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Keyword: infection

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  • Tick, mosquito-borne infections surge in United States: CDC

    05/02/2018 6:37:42 AM PDT · by Tilted Irish Kilt · 34 replies
    reuters.com ^ | 5/1/18 | Gina Cherelus
    The number of Americans sickened each year by bites from infected mosquitoes, ticks or fleas tripled from 2004 through 2016, with infection rates spiking sharply in 2016 as a result of a Zika outbreak, U.S. health officials said on Tuesday. Infections in 2016 went up 73 percent from 2015, reflecting the emergence of Zika, which is transmitted by mosquitoes and can cause severe birth defects. Zika was the most common disease borne by ticks, mosquitoes and fleas reported in 2016, with 41,680 cases reported, followed by Lyme disease, with 36,429 cases, almost double the number in 2004.
  • nearly three-quarters of medical scopes tainted by bacteria

    04/25/2018 6:23:51 PM PDT · by spintreebob · 19 replies
    Modern Healthcare ^ | 4-24-18 | Chad Terhune
    In an ominous sign for patient safety, 71% of reusable medical scopes deemed ready for use on patients tested positive for bacteria at three major U.S. hospitals, according to a new study. The paper, published recently in the American Journal of Infection Control, underscores the infection risk posed by a commonly used endoscopes. It signals a lack of progress by manufacturers, hospitals and regulators in reducing contamination despite numerous reports of superbug outbreaks and patient deaths, experts say. "These results are pretty scary," said Janet Haas, president of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. "These are very...
  • This man discovered a dirty little secret that reinvented medicine

    11/21/2017 5:06:55 AM PST · by x1stcav · 22 replies
    New York Post ^ | November 18, 2017 | Larry Getlen
    At the time, the medical community was unaware of the existence of germs and didn’t know how infectious diseases were passed on. As a result, cleanliness was not a factor in surgery, leading to gruesome sights and harrowing results. Surgeons — then regarded as low-status workers and often paid less than the men employed to pick lice off hospital beds — didn’t bother cleaning the blood and guts from surgical tables or their instruments between operations. No one in the operating theater wore gloves, and “it was not uncommon to see a medical student with shreds of flesh, gut or...
  • Mice found able to ward off fungal lung infections by causing fungus to kill itself

    09/08/2017 2:14:18 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 6 replies
    medicalxpress.com ^ | September 8, 2017 | by Bob Yirka
    (Medical Xpress)—A team of researchers from the U.S., Germany and Israel has found that mice are able to ward off fungal lung infections because their immune systems cause fungal spores to die. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes the means by which they discovered how mice are able to ward off fungal lung infections and what their findings might mean for human patients. Fungus is all around us, so much so that most people breathe in approximately 1000 fungal spores every single day. But the means by which people ward off fungal infections in the...
  • Rep. Steve Scalise remains in serious condition after undergoing surgery to manage infection

    07/06/2017 3:30:02 PM PDT · by navysealdad · 14 replies
    ABC NEWS ^ | Jul 6, 2017
    Rep. Steve Scalise, R-La., remains in serious condition more than three weeks after the House majority whip and three others were shot at a baseball field in Alexandria, Virginia. The MedStar Washington Hospital Center provided an update on Scalise's condition Thursday afternoon after he underwent surgery for "the management of infection." Scalise "tolerated the procedure well," the hospital said. The hospital announced Wednesday night that Scalise had been readmitted to the intensive care unit in serious condition "due to new concerns for infection."
  • Stunning Success! Vitamin C Saves People Dying of Sepsis

    04/17/2017 4:28:32 AM PDT · by huldah1776 · 149 replies
    CBN News ^ | April 6, 2017 | Lorie Johnson
    It seems too good to be true. A simple and inexpensive treatment for one of the most dreadful conditions around: sepsis. Also known as blood poisoning, sepsis strikes one million Americans every year, killing one-fourth of them. Dr. Paul Marik, chief of pulmonary and critical care at Eastern Virginia Medical School, came up with the idea on little more than a whim. His patient, 48-year-old Valerie Hobbs, was succumbing to sepsis and he had run out of options to save her. It was a desperation shot in the dark: Vitamin C. It worked. Beautifully. Again and again. Valerie spent a...
  • It Gets Worse: Dentist at VA Hospital May Have Infected Hundreds of Veterans With HIV

