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Keyword: imaging

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  • New Israeli facial imaging claims to identify terrorists and pedophiles

    05/24/2016 1:49:53 PM PDT · by Nachum · 26 replies
    Times of Israel ^ | 5/24/16 | Sue Surkes
    A Tel-Aviv based start-up company says it has developed a program to identify personality types such as terrorists, pedophiles, white collar offenders and even great poker players from facial analysis that takes just a fraction of a second. Faception claims it has signed a contract with a homeland security agency to help identify terrorists, the Washington Post reported Tuesday. Furthermore, it says it successfully identified nine of the terrorists involved in November’s terror attacks in Paris, according to the Daily Mail. And it asserts that its technology was able to accurately classify 25 out of 27 facial images of poker...
  • Hi-tech goggles 'detect cancer cells'

    04/28/2014 12:24:18 AM PDT · by aquila48 · 1 replies
    BBC ^ | 11 April 2014 | Bahman Kalbasi
    A US trial of hi-tech goggles could reduce the need for secondary operations for cancer patients. Surgeons are not always able to tell if they have removed all the cancerous tissues and many patients face a follow-up operation to remove more. The goggles create an augmented reality, showing cancerous cells as glowing.
  • New MRI research reveals cancer cells thrive on processed sugar

    07/18/2013 3:37:50 PM PDT · by neverdem · 121 replies
    NaturalNews via The Watcher ^ | July 17, 2013 | Jonathan Benson
    Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, your dietary habits could be significantly adding to your risk of developing cancer. New research published in the journal Nature Medicine has confirmed that processed sugar is one of the primary driving forces behind the growth and spread of cancer tumors, so much so that the future of cancer screening could rely on scanning the body for sugar accumulation. Scientists from University College London (UCL) in the U.K. made this discovery after experimenting with a new cancer detection method that involves utilizing a unique form of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). After sensitizing an MRI scanner to...
  • Imaging hits noise barrier

    07/11/2013 10:29:14 PM PDT · by neverdem · 10 replies
    Nature News ^ | 10 July 2013 | Eugenie Samuel Reich
    Physical limits mean that electron microscopy may be nearing highest possible resolution. Plans for the next generation of electron microscopes have been dealt a blow by the discovery of an unexpected source of noise that could frustrate efforts to improve resolution to well below the size of an atom. Researchers working for a leading manufacturer of advanced optics describe the noise source in a paper1 now in press. They think that they can find a way to mitigate it, but electron microscopists admit that the finding is the latest sign that their costly quest to capture ever more detailed images...
  • Sugar makes cancer light-up in MRI scanners

    07/08/2013 5:59:57 PM PDT · by neverdem · 44 replies
    Biology News Net ^ | July 7, 2013 | NA
    UCL scientists have developed a new technique for detecting the uptake of sugar in tumors, using magnetic resonance imaging. A new technique for detecting cancer by imaging the consumption of sugar with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been unveiled by UCL scientists. The breakthrough could provide a safer and simpler alternative to standard radioactive techniques and enable radiologists to image tumours in greater detail. The new technique, called 'glucose chemical exchange saturation transfer' (glucoCEST), is based on the fact that tumours consume much more glucose (a type of sugar) than normal, healthy tissues in order to sustain their growth. The...
  • Two-photon microscopy: New research may help drastically reduce cost of powerful microscope...

    06/29/2013 12:04:25 PM PDT · by neverdem · 4 replies
    Phys.org ^ | Apr 21, 2013 | NA
    Two-photon microscopy: New research may help drastically reduce cost of powerful microscope technique Enlarge The same section of a mouse brain imaged with a femtosecond laser (above) and a much weaker laser but the new dye (below). (Phys.org) —A dye-based imaging technique known as two-photon microscopy can produce pictures of active neural structures in much finer detail than functional magnetic resonance imaging, or fMRI, but it requires powerful and expensive lasers. Now, a research team at the University of Pennsylvania has developed a new kind of dye that could reduce the cost of the technique by several orders of magnitude....
  • The 'Garbage Truck' of the Human Brain: New Clues to Treating Alzheimer's

    06/28/2013 11:08:37 PM PDT · by neverdem · 14 replies
    Science World Report ^ | Jun 28, 2013 | Catherine Griffin
    The brain works like a complex machine, sending electrical signals that allow us to perceive and understand the world around us. Now, scientists have discovered a new system in this brain that acts as a "garbage truck," removing waste that might affect the brain. The findings could have large implications for treating neurological disorders like Alzheimer's disease. The body defends the brain like a fortress, ringing it with a complex system of gateways that control which molecules can enter and exit. This "blood-brain barrier" was known to exist for quite some time, but it's only now that researchers are beginning...
  • Striped nanoparticle controversy blows up

