Free Republic 3rd Quarter Fundraising Target: $85,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $26,555
31%  
Woo hoo!! And the first 31% is in!! Thank you all very much!!

Keyword: immune

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • White House defies House Oversight Committee subpoena - advisers are 'absolutely immune'

    07/16/2014 4:43:25 PM PDT · by Libloather · 16 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 7/16/14 | Francesca Chambers
    House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Darrell Issa subpenaed the president's official political adviser, David Simas Issa is concerned that Simas may be violating a federal law that bans most employees of the executive branch from engaging in political activity White House Counsel sent Issa a letter last night claiming the president's 'immediate advisers are absolutely immune' from such demands Issa held a hearing today anyway, claiming that his committee has a 'legal obligation' to make sure taxpayer funds are being used properly
  • Researchers find source of new lineage of immune cells

    02/13/2014 8:39:38 AM PST · by neverdem · 6 replies
    Biology News Net ^ | February 12, 2014 | NA
    The elusive progenitor cells that give rise to innate lymphoid cells—a recently discovered group of infection-fighting white blood cells—have been identified in fetal liver and adult bone marrow of mice, researchers from the University of Chicago report early online in the journal Nature. Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are among the first components of the immune system to confront certain pathogens. They have a critical function at mucosal barriers—locations such as the bowel or the lung—where the body comes in direct contact with the environment. Yet they went undetected by researchers studying the immune system for a century. "Scientists tend to...
  • Scavenger cells help limbs to regrow

    05/21/2013 11:35:15 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 7 replies
    ABC.net.au ^ | 5/21/13 | Clare Pain
    A scavenging immune system cell that helps limbs regrow in salamanders brings hope that humans will one day be able to mimic the animal's amazing regenerative powers, say Australian researchers. The findings by Dr James Godwin, of the Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute at Monash University, and colleagues, are published in today's issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.Salamanders (axolotls) are unique amongst vertebrates in being able to repair their hearts, tails, spinal cord and brain, and even regrow whole limbs during adult life, says Godwin. He sees their "perfect regeneration" as a holy grail. "We're trying to...
  • Early Cities Spurred Evolution of Immune System? [ "Amazing" DNA results show benefits ]

    11/12/2010 9:03:42 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 47 replies · 1+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | November 8, 2010 | Matt Kaplan
    As in cities today, the earliest towns helped expose their inhabitants to inordinate opportunities for infection -- and today their descendants are stronger for it, a new study says. "If cities increase the amount of disease people are exposed to, shouldn't they also, over time, make them natural places for disease resistance to evolve?" asked study co-author Mark Thomas, a biologist at University College London... study co-author Ian Barnes, a molecular paleobiologist at University College London, screened DNA samples from 17 groups long associated with particular regions of Europe, Asia, and Africa -- for example Anatolian Turks and the southern...
  • Immune system of healthy adults may be better prepared than expected to fight 2009 H1N1 influenza

    11/16/2009 12:23:01 PM PST · by decimon · 9 replies · 560+ views
    WHAT: A new study shows that molecular similarities exist between the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus and other strains of seasonal H1N1 virus that have been circulating in the population since 1988. These results suggest that healthy adults may have a level of protective immune memory that can blunt the severity of infection caused by the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus. The study team was led by Bjoern Peters, Ph.D., and Alessandro Sette, Ph.D., of La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, Calif., grantees of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health. The...
  • Computer Simulation Sheds Light on Body's Immune Response to Flu

    05/22/2009 2:22:36 AM PDT · by grey_whiskers · 1 replies · 288+ views
    OBBEC ^ | 05-19-2009 | Dr Hulin Wu
    Rochester, NY (OBBeC) - Researchers have reported new revelations on how the body responds to flu. According to the report, scientists at the University of Rochester Medical Center have for the first time -- with the use of a computer simulation -- successfully tested a major portion of the body's immune reaction to influenza type A, with implications for treatment design and preparation ahead of future pandemics. The work has been accepted for publication, and posted online, by the Journal of Virology. The new "global" flu model is built out of preexisting, smaller-scale models that capture in mathematical equations millions...
  • Broccoli May Help Boost Aging Immune System

