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Keyword: intellectualproperty

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  • Musicians ask Trump for money help after Grammys bashing

    02/13/2017 6:50:54 AM PST · by Cheerio · 68 replies
    Washington Examiner ^ | 2/13/17 | Joel Gehrke
    President Trump's political opponents in the music industry would like his help in at least one regard: The laws that govern who makes money off of music. "The Recording Academy, together with America's music makers, call on the president and Congress to help keep the music playing by updating music laws, protecting music education, and renewing America's commitment to the arts," Neil Portnow, the president of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences, said during the 2017 Grammy Awards Sunday night. The appeal demonstrated how the business side of the music industry will have to grapple with the reality...
  • Wall Street Journal (behind paywall): China’s Global Semiconductor Raid

    01/16/2017 9:22:51 PM PST · by RightGeek · 36 replies
    Semiconductors are essential to everything from home appliances to cars, satellites and fighter aircraft. The U.S. has led the industry since its start in the 1950s, with firms like Intel, Qualcomm and Apple today accounting for nearly 50% of global sales, worth about $165 billion a year, and employing some 359,000 Americans. Semiconductors are the fourth-most valuable U.S. export behind airplanes, petroleum products and cars. China hopes to change this through state subsidies and predatory trade practices. The White House report, drafted by industry and policy experts, warns that “Chinese policies are distorting markets in ways that undermine innovation, subtract...
  • What we know about Mainak Sarkar, UCLA shooter

    06/02/2016 12:58:24 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 52 replies
    startribune.com ^ | 06/02/216
    Police discovered what Sarkar titled his "kill list" at his St. Paul apartment on Agate Street, which listed the names of two targeted professors, one of whom was not on the UCLA campus at the time of the shootings. A Brooklyn Park woman was also listed. Brooklyn Park police discovered her body in her home at 12:35 a.m. Thursday. Neighbors identified her as Hasti. • Sarkar's motive for killing the professor was believed to be over the perceived intellectual property theft. • Beck said the professors knew Sarkar had issues with them, but didn't believe he was a danger. •...
  • Soros, Dell dragged into Magic Johnson credit card mess

    01/18/2014 9:29:46 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Page Six ^ | January 18, 2014 | Ian Mohr
    <p>Billionaires George Soros and Michael Dell have been dragged into a nasty lawsuit against former NBA great Magic Johnson over his prepaid credit card, the Magic Card.</p> <p>The moguls are principals of OneWest Bank, which entrepreneur Reed Wallace is accusing, along with the former NBA great Johnson, of stealing his concept for a Magic-backed credit card.</p>
  • Let's Protect Intellectual Property Rights From "Big Fix"

    10/08/2015 6:28:38 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 2 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | October 8, 2015 | Ken Blackwell
    Fall is always a busy time on Capitol Hill. Members usually wait for this time of year to consider the most controversial and thorny issues like appropriation bills to keep the government open and tax legislation that expires at the end of the year. Deals are made and legislators look for any opening to sneak through supposed non-controversial legislation without much debate or fanfare. Add to this yearly spectacle the fact that House Republicans are in the midst of a leadership shakeup with Speaker Boehner having announced his resignation and retirement at the end of October and the GOP presidential...
  • Analysts: Beijing Parade a 'Bazaar' of Stolen Technology

    09/04/2015 6:12:26 AM PDT · by sukhoi-30mki · 20 replies
    Voice of America ^ | September 04, 2015 | Saibal Dasgupta
    BEIJING—The massive military parade in Beijing this week showcased China’s latest weapons, unveiling many to the public for the first time. But weapons experts say the systems on display showed hallmarks of China’s reputation for stealing technology and adapting it to its requirements. The show involved long, medium and short range missiles, a range of tanks and 200 fighter aircraft. The Chinese government said that all the equipment had been made indigenously, attesting to the success of the country’s military industrial capability and the estimated $145 billion spent on the military in 2015. “The parade was a bazaar of stolen...
  • A reminder that your Instagram photos aren’t really yours: Someone else can sell them for $90,000

    05/27/2015 8:53:39 AM PDT · by a fool in paradise · 14 replies
    Washington Post ^ | May 25, 2015 | Jessica Contrera
    ...This month, painter and photographer Richard Prince reminded us that what you post is public, and given the flexibility of copyright laws, can be shared — and sold — for anyone to see. As a part of the Frieze Art Fair in New York, Prince displayed giant screenshots of other people’s Instagram photos without warning or permission. The collection, “New Portraits,” is primarily made up of pictures of women, many in sexually charged poses. They are not paintings, but screenshots that have been enlarged to 6-foot-tall inkjet prints. According to Vulture, nearly every piece sold for $90,000 each. How is...
  • Homeland Security confiscates Royals underwear in Kansas City

