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Keyword: huntergatherers

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  • Filipino scientist discovers rice's ancient origins

    05/11/2011 12:31:14 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    GMA News ^ | Wednesday, May 4, 2011 | TJ Dimacali
    Using large-scale gene re-sequencing, Purugganan and a team of researchers traced the origins of domesticated rice as far back as 9,000 years ago to China's Yangtze Valley, according to a May 2 press release from New York University. The tens of thousands of kinds of rice available in the world today are mostly varieties of either japonica or indica, the two major subspecies of Asian rice, Oryza sativa. It had been a subject of scientific debate whether these two subspecies had a common origin, or developed separately in China and India. "The multiple-origin model has gained currency in recent years...
  • Genetic Origin of Cultivated Citrus Determined: ...Evidence of Origins of Orange, Lime, et al

    01/26/2011 5:47:23 AM PST · by Red Badger · 51 replies
    www.sciencedaily.com ^ | 01-26-2011 | Staff
    Citrus species are among the most important fruit trees in the world. Citrus has a long history of cultivation, often thought to be more than 4,000 years. Until now, however, the exact genetic origins of cultivated citrus such as sweet orange (Citrus sinensis), lemon (C. limon), and grapefruit (C. paradisi) have been a mystery. A team of researchers from China has published a study in the Journal of the American Society of Horticultural Science that provides genetic evidence of the origins of a variety species of today's cultivated citrus. The research team, led by Zhiqin Zhou from Southwest University, analyzed...
  • Livestock and people in a Middle Chalcolithic settlement: a micromorphological investigation from...

    01/18/2011 7:02:14 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Antiquity ^ | Vol 84:326, 2010 pp 1123-1134 | Emily M. Hubbard
    Round and rectangular buildings with grain silos at a Copper Age site in Israel suggested social stratification to the excavators. Using micromorphology, the author demonstrates that while the rectangular building was occupied by people, the round ones had contained animals, perhaps as providers of milk, and dung for fuel. While this removes the direct indication of social variance, it strengthens the argument that animals, as well as grain, formed the basis for the creation of surplus.
  • Remains Of Oldest Fruit Trees In Iberian Peninsula Found

    01/18/2011 6:31:05 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Arch News ^ | Friday, January 14, 2011 | Stephen Russell
    This research has enabled the recording of numerous fleshy fruits such as plums of various types, cherries, peaches, sloes, grapes, apples, figs, quince and medlar and, in a token manner, olives. The overall collection of nuts is interesting, significant being the presence of hazel nuts, acorns, walnuts, pine kernels and, sporadically, beechnuts. As regards cereals, wheat, barley and oats have been identified. Also of particular important are the various seeds of the bottle (or calabash) gourd, a species of water pumpkin, very rarely recorded in archaeological contexts.
  • From foraging to farming: the 10,000-year revolution

    03/29/2012 4:46:05 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | March 26, 2012 | U of Cambridge
    The moment when the hunter-gatherers laid down their spears and began farming around 11,000 years ago is often interpreted as one of the most rapid and significant transitions in human history -- the 'Neolithic Revolution'. By producing and storing food, Homo sapiens both mastered the natural world and took the first significant steps towards thousands of years of runaway technological development. The advent of specialist craftsmen, an increase in fertility and the construction of permanent architecture are just some of the profound changes that followed. Of course, the transition to agriculture was far from rapid. The period around 14,500 years...
  • The Mystery Behind the 5,000 Year Old Tarim Mummies

    08/31/2009 2:18:47 PM PDT · by BGHater · 28 replies · 2,209+ views
    Environmental Graffiti ^ | 31 Aug 2009 | EG
    A Tarim Basin mummy photographed circa 1910 Photo: Aurel Stein The door creaked open, and there in the gloom of the newly opened room, perfectly preserved despite the passing of thousands of years, a red-haired mummy with Caucasian features stared back. It was a life-changing moment for archaeologist Professor Victor Mair, and ten years on it still gave him chills. Mair had stumbled upon the recently discovered corpses of a man and his family in a museum in the Chinese city of Ürümqi, but the shock waves of the find would be felt far and wide. The 3000-year-old Cherchen...
  • White Europeans evolved only ‘5,500 years ago’

