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Keyword: isp

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  • Kim Komando: 3 surprising things that spy on you that you can't stop

    08/10/2014 12:22:33 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 69 replies
    Komando.com ^ | August 9, 2014 | Kim Komando
    Do you ever feel like you're being watched? In the past, you could chalk it up to paranoia, close the curtains and get on with your life. Thanks to technology, it's not just your imagination. You really are being watched in your home, at work and everywhere in between. From online advertisers and hackers to the NSA and other government agencies, everyone is trying to keep tabs on you. And things keep getting worse. If you think you know every gadget and organization that's a danger, think again. Here are three things spying on you that you probably didn't know...
  • Many home routers supplied by ISPs can be compromised en masse, researchers say

    08/11/2014 9:36:34 PM PDT · by Utilizer · 44 replies
    CSO ^ | 10 August, 2014 23:33 | Lucian Constantin (IDG News Service)
    Specialized servers used by many ISPs to manage routers and other gateway devices provisioned to their customers are accessible from the Internet and can easily be taken over by attackers, researchers warn. By gaining access to such servers, hackers or intelligence agencies could potentially compromise millions of routers and implicitly the home networks they serve, said Shahar Tal, a security researcher at Check Point Software Technologies. Tal gave a presentation Saturday at the DefCon security conference in Las Vegas. At the core of the problem is an increasingly used protocol known as TR-069 or CWMP (customer-premises equipment wide area network...
  • Comcast vs. Netflix: Is this really about Net neutrality?

    05/15/2014 1:40:39 PM PDT · by Las Vegas Dave · 20 replies
    cnet.com ^ | May 15, 2014 | Marguerite Reardon
    If you noticed more buffering and sputtering when streaming video from Netflix a few months ago, you weren't alone. But who was really to blame? Your broadband provider or Netflix? Netflix, which earlier this year reluctantly agreed to pay interconnection fees to broadband providers, has suggested that Comcast is to blame because it's violating principles of Net neutrality, which are all about keeping the Internet free and open. Comcast has vigorously denied these assertions. Still, questions remain and confusion abounds over how the two ideas are linked or whether they should be linked at all. The confusion deepened with statements...
  • Cruz looking to blunt FCC authority

    05/14/2014 7:43:26 AM PDT · by SoConPubbie · 22 replies
    The Hill ^ | 05/13/14 08:11 PM EDT | Julian Hattem
    Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) is looking to strip the Federal Communications Commission of its ability to write new net neutrality rules.The senator is currently circulating draft legislation that would undercut the commission’s legal authority to write new regulations governing the way that Internet service providers treat different streams of traffic online.Cruz “has serious concerns about the course the FCC is pursuing on net neutrality and on the questionable authority on which it’s relying,” spokeswoman Catherine Frazier said in an email to The Hill. “He is exploring legislative options to preserve the freedom of the Internet to remain an engine for...
  • Five US Internet Providers Are Slowing Down Access Until They Get More Cash

    05/06/2014 8:34:38 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 29 replies
    Popular Resistance ^ | May 6, 2014 | Timothy B. Lee
    If you’re the customer of a major American internet provider, you might have been noticing it’s not very reliable lately. If so, there’s a pretty good chance that a graph like this is the reason:These graphs comes from Level 3, one of the world’s largest providers of “transit,” or long-distance internet connectivity. The graph on the left shows the level of congestion between Level 3 and a large American ISP in the Dallas area. In the middle of the night, the connection is less than half-full and everything works fine. But during peak hours, the connection is saturated. That produces...
  • Internet providers can be forced to block access to illegal downloads, rules EU Court

    03/30/2014 5:29:42 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 8 replies
    EU Observer ^ | 28.03.14 @ 09:44 | Benjamin Fox
    EU-based internet service providers can be ordered to block customers’ access to a copyright-infringing website, following a ruling on Thursday (27 March) by the European Court of Justice (ECJ). The judgment follows a dispute between Austrian Internet provider Telekabel Wien and two film companies, based in Germany and Austria, over whether the internet service provider (ISP) should be forced to prevent its customers from accessing film download site kino.to, a Tonga-based website that received nearly 4 million visitors a day. …
  • Change your passwords: Comcast hushes, minimizes serious hack

    02/10/2014 8:25:32 AM PST · by MeshugeMikey · 36 replies
    zdnet.com ^ | February 9, 2014 | Violet Blue
    Are you a Comcast customer? Please change your password. On February 6, NullCrew FTS hacked into at least 34 of Comcast's servers and published a list of the company's mail servers and a link to the root file with the vulnerability it used to penetrate the system on Pastebin.
  • Is there a way to internet without an ISP ?

