Keyword: hasandag

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  • 9500 year old obsidian bracelet shows exceptional craft skills

    12/29/2011 10:36:07 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 74 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | Tuesday, December 27, 2011 | LTDS press release
    Researchers have analysed the oldest obsidian bracelet ever identified, discovered in the 1990s at the site of Asikli Hyk, Turkey. A high level of technical expertise Using high-tech methods developed by LTDS to study the bracelet's surface and micro-topographic features, the researchers have revealed the astounding technical expertise of craftsmen in the eighth millennium BCE. Their skills were highly sophisticated for this period in late prehistory, and on a par with today's polishing techniques. This work is published in the December 2011 issue of Journal of Archaeological Science, and sheds new light on Neolithic societies. Dated to 7500 BCE, the...
  • Mound excavation reveals transition from hunting to herding in Neolithic settlement

    04/30/2014 5:04:50 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Phy dot org ^ | Tuesday, April 29, 2014 | Bob Yirka
    A team of researchers with members from several countries has found evidence of the birth of pre-ceramic Neolithic populations in a region of what is now Turkey. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describes how excavations of various levels at Aşıklı Höyük, reveal the history of the people that lived there... Aşıklı Höyük is the earliest known preceramic Neolithic mound site in Central Anatolia. The oldest Levels, 4 and 5, spanning 8,200 to approximately 9,000 cal B.C., associate with round-house architecture and arguably represent the birth of the Pre-Pottery Neolithic in the...
  • Layers of clustered apartments hide artifacts of ancient urban life

    04/20/2005 9:26:57 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies · 752+ views
    San Francisco Chronicle ^ | Monday, April 18, 2005 | David Perlman
    But because of the spectacular female clay figures that the archaeologists have found in the excavated layers over the years, atalhyk has become a draw for modern believers who hold to the idea that the neolithic people were ruled by a matriarchy whose central figure was a mother goddess... But to Ian Hodder of Stanford and Ruth Tringham of Berkeley, who will lead the expedition's 11th season at atalhyk this summer, the evidence questions the notion of a mother goddess and a matriarchal society... Mellaart's mother goddess was found in a grain bin, and the Hodder team's 3-inch figurine was...
  • Neolithic Mural in Turkey May Illustrate Ancient Volcanic Eruption

    01/09/2014 2:21:41 PM PST · by Theoria · 6 replies
    Popular Archaeology Magazine ^ | 08 Jan 2014 | Popular Archaeology Magazine
    Study indicates a correlation between the ancient mural image and date of the Hasan Dagi volcanic eruption. First discovered and excavated in the 1960's by British archaeologist James Mellaart, the world-famous 9,000-year-old Neolithic site of Catlhyuk in Central Anatolia, Turkey, has provided a unique window on the lives of humans at the transition from hunter-gatherer to settled agriculture societies. Among the spectacular finds was a mural or wall-painting dated to about 6600 BCE and described by its discoverer and others as depicting a volcanic eruption. Arguably regarded as the first map or graphical representation of a landscape, it featured "a...