    12/01/2016 10:28:59 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 72 replies
    Townhall ^ | 12/01/2016 | Katie Pavlich
    For years veterans across the country have languished in VA hospitals, with thousands dying waiting for care. Suicide hotlines go unanswered and at least one hospital in Illinois, dead bodies were left in the morgue for months. Other hospitals are filled with black mold and roaches. Since the VA scandal broke two years ago, wait times haven't improved. At some hospitals wait times are now double what they were in 2014. But it gets worse. According to a local news report from WEAU News 13, as many as 600 veterans may have been infected with life threatening, lethal and incurable...
  • Millennials aren’t wearing condoms anymore [because of HPV vaccine and anti-HIV meds]

    11/03/2016 8:59:39 PM PDT · by grundle · 36 replies
    New York Post ^ | November 2, 2016 | Christian Gollayan
    A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found a recent spike in STIs such as chlamydia (up nearly 6 percent since 2014), gonorrhea (up nearly 13 percent) and syphilis (up 19 percent) among young people. A 2015 CDC study found that condom use among sexually active high schoolers dropped from 63 percent in 2003 to 57 percent in 2015. A study that same year by Skyn condoms found that 48 percent of millennials use condoms “never” or “rarely.” Gay men such as Ben, a 29-year-old designer based in Hell’s Kitchen, say the rise of PrEP —...
  • Creeping Sharia in Health Care

    07/28/2016 9:13:30 AM PDT · by PROCON · 29 replies
    americanthinker.com ^ | July 28, 2016 | Carol Brown
    Islamic supremacy is arriving in medical settings using stealth means, or what is often referred to as creeping sharia. Common themes include Muslim health care workers refusing to uphold infection control protocols, Muslim medical students refusing to study topics they deem forbidden according to Islamic law, Muslim visitors in hospitals ignoring hygiene guidelines to protect patients, and hospitals bending over backwards (or is it forwards?) to accommodate Muslim demands above and beyond anything done for members of any other religious or demographic group. Also covered are outright acts of violence perpetrated by Muslim men who attack hospital personnel. Islamic supremacy...
  • A Rare Blood Infection Is Killing People in Wisconsin and Michigan

    04/30/2016 9:02:35 AM PDT · by StCloudMoose · 28 replies
    A rare blood infection is claiming lives, and the CDC can't pinpoint the source. The infection, caused by the Elizabethkingia anophelis bacteria, has killed 17 people in Wisconsin since November and just claimed a life in Michigan, the Detroit News reports. Elizabethkingia is often found in water and soil, but – until now – has seldom caused infections. So far, 54 Wisconsin residents have contracted the infection, CNN reports. "We don't see 48 of the identical organism causing an outbreak like this very often," Michael Bell, deputy director for the Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion at the Centers for Disease...
  • Mysterious 'Demonic' Ring Eating Away Boy's Finger

    02/22/2015 4:59:39 AM PST · by SWAMPSNIPER · 46 replies
    pulse.com.gh ^ | 02/20/15 | Daniel Russell
    Eric Buabeng, told Starr Fm that he found the ring by the roadside on his way home from church in November 2014 and picked it up. Buabeng said he wore the ring on his right index finger when he got home and felt the ring tightening up his finger.
  • Abortion industry rejects oversight (what do they have to hide?)

    09/08/2015 7:01:08 AM PDT · by Mrs. Don-o · 3 replies
    Wopular ^ | September 7, 2015 | Charmaine Yoest
    It should be a national scandal that the abortion industry fights viciously against any kind of medical standard of care to protect women, even when those efforts mirror its own internal recommendations. The industry simply rejects accountability. Recently, a federal appeals court upheld a Texas law requiring abortionists to have hospital admitting privileges near their practices. Planned Parenthood, the nation’s largest abortion provider, admits that women may suffer complications after abortions, including blood clots, hemorrhage, incomplete abortions, infection and organ injuries. It further concedes that in Texas, at least 210 women a year must be hospitalized after abortions. Given these...
  • South Africa’s Tutu being treated for “stubborn infection”

    07/16/2015 11:09:15 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 4 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Jul 16, 2015 10:50 AM EDT | Lynsey Chutel
    It’s time for retired archbishop Desmond Tutu to begin saying no to public events in order to conserve his health, his daughter said Thursday, as the Nobel laureate remained hospitalized for a persistent infection. Tutu, 83, was admitted to a Cape Town hospital on Tuesday where he is receiving an “intensive course” of antibiotics to fight a “stubborn infection,” the Desmond and Leah Tutu Legacy Foundation said earlier in a statement. […] Tutu’s illness is not related to prostate cancer, for which he has been treated for years, Mpho Tutu said. It is uncertain how long he will remain in...
  • Test unravels history of infection

