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Keyword: indusvalley

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  • Harappan Workshops Excavated in Northwest India

    07/07/2016 8:14:17 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Wednesday, July 06, 2016 | editors
    A 5,000-year-old industrial production center featuring furnaces, hearths, and mud-brick structures has been found in northwest India between two channels of the Ghaggar River. According to a report in Frontline, the settlement, occupied for more than 1,000 years, lacked the fortification walls, streets at right angles, citadel, and area for traders and craftsmen usually seen in Harappan sites. One of the furnaces, used for smelting gold and copper, had a platform where the smith could sit and blow through an underground tube to the fire pit. Nearby hearths were used to produce gold jewelry and copper fish hooks and spear...
  • Indus Valley civilisation may pre-date Egypt's pharoahs: Ancient society is 2,500 years older [tr]

    06/02/2016 6:41:38 AM PDT · by C19fan · 34 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | June 2, 2016 | Sarah Griffiths
    With its impressive pyramids and complex rules, Ancient Egypt may seem to many the epitome of an advanced early civilisation. But new evidence suggests the Indus Valley Civilisation in India and Pakistan, famed for its well-planned cities and impressive crafts, predates Egypt and Mesopotamia. Already considered one of the oldest civilisations in the world, experts now believe it is 8,000 years old - 2,500 years older than previously thought.
  • Ancient civilization: Cracking the Indus script

    10/21/2015 3:47:27 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Nature ^ | Tuesday, October 20, 2015 | Andrew Robinson
    Whatever their differences, all Indus researchers agree that there is no consensus on the meaning of the script. There are three main problems. First, no firm information is available about its underlying language. Was this an ancestor of Sanskrit or Dravidian, or of some other Indian language family, such as Munda, or was it a language that has disappeared? Linear B was deciphered because the tablets turned out to be in an archaic form of Greek; Mayan glyphs because Mayan languages are still spoken. Second, no names of Indus rulers or personages are known from myths or historical records: no...
  • Drowned Indian city could be world's oldest

    01/18/2002 9:59:20 AM PST · by Oxylus · 26 replies · 304+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 18 January 02 | Emma Young
    Evidence of an ancient "lost river civilisation" has been uncovered off the west coast of India, the country's minister for science and technology has announced. Local archaeologists claim the find could push back currently accepted dates of the emergence of the world's first cities. Underwater archaeologists at the National Institute of Ocean Technology first detected signs of an ancient submerged settlement in the Gulf of Cambray, off Gujarat, in May 2001. They have now conducted further acoustic imaging surveys and have carbon dated one of the finds. The acoustic imaging has identified a nine-kilometre-long stretch of what was once a ...
  • Lost Civilisation From 7,500 BC Discovered Off Indian Coast

    01/16/2002 5:18:59 AM PST · by blam · 113 replies · 8,270+ views
    Ananova ^ | 1-16-2002
    Lost civilisation from 7,500 BC discovered off Indian coast Archaeologists have found a civilisation dating back to 7,500 BC off India's western coast. The find is 5,000 years older than any previously unearthed civilisation in the subcontinent. Researchers uncovered pottery, beads, sculptures, a fossilised jaw bone and human teeth at the Gulf of Cambay site.(DNA tests?) Previously, the oldest known civilisations were the Harrapan and Indus Valley communities - which date from around 2,500BC. Murli Manohar Joshi, minister for human resources and ocean development, told The Times of India: "The findings buried 40 metres below the sea reveal some ...
  • 'Farming in India began much earlier'

    12/05/2006 10:59:05 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies · 403+ views
    Hindustan Times ^ | December 3, 2006 | HT Correspondent
    Professor VD Mishra said that new researches have revealed that agricultural practices in India started in Mesolithic period (6-7,000 BC), much before the Neolithic period (4000 BC) as is generally believed. This discovery has proved that agriculture in India started simultaneously with other parts of the world. He said that Sativa rice, discovered from excavations at Chopni in Belan valley, has proved that India did not lag behind in agriculture... Joshi said that encroachments around historical monuments should be stopped because it harms our heritage. Citing an example, he said that Gwalior Fort could not be declared World Heritage due...
  • Huge Ancient Civilization’s Collapse Explained

    05/29/2012 5:32:20 AM PDT · by Renfield · 47 replies
    LiveScience ^ | 5-28-2012 | Charles Choi
    The mysterious fall of the largest of the world's earliest urban civilizations nearly 4,000 years ago in what is now India, Pakistan, Nepal and Bangladesh now appears to have a key culprit — ancient climate change, researchers say. Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia may be the best known of the first great urban cultures, but the largest was the Indus or Harappan civilization. This culture once extended over more than 386,000 square miles (1 million square kilometers) across the plains of the Indus River from the Arabian Seato the Ganges, and at its peak may have accounted for 10 percent of...
  • Tales teeth can tell: Dental enamel reveals surprising migration patterns in ancient Indus civ...