    12/14/2013 9:44:32 AM PST · by knarf · 132 replies
    self | December 14, 2013 | knarf
    If The ISP's are taken by the government, is there a way to use computers and the internet ?
  • State Police Probe Death Of Elderly Man Shot By Cops

    08/05/2013 3:48:35 AM PDT · by markomalley · 25 replies
    WBBM ^ | 8/2/2013
    Illinois State Police have launched an investigation into why police in Park Forest shot a 95-year-old man with a bean bag round, leading to the man’s death. WBBM Newsradio’s John Waelti reports World War II veteran John Wrana met his demise at the hands of Park Forest police officers last week, after allegedly threatening nursing home staff and paramedics with a cane, butcher knife, and shoehorn at the Victory Centre assisted living center. But Wrana family attorney Nicholas Grapsas denied Wrana ever wielded a knife, and questioned why police needed to use force on an elderly man, when the staff...
  • FBI pressures Internet providers to install surveillance software

    08/03/2013 10:40:40 AM PDT · by Jim Robinson · 57 replies
    c|net ^ | Aug 2, 2013 | by Declan McCullagh
    CNET has learned the FBI has developed custom "port reader" software to intercept Internet metadata in real time. And, in some cases, it wants to force Internet providers to use the software. The U.S. government is quietly pressuring telecommunications providers to install eavesdropping technology deep inside companies' internal networks to facilitate surveillance efforts. FBI officials have been sparring with carriers, a process that has on occasion included threats of contempt of court, in a bid to deploy government-provided software capable of intercepting and analyzing entire communications streams. The FBI's legal position during these discussions is that the software's real-time interception...
  • What You Need to Know About the Internet Snooping Bill (and How You Can Protect Yourself)

    07/31/2011 4:38:42 PM PDT · by lbryce · 19 replies
    Lifehacker ^ | July 29, 2011 | Adam Dachis
    On Thursday, the US House of Representatives approved an internet snooping bill that requires internet service providers (ISPs) to keep records of customer activity for a year so police can review them as needed. Here's what this bill means for you and what you can do about it. What Is This Internet Snooping Bill, Exactly, and Why Is It Bad? The lovingly titled Protecting Children From Internet Pornographers Act of 2011 (PCFIPA of 2011) requires ISPs to retain customer names, addresses, phone numbers, credit card numbers, bank account numbers, and dynamic IP addresses. It's a record of your personal information...
  • House panel approves broadened ISP snooping bill

    Internet providers would be forced to keep logs of their customers' activities for one year--in case police want to review them in the future--under legislation that a U.S. House of Representatives committee approved today. The 19 to 10 vote represents a victory for conservative Republicans, who made data retention their first major technology initiative after last fall's elections, and the Justice Department officials who have quietly lobbied for the sweeping new requirements, a development first reported by CNET. A last-minute rewrite of the bill expands the information that commercial Internet providers are required to store to include customers' names, addresses,...
  • House Committee passes bill requiring your ISP to spy on every click and keystroke you make online

    07/30/2011 6:43:38 PM PDT · by BfloGuy · 59 replies
    Boingboing.net ^ | 7/29/2011 | Cory Doctorow
    Yesterday, the House Judiciary Committee voted 19-10 for H.R. 1981, a data-retention bill that will require your ISP to spy on everything you do online and save records of it for 12 months. California Rep Zoe Lofgren, one of the Democrats who opposed the bill, called it a “data bank of every digital act by every American” that would “let us find out where every single American visited Web sites.”
  • Obama Conscripts ISPs as "Copyright Cops", Unveils "Six Strikes" Plan

