Keyword: history

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • The True Story Of Andrew Jackson’s Swearing Parrot

    01/16/2018 10:19:16 PM PST · by oxcart · 38 replies
    omgfacts.com ^ | 02/22/17 | staff
    Andrew Jackson isn’t the only US President to keep a pet bird in the White House. Teddy Roosevelt had a one-legged rooster and James Buchanan supposedly owned two bald eagles (because America). But to our knowledge, Jackson was the only one to have a swearing parrot. The bird’s name was Poll and was originally meant for Jackson’s wife, Rachel. But after she passed away, Jackson became the African Grey’s caretaker. So how did the parrot get a foul mouth? We can’t say for sure. But with what we know about Jackson—a man so tough and temperamental his nickname was “Old...
  • 'Damn … I missed': incredible story when the Queen was nearly shot in New Zealand in 1981.

    01/16/2018 6:16:24 PM PST · by apoliticalone · 24 replies
    The Guardian UK ^ | 1-13-2018 | Eleanor Ainge Roy
    The Queen had just stepped out of a Rolls-Royce to greet 3,500 well wishers when a distinctive crack rang out across the grassy reserve. According to former Dunedin police det sgt Tom Lewis (no relation to the shooter), police immediately attempted to disguise the seriousness of the threat, telling the British press the noise was a council sign falling over. Later, under further questioning from reporters, they said someone had been letting off firecrackers nearby. According to Tom Lewis, the then prime minister Robert Muldoon feared if word got out about how close the teenager had come to killing the...
  • How Fanta Was Created for Nazi Germany

    01/16/2018 1:33:09 AM PST · by beaversmom · 36 replies
    Atlas Obscura ^ | January 11, 2018 | Matthew Blitz
    IT’S FEBRUARY 1944, AND BERLIN is attempting to recover from American aerial bombing. But life and industry continues on the city’s outskirts. In farmhouses, bottles clang and a mix of ex-convicts, Chinese laborers, and other workers fill glass bottles of what was likely a cloudy, brownish liquid. This is one of Coca-Cola’s makeshift bottling operations, and they are making Nazi Germany’s signature beverage. Even during war, Germans want their Fanta. The soft drink Fanta was invented by Coca-Cola, an American company, inside of Nazi Germany during World War II. Developed at the height of the Third Reich, the new soda...
  • Martin Luther King Jr. Tells Us to Take Personal Responsibility, Not Blame Others

    01/15/2018 7:44:54 PM PST · by Kaslin · 6 replies
    PJ Media ^ | January 15, 2018 | D.C. MCALLISTER
    In 1953, Martin Luther King Jr. preached a sermon at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church that we need to hear today, because it’s about something we’ve forgotten as we stoke the flames of anger and blame others for our real and perceived sufferings — it’s about personal responsibility. Our refusal to accept responsibility is a rot within our society, a cancer that is eating away at our institutions, relationships, and liberty. We point fingers at others instead of pointing them at ourselves. We see ourselves as victims of everything — the economy, government action or inaction, other people, our parents, our...
  • Frederick Douglass in 1852: "What to the Slave is the 4th of July?"

    01/15/2018 11:17:47 AM PST · by GoldenState_Rose · 62 replies
    Teaching American History ^ | July 5, 1852 | Frederick Douglass
    Fellow Citizens, I am not wanting in respect for the fathers of this republic. The signers of the Declaration of Independence were brave men. They were great men too — great enough to give fame to a great age. It does not often happen to a nation to raise, at one time, such a number of truly great men. The point from which I am compelled to view them is not, certainly, the most favorable; and yet I cannot contemplate their great deeds with less than admiration. They were statesmen, patriots and heroes, and for the good they did, and...
  • On January 15, 1919, Boston's 2.3 million gallon molasses flood killed 21 people

    01/15/2018 6:32:51 AM PST · by harpygoddess · 34 replies
    http://vaviper.blogspot.com ^ | 01/15/2018 | Harpygoddess
    On January 15, 1919, a tank containing 2.3 million gallons of molasses weighing an estimated 26 million pounds burst open, unleashing a sticky flood onto Boston's North End. The 25-foot high wave of goo oozed over the streets at 35 miles per hour, crushing buildings in its wake and killing 21 people. The wave broke steel girders of the Boston Elevated Railway, almost swept a train off its tracks, knocked buildings off their foundations, and toppled electrical poles, the wires hissing and sparking as they fell into the brown flood. The Boston Globe reported that people 'were picked up and...
  • History as Therapy: Alternative History and Nationalist Imaginings in Russia (Post-Soviet Society)

