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Keyword: indoeuropean

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  • A Lost European Culture, Pulled From Obscurity

    11/30/2009 8:48:53 PM PST · by Borges · 32 replies · 1,681+ views
    NY Times ^ | 11/30/09 | JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
    Before the glory that was Greece and Rome, even before the first cities of Mesopotamia or temples along the Nile, there lived in the Lower Danube Valley and the Balkan foothills people who were ahead of their time in art, technology and long-distance trade. For 1,500 years, starting earlier than 5000 B.C., they farmed and built sizable towns, a few with as many as 2,000 dwellings. They mastered large-scale copper smelting, the new technology of the age. Their graves held an impressive array of exquisite headdresses and necklaces and, in one cemetery, the earliest major assemblage of gold artifacts to...
  • Semerano, The Scholar Feared By The Academy, Awarded (2001)

    02/27/2005 9:36:15 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies · 471+ views
    Giovanni Semerano had to wait 90 years before receiving his first institutional acknowledgement for his important discoveries concerning ancient languages, in particular, the Etruscan language. Semerano has revolutionized the theories tied to the Indo-European languages as the root of the current Mediterranean and European languages. He was defined a "heretic" scholar because he erased centuries of philosophical studies that saw in the Greek-Latin philosophies the origins of European culture. Thanks to his etymological studies the 90-year-old philosopher instead sustains that Western culture derives from the Shiites and the Assyrians.
  • (from April 22, 2016) Some fairy tales may be 6000 years old

    06/09/2016 4:55:27 PM PDT · by SteveH · 51 replies
    sciencemag.org ^ | April 22, 2016 | David Shultz
    When it comes to the origin of Western fairy tales, the 19th century Brothers Grimm get a lot of the credit. Few scholars believe the Grimms were actually responsible for creating the tales, but academics probably didn’t realize how old many of these stories really are. A new study, which treats these fables like an evolving species, finds that some may have originated as long as 6000 years ago. The basis for the new study, published in Royal Society Open Science, is a massive online repository of more than 2000 distinct tales from different Indo-European cultures known as the Aarne–Thompson–Uther...
  • Celtic Found to Have Ancient Roots

    07/01/2003 5:48:39 AM PDT · by Pharmboy · 191 replies · 3,558+ views
    NY Times ^ | July 1, 2003 | NICHOLAS WADE
    In November 1897, in a field near the village of Coligny in eastern France, a local inhabitant unearthed two strange objects. One was an imposing statue of Mars, the Roman god of war. The other was an ancient bronze tablet, 5 feet wide and 3.5 feet high. It bore numerals in Roman but the words were in Gaulish, the extinct version of Celtic spoken by the inhabitants of France before the Roman conquest in the first century B.C. The tablet, now known as the Coligny calendar, turned out to record the Celtic system of measuring time, as well as being...
  • European languages linked to migration from the east

    02/13/2015 12:32:32 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Nature ^ | 12 February 2015 | Ewen Callaway
    Large ancient-DNA study uncovers population that moved westwards 4,500 years ago. A mysterious group of humans from the east stormed western Europe 4,500 years ago -- bringing with them technologies such as the wheel, as well as a language that is the forebear of many modern tongues, suggests one of the largest studies of ancient DNA yet conducted. Vestiges of these eastern emigres exist in the genomes of nearly all contemporary Europeans, according to the authors, who analysed genome data from nearly 100 ancient Europeans. ...last year, a study of the genomes of ancient and contemporary Europeans found echoes not...
  • Burushaski

    11/06/2004 10:34:09 PM PST · by Ptarmigan · 10 replies · 427+ views
    Burushaski is a language spoken in northern Pakistan and Kashmir. It is spoken by 40,000 to 50,000 people. It has no known relatives and some believe it maybe a remnant of a prehistoric language. Burushaski is like Ainu and Basque, language isolate with no known relatives. Language Museum Burushaski: An Extraordinary Language in the Karakoram MountainsWikipedia-Burushaski
  • Mother of all Indo-European languages was born in Turkey