    10/24/2014 11:20:16 AM PDT · by massmike · 39 replies
    kansas.com ^ | 10/24/2014 | JENEÉ OSTERHELDT
    Peregrine Honig says she just wanted to help celebrate the hometown team when she designed Lucky Royals boyshorts. The panties, with “Take the Crown” and “KC” across the bottom, were set to be sold in Honig’s Birdies Panties shop Tuesday. But Homeland Security agents visited the Crossroads store and confiscated the few dozen pairs of underwear, printed in Kansas City by Lindquist Press. “They came in and there were two guys” Honig said. “I asked one of them what size he needed and he showed me a badge and took me outside. They told me they were from Homeland Security...
  • Kansas City lingerie shopowners in a twist after Homeland Security's panty raid

    10/23/2014 3:38:40 PM PDT · by dware · 39 replies
    Fox News ^ | 10.23.2014 | FoxNews.com
    When two burly men walked into a Missouri women's underwear store Tuesday, the owners didn't think much of it -- until the pair flashed their Homeland Security badges and confiscated several dozen panties bearing the initials "KC" in honor of the Kansas City Royals.
  • Proprietary Primate: Wikipedia Says Monkey Owns Copyright to ‘Selfie’

    08/07/2014 2:34:38 PM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 38 replies
    The National Review ^ | 8-7-14 | Ian Tuttle
    Monkey business — or legitimate copyright claim? In Indonesia in 2011 a female crested black macaque hijacked the camera of British nature photographer David Slater and proceeded to snap hundreds of photos — among them several selfies, photos of himself, one of which made worldwide headlines and the animal’s Wikipedia page. Slater, citing royalty losses, has tried to have the photograph removed from the site. The Telegraph reports: The Gloucestershire-based photographer now claims that the decision is jeopardising his income as anyone can take the image and publish it for free, without having to pay him a royalty. He complained...
  • Biz Break: Google, Facebook and Instagram risk user backlash with privacy changes

    10/11/2013 6:09:22 PM PDT · by george76 · 8 replies
    San Jose Mercury News ^ | 10/11/2013 | Jeremy C. Owens
    Google announced Friday that it would begin placing users' activity and photos into advertisements and recommendations seen by the account-holders' Google+ contacts, similar to Facebook's "Sponsored Stories," which led to a class-action lawsuit that cost the Menlo Park company $20 million and forced it to offer members an option to opt out of such uses. "For example, your friends might see that you rated an album 4 stars on the band's Google Play page. And the +1 you gave your favorite local bakery could be included in an ad that the bakery runs through Google," the Mountain View search giant...
  • Report: China Steals $300 Billion of American Ideas Every Year Costing US Economy 2.1 Million Jobs

    05/29/2013 4:53:44 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 30 replies
    Gateway Pundit ^ | May 29, 2013 | Jim Hoft
    A new study led by Dennis Blair, who served as President Barack Obama’s first director of national intelligence, and former Utah Governor Jon Huntsman, who served as U.S. ambassador to China from 2009 through 2011 found that the US loses billions in intellectual property to Chinese hackers every year. The report found that an estimated 2.1 million American jobs were lost due to intellectual theft. The report recommends corporations hire what amount to full-time IT security guards who patrol their networks — assisted by automated systems that scan for software behaving strangely, a telltale sign of malware — looking for...
  • Chinese Investment Threatens Security

    07/29/2002 4:03:55 PM PDT · by flamefront · 10 replies · 404+ views
    foxnews ^ | Friday, July 26, 2002 | Frank Gaffney, Jr.
    <p>One of the largest Chinese telecommunications equipment suppliers, Huawei Technologies Company, recently unveiled plans to establish Future Wei, a wholly-owned U.S. subsidiary with headquarters in Plano, Texas.</p> <p>Ordinarily, such a foreign investment in the United States would be welcomed by the local Chamber of Commerce and others anticipating associated employment and revenue opportunities. As Americans learn more about the parent company and what Chinese enterprises like it are up to, however, patriots in Texas and elsewhere in this country are likely to say "No way, Huawei!"</p>
  • High Court Rules in Favor of Book Reseller [6-3]