    05/09/2015 6:20:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    University of Florida ^ | April 29, 2015 | Gigi Marino [Sources: John Krigbaum, George Kamenov]
    When tooth enamel forms, it incorporates elements from the local environment -- the food one eats, the water one drinks, the dust one breathes. When the researchers looked at remains from the ancient city of Harappa, located in what is known today as the Punjab Province of Pakistan, individuals' early molars told a very different story than their later ones, meaning they hadn't been born in the city where they were found... The text of the Indus Valley Civilization remains undeciphered, and known and excavated burial sites are rare. A new study, published in today's PLOS ONE, illuminates the lives...
  • The ancient city that's crumbling away

    03/23/2015 11:43:41 AM PDT · by the scotsman · 10 replies
    BBC Magazine ^ | 22nd March 2015 | BBC Correspondent
    'The ancient city of Mohenjo Daro was one of the world's earliest major urban settlements - but as Razia Iqbal found on a recent visit to Pakistan, its remains are in danger of crumbling away. As a lover of language, I am convinced that certain combinations of letters have in them some innate magic - like Kubla Khan, or Xanadu, or Nineveh. So allow the words Mohenjo Daro to roll slowly off your tongue. And let me tell you about this ancient city, rediscovered nearly 100 years ago, but which had its heyday 4,000 years ago. It lies on the...
  • 4,000-Year-Old Copper Crown Found in India

    01/04/2015 4:30:46 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    Epoch Times ^ | January 1, 2015 | Venus Upadhayaya
    Indian archaeologists uncovered a 4,000-year-old copper crown in the village of Chandayan, in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh this week, from what they believe was the late Indus Valley civilization. According to Dr. Rakesh Tewari, the director general of the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI), this is only the second crown discovered at an Indus Valley site in either India or Pakistan. Earlier, a silver crown was found at another late Indus Valley site in what is now the Fatehabad district of Haryana state in northeast India... The copper crown, decorated with a Carnelian and a Fiance bead...
  • A New Type of Inscribed Copper Plate from Indus Valley (Harappan) Civilisation

    10/17/2014 10:28:15 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    Ancient Asia Journal ^ | October 8, 2014 | Vasant Shinde, Rick J. Willis
    A group of nine Indus Valley copper plates (c. 2600–2000 BC), discovered from private collections in Pakistan, appear to be of an important type not previously described. The plates are significantly larger and more robust than those comprising the corpus of known copper plates or tablets, and most significantly differ in being inscribed with mirrored characters. One of the plates bears 34 characters, which is the longest known single Indus script inscription. Examination of the plates with x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrophotometry indicates metal compositions, including arsenical copper, consistent with Indus Valley technology. Microscopy of the metal surface and internal structure...
  • Disease and trauma within collapsing Indus Civilisation

    12/27/2013 3:02:52 AM PST · by Renfield · 31 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | 12-25-2013
    During the third millennium BCE, the Indus Civilisation flourished in what is now northwest India and Pakistan. Between 2200-1900 BCE the culture was characterised by long-distance exchange networks, carefully planned urban settlements such as Harappa and Mohenjo Daro that had sophisticated sanitation facilities, standardised weights and measures, and a sphere of influence that extended over a million square kilometres of territory. The culture was seemingly at its height when the end came (collapse attributed to climatic change) but recent research published in both the open access journal PLoS ONE and an earlier 2012 article in the International Journal of Palaeopathology...
  • Is the Harappan civilisation 2000 years older?

    11/14/2012 12:03:35 PM PST · by Renfield · 9 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | 11/14/2012
    The recent International Conference on Harappan Archaeology produced an unexpected announcement from archaeologists BR Mani and KN Dikshit, both of the Archaeological Survey of India, who claim that new dates from excavations show the Harappan culture began around 2000 years earlier than previously thought.The ruins of the Harrapan city of Mohenjo-daro remained undocumented for over 3,700 years, until their discovery in 1922 by Rakhaldas Bandyopadhyay, an officer of the Archaeological Survey of India. He was led to the mound by a Buddhist monk, who reportedly believed it to be a stupa. Image: Wikimedia commons Redating of Harappan culture Based on...
  • Is Haryana home to older, larger Harappan-era site?

