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Keyword: inca

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  • 1781: Tupac Amaru II, Incan insurgent

    05/18/2020 7:01:15 AM PDT · by CheshireTheCat · 13 replies
    ExecutedToday.com ^ | May 18, 2009 | Headsman
    On this date in 1781, the last name in Incan rebellion met a horrible end in the ancient Incan capital of Cusco. José Gabriel Condorcanqui — rechristened Tupac Amaru II, as he was a distant descendant of the last Incan king — was a member of the privileged indigenous population depended upon by the Spanish to administer the forced and extorted labor that made its New World empire worth having. Condorcanqui evidently had an epiphany. In November 1780, he launched a well-planned rebellion by engineering the public execution of a hated corregidor Antonio de Arriaga at the hands of his...
  • Remains of 250 sacrificed children found in Peru

    (CNN) — Archeologists in Peru have uncovered the remains of around 250 children sacrificed by the pre-Columbian Chimú civilization. The remains are of children aged 4-12 years old, as well as 40 warriors, sacrificed between the 13th and 15th centuries, according to a video from Peruvian state media agency Andina. The Chimú civilization inhabited northern Peru before they were conquered by the Inca. They built Chan Chan, the largest city in pre-Columbian South America.
  • Incan Empire's 'Reign of Terror' Revealed in Four Ancient Skulls Found in Trash Heap

    08/27/2019 10:25:34 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 29 replies
    Live Science ^ | 08/27/2019 | Isobel Whitcomb
    Something was amiss at the ruins of Iglesia Colorada, an ancient Incan village in the foothills of the Andes. In the remains of what had been a garbage dump, among ancient food scraps and shards of discarded pottery, researchers discovered four skulls. No bodies, no formal burial, no jewelry to carry on to an afterlife — just the skulls. No one knew why they were there. For over 15 years, since the skulls were uncovered in 2003, the mystery has baffled archaeologists. But two researchers at the National Museum of Natural History in Santiago, Chile, have proposed an explanation: The...
  • The College Student Who Decoded the Data Hidden in Inca Knots

    08/11/2019 12:00:49 PM PDT · by wildbill · 41 replies
    pocket/com ^ | catherine Davis
    With the help of his professor, Gary Urton, a scholar of Pre-Columbian studies, Medrano interpreted a set of six khipus, knotted cords used for record keeping in the Inca Empire. By matching the khipus to a colonial-era Spanish census document, Medrano and Urton uncovered the meaning of the cords in greater detail than ever before. Their findings could contribute to a better understanding of daily life in the Andean civilization.
  • Something Hidden — The Inca Trail to Machu Picchu

    03/20/2019 11:18:01 PM PDT · by Osage Orange · 19 replies
    Pretty great video....
  • Earthquake struck Machu Picchu in 1450 study concludes

    12/25/2018 11:59:35 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Peruvian Times ^ | December 13, 2018 | Andean Air Mail and Peruvian Times
    Construction of Machu Picchu was interrupted around 1450 by a powerful earthquake, leaving damage still evident today and prompting the Inca to perfect the seismic-resistant megalithic architecture that is now so famous throughout Cusco, according to a major new scientific study revealed by Peru’s state-run news agency Andina... The Cusco-Pata Research Project determined that a temblor of at least magnitude 6.5 struck during the reign of the 9th Inca Pachacutec while he was building his now iconic summer estate atop the saddle-ridge between two craggy mountain peaks. As a result, the Inca moved away from using smaller stones, assembled in...
  • Amazon Jungle Once Home to Millions More Than Previously Thought

    03/28/2018 6:20:07 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 13 replies
    nationalgeographic.com ^ | By Erin Blakemore | By Erin Blakemore
    Forget small nomadic tribes and pristine jungle: the southern Amazon was likely covered in a network of large villages and ceremonial centers before Columbus. Geoglyphs in the southern Amazon are evidence of a once-thriving population. Photograph courtesy of University of Exeter ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Before Spanish invaders conquered South America, sparse groups of nomadic people clustered around the Amazon River, leaving the surrounding rain forest pristine and untouched. Or did they? New research suggests a very different story—an Amazonian region peppered with rain forest villages, ceremonial earthworks, and a much larger population than previously thought. The research, funded in part by the...
  • an overlooked inca wonder