    08/30/2009 10:40:35 AM PDT · by decimon · 150 replies · 4,451+ views
    The Sunday Times ^ | August 30, 2009 | Jonathan Leake
    White Europeans could have evolved as recently as 5,500 years ago, according to research which suggests that the early humans who populated Britain and Scandinavia had dark skins for millenniums. It was only when early humans gave up hunter-gathering and switched to farming about 5,500 years ago that white skin began to be favoured, say the researchers. This is because farmed food was deficient in vitamin D, a vital nutrient. Humans can make this in their skin when exposed to sunlight, but dark skin is much less efficient at it. In places such as northern Europe, where sunlight levels are...
  • Why Did People Become White?

    09/02/2009 12:47:20 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 137 replies · 3,273+ views
    Live Science ^ | 9/2/2009 | Heather Whipps
    Humans come in a rainbow of hues, from dark chocolate browns to nearly translucent whites. This full kaleidoscope of skin colors was a relatively recent evolutionary development, according to biologists, occuring alongside the migration of modern humans out of Africa between 100,000 and 50,000 years ago. The consensus among scientists has always been that lower levels of vitamin D at higher latitudes — where the sun is less intense — caused the lightening effect when modern humans, who began darker-skinned, first migrated north. But other factors might be at work, a new study suggests. From the varying effects of frostbite...
  • Saami not descended from Swedish Hunter-Gathers

    09/28/2009 8:11:25 PM PDT · by BGHater · 23 replies · 1,322+ views
    Science blogs ^ | 24 Sep 2009 | Razib Khan
    A few weeks ago I posted on a paper, Genetic Discontinuity Between Local Hunter-Gatherers and Central Europe's First Farmers.Another one is out in the same vein, Ancient DNA Reveals Lack of Continuity between Neolithic Hunter-Gatherers and Contemporary Scandinavians: The driving force behind the transition from a foraging to a farming lifestyle in prehistoric Europe (Neolithization) has been debated for more than a century...Of particular interest is whether population replacement or cultural exchange was responsible...Scandinavia holds a unique place in this debate, for it maintained one of the last major hunter-gatherer complexes in Neolithic Europe, the Pitted Ware culture...Intriguingly, these late...
  • Ancient DNA Reveals Lack Of Continuity - Neolithic Hunter-Gatherers And Contemporary Scandinavians

    01/02/2012 6:33:58 AM PST · by blam · 42 replies
    Science Direct ^ | Department of Evolutionary Biology, Uppsala University, SE-11863 Uppsala, Sweden
    Ancient DNA Reveals Lack Of Continuity Between Neolithic Hunter-Gatherers And Contemporary Scandinavians September 24, 2009. Summary The driving force behind the transition from a foraging to a farming lifestyle in prehistoric Europe (Neolithization) has been debated for more than a century [1] , [2] and [3] . Of particular interest is whether population replacement or cultural exchange was responsible [3] , [4] and [5] . Scandinavia holds a unique place in this debate, for it maintained one of the last major hunter-gatherer complexes in Neolithic Europe, the Pitted Ware culture [6]. Intriguingly, these late hunter-gatherers existed in parallel to early...
  • Archaeologists Trace Early Irrigation Farming In Ancient Yemen

    07/22/2008 11:10:49 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies · 592+ views
    Science Daily ^ | Wednesday, July 16, 2008 | adapted from materials by University of Toronto
    In the remote desert highlands of southern Yemen, a team of archaeologists have discovered new evidence of ancient transitions from hunting and herding to irrigation agriculture 5,200 years ago. As part of a larger program of archaeological research, Michael Harrower from the University of Toronto and The Roots of Agriculture in Southern Arabia (RASA) team explored the Wadi Sana watershed documenting 174 ancient irrigation structures, modeled topography and hydrology, and interviewed contemporary camel and goat herders and irrigation farmers. "Agriculture in Yemen appeared relatively late in comparison with other areas of the Middle East, where farming first developed near the...
  • FSU Anthropologist Finds Earliest Evidence Of Maize Farming In Mexico (7,300 YA)