    12/08/2012 11:14:18 PM PST · by neverdem · 9 replies
    Chemistry World ^ | 7 December 2012 | Simon Hadlington
    Some scientists question the existence of self-assembling stripes on nanoparticles © NPGA prickly controversy has erupted in the rarefied world of nanoscience revolving around the strength of the evidence that molecules can assemble themselves into discrete stripes around gold nanoparticles. The issue highlights the difficulty of interpreting images of nanoscale objects.For many years researchers have been decorating gold nanoparticles with thiolated ligands to imbue the nanoparticles with a range of properties. In 2004, a group led by Francesco Stellacci, then at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the US, published a paper in Nature Materials demonstrating that if two different...
  • Spotting silicon in graphene, it's dope

    11/27/2012 1:04:16 PM PST · by neverdem · 14 replies
    Chemistry World ^ | 26 November 2012 | David Bradley
    Atomic structures for three-fold and four-fold coordinated silicon impurities in monolayer graphene © APSA combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy and atomic-resolution spectroscopic techniques has allowed US researchers to pick out individual silicon atoms in a doped graphene sheet. The technique reveals that the silicon atoms can exist in a planar hybridised ‘sp2d’ like form when bonded to four carbon atoms, as well as the anticipated sp3 form when triply coordinated. The experimental observations mesh with simulations of two-dimensional solids and point the way to a method for exploring single impurities in graphene and related materials.Stephen Pennycook and colleagues at...
  • CONSERVATIVE OR LIBERAL, GRAY MATTER MAY DECIDE HOW YOU VOTE

    09/26/2012 10:30:38 PM PDT · by neverdem · 27 replies
    Human Events ^ | 9/25/2012 | David Alan Coia
    We knew liberals were different, but just how different is revealed in a new study of the human brain indicating that not only do liberals and conservatives share different moral sentiments, but that markedly differing brain structures underlie those sentiments. The study’s “findings demonstrate that variation in moral sentiment corresponds to individual differences in brain structure and suggest that moral values possess deep-rooted biological bases distributed across distinct brain regions,” say University of California, Santa Barbara, post-doctoral researcher Gary J. Lewis and three research collaborators in the August 2012 issue of the Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (JCN). “People differ in...
  • Seeing cells under stress

    09/18/2012 7:42:06 AM PDT · by neverdem · 1 replies
    Chemistry World ^ | 17 September 2012 | Jennifer Newton
    The assembly includes a cell-stretching device, an atomic force microscopy head and an objective of the inverted microscopeAn analytical platform that imposes controlled mechanical strain onto live cells whilst monitoring changes in cell morphology and molecular signalling has been developed by scientists in Germany. Cellular processes induced by mechanical forces are crucial for bone healing and lung function. Understanding these processes could help to prevent and aid the development of therapies for mechanically induced lung and cardiovascular diseases and injuries.Christine Kranz and colleagues from the University of Ulm combined fluorescence microscopy with atomic force microscopy to analyse the cells. They...
  • Atomic bond types discernible in single-molecule images

    09/14/2012 7:55:26 PM PDT · by neverdem · 33 replies
    BBC News ^ | 13 September 2012 | Jason Palmer
    A pioneering team from IBM in Zurich has published single-molecule images so detailed that the type of atomic bonds between their atoms can be discerned. The same team took the first-ever single-molecule image in 2009 and more recently published images of a molecule shaped like the Olympic rings. The new work opens up the prospect of studying imperfections in the "wonder material" graphene or plotting where electrons go during chemical reactions. The images are published in Science. The team, which included French and Spanish collaborators, used a variant of a technique called atomic force microscopy, or AFM. AFM uses a...
  • Engineers build 50 gigapixel camera (Yes, you read that right)

    06/20/2012 2:50:29 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 37 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 06-20-2012 | Provided by Duke University
    By synchronizing 98 tiny cameras in a single device, electrical engineers from Duke University and the University of Arizona have developed a prototype camera that can create images with unprecedented detail. The camera's resolution is five times better than 20/20 human vision over a 120 degree horizontal field. The new camera has the potential to capture up to 50 gigapixels of data, which is 50,000 megapixels. By comparison, most consumer cameras are capable of taking photographs with sizes ranging from 8 to 40 megapixels. Pixels are individual "dots" of data – the higher the number of pixels, the better resolution...
  • The Lens We’ll Look Through to Find a New Earth