    05/05/2017 1:31:07 AM PDT · by SteveH · 26 replies
    Archaeology ^ | April 5, 2016 | Eric A. Powell
    Members of the public regularly get in touch with Charles Stanish, an expert on Andean cultures at the University of California, Los Angeles. Two years ago, Stanish received a call from a man in Pittsburgh who had just seen a program claiming that aliens played a large role in the lives of ancient people. He was interested in getting Stanish’s take on a particular Peruvian site purported to be the handiwork of extraterrestrials. “I always try to be nice to people like that,” says Stanish. “For whatever reason, they are interested in the ancient past, and I share with them...
  • Untangling the Ancient Inca Code of Strings

    04/20/2017 8:28:45 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 23 replies
    discover ^ | Bridget Alex
    In the study, University of St. Andrews anthropologist Sabine Hyland analyzed string color, fiber and twist direction to identify 95 unique signs — enough to constitute a writing system — and proposed a phonetic decipherment of the khipus’ final strings, thought to represent family lineage names. ... Khipus are best known by archaeologists as record keeping devices of the Inca Empire, which encompassed over 18 million people and 3,000 miles of South America from the early 1400s until the Spanish conquest in 1532. The strings usually consist of a top cord, to which pendants are attached; the pendants may have...
  • Untangling an Accounting Tool and an Ancient Incan Mystery

    01/06/2016 12:06:36 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    New York Times ^ | January 2, 2016 | William Neuman
    In a dry canyon strewn with the ruins of a long-dead city, archaeologists have made a discovery they hope will help unravel one of the most tenacious mysteries of ancient Peru: how to read the knotted string records, known as khipus, kept by the Incas. At the site called Incahuasi, about 100 miles south of Lima, excavators have found, for the first time, several khipus in the place where they were used -- in this case, a storage house for agricultural products where they appear to have been used as accounting books to record the amount of peanuts, chili peppers,...
  • 3,800-year-old statuettes found in Peru

    06/17/2015 2:42:49 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 49 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | Jun 09, 2015 | Staff
    Researchers in Peru have discovered a trio of statuettes they believe were created by the ancient Caral civilization some 3,800 years ago, the culture ministry said Tuesday. The mud statuettes were found inside a reed basket in a building at the ancient city of Vichama in northern Peru, which is today an important archaeological site. The ministry said they were probably used in religious rituals performed before breaking ground on a new building. Two of the figures, a naked man and woman painted in white, black and red, are believed to represent political authorities. The third, a women with 28...
  • Archeologists Detect Ancient Pyramid Buried in Bolivia

    04/06/2015 11:01:12 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 39 replies
    Costa Rican Star ^ | 03-27-2015 | Staff
    La Paz, Mar 27 (EFE).- The government of Bolivia announced it will start exploratory excavations this year at the ancient fortress of Tiahuanaco after a buried pyramid was detected. Ludwing Cayo, director of the Tiahuanaco Archeological Research Center, told Efe that the formation is located in the area of Kantatallita, east of the Akapana pyramid. In a presentation for the media, Cayo outlined a five-year for further research at Tiahuanaco, an archaeological site 71 kilometers (44 miles) west of La Paz that was the cradle of an ancient civilization predating the Incas. Excavations may start in May or June, depending...
  • Who Really Discovered America?

    07/14/2002 2:08:47 PM PDT · by blam · 182 replies · 18,652+ views
    Who Really Discovered America? Did ancient Hebrews reach the shores of the North and South American continents thousands of years before Christopher Columbus? What evidence is there for Hebrew and Israelite occupation of the Western Hemisphere even a thousand years before Christ? Was trans-Atlantic commerce and travel fairly routine in the days of king Solomon of Israel? Read here the intriguing, fascinating saga of the TRUE DISCOVERERS OF AMERICA! William F. Dankenbring A stone in a dry creek bed in New Mexico, discovered by early settlers in the region, is one of the most amazing archaeological discoveries in the Western...
  • Archaeologists find 25 quipus at Inca site in Peru

    06/28/2014 1:47:12 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    Peru this Week ^ | June 25, 2014 | Andina
    Quipus where used as a form of record-keeping in Inca society, which had no written language. A set of twenty-five well-preserved quipus were found in the archaeological complex of Incahuasi, south of Lima, Alejandro Chu, archaeologist in charge of the site reported on Tuesday. Chu told Andina News Agency that this is a major finding as the quipus were found in warehouses or kallancas and not in a funerary context, as most discoveries in the past, “what makes us believe they were used for administrative purposes”. According to the Peruvian archaeologist, these objects, used by the Inca empire and previous...
  • Inca Children Were Stoned and Drunk Prior to Their Sacrifice