    04/10/2007 10:37:52 AM PDT · by blam · 24 replies · 640+ views
    Eureka Alert/FSU ^ | 4-9-2007 | Mary Pohl/FSU
    Contact: Mary Pohl mpohl@mailer.fsu.edu 850-644-8153 Florida State University FSU anthropologist finds earliest evidence of maize farming in Mexico TALLAHASSEE, Fla.--A Florida State University anthropologist has new evidence that ancient farmers in Mexico were cultivating an early form of maize, the forerunner of modern corn, about 7,300 years ago - 1,200 years earlier than scholars previously thought. Professor Mary Pohl conducted an analysis of sediments in the Gulf Coast of Tabasco, Mexico, and concluded that people were planting crops in the "New World" of the Americas around 5,300 B.C. The analysis extends Pohl's previous work in this area and validates principles...
  • Myth of the Hunter-Gatherer

    08/13/2004 12:07:48 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies · 846+ views
    Archaeology ^ | September/October 1999 Volume 52 Number 5 | Kenneth M. Ames
    On September 19, 1997, the New York Times announced the discovery of a group of earthen mounds in northeastern Louisiana. The site, known as Watson Brake, includes 11 mounds 26 feet high linked by low ridges into an oval 916 feet long. What is remarkable about this massive complex is that it was built around 3400 B.C., more than 3,000 years before the development of farming communities in eastern North America, by hunter-gatherers, at least partly mobile, who visited the site each spring and summer to fish, hunt, and collect freshwater mussels... Social complexity cannot exist unless I it...
  • Papua New Guineans Among World's First Farmers

    06/20/2003 8:09:05 AM PDT · by blam · 15 replies · 291+ views
    News In Science ^ | 6-20-2003
    Papua New Guineans among world's first farmers Friday, 20 June 2003 Papua New Guinea's highlands are one of the places where farming first began (Pic: ANU) Papua New Guinea's highlands was one of the cradles of farming, where some of the world's staple food plants were first domesticated, researchers have confirmed. The region now joins five others as a core area in which the agricultural revolution - the world's most dominant landuse - had its origins, report a team led by archaeologist Dr Tim Denham of Adelaide's Flinders University in today's issue of the journal Science. "Until recently, the evidence...
  • Autism May Have Had Advantages in Humans' Hunter-Gatherer Past, Researcher Believes

    06/10/2011 3:13:11 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 85 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | June 3, 2011 | University of Southern California
    Though people with autism face many challenges because of their condition, they may have been capable hunter-gatherers in prehistoric times, according to a paper published in the journal Evolutionary Psychology in May. The autism spectrum may represent not disease, but an ancient way of life for a minority of ancestral humans, said Jared Reser, a brain science researcher and doctoral candidate in the USC Psychology Department. Some of the genes that contribute to autism may have been selected and maintained because they created beneficial behaviors in a solitary environment, amounting to an autism advantage, Reser said. The "autism advantage," a...
  • Noble Savages? The era of the hunter-gatherer was not the social and environmental Eden some suggest

    01/01/2008 11:54:37 AM PST · by billorites · 24 replies · 489+ views
    Economist.com ^ | December 19, 2007
    HUMAN beings have spent most of their time on the planet as hunter-gatherers. From at least 85,000 years ago to the birth of agriculture around 73,000 years later, they combined hunted meat with gathered veg. Some people, such as those on North Sentinel Island in the Andaman Sea, still do. The Sentinelese are the only hunter-gatherers who still resist contact with the outside world. Fine-looking specimens—strong, slim, fit, black and stark naked except for a small plant-fibre belt round the waist—they are the very model of the noble savage. Genetics suggests that indigenous Andaman islanders have been isolated since the...