    03/10/2008 11:03:55 AM PDT · by blam · 43 replies · 844+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 3-10-2008 | University of California - Los Angeles.
    Broccoli May Help Boost Aging Immune SystemBroccoli. (Credit: Image courtesy of University of California - Los Angeles)ScienceDaily (Mar. 10, 2008) — Eat your broccoli! That's the advice from UCLA researchers who have found that a chemical in broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables may hold a key to restoring the body's immunity, which declines as we age. Published in the online edition of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, the study findings show that sulforaphane, a chemical in broccoli, switches on a set of antioxidant genes and enzymes in specific immune cells, which then combat the injurious effects of molecules...
  • Strange Creature Immune to Pain (Naked mole rats)

    01/29/2008 9:49:18 AM PST · by NormsRevenge · 33 replies · 1,320+ views
    LiveScience.com on Yahoo ^ | 1/29/08 | Charles Q. Choi
    As vulnerable as naked mole rats seem, researchers now find the hairless, bucktoothed rodents are invulnerable to the pain of acid and the sting of chili peppers. A better understanding of pain resistance in these sausage-like creatures could lead to new drugs for people with chronic pain, scientists added. Naked mole rats live in cramped, oxygen-starved burrows some six feet underground in central East Africa. Unusually, they are cold-blooded — which, as far as anyone knows, is unique among mammals. "They're the nicest, sweetest animals I've ever worked with — they look frightening, but they're very gentle," said neurobiologist Thomas...
  • Potato Salad May Help the Immune System

    06/25/2007 3:22:59 PM PDT · by blam · 147 replies · 2,975+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 6-25-2007 | Society Of Chemical Industry
    Source: Society of Chemical Industry Date: June 25, 2007 Potato Salad May Help the Immune System Science Daily — It has long been known that eating potatoes is good for bowel health, but new research suggests that they may also have a beneficial effect on the whole immune system. Especially if eaten cold or in a potato salad, Anne Pichon reports in Chemistry & Industry. Spanish researchers found that growing pigs fed large quantities of raw potato starch (RPS) had a healthier bowel. Not a surprise, but they also found that RPS pigs had decreased levels of white blood cells,...
  • Create A Back-Up Copy Of Your Immune System

    06/22/2007 5:37:05 PM PDT · by blam · 5 replies · 534+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 6-22-2007 | Andy Coghlan
    Create a back-up copy of your immune system 22 June 2007 NewScientist.com news service Andy Coghlan Imagine having a spare copy of your immune system on ice, ready to replace your existing one should you fall victim to AIDS, an autoimmune disease, or have to undergo extensive chemotherapy for cancer. An Anglo-American company called Lifeforce has received permission from the US Food and Drug Administration to do just that. The firm collects 480-millilitre samples of blood from healthy individuals, extracts the white blood cells and stores them as an insurance policy against future disease. The service comes at a price,...
  • 'Rebuilt' immune system shakes off diabetes

    04/11/2007 8:54:44 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 34 replies · 1,158+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 4/10/07 | Roxanne Khamsi
    Diabetics appear to have been cured with a one-off treatment that rebuilds their immune system, according to a new study. The technique, which uses patients' own bone marrow cells, has freed 14 of 15 patients with type 1 diabetes from their dependence on insulin medication. So far, participants in the trial have gone 18 months without insulin therapy following the procedure, on average. One patient has lasted three years without needing such injections. In patients with type 1 diabetes, which typically strikes in early childhood or adolescence, the immune system appears to erroneously attack cells in the pancreas that produce...
  • Are Some People Immune To Avian Flu?

    02/28/2007 10:55:06 AM PST · by blam · 13 replies · 440+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 2028-2007 | Richard Webby
    Source: Public Library of Science Date: February 28, 2007 Are Some People Immune To Avian Flu? Science Daily — New results from Richard Webby at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and colleagues published in the international open-access medical journal PLoS Medicine suggest that the answer might be yes. Neuraminidase ribbon diagram. (Image courtesy of PLoS Medicine)The H5N1 avian flu virus is quite different from the seasonal H1N1 and H3N2 flu viruses most humans have been exposed to, which is why many scientists believe that H5N1 could start a new pandemic. (The H and N refer to two virus components, the...
  • The Antibiotic Vitamin

