Keyword: hirbetqeiyafa

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  • Archaeologists claim discovery of oldest Hebrew writing

    01/07/2010 1:25:03 PM PST · by decimon · 30 replies · 951+ views
    AFP ^ | Jan 7, 2009 | Unknown
    This undated picture released by the University of Haifa shows an ancient inscription on a piece of pottery in early Hebrew writing. The 3,000 year-old inscription discovered at a site where the Bible says David slew Goliath has been deciphered, showing it to be the earliest known Hebrew writing, Israeli archaeologists said. (AFP/U of Haifa) JERUSALEM (AFP) – A 3,000 year-old inscription discovered at a site where the Bible says David slew Goliath has been deciphered, showing it to be the earliest known Hebrew writing, Israeli archaeologists said on Thursday. The pottery shard with five lines of text in the...
  • King David Era Pottery Shard Supports Biblical Narrative

    01/08/2010 10:11:01 AM PST · by Nachum · 9 replies · 1,143+ views
    INN ^ | 1/8/10 | Avi Yellin
    (IsraelNN.com) A breakthrough in the research of the Hebrew Scriptures has shed new light on the period in which the Bible books of the Prophets were written. Professor Gershon Galil of the Department of Biblical Studies at the University of Haifa has deciphered an inscription dating from the 10th century BCE (the period of King David’s reign) and has proven the inscription to be ancient Hebrew, thus making it the earliest known example of Hebrew writing. The significance of this breakthrough relates to the fact that at least some of the Biblical scriptures are now proven to have been composed...
  • David and Solomon

    11/15/2010 8:25:23 AM PST · by Palter · 9 replies
    National Geographic Magazine ^ | December 2010 | Robert Draper
    Kings of Controversy Was the Kingdom of David and Solomon a glorious empire—or just a little cow town? It depends on which archaeologist you ask. The woman sitting on a bench in the Old City of Jerusalem, round-faced and bundled up against the autumn chill, chews on an apple while studying the building that has brought her both fame and aggravation. It doesn't really look like a building—just some low stone walls abutting an ancient terraced retaining wall 60 feet high. But because the woman is an archaeologist, and because this is her discovery, her eyes see what others might...
  • Oldest Possibly Hebrew Inscription Possibly Found

    10/30/2008 12:48:50 PM PDT · by Alex Murphy · 22 replies · 570+ views
    Fox News ^ | October 30, 2008 | AP
    ...The five lines of faded characters written 3,000 years ago, and the ruins of the fortified settlement where they were found, are indications that a powerful Israelite kingdom existed at the time of the Old Testament's King David, says Yossi Garfinkel, the Hebrew University archaeologist in charge of the new dig at Hirbet Qeiyafa...
  • 'Oldest Hebrew writing found near J'lem'

    10/30/2008 5:07:10 AM PDT · by SJackson · 13 replies · 646+ views
    Jerusalem Post ^ | 10-30-08
    An Israeli archaeologist digging at a hilltop south of Jerusalem believes a ceramic shard found in the ruins of an ancient town bears the oldest Hebrew inscription ever discovered, a find that could provide an important glimpse into the culture and language of the Holy Land at the time of the Bible. The five lines of faded characters written 3,000 years ago, and the ruins of the fortified settlement where they were found, are indications that a powerful Israelite kingdom existed at the time of King David, says Yossi Garfinkel, the Hebrew University archaeologist in charge of the new dig...
  • Earliest Evidence of Biblical Cult Discovered (From time of King David)

    05/11/2012 8:30:03 AM PDT · by C19fan · 9 replies
    LiveScience ^ | May 10, 2012 | Wynne Parry
    For the first time, archaeologists have uncovered shrines from the time of the early Biblical kings in the Holy Land, providing the earliest evidence of a cult, they say. Excavation within the remains of the roughly 3,000-year-old fortified city of Khirbet Qeiyafa, located about 19 miles (30 kilometers) southwest of Jerusalem, have revealed three large rooms used as shrines, along with artifacts, including tools, pottery and objects, such as alters associated with worship.
  • Archaeological Find Supports Biblical Portrait of the Davidic Kingdom