    06/26/2013 4:57:23 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Business Standard ^ | June 24th, 2013 | Jaideep Sarin
    Located on the Jind-Hansi road, about eight kilometres from Narnaund town, the seven mounds in the area could change history related to the Indus Valley civilization (now referred to as the Harappan civilization), researchers say. Vijai Vardhan, Haryana's principal secretary for archaeology and museums, told IANS: ... "Excavations conducted at Rakhigarhi indicate that the settlement witnessed all the phases of the Harappan civilization - the early Harappan (3200-2700 BCE) as well as the Mature Harappan (2700-1800 BCE). This positions Rakhigarhi as a unique Harappan site which promises to reveal new civilization contours by pushing the Indus Valley civilization by a...
  • FReeper Canteen ~ Part X of War in Ancient India ~ September 14, 2004

    09/13/2004 7:56:18 PM PDT · by LaDivaLoca · 407 replies · 2,513+ views
    A Tribute to Hinduism ^ | September 14, 2004 | LaDivaLoca
        For the freedom you enjoyed yesterday... Thank the Veterans who served in The United States Armed Forces.     Looking forward to tomorrow's freedom? Support The United States Armed Forces Today!     ANCIENT WARFARE Part X: War in Ancient India   Naval WarfareThe old notion that the Hindus were essentially a landlocked people, lacking in a spirit of adventure and the heart to brave the seas, is now dispelled. The researches of a generation of scholars have proved that from very early times the people of India were distinguished by nautical skill and enterprise, that they...
  • Indian ancestry revealed

    09/23/2009 5:45:59 PM PDT · by BGHater · 64 replies · 4,635+ views
    Nature News ^ | 23 Sep 2009 | Elie Dolgin
    The mixing of two distinct lineages led to most modern-day Indians. The population of India was founded on two ancient groups that are as genetically distinct from each other as they are from other Asians, according to the largest DNA survey of Indian heritage to date. Nowadays, however, most Indians are a genetic hotchpotch of both ancestries, despite the populous nation's highly stratified social structure. "All Indians are pretty similar," says Chris Tyler-Smith, a genome researcher at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute near Cambridge, UK, who was not involved in the study. "The population subdivision has not had a dominating...
  • India set to cut Hindu bias from history books

    06/27/2004 8:32:43 AM PDT · by CarrotAndStick · 12 replies · 340+ views
    SMH.com.au ^ | June 28, 2004 | SMH
    India's new government is poised to rewrite the history taught to schoolchildren after a panel of eminent historians recommended scrapping textbooks written by scholars hand-picked by the previous Hindu nationalist administration. Hundreds of thousands of textbooks are likely to be dropped by the National Council of Educational Research and Training, the central government body that sets the national curriculum for students up to 18. The move, one of the first made by the new Congress-led government, will strongly signal a departure from the program of its predecessor. The "saffronisation" of history, critics of the last government say, depicted India's Muslim...
  • Chronological History of Afghanistan

    11/10/2001 9:08:09 PM PST · by Cultural Jihad · 25 replies · 1,236+ views
    Afghanistan Online ^ | 04/2001 | Unknown
    Chronological History of Afghanistan Part I (50,000 BCE - 652) 50,000 BCE-20,000 BCE Archaeologists have identified evidence of stone age technology in Aq Kupruk, and Hazar Sum. Plant remains at the foothill of the Hindu Kush mountains indicate, that North Afghanistan was one of the earliest places to domestic plants and animals. 3000 BCE-2000 BCE Bronze might have been invented in ancient Afghanistan around this time. First true urban centers rise in two main sites in Afghanistan--Mundigak, and Deh Morasi Ghundai. Mundigak (near modern day Kandahar)--had an economic base of wheat, barley, sheep and goats. Also, evidence indicates that ...
  • India Acquired Language, Not Genes, From West, Study Says

    01/12/2006 7:06:13 PM PST · by dennisw · 34 replies · 13,510+ views
    national geographic ^ | January 10, 2006 | Brian Handwerk
    Most modern Indians descended from South Asians, not invading Central Asian steppe dwellers, a new genetic study reports. The Indian subcontinent may have acquired agricultural techniques and languages—but it absorbed few genes—from the west, said Vijendra Kashyap, director of India's National Institute of Biologicals in Noida. The finding disputes a long-held theory that a large invasion of central Asians, traveling through a northwest Indian corridor, shaped the language, culture, and gene pool of many modern Indians within the past 10,000 years. That theory is bolstered by the presence of Indo-European languages in India, the archaeological record, and historic sources such...
  • New Indo-European Language Discovered

    06/21/2012 5:14:04 PM PDT · by Renfield · 19 replies
    Sci-News.com ^ | 6-19-2012 | John Shanks
    A linguistics researcher at the Macquarie University in Australia has discovered that the language, known as Burushaski, which is spoken by about 90,000 people who reside in a remote area of Pakistan, is Indo-European in origin. Prof Ilija Casule’s discovery, which has now been verified by a number of the world’s top linguists, has excited linguistics experts around the world. An entire issue of the eminent international linguistics journal the Journal of Indo-European Studies is devoted to a discussion of his findings later this month. More than fifty eminent linguists have tried over many years to determine the genetic relationship...