    11/26/2003 5:35:02 PM PST · by a_Turk · 114 replies · 991+ views
    AFP ^ | 11/26/2003 | N/A
    PARIS (AFP) - The vast group of languages that dominates Europe and much of Central and South Asia originated around 8,000 years ago among farmers in what is now Anatolia, Turkey. So say a pair of New Zealand academics who have remarkably retraced the family tree of so-called Indo-European languages -- a linguistic classification that covers scores of tongues ranging from Faroese to Hindi by way of English, French, German, Gujarati, Nepalese and Russian. Russell Gray and Quentin Atkinson, psychologists at the University of Auckland, built their language tree on the same principles as the theory of genetic evolution. According...
  • LINGUISTICS: Early Date for the Birth of Indo-European Languages

    11/28/2003 10:24:23 AM PST · by Lessismore · 36 replies · 3,431+ views
    Science Magazine ^ | 2003-11-28 | Michael Balter
    Ever since British jurist Sir William Jones noted in 1786 that there are marked similarities between diverse languages such as Greek, Sanskrit, and Celtic, linguists have assumed that most of the languages of Europe and the Indian subcontinent derive from a single ancient tongue. But researchers have fiercely debated just when and where this mother tongue was first spoken. Now a bold new study asserts that the common root of the 144 so-called Indo-European languages, which also include English and all the Germanic, Slavic, and Romance languages, is very ancient indeed. In this week's issue of Nature, evolutionary biologist Russell...
  • A Turkish origin for Indo-European languages

    08/24/2012 8:04:40 AM PDT · by Renfield · 43 replies
    Nature.com ^ | 8-23-2012 | Alyssa Joyce
    Languages as diverse as English, Russian and Hindi can trace their roots back more than 8,000 years to Anatolia — now in modern-day Turkey. That's the conclusion of a study1 that assessed 103 ancient and contemporary languages using a technique normally used to study the evolution and spread of disease. The researchers hope that their findings can settle a long-running debate about the origins of the Indo-European language group...
  • Faith & Beliefs | How’s your Sanskrit today?

    07/14/2012 7:48:30 PM PDT · by James C. Bennett · 26 replies
    The Kansas City Star ^ | July 10, 2012 | Vern Barnet
    You may know more Sanskrit than you realize. In fact, the word know comes from the same Indo-European root for the Sanskrit jnana. A Greek form of the root inflected by Latin gives us the English term gnostic, referring to knowledge of spiritual mysteries. You, faithful reader, know what agnostic means. Have you ever watched or created a video? Again, an IE root is the source of the term. Some scholars think the Sanskrit vidya, another word for knowledge, arose from a lexeme for seeing. With the twists and turns of consonants and vowels as language developed, we have an...
  • Unearthed cities in Southern Siberia could rewrite Aryan history

    10/04/2010 7:10:56 PM PDT · by James C. Bennett · 26 replies · 1+ views
    Sify News ^ | Sify News
    A new study has suggested that recently unearthed cities in Southern Siberia could rewrite Aryan history-as they are believed to be the original home of the Aryans. Twenty of the spiral-shaped settlements, believed to be the original home of the Aryan people, have been identified, and there are about 50 more suspected sites. They all lie buried in a region more than 640km long near Russia's border with Kazakhstan. The cities are apparently 3500-4000 years ago and are about the same size as several of the city-states of ancient Greece. If archaeologists confirm the cities as Aryan, they could be...
  • MIT: No easy answers in evolution of human language

    02/17/2008 7:01:56 AM PST · by decimon · 127 replies · 459+ views
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology ^ | David Chandler, MIT News Office
    CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — The evolution of human speech was far more complex than is implied by some recent attempts to link it to a specific gene, says Robert Berwick, professor of computational linguistics at MIT. Berwick will describe his ideas about language in a session at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science on Sunday, Feb. 17. The session is called “Mind of a Toolmaker,” and explores the use of evolutionary research in understanding human abilities. Some researchers in recent years have speculated that mutations in a gene called Foxp2 might have played a fundamental...
  • Sanskrit echoes around the world