    04/29/2012 9:48:15 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 11 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | 3/28/12 | Brent Rose
    We have heard a lot about exoplanets in the past year. But for all the talk about these planets, which orbit a star other than our sun, we still haven't actually seen one. One tool could change that, giving us our first look at a distant planet that could be the next best thing to Earth. Currently, scientists detect an extra-solar planet by measuring the dimming of its star as the planet passes between it and our line of sight (this is known as the Transit Method). By observing the way the star's light shines around the planet, it's possible...
  • ScienceShot: Crystal Clear Nano-Gold

    03/21/2012 11:06:30 PM PDT · by neverdem · 9 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | Robert F. Service | 21 March 2012
    Credit: Image courtesy of Nature Press Superman has nothing on Jianwei Miao, at least in the vision department. Miao, a physicist at the University of California, Los Angeles, and his colleagues have developed a way to image any type of nanoparticle with unprecedented accuracy. In the picture above, the technique, called electron tomography, shows a gold nanoparticle made up of 3871 atoms. Inside the nanoparticle, the researchers could easily resolve multiple "grains" (green, gold, blue, and red) in which atoms in each grain share a common atomic alignment that is offset from neighboring grains. The technique also manages to...
  • TSA installing privacy-protection software in imaging machines (finally, something sensible)

    07/20/2011 10:37:41 AM PDT · by rawhide · 11 replies
    ajc.com ^ | 7-20-11 | Kelly Yamanouchi
    Travelers will get more protection from prying eyes when going through security screening thanks to an upgrade to more imaging machines at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport and many other airports around the country. TSA tested the software earlier this year on one machine at the Atlanta airport, as well as at airports in Las Vegas and Washington, D.C. The testing was successful and in the coming months the software will be rolled out to all similar machines at 40 airports, including all of the imaging machines at Hartsfield-Jackson. The $2.7 million software upgrade comes in the wake of an outcry over...
  • Need Help - What Is This Company Named NATEVEO?

    05/11/2011 12:38:30 PM PDT · by Lmo56 · 12 replies
    5/21/11 | Self
    An SUV with the word "Nateveo" [or something like it] just cruised through my neighborhood. It had a 5-foot tall rig attached to its roof. Wondering if it is an imaging company ala Google Earth OR someone trying to capture Wi-Fi nets. Tried Googling - no help there ... Any thoughts ???
  • Holograms in True Color

    04/15/2011 9:01:53 PM PDT · by neverdem · 18 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 7 April 2011 | Sid Perkins
    Enlarge Image In living color. This three-dimensional, true-color image of an apple was generated using a new technique of making holograms (inset) that allows the image to be viewed using ordinary white light. Credit: Science/AAAS Researchers have developed a new way to create true-color holograms that can be viewed from any angle using ordinary white light. The advance could lead to a new generation of electronic devices, such as cell phones or miniature televisions that display three-dimensional (3D) images. True 3D images can be created in several ways. In the 1960s, researchers generated the first holograms by firing a...
  • Some question pep rally atmosphere at Obama speech (Robert Gibbs approved)

    01/13/2011 6:39:50 PM PST · by markomalley · 32 replies
    AP ^ | 1/13/11 | GILLIAN FLACCUS and BOB CHRISTIE
    What was billed as a memorial for victims of the Arizona shooting rampage turned into a rollicking rally, leaving some conservative commentators wondering whether President Barack Obama's speech was a scripted political event. Not so, insisted the White House and host University of Arizona. Obama spokesman Robert Gibbs said Thursday he and other aides didn't expect the president's remarks at the school's basketball arena to receive as much rousing applause as it did. Gibbs said the crowd's response, at times cheering and shouting, was understandable.
  • Stepping Away From the Trees For a Look at the Forest (A review of science from the last decade)

    12/17/2010 12:01:21 AM PST · by neverdem · 3 replies · 1+ views
    Science ^ | 17 December 2010 | The News Staff
    Vol. 330 no. 6011 pp. 1612-1613 DOI: 10.1126/science.330.6011.1612 News IntroductionTen years ago, Karl Deisseroth was stuck. A psychiatrist and neuroscientist, he wanted to learn how different brain circuits affect behavior—and what went awry in the brains of his patients with schizophrenia and depression. But the tools of his trade were too crude: Electrodes inserted into the brain would stimulate too many cells in their vicinity. So in 2004, Deisseroth and his students invented a new tool. They inserted a gene for a light-activated algal protein into mice brains, where it entered nerve cells. By stimulating those cells with a laser,...