    11/10/2006 4:08:52 PM PST · by blam · 135 replies · 3,251+ views
    Science News ^ | 11-10-2006 | Janet Raloff
    The Antibiotic VitaminDeficiency in vitamin D may predispose people to infection Janet Raloff In April 2005, a virulent strain of influenza hit a maximum-security forensic psychiatric hospital for men that's midway between San Francisco and Los Angeles. John J. Cannell, a psychiatrist there, observed with increasing curiosity as one infected ward after another was quarantined to limit the outbreak. Although 10 percent of the facility's 1,200 patients ultimately developed the flu's fever and debilitating muscle aches, none did in the ward that he supervised. WINTER WOES. Cold-weather wear and the sun's angle in the winter sky limit how much ultraviolet...
  • Past may hold clue to future flu fight Secrets may be in blood of 1918 survivors

    10/05/2006 6:52:51 PM PDT · by Coleus · 38 replies · 847+ views
    Star Ledger ^ | 09.29.06 | CAROL ANN CAMPBELL
    People who lived during the 1918 influenza epidemic may hold secrets in their blood that could help fight a future pandemic, but finding them now is a race against time. People who were toddlers at the end of World War I -- when the epidemic swept the globe and killed 50 million -- are in their 90s now. Nearly a lifetime after the notorious outbreak, researchers are hoping those who lived through it will come forward and donate a vial of blood, which then will be analyzed for antibodies to the virus. In particular, a New Jersey researcher is seeking...
  • Immune System Cells May Be Cause of Asthma

    03/17/2006 7:14:02 AM PST · by SheLion · 37 replies · 702+ views
    WEDNESDAY, March 15 (HealthDay News) -- As medical technologies improve, researchers are rooting out more information about possible causes of common diseases, such as asthma.One new finding, reported in the March 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, is that immune system cells long thought to cause asthma may not be the primary culprit behind the disease."We found that asthma is caused not by T-helper 2 cells as has been previously thought, but by a novel class of cells called natural killer T cells," said one of the study's authors, Dr. Dale Umetsu, a professor of pediatrics at...
  • Protecting People From A Terrifying Toxin: Vaccine Stimulates Immune Response Against Ricin

    02/08/2006 4:57:39 PM PST · by blam · 2 replies · 534+ views
    Science News Online ^ | 2-8-2006 | Ben Harder
    Protecting People from a Terrifying Toxin: Vaccine stimulates immune response against ricin Ben Harder In its first test in people, a vaccine against the toxin ricin appears safe and generates antibodies that are expected to be protective against the potential bioterrorism agent. Ricin comes from castor seeds and can cause lethal damage to the gut if swallowed or to the lungs if inhaled. Murderers and assassins have used it for centuries. The vaccine might be used to protect soldiers and first responders in advance of possible ricin exposure, says immunologist and study leader Ellen S. Vitetta of the University of...
  • Bird Flu May Over-Stimulate Immune System

    11/11/2005 4:29:40 PM PST · by blam · 149 replies · 4,018+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 11-11-2005
    Bird flu may over-stimulate immune system HONG KONG, Nov. 11 (UPI) -- Researchers in Hong Kong say the H5N1 bird flu virus may provoke an excessive immune reaction, explaining why it is deadly even to the young and healthy. Laboratory tests on human cells showed that the virus caused the immune system to send proteins called cytokines to infected lung cells, a reaction that would end up damaging or destroying the tissues the immune system is meant to defend. The tests were carried out by scientists at the University of Hong Kong, working with samples from patients who died in...
  • Worms to help combat allergies

    09/05/2005 2:12:29 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 7 replies · 237+ views
    BBC ^ | 9/5/05 | Jonathan Amos
    Irish scientists are investigating parasitic worms to try to find new ways to prevent asthma and reduce allergies.Dr Padraic Fallon, from Trinity College Dublin, and colleagues have already managed to cure asthma in lab mice by infecting them with the tiny creatures. The team now has to explain how the parasites achieve this feat at a molecular level. If they can do that, they should then be able to synthesise a new drug compound to treat asthma in people. On the riseAsthma and other allergies have increased almost threefold over the last 30 years in many developed countries, including...
  • Nanocell's double hit on cancer

    07/28/2005 12:43:40 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 14 replies · 1,104+ views
    BBC ^ | 7/27/05
    A nanocell that can burrow into a tumour, cut off its blood supply and detonate a lethal dose of anti-cancer toxins has been developed.The double-action therapy, which comes packed in a tiny double chamber, leaves healthy cells unscathed. It has proved safe and effective against melanoma and a form of lung cancer in mice. Details of the technique, developed at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, are published in Nature. The technique combines two methods of combating cancer - poisoning tumour cells and cutting off the blood supply to the tumour. Previously, the dual strategy has proved difficult as chemotherapy could...
  • Insulin itself may spark Type I diabetes