    06/04/2015 5:28:40 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 3 replies
    The British Broadcasting Corporation ^ | June 4, 2015 | Jonathan Ball
    US researchers claim to have developed a single test that is able to identify past exposure to every known human virus infection, using a drop of blood.The technique decodes the infection history imprinted in our immune response. The scientists hope that the test will eventually provide important insight into how viruses contribute to development of a range of diseases. The work was published in the journal Science. During a virus infection, your immune system generates antibodies designed to fight the virus. Each antibody recognises a tiny fragment of the virus and their interaction is very specific - they fit like...
  • 1,000-year-old onion and garlic eye remedy kills MRSA

    03/31/2015 6:33:43 AM PDT · by Hojczyk · 22 replies
    BBC News ^ | March 30,2015 | Tom Feilden
    The leechbook is one of the earliest examples of what might loosely be called a medical textbook It seems Anglo-Saxon physicians may actually have practised something pretty close to the modern scientific method, with its emphasis on observation and experimentation. Bald's Leechbook could hold some important lessons for our modern day battle with anti-microbial resistance. line break n each case, they tested the individual ingredients against the bacteria, as well as the remedy and a control solution. They found the remedy killed up to 90% of MRSA bacteria and believe it is the effect of the recipe rather than one...
  • 724 Hospitals Have Lost Medicare Funding For Avoidable Complications

    01/24/2015 1:27:06 PM PST · by LucyT · 57 replies
    The Inquisitor ^ | January 24, 2015 | Staff
    Nationally, 724 hospitals have had their Medicare funding reduced after the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services found that each had high rates of potentially avoidable “hospital-acquired conditions,” including falls, bed sores, and certain infections, including ventilator acquired pneumonia and catheter-associated urinary tract infections. CMS scored hospitals on the prevalence of three risk factors to their Medicare population patients: central line bloodstream infections, catheter-associated urinary tract infections, and serious complications, a catch-all group made up of eight types of injuries, including blood clots, falls, and bed sores. Funding can be reinstated for hospitals whose scores improve in the targeted areas.
  • Infected and undocumented: Thousands of Canadians dying from hospital-acquired bugs ( Canada)

    01/19/2015 6:01:48 AM PST · by george76 · 10 replies
    National Post ^ | January 19, 2015 | Tom Blackwell
    Ms. Smith’s tragic demise was more dramatic than many cases of hospital-acquired infection (HAI). Necrotizing fasciitis is a frightening, but rare, complication. Still, about 8,000 Canadians a year die from bugs they contract in facilities meant to make them better, while many more see their hospital stay prolonged by such illness. Yet after years of well-intentioned work and millions of dollars spent on combatting the scourge, the details and extent of the problem remain murky. No national statistics, for instance, document the number of surgical-wound infections like Ms. Smith’s, one of the most common types of hospital-acquired pathogens. A federal...
  • 'Ingenious' Antibiotic Discovery 'Challenges Long-Held Scientific Beliefs'

    01/07/2015 9:10:36 PM PST · by blam · 19 replies
    BI - Reuters ^ | 1-7-2015 | Lauren F Friedman and Reuters
    Lauren F Friedman and Reuters January 7, 2015Scientists have discovered a new antibiotic, teixobactin, that can kill serious infections in mice without encountering any detectable resistance, offering a potential new way to get ahead of dangerous evolving superbugs. The new antibiotic was discovered in a sample of soil. The research is "ingenious," Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious disease specialist at Vanderbilt University, told The New York Times. Researchers said the antibiotic, which has yet to be tested in humans, could one day be used to treat drug-resistant infections caused by the superbug MSRA, as well as tuberculosis, which normally requires...
  • Grand Junction hospital limits visitors due to flu ( Colorado )

    01/02/2015 7:44:02 PM PST · by george76 · 31 replies
    ksl ^ | January 2, 2015
    Hospitals and medical centers in western Colorado are limiting visitors because of a serious flu outbreak. ... The Veterans Affairs Medical Center's community living center still is not accepting visitors after 11 patients showed signs of having the flu. All of those patients will remain in isolation until two or three days after the last one recovers. The Centers for Disease Control said influenza has reached epidemic proportions. There have been 15 pediatric deaths nationwide
  • A Virus Found In Lakes May Be Literally Changing The Way People Think

    10/30/2014 10:54:35 AM PDT · by blam · 57 replies
    BI ^ | 10-30-2014 | Kevin Loria
    Kevin Loria October 30, 2014While conducting a totally separate experiment, a group of scientists from Johns Hopkins and the University of Nebraska accidentally discovered something unexpected and potentially disturbing. A virus was living in the mouths and throats of a good portion of the people in the study, a virus that the researchers didn't think was capable of infecting humans. Worse still, it seemed to be slowing some of the subjects' mental abilities, especially their ability to process visual information. The surprising part about this for researchers was that a microscopic organism that we thought could only infect algae —...