    01/14/2018 2:17:40 PM PST · by GoldenState_Rose · 4 replies
    University of Wollongong, Australia ^ | 2014 | Konstantin Sheiko and Stephen Brown
    "For Russians disillusioned with their initial experience of capitalism and democracy, alternative history offered a therapy in which the problems of today gave way to new images of past glory." In 2009, we wrote a book entitled Nationalist Imaginings of the Russian Past. Anatolii Fomenko and the Rise of Alternative History. Its focus was the explosion of 'alternative' history, a publishing phenomenon that emerged in Russia after the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. The leading light in this movement was, and remains, Anatolii Fomenko, a Sovietera mathematician who claimed that the standard historical chronology was hopelessly inaccurate and...
  • A Brief History of Presidential Profanity

    01/14/2018 2:16:28 PM PST · by oxcart · 8 replies
    Eloquent at the podium, JFK could swear like a (which he was, of course) away from the microphone. When word leaked that the Air Force had spent $5000 to furnish a maternity suite for Jackie Kennedy at Otis Air Force Base, the president knew the expenditure would be used as a political football. "This is obviously a fu**-up," he fumed to a hapless general over the phone.
  • Happy Feast of the Ass!

    01/14/2018 5:51:45 AM PST · by harpygoddess · 11 replies
    http://vaviper.blogspot.com ^ | 01/12/2018 | Harpygoddess
    The Feast of the Ass (Latin: Festum Asinorum or asinaria festa, French: Fête de l’âne) was a medieval, Christian feast observed on January 14, celebrating the Flight into Egypt. It was celebrated primarily in France, as a by-product of the Feast of Fools celebrating the donkey-related stories in the Bible, in particular the donkey bearing the Holy Family into Egypt after Jesus‘s birth. A girl with child on a donkey would be led through town to the church, where the donkey would stand beside the altar during the sermon, and the congregation would “hee-haw” their responses to the priest. Mass...
  • In his own words – Billy Graham on Martin Luther King, Jr.

    01/12/2018 5:33:17 PM PST · by GoldenState_Rose · 21 replies
    Billy Graham Library ^ | 2015 | Billy Graham
    Civil rights were very much in the forefront in America during the 1960s and early 1970s. As the issue unfolded, I sometimes found myself under fire from both sides, extreme conservatives castigating me for doing too much and extreme liberals blaming me for not doing enough. In reality, both groups tended to stand aloof from our evangelistic Crusades, but those people who actively supported us understood very well our commitment to doing what we could through our evangelism to end the blight of racism. Early on, Dr. King and I spoke about his method of using non-violent demonstrations to bring...
  • On January 10 in 49 B.C., Julius Caesar crossed the Rubicon River

    01/10/2018 6:52:04 AM PST · by harpygoddess · 46 replies
    http://vaviper.blogspot.com ^ | 01/10/2018 | Harpygoddess
    Today is the anniversary of the day in 49 B.C. when Julius Caesar - noting, Iacta alea esto ("The die is cast") - crossed the Rubicon River with his legions to march on Rome in defiance of both the Senate and Roman law, which forbade any general from crossing the Rubicon and entering Italy proper with a standing army. To do so was treason. This tiny stream would reveal Caesar's intentions and mark the point of no return. Born around 100 B.C. into one of the oldest patrician families of the republic, Caesar began his political career as a member...
  • Legendary astronaut John W. Young dies

    01/06/2018 1:55:03 PM PST · by jmcenanly · 27 replies
    Spaceflight Now ^ | 1/6/2018 | William Harwood
    Legendary astronaut John Young, who twice ventured into space in pioneering two-man Gemini capsules, orbited the moon and then walked on its cratered surface before commanding two space shuttle missions, including the program’s maiden flight, has passed away. NASA confirmed the death early Saturday in a posting on Twitter: “We’re saddened by the loss of astronaut John Young, who was 87. Young flew twice to the Moon, walked on its surface & flew the first Space Shuttle mission. He went to space six times in the Gemini, Apollo & Space Shuttle programs.” Tweeted astronaut Terry Virts: “Rest In peace John...
  • The Battle of New Orleans, Dec, 1814 - 8 Jan, 1815

    01/06/2018 11:45:25 AM PST · by NonValueAdded · 24 replies
    BattleofNewOrleans.org ^ | 2009 | Thomas Zimmerman
    [British General Edward] Pakenham delayed his main assault until Jan 8, when he had brought up nearly 10,000 men, and planned to attack with about 5,500, keeping the rest in reserve. [snip] The men on both sides knew an attack was planned on the 8th. Jackson, clearly felt that some sort of night attack was coming . Jackson, was awakened by a messenger who arrived from Morgan across the river, requesting more troops. Morgan and Patterson could see some activity by the British on the river and feared they were going to send a large force across the river to...
  • If you could have lunch with anyone in history, living or dead, who would it be?