    07/08/2011 9:05:02 AM PDT · by decimon · 16 replies
    Daily Tech ^ | July 8, 2011 | Jason Mick
    ISPs begrudgingly accept their conscriptmentCopyright enforcement is a big headache. It's a big headache for the media industry as it's a money-losing proposition. It's a big headache for the U.S. Senate who had nearly 10 percent of their collective campaign expenses paid by media lobbyists. It seems neither the federal government or big media wants to pay themselves for the massive cost of copyright enforcement, so they've cooked up a clever plan -- force internet service providers to become copyright cops and police the internet. > The plan was inspired by similar plans proposed in other nations (most of which...
  • F.B.I. seizes web servers, knocks sites offline

    06/22/2011 9:06:01 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 40 replies
    MSNBC ^ | 6/21/2011 | By VERNE G. KOPYTOFF
    Instapaper and Curbed Network are among the sites hit, though the cause of the raid is unknown The F.B.I. seized Web servers in a raid on a data center early Tuesday, causing several Web sites, including those run by the New York publisher Curbed Network, to go offline. The raid happened at 1:15 a.m. at a hosting facility in Reston, Va., used by DigitalOne, which is based in Switzerland, the company said. The F.B.I. did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the raid. In an e-mail to one of its clients on Tuesday afternoon, a DigitalOne employee,...
  • DoJ to Congress: Make ISPs keep tabs on users

    05/12/2011 5:58:49 AM PDT · by ShadowAce · 21 replies
    Politico ^ | 10 May 2011 | TONY ROMM
    As a new Senate privacy panel considers the data collected by iPhones, Androids and BlackBerrys, the Department of Justice is reminding lawmakers that it needs Internet providers to store more data about their users to help with federal investigations.Current law doesn't require those Internet service providers to "retain any data for any particular length of time," although some already do, said Jason Weinstein, deputy assistant attorney general at the DOJ's Criminal Division. And many wireless companies — which must collect some data — also "do not retain records that would enable law enforcement to identify a suspect's smartphone based on...
  • NSL Recipient Can Speak Out For First Time Since FBI Demanded Customer Records From Him

    08/12/2010 9:45:27 AM PDT · by Palter
    ACLU ^ | 10 Aug 2010 | ACLU
    FBI Partially Lifts Gag Order In ACLU Case The FBI has partially lifted a gag it imposed on American Civil Liberties Union client Nicholas Merrill in 2004 that prevented him from disclosing to anyone that he received a national security letter (NSL) demanding private customer records. Merrill, who received the NSL as the president of an Internet service provider (ISP), can now reveal his identity and speak about his experience for the first time since receiving the NSL. The ACLU and New York Civil Liberties Union filed a lawsuit challenging the NSL statute and the gag order on behalf of...
  • Aussie ISP beats Hollywood on 'copyright' rap

    02/04/2010 10:06:47 AM PST · by ShadowAce · 2 replies · 194+ views
    The Register ^ | 4 February 2010 | John Oates
    The Australian Federal Court has found an Aussie ISP not responsible for copyright offences committed by its customers. The Australian Federation against Copyright Theft claimed that iiNet authorised copyright theft by its customers. Judge J Cowdroy accepted that iiNet users had used BitTorrent to infringe copyright, but that the number was far less than alleged by AFCT and that iiNet in no way authorised the infringements. The judge found that providing the means to infringement, internet access, was not the same as authorising infringement - BitTorrent was. In summary the judge said: the key question is: Did iiNet authorise copyright...
  • ISP Cancellation - Email Question

    08/26/2009 6:42:53 PM PDT · by tnvol01 · 21 replies · 1,415+ views
    tnvol01
    I have recently switched to DSL and need to cancel my dial-up service (MSN). I've researched and researched, but I can't find a definitive answer to this question: When I cancel my dial-up service, what happens to my email account (msn.com address)? Will I still be able to access my old email account via Hotmail? How to proceed? Recommendations?
  • Hundreds Of ISPs Refuse To Go Along With Big Brother Spy System