    05/11/2005 12:52:34 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 18 replies · 762+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 5/11/05 | Bob Holmes
    Insulin itself is the target of friendly fire from the immune system in Type I diabetes, new research shows. The discovery may one day help doctors forestall that attack and thus prevent the disease. Type I diabetes, also called juvenile diabetes, occurs when T-cells of the immune system mistakenly recognise insulin-producing cells in the pancreas as foreign and destroy them. But researchers have not been sure which of several possible molecules actually triggers this case of mistaken identity. A team led by George Eisenbarth at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver, US, genetically engineered diabetes-prone mice to...
  • Destructive OS X malware spies on Apple users

    01/27/2005 2:39:19 PM PST · by Bush2000 · 11 replies · 523+ views
    ZDNet Australia ^ | 25 October 2004 | Munir Kotadia,
    A malicious script that spies on Apple Mac users was discovered over the weekend. The malware, which has been dubbed ‘Opener’ by Mac user-groups, disables Mac OS X’s built-in firewall, steals personal information and can destroy data. Security experts say these traits are common among the thousands of viruses targeting Microsoft’s ubiquitous Windows operating system but are virtually unheard of amongst the Apple Macintosh community. Paul Ducklin, Sophos’ head of technology in the Asia Pacific, told ZDNet Australia that the malware, which Sophos calls Renepo, is designed to infect any Mac OS X drives connected to the infected system and...
  • Tapping the Hornet's Nest

    12/13/2004 8:40:27 AM PST · by forty_years · 2 replies · 1,319+ views
    http://netwmd.com ^ | December 13, 2004 | Michael Rubin
    Editor's note: Readers may also be interested in Iran: The Invisible Revolution. During the U.S. presidential campaign, debate over Iran policy received unprecedented attention. The reasons are multifold. With Iran on the verge of developing both nuclear and intercontinental ballistic missile capability, Washington policymakers can no longer ignore the Iranian threat, especially when confidants of Supreme Leader Ali Khomenei lead televised chants of "American will be annihilated," as Ayatollah Ahmad Jannati did last June. American concern over a nuclear Iran is multifold. The danger is not necessarily that Iran would conduct a nuclear first strike, although former president Ali Akbar...
  • A Healthy Shark Attack

    08/20/2004 2:58:46 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 1 replies · 336+ views
    Technology Review ^ | 8/20/04 | Erika Jonietz
    New research into primitive protective proteins from the immune systems of sharks could lead to more versatile drugs to battle diseases such as cancer and dangerous bacterial infections and to robust diagnostic kits that could easily leave the lab, an area of intense research following the anthrax attacks of 2001. In a study published Thursday online by the journal Science, researchers at The Scripps Institute in La Jolla, CA, and the University of Maryland at Baltimore determined that the structure of the primitive antibody that marks a difference between the immune systems of sharks and mammals is unusually simple. Ian...
  • Immune Memory From Smallpox Vaccination Last More 50 Years, According To Emory Research

    11/12/2003 10:00:42 AM PST · by blam · 50 replies · 493+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 11-12-2003 | Emory University
    Source: Emory University Health Sciences Center Date: 2003-11-12 Immune Memory From Smallpox Vaccination Lasts More 50 Years, According To Emory Research ATLANTA -- Immune memory after smallpox vaccination persists for at least 50 years in immunized individuals, according to research conducted by scientists at the Emory Vaccine Center and Emory University School of Medicine. This is good news, since the findings, published in the Nov. 15 issue of the Journal of Immunology, suggest that individuals vaccinated against smallpox prior to the end of the smallpox vaccination program in 1972 may still retain at least some protection against smallpox. Rafi Ahmed,...
  • Green, Black Tea Said to Boost Immune System

    04/22/2003 4:06:48 PM PDT · by FairOpinion · 22 replies · 876+ views
    Discovery Channel/Health ^ | April 21, 2003 | AFP
    April 21, 2003 — Certain types of tea have long been known to protect against cancer, but now US researchers have reason to believe they may also boost the immune system. The findings are very preliminary, but Brigham and Women's researchers reported that volunteers who were asked to drink 20 ounces of black tea a day demonstrated stronger immune responses to infection than they had previously, or than a control group of coffee drinkers. "The health benefits of tea have been touted for centuries but no human research has demonstrated an association between tea drinking and immunology," said lead author...