    08/07/2013 1:02:51 PM PDT · by BBell · 36 replies
    http://firsttoknow.com ^ | 8/1/13 | Elysia McMahan
    Tests performed on three mummies found in the Argentinian mountains have shed new light on the Inca practice of child sacrifice. An analysis of the mummies, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences revealed that alcohol and drugs played a large role in the weeks and months leading up to the sacrifice of these children. Before Incan high priests embarked on the pilgrimage to take the victims to the top of mountains, the children were given diets high in animal protein and maize–a diet made for the elite. Along the demanding journey, coca leaves, the plant from...
  • Pre-Incan Mettalurgy Discovered

    04/19/2007 4:43:37 PM PDT · by blam · 17 replies · 906+ views
    Yahoo News/Live Science ^ | 4-19-2007 | Charles Q. Choi
    Pre-Incan Metallurgy Discovered Charles Q. Choi Special to LiveScience Thu Apr 19, 9:50 AM ET Metals found in lake mud in the central Peruvian Andes have revealed the first evidence for pre-Colonial metalsmithing there. These findings illustrate a way that archaeologists can recreate the past even when looters have destroyed the valuable artifacts that would ordinarily be relied upon to reveal historical secrets. For instance, the new research hints at a tax imposed on local villages by ancient Inca rulers to force a switch from production of copper to silver. Pre-Colonial bronze artifacts have previously been found in the central...
  • Ancient War Revealed in Discovery of Incan Fortresses

    06/03/2011 7:53:26 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    LiveScience ^ | Tuesday, May 31, 2011 | Owen Jarus
    Incan fortresses built some 500 years ago have been discovered along an extinct volcano in northern Ecuador, revealing evidence of a war fought by the Inca just before the Spanish conquistadors arrived in the Andes. "We're seeing evidence for a pre-Columbian frontier, or borderline, that we think existed between Inca fortresses and Ecuadorian people's fortresses," project director Samuel Connell, of Foothill College in California, told LiveScience. The team has identified what they think are 20 fortresses built by the Inca and two forts that were built by a people from Ecuador known as the Cayambe. The volcano is called Pambamarca......
  • 440-year-old document sheds new light on native population decline under Spanish colonial rule

    05/26/2011 6:07:24 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Eurekalert ^ | May 19, 2011 | Kevin Stacey of University of Chicago Press Journals
    Analysis of a 440-year-old document reveals new details about native population decline in the heartland of the Inca Empire following Spanish conquest in the 16th century. According to the analysis, the native Andean population in the Yucay Valley of Peru showed a remarkable ability to bounce back in the short term from the disease, warfare, and famine that accompanied the initial Spanish invasion. However, it was the repetition of such disasters generation after generation, along with overly rigid colonial administration, that dramatically reduced the population over the long term... The analysis is based on an unusually detailed survey of the...
  • President Tells Pope How to Reform Church (No, not that president)

    06/16/2010 10:00:21 AM PDT · by IbJensen · 2 replies · 230+ views
    TFP ^ | 6/10/2010 | Luiz Sérgio Solimeo
    A rather unexpected voice just joined the chorus of the liberal media outcry over sex scandals among some Catholic clergymen: none other than Evo Morales, Bolivia’s socialist and neopagan president. A Neopagan Socialist... Indeed, Mr. Morales, leader of the Movement to Socialism, figured he should teach the Pope how things in the Church ought to be run. For those who may not know, he was inaugurated President of Bolivia in 2006 using indigenous pagan rituals.1 The Bolivian newspaper Los Tiempos, of Cochabamba (6/20/2006), described the ceremony: “Evo Morales assumed political power with a spectacular display of religious rituals alluding to...
  • Village high in the Andes protects ancient Inca puzzle

    08/25/2010 5:25:05 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    New York Times ^ | Saturday, August 21, 2010 | Simon Romero, with contribs by Andrea Zarate
    Archaeologists say the Incas, brought down by the Spanish conquest, used khipus -- strands of cords made from the hair of animals such as llamas or alpacas -- as an alternative to writing... San Cristóbal de Rapaz, a village 13,000 feet above sea level... isolation has allowed it to guard an enduring archaeological mystery: a collection of khipus, the cryptic woven knots that may explain how the Incas -- in contrast to contemporaries in the Ottoman Empire and China's Ming dynasty -- ruled a vast, administratively complex empire without a written language. Archaeologists say the Incas, brought down by the...