    08/06/2009 8:12:22 PM PDT · by Iam1ru1-2 · 10 replies · 740+ views
    dprogram.net ^ | Steve Watson
    Communications firms warn of unprecedented extension of state powers Wednesday, August 5, 2009 A group of over 300 internet service providers and telecommunications firms is fighting back against the British government’s plans to monitor all emails, phone calls and internet activity nationwide. The London Internet Exchange (LINX), which represents some 330 companies, including BT, Virgin and Carphone Warehouse, says that the government is misleading the public about the extent to which it plans to monitor their communications and internet activity. LINX has described the Government’s surveillance proposals as an “unwarranted” invasion of people’s privacy. A statement from the group to...
  • Firms Await Broadband Grant Rules

    06/30/2009 9:28:06 PM PDT · by Westlander · 5 replies · 691+ views
    WSJ ^ | 7-1-2009 | AMY SCHATZ
    WASHINGTON -- Obama administration officials will announce rules Wednesday for handing out $7.2 billion in broadband stimulus funds, but some companies already are raising concerns about how long it could take to award the money. Officials are expected to detail how they plan to distribute $4.7 billion in broadband money from the Commerce Department in grants and $2.5 billion from the Agriculture Department in grants or loans.
  • Free Web Content Filtering Service

    06/19/2009 12:22:28 PM PDT · by dan1123 · 2 replies · 297+ views
    bestsecuritytips.com ^ | 2007/10/20 | Max
    WebWithout provides safe online protection for your family or workplace. It is done by providing a free, simple and easy to use service that filters out the less desirable aspects of the Internet. Once you use the WebWithout service, you can be confident in the knowledge that your user experience will be free of items such as pornography, Phishing, violence, racial hatred and such like.
  • US ISPs Using Push Polling To Stop Cheap Internet {"Atlas Shrugged" comes to life]

    04/29/2009 7:45:06 AM PDT · by Clint Williams · 23 replies · 1,123+ views
    Slashdot ^ | 4/29/9 | kdawson
    An anonymous reader writes "What happens when a new ISP is started somewhere in the United States that completely blows out of the water all the other ISPs in the area, in terms of price and performance? Apparently, that question is being answered in North Carolina, where Greenlight Inc., a company started by a city government, is trying to offer faster, more reliable, and cheaper Internet service to the local residents. Time Warner and Embarq can't compete. So they are not only lobbying the state government to destroy the upstart competition, but are now using push polling methods to gain...
  • ISP sabotages file sharing law

    04/17/2009 11:43:02 AM PDT · by Schnucki · 5 replies · 502+ views
    The Local (Sweden) ^ | April 16, 2009
    Broadband operator Bahnhof is continuing to destroy the IP address details of its customers in an open and fully legal bid to undermine Sweden's new anti-file sharing laws. Bahnhof CEO Jon Karlung, a vociferous opponent of the measures that came into force on April 1st, has said he is determined to protect the company's clients. The new file sharing law is based on the European Union's Intellectual Property Rights Enforcement Directive (IPRED) and allows courts to order internet operators to hand over details that identify suspected illegal file sharers. As such, the law enables Internet Service Providers (ISPs) to retain...
  • Will your ISP block your Internet if you are accused of file sharing?

    03/26/2009 3:42:48 AM PDT · by Askwhy5times · 6 replies · 515+ views
    Bluegrass Pundit ^ | March 25, 2009 | Bluegrass Pundit
    Will your ISP block your Internet if you are accused of file sharing?That is exactly what the Recording Industry Association of America has asked Internet providers to do. Apparently, some are willing to cooperate. Under this plan, if the RIAA accuses you of illegal file sharing, you will have your Internet service terminated after receiving warnings. This practice is already underway in some other countries. Illegal file sharing is wrong, but having the RIAA as the judge and jury is a violation of American's rights. This plan would only be fair if businesses in the music industry have their Internet...
  • 3 Strikes: Music Industry, ISPs May Cut Internet Access for File-Sharers (Ooooh, scary--sarc/)