    04/23/2012 6:45:30 AM PDT · by NYer · 37 replies
    The Sacred Page ^ | April 20, 2012
    In 2008 I first ran a story about a major archaeological discovery at Khirbet Qeiyafa. The Israeli Antiquities Authority is releasing the preliminary report of the finds at Khirbet Qeiyafa. As I explained then, the findings are challenging skeptical scholars' claims. As I explained then, according to skeptical scholars the accounts of the kingdoms of David and Solomon are myths--essentially the Israelite equivalent of Arthurian legends of Camelot and the Roundtable. In short, in their view, it was simply fabricated. After Israel's Babylonian exile, the Jewish leaders invented these stories. The Israelites simply "idealized" their past; the Davidic traditions...
  • Archaeologists: Israeli artifacts support Solomon’s Temple

    05/12/2012 10:53:21 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 5 replies
    Sun Herald ^ | 05/12/2012 | MICHELE CHABIN - Religion News Service
    JERUSALEM -- Archaeologists have unearthed a trove of artifacts dating back to the time of the biblical King David that they say closely correspond to the description of Solomon’s Temple found in the Book of Kings. Hebrew University archaeologist Yosef Garfinkel said the find “is extraordinary” first because it marks the first time that shrines from the time of the early Israelite kings were found. In addition, two small, well-preserved models discovered in the excavations closely resemble elements described in the Bible. The multiyear excavations took place at Khirbet Qeiyafa, a fortified city about 20 miles southwest of Jerusalem, adjacent...
  • Artifacts from King David's Time Confirm Bible

    05/11/2012 8:54:41 AM PDT · by robowombat · 27 replies
    CBN News ^ | Friday, May 11, 2012 | Julie Stahl
    Artifacts from King David's Time Confirm Bible By Julie Stahl CBN News Mideast Correspondent Friday, May 11, 2012 JERUSALEM, Israel -- Was the Bible's King David man or myth? That's the question Israeli archeologists are answering with new archeological finds. Their discoveries also shed light on how the first Jewish temple was built. Khirbet Qeiyafa is in the Elah Valley. Not far from here the Bible says David killed the giant, Goliath. "We don't know much about the history, the politics really and about urbanization in the time of David," archaeologist Prof. Yosef Garfinkel of the Institute of Archaeology at...
  • Archaeologists Return to 'King Solomon's Mines' of Biblical Edom

    05/31/2011 8:53:36 AM PDT · by Palter · 24 replies · 1+ views
    Popular Archaeology ^ | 31 May 2011 | Dan McLerran
    A team of archaeologists and others will return to a site southeast of the Dead Sea in late September, 2011 to continue investigations of what is now considered to be one of the largest copper mines of the ancient Middle East. Among other things, scientists hope to be able to identify the ethnicity or nationality of the people who actually controlled the mining and smelting operation during the 10th century B.C.E., the time period when, based on the Biblical accounts, scholars have traditionally dated the kingdom of Edom, as well as that of David and Solomon of ancient Israel. The...
  • Top 8 of 2008: Archaeological Discoveries Related to the Bible

    01/01/2009 7:03:16 AM PST · by Mike Fieschko · 11 replies · 1,253+ views
    BiblePlaces.com blog ^ | Tuesday, December 30, 2008 | Todd Bolen
    2008 was a good year for archaeology.  You can read about the top ten archaeological discoveries in the world this year, but my goal here is simply to suggest what I perceive to be the most significant discoveries for understanding the Bible and its world.  Both the selection and the ranking is purely subjective; there were no polls, editorial committees, or coin tosses.  For another opinion, take a look at the list of Dr. Claude Mariottini.  1. Khirbet Qeiyafa (and inscription).  The new excavations of this fortified site in the Shephelah ranks as #1 for the following reasons: 1) The...
  • Deciphered etching sheds new light on Bible's origin

    01/10/2010 10:16:56 AM PST · by NYer · 65 replies · 1,630+ views
    Haaretz ^ | January 8, 2010 | Fadi Eyadat
    Did the writing of the Bible begin as far back as the 10th century B.C.E., during the time of King David? That is four centuries earlier than Biblical scholars currently believe - but an inscription recently deciphered by a scholar at Haifa University indicates that for at least some books of the Bible, the answer may be yes. The inscription, written in ink on clay, is the earliest yet found in Hebrew. It was discovered about 18 months ago in a dig at Khirbet Qeiyafa, near Emek Ha'ela. While it was quickly dated, its language remained uncertain until Prof. Gershon...
  • Are these ruins of biblical City of David?