    03/19/2013 8:37:00 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 41 replies
    http://online.wsj.com ^ | 03-19-2013 | By BRENT KENDALL
    WASHINGTON—The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday handed a setback to publishers, ruling in favor of a Thai student who bought inexpensive foreign-edition textbooks and resold them to U.S. students on eBay. The high court rejected arguments by publisher John Wiley & Sons Inc., which accused Supap Kirtsaeng, a former University of Southern California Ph.D. student, of infringing its copyrights on several works, including textbooks on physics, organic chemistry and engineering. The Asian versions of those books were marked with warnings that they were intended for sale only in certain foreign regions. U.S. law has long held that in principle, once...
  • RSC Policy Brief: Three Myths about Copyright Law and Where to Start to Fix It

    11/16/2012 11:46:08 PM PST · by Utmost Certainty · 28 replies
    Republican Study Committee ^ | November 16, 2012 | Republican Study Committee
    Outline/Summary: This paper will analyze current US Copyright Law by examining three myths on copyright law and possible reforms to copyright law that will lead to more economic development for the private sector and to a copyright law that is more firmly based upon constitutional principles. 1. The purpose of copyright is to compensate the creator of the content:It’s a common misperception that the Constitution enables our current legal regime of copyright protection – in fact, it does not. The Constitution’s clause on Copyright and patents states:“To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times...
  • Could Morse Have Patented the Web?

    04/01/2012 2:34:03 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 10 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | L. GORDON CROVITZ | March 25, 2012
    In 1853, the Supreme Court gave Samuel Morse some bad news. In O'Reilly v. Morse, the justices approved the inventor's patent for part of the telegraph that delivered the Morse code message "What Hath God Wrought?" but said he could not patent the idea of sending messages electronically across great distances. Ideas alone, the justices said, cannot be patented. Morse's descendants should demand a rehearing. The standards for patents are so low that simply having an idea often justifies a patent. Morse wanted a patent to cover "electro-magnetism, however developed, for marking or printing intelligible characters, signs, letters, at any...
  • Up in the Air: Will America lose its dominance of the skies?

    12/21/2011 8:52:56 PM PST · by neverdem · 40 replies · 4+ views
    NATIONAL REVIEW ONLINE ^ | December 19, 2011 | Michael Auslin
    Up in the AirWill America lose its dominance of the skies? There were a number of reasons last week to look up to the sky and wonder about the future of airpower. In a world in which the United States will have smaller ground and naval forces, we will likely become more dependent on land- and sea-based airpower to deter or defeat enemies. The proper employment of air assets as part of a joint force allows for nearly instantaneous response to crises, saves American lives, and can bring pinpoint devastation to an enemy’s forces and command-and-control systems. Yet along with...
  • Google engineer admits "strong indication that it is likely" he copied Sun code into Android

    09/08/2011 12:27:54 PM PDT · by Swordmaker · 24 replies
    Foss Patents ^ | September 7, 2011 | Florian Mueller
    This is the second of three consecutive posts on information gleaned from last night's filings in Oracle v. Google. I previously blogged about Sun's proposal to create a Red Hat-style Android distribution with open source Java.While patents are the most important part of Oracle's lawsuit against Google, the copyright infringement part shouldn't be underestimated. Google is currently trying to get rid of it on summary judgment, but Oracle defends its related claims.Judge Alsup denied the filing of various interesting documents under seal, so they entered the public record last night. Also, documents that were heavily-redacted are now much less redacted...
  • US House takes up major overhaul of patent system

    06/23/2011 1:26:42 AM PDT · by newzjunkey · 14 replies
    AP ^ | Updated 01:00 a.m., Thursday, June 23, 2011 | JIM ABRAMS, Associated Press
    ...The legislation, supported by the Obama administration and a broad range of business groups and high tech companies, aims to ease the lengthy backlog in patent applications, clean up some of the procedures that can lead to costly litigation and put the United States under the same filing system as the rest of the industrialized world. The Senate passed a similar bill last March on a 95-5 vote. If the bill makes it to the White House for the president's signature, it could be one of the first congressional actions this year to have a concrete effect on business after months...
  • The 18 Senators Who Approve Breaking The Internet To Protect Hollywood

    06/07/2011 3:22:34 AM PDT · by JerseyHighlander · 30 replies
    techdirt.com ^ | 05/26/2011
    The 18 Senators Who Approve Breaking The Internet To Protect Hollywood from the not-cool dept Last fall, we noted that the Senate Judiciary Committee had unanimously voted to approve COICA, a bill for censoring the internet as a favor to the entertainment industry. Thankfully, Senator Ron Wyden stepped up and blocked COICA from progressing. This year, COICA has been replaced by the PROTECT IP Act, which fixes some of the problems of COICA, but introduces significant other problems as well. A wide cross section of people who actually understand technology and innovation have come out against PROTECT IP as written...