56 PM PST · by Tyche · 25 replies · 888+ views
    The Times Online ^ | Jan 28, 2006 | Martin Penner
    INSPIRED by the legend of a Persian king and his lost army, Stefano Miglietti, an Italian adventurer, completed a 340-mile hike through the most isolated and arid part of the western Sahara yesterday. The route that Signor Miglietti followed through the so-called Great Sand Sea — from the Farafra oasis in southern Egypt to the Siwa oasis in the north — has always been considered impossible for a man carrying his own food and water. According to legend, Cambyses II, the Persian king, foolishly tried to take the same route in 523 BC, setting off with a 50,000-strong army. Herodotus,...