    07/23/2011 7:21:31 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    CNN ^ | July 2011 | Matthew Chance
    Professor Israel Finkelstein, of Tel Aviv University, pointed out that the remains are not evidence of a powerful biblical state. He said: "We are not talking about some great empire ruled from a wonderful capital, the way we look at Assyria in the 9th century B.C., or even the northern Kingdom of Israel in the 9th century B.C. We are here in a formative phase of the rise of Judah." Finkelstein added: "Khirbet Qeiyafa does not make Judah a great empire with great armies." Garfinkel argued that even if it was not the great empire of the bible, its existence...
  • New evidence surfaces of David's kingdom

    11/17/2008 6:59:46 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies · 698+ views
    SF Chronicle ^ | Monday, November 17, 2008 | Matthew Kalman
    On Tuesday, Hebrew University archaeology Professor Yosef Garfinkel will present compelling evidence to scholars at Harvard University that he has found the 10th century biblical city of Sha'arayim, Hebrew for "Two Gates." Garfinkel, who made his startling discovery at the beginning of this month, will also discuss his findings at the American Schools of Oriental Research conference hosted by Boston University on Thursday. Garfinkel believes the city provides evidence that King David ruled a kingdom from his capital of Jerusalem. Some modern scholars have questioned the biblical account of David's kingdom and even whether he existed. Although it is not...
  • Archeologist finds 3,000-year old Hebrew text

    10/30/2008 6:37:54 PM PDT · by george76 · 46 replies · 1,644+ views
    CNN ^ | October 30, 2008
    An Israeli archaeologist has discovered what he says is the earliest-known Hebrew text, found on a shard of pottery that dates to the time of King David from the Old Testament, about 3,000 years ago. Professor Yosef Garfinkel of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem says the inscribed pottery shard -- known as an ostracon -- was found during excavations of a fortress from the 10th century BC. Carbon dating of the ostracon, along with pottery analysis, dates the inscription to time of King David, about a millennium earlier than the famous Dead Sea Scrolls, the university said. The shard contains...
  • When Was the Bible Really Written?

    01/09/2010 5:55:26 PM PST · by driftdiver · 32 replies · 1,212+ views
    Foxnews ^ | Jan 9, 2010 | foxnews
    By decoding the inscription on a 3,000-year-old piece of pottery, an Israeli professor has concluded that parts of the bible were written hundreds of years earlier than suspected. The pottery shard was discovered at excavations at Khirbet Qeiyafa near the Elah valley in Israel -- about 18 miles west of Jerusalem. Carbon-dating places it in the 10th century BC, making the shard about 1,000 years older than the Dead Sea scrolls. ...... English translation of the deciphered text: 1' you shall not do [it], but worship the [Lord]. 2' Judge the sla[ve] and the wid[ow] / Judge the orph[an] 3'...
  • 3,000-year-old artifacts fuel Biblical archaeology debate

    05/08/2012 1:00:23 PM PDT · by Pharmboy · 37 replies
    The Times of Israel ^ | May 8, 2012 | MATTI FRIEDMAN
    New finds presented Tuesday from an intriguing site in the Judean Hills are part of a scholarly argument about the accuracy of the Bible The excavation at Hirbet Qeiyafa is currently one of the most important in the world of Biblical archaeology (Courtesy of Hebrew University of Jerusalem)Two rare 3,000-year-old models of ancient shrines were among artifacts presented by an Israeli archaeologist on Tuesday as finds he said offered new support for the historical veracity of the Bible. The archaeologist, Yosef Garfinkel of Hebrew University, is excavating a site known as Hirbet Qeiyafa, located in the Judean hills not far...