    03/24/2009 9:47:56 AM PDT · by max americana · 125 replies · 2,052+ views
    fox news ^ | March 23, 2009 | Liza Porteus Viana
    Under pressure from the big record labels, several countries around the world are cracking down hard on illegal file-sharers with a "three strikes, you're out" policy — and the United States may be next. The basics are simple: Get caught three times sharing files illegally, and your Internet access gets cut off. But in a day and age when Internet access is almost as essential as a cell phone or electricity, should the music industry or Internet service providers [ISPs] have the power to determine who can and can't get online, particularly without criminal charges being filed? And what if...
  • Bill proposes ISPs, Wi-Fi keep logs for police [even home users] [it's for the children]

    02/20/2009 6:01:36 AM PST · by rabscuttle385 · 91 replies · 1,796+ views
    CNET ^ | 2009-02-19 | Declan McCullagh
    Republican politicians on Thursday called for a sweeping new federal law that would require all Internet providers and operators of millions of Wi-Fi access points, even hotels, local coffee shops, and home users, to keep records about users for two years to aid police investigations. The legislation, which echoes a measure proposed by one of their Democratic colleagues three years ago, would impose unprecedented data retention requirements on a broad swath of Internet access providers and is certain to draw fire from businesses and privacy advocates. "While the Internet has generated many positive changes in the way we communicate and...
  • US lawmaker injects ISP throttle into Obama rescue package

    02/12/2009 1:07:35 AM PST · by Rennes Templar · 32 replies · 3,866+ views
    The Register ^ | Feb 11, 2998 | Cade Metz
    US Senator Dianne Feinstein hopes to update President Barack Obama's $838bn economic stimulus package so that American ISPs can deter child pornography, copyright infringement, and other unlawful activity by way of "reasonable network management." Clearly, a lobbyist whispering in Feinstein's ear has taken Comcast's now famous euphemism even further into the realm of nonsense. According to Public Knowledge, Feinstein's network management amendment did not find a home in the stimulus bill that landed on the Senate floor. But lobbyists speaking with the Washington DC-based internet watchdog said that California's senior Senator is now hoping to insert this language via conference...
  • Intelligence Court Rules Wiretapping Power Legal

    01/15/2009 9:51:26 AM PST · by fremont_steve · 52 replies · 3,022+ views
    The New York Times ^ | January 15, 2009 | Eric Lichtblau
    WASHINGTON — A federal intelligence court, in a rare public opinion, is expected to issue a major ruling validating the power of the president and Congress to wiretap international phone calls and intercept e-mail messages without a court order, even when Americans’ private communications may be involved, according to a person with knowledge of the opinion.
  • Computer Help Needed - Problem/Question about my modem - Sorry, it's a vanity post!

    01/18/2009 6:17:26 PM PST · by MplsSteve · 84 replies · 4,806+ views
    1/18/09
    I have a question regarding the modem on my PC. My OS is Windows Vista and my IP is NetZero. When someone tries to call on my phone, it won't disconnect my Internet dial-up service. Instead, callers listen to my line ringing and ringing. How can I fix my modem software so that incoming calls will get through (IOW, my phone will ring)? I went to the control panel and can't figure it out. Than you!
  • Canadian woman in tech support hostage drama

    09/04/2008 7:21:17 AM PDT · by Schnucki · 12 replies · 162+ views
    Yahoo UK News ^ | September 4, 2008 | Iain Thom
    A Canadian actress and playwright has been charged with holding a technical support member hostage after losing her internet connection. Carol Sinclair lost her connection with ISP Aliant and, by her own account, spent days trying to get the line fixed. "I was polite the first 20 times I talked to them. But each one gave me the same routine: 'Is the modem connected? Are the lights blipping?'," she told The Globe and Mail. "And then each one would say: 'It should be working. The problem must be with your computer.' I was a little stressed. I had six days...
  • DNS attack writer a victim of his own creation

    07/31/2008 7:27:37 AM PDT · by ShadowAce · 13 replies · 5,214+ views
    Network World ^ | 30 July 2008 | Robert McMillan
    HD Moore has been owned. That's hacker talk, meaning that Moore, the creator of the popular Metasploit hacking toolkit, has become the victim of a computer attack. It happened on Tuesday morning, when Moore's company, BreakingPoint, had some of its Internet traffic redirected to a fake Google page that was being run by a scammer. According to Moore, the hacker was able to do this by launching what's known as a cache poisoning attack on a DNS server on AT&T's network that was serving the Austin, Texas, area. One of BreakingPoint's servers was forwarding DNS traffic to the AT&T server,...
  • Lawyers in YouTube Lawsuit Reach User Privacy Deal