    01/03/2018 9:07:52 AM PST · by HonkyTonkMan · 210 replies
    03 January, 2018 | HTM
    If you could have lunch with anyone in history, living or dead, who would it be?
  • Russian Nostalgia for Soviet Times Not Nostalgia for Soviet Realities, Psychologist Says

    01/02/2018 8:07:24 AM PST · by GoldenState_Rose · 15 replies
    Nadezhda Vlasova says that those who are nostalgic for the Soviet Union include both those whose youth was passed while it existed and who remember it through the gauzy lens of memory and young people who did not live then but who believe because of what some of their elders say that life was better (momenty.org/city/i180459/). She points out that this is much like the reaction of those who like “romantic films about the Middle Ages with beautiful dresses and architecture” but who in no case “would like to live in a city without plumbing.” Russians today look at the...
  • Lawsuit may stall Suncoast Parkway extension

    12/21/2017 2:10:15 PM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 10 replies
    The Tampa Bay Times ^ | December 21, 2017 | Barbara Behrendt
    BROOKSVILLE — A last-minute lawsuit may put the brakes on the long-awaited extension of the Suncoast Parkway north into Citrus County. Construction was slated to begin early next year. At a Hernando-Citrus Metropolitan Planning Organization meeting last week, city and county officials talked about a push at the state level to move the project ahead even faster. A ground-breaking ceremony was in the works. But like other steps in the process of building the toll road extension known as Suncoast Parkway 2, within days of that discussion, another shoe dropped. On Dec. 15, the Friends of Etna Turpentine Camp, Inc.,...
  • Happy 80th Birthday to Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs

    12/21/2017 9:28:25 AM PST · by Ciaphas Cain · 34 replies
    Walt Disney Productions ^ | December 21st, 1937 | Walt Disney and many other talented people
    Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, the first ever full-length animated motion picture, was released on this day in 1937. In one theater at first and then wide across America a month and a half later.Click here for the original theatrical trailer.
  • Quiz: What year is this tech from? SLIDE SHOW QUIZ (from the past)

    12/20/2017 9:07:59 AM PST · by Swordmaker · 44 replies
    TechRepublic ^ | August 27, 2017 | By Fox Van Allen
    In what year was the Commodore PET released? Short for Personal Electronic Transactor, the monochrome PET was the first full-featured computer released by Commodore. via Oldcomputers.net About Fox Van Allen Fox Van Allen is a Los Angeles-based writer for CBS Interactive covering technology, tech lifestyle and gaming topics for GameSpot, CNET, ZDNet and TechRepublic. He has previously worked as a news and feature writer for a number of other sites, inclu... Full Bio. . .
  • Colorado Dems rename annual ‘Jefferson Jackson Dinner’ after Obama: ‘Damn right’

    12/18/2017 11:40:54 PM PST · by Impy · 21 replies
    The Washington Times ^ | 12-18-2017 | Douglas Ernst
    Colorado Democrats have renamed their annual “Jefferson Jackson Dinner” the “Obama Dinner” to honor the legacy of the 44th president and his wife. Barack and Michelle Obama are the ones that the Colorado Democratic Party has been waiting for — to usurp a fundraising event named after the third and seventh U.S. presidents, respectively. Party spokesman Eric Walker had two words for critics of the decision: “Damn right.”
  • December 17 is the anniversary of the Wright brothers' first flight

    12/17/2017 8:45:42 AM PST · by harpygoddess · 21 replies
    http://vaviper.blogspot.com ^ | 12/17/2017 | Va Viper
    Today is the anniversary of mankind's first powered flight, achieved at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina on 17 December 1903 by pioneer American aviators Wilbur and Orville Wright (1867-1912 and 1871-1948, respectively). The Wrights - Dayton, Ohio bicycle mechanics - become interested in aviation as an avocation and embarked on a systematic experimental program that eventually led to their extraordinary success - of which movable wing parts and a lightweight engine were the key elements. Prior To the powered flight, the brothers completed over one thousand glides from atop Big Kill Devil Hill. These flying skills were a crucial component of...