    07/06/2007 12:18:56 AM PDT · by Lorianne · 39 replies · 953+ views
    Christian Science Monitor ^ | July 5, 2007 | Vijaysree Venkatraman
    The rise of India's economy has brought an eagerness to learn the ancient 'language of the gods' – and a great-great aunt to English. ___ Deep inside the Massachusetts Institute of Technology on a Wednesday evening recently, a class of about a dozen students were speaking an arcane ancient tongue. "It is time for exams, and I play every day," says one. "Perhaps, you should study, too," counters another at the conversation table. The others laugh. No, this isn't Latin 101 – that would be easy. This is Sanskrit, a classical language that is the Indian equivalent of ancient Greek...
  • What if the Persians would have conquered Arabia? [Vanity]

    03/14/2007 1:04:50 PM PDT · by freedom44 · 50 replies · 784+ views
    me ^ | 3/14/07 | me
    What if instead of invading Greece the Persians would have invaded and conquered Arabia? At the time Arabia was real weak so it would have been an easy victory. Freeper CarrotandStick poised this question in another thread. Lets hear your predictions history buffs. No Islam? A Zoroastrian Middle East? How would it have played out? The Persian Empire. Notice how accessible Arabia was. Until the sixth century BC, they were a people shrouded in mystery. Living in the area east of the Mesopotamian region, the Persians were a disparate group of Indo-European tribes, some nomadic, some settled, that were developing...
  • India Acquired Language, Not Genes, From West, Study Says

    01/12/2006 7:06:13 PM PST · by dennisw · 34 replies · 13,510+ views
    national geographic ^ | January 10, 2006 | Brian Handwerk
    Most modern Indians descended from South Asians, not invading Central Asian steppe dwellers, a new genetic study reports. The Indian subcontinent may have acquired agricultural techniques and languages—but it absorbed few genes—from the west, said Vijendra Kashyap, director of India's National Institute of Biologicals in Noida. The finding disputes a long-held theory that a large invasion of central Asians, traveling through a northwest Indian corridor, shaped the language, culture, and gene pool of many modern Indians within the past 10,000 years. That theory is bolstered by the presence of Indo-European languages in India, the archaeological record, and historic sources such...
  • Sanskrit works discussed at Jerusalem University

    07/28/2005 4:27:07 AM PDT · by CarrotAndStick · 4 replies · 464+ views
    The Press Trust of India ^ | 28 July, 2005 | The Press Trust of India
    JERUSALEM: Some forty scholars from all over the world recently took part in a summer programme on second millennium Sanskrit literature at Hebrew University here. Eminent Indologist, Prof David Shulman, who was instrumental in organising the programme, pointed out that so far the Sanskrit works in the first millennium (those of Kalidasa et al) have been explored to a great extent by the modern-day Sanskrit scholars, but the later period literature hasn't got much attention. "The second millennium A.D. Also witnessed intense creativity in Sanskrit throughout South Asia. Every major region produced its own distinctive corpus of Sanskrit literary works...
  • Ahmad Hassan Dani (Indus Valley script)

    08/12/2004 10:20:30 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies · 983+ views
    Harappa ^ | January 6, 1998 | interviewed by Omar Khan
    ...my friends like Asko Parpola, Professor Mahadevan, and the Russians Professors who have worked on this subject. They have all been working on the assumption that the language of the Indus people was Dravidian, that the people who build the Indus Civilization are Dravidian. But unfortunately I, as well as my friend Prof. B.B. Lal in India, have not been able to agree with this... On the other hand, I have been talking to Prof. Parpola that certainly this is an agglutinative language, there is no doubt. That has been accepted by all of us. Dravidian is an agglutinative language....
  • Scientists trace evolution of Indo-European languages to Hittites

    11/30/2003 10:59:07 AM PST · by Destro · 16 replies · 208+ views
    guardian.co.uk ^ | Thursday November 27, 2003 | Tim Radford
    Scientists trace evolution of Indo-European languages to Hittites Tim Radford, science editor Thursday November 27, 2003 The Guardian At last the answer in black and white, or beltz and zuri if you happen to be Basque, or noir and blanc, if you are French. You owe the words to Hittite-speaking farmers from Anatolia, who invented agriculture and spread their words as they sowed their seed, 9,500 years ago. Languages, like people, are related. Russell Gray of the University of Auckland, New Zealand, reports in Nature today that he and a colleague decided to treat language as if it was DNA...