    07/15/2008 5:08:42 AM PDT · by Coffee200am · 2 replies · 68+ views
    Asia One ^ | 07.15.2008 | Reuters
    SAN FRANCISCO, US - DEFENDANTS and plaintiffs in two related copyright infringement lawsuits against YouTube have reached a deal to protect the privacy of millions of YouTube watchers during evidence discovery, a spokesman for Google Inc said on Monday. Earlier in July, a New York federal judge ordered Google to turn over YouTube user data to Viacom Inc and other plaintiffs to help them to prepare a confidential study of what they argue are vast piracy violations on the video-sharing site. Google said it had agreed to provide plaintiffs' attorneys for Viacom and a class action group led by the...
  • Shielding Consumers From Privacy-Breaching ISP Tracking

    07/08/2008 7:16:44 PM PDT · by Coffee200am · 3 replies · 133+ views
    DMNews ^ | 07.08.2008 | Mark Smith
    So who cares if my Internet service provider tracks my Web surfing behavior or e-mailing to better target advertising? After all, won't that result in a more relevant user experience? Well, not exactly and here's why. The lines between content, context and advertising are becoming increasingly blurred, and as a result the consumer is caught dead in the middle with increasingly less and less control over the Internet's most prized commodity: his own information. I'm referring to the growing reality that a process called deep packet inspection (DPI) is being used to build revenue streams based on your discreet —...
  • Illinois begins aggressive speed enforcement in construction zones

    06/06/2008 7:57:52 AM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 24 replies · 959+ views
    Land Line Magazine ^ | June 5, 2008 | Charlie Morasch
    The Illinois State Police are using vans with cameras and radar guns to photograph motorists and other drivers who speed through highway construction zones, and are enforcing strict penalties for alleged offenders. Citations for a first offense are $375, and a second offense can cost $1,000 and a 90-day suspension of driver’s license. State Police officials said four white vans, which are equipped with radar guns, cameras and a monitor to show drivers their speed, have been deployed at different construction zones in the state. As of Thursday, June 5, those vans are deployed at the widening project on the...
  • Utah Internet providers could earn 'G-rating'

    02/26/2008 11:25:04 AM PST · by TChris · 28 replies · 166+ views
    Deseret Morning News ^ | 2/26/2008 | Staff
    Utah Internet service providers could earn a state-approved "G-rating" for filtering content and insuring that users could not access pornography under provisions in a bill heard by a House committee on Monday.
  • All because of you : U2 manager says ISPs are ruining music

    01/30/2008 9:32:00 PM PST · by bamahead · 37 replies · 88+ views
    CBC ^ | January 29, 2008
    Paul McGuinness, long-time manager of rock band U2, on Monday launched a verbal attack against illegal music downloaders, as well as internet service providers, device makers, Silicon Valley and even hippies in a speech at a conference in France. McGuinness blamed these forces for "destroying the recorded music industry," with illegal downloading through peer-to-peer file-sharing networks the single biggest reason for why the business is in decline. ISPs have for years profited from that illegal downloading, which occurs on their networks, and their arguments that it isn't their job to police the internet are no longer valid, he said. The...
  • New Software Detects Web Interference

    11/28/2007 4:34:24 PM PST · by ShadowAce · 9 replies · 153+ views
    Excite news ^ | 28 November 2007 | JORDAN ROBERTSON
    SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) - Increasingly worried over Internet providers' behavior, a nonprofit has released software that helps determine whether online glitches are innocent hiccups or evidence of deliberate traffic tampering. The San Francisco-based digital rights group Electronic Frontier Foundation hopes the program, released Wednesday, will help uncover "data discrimination" - efforts by Internet providers to disrupt some uses of their services - in addition to the cases reported separately by EFF, The Associated Press and other sources. "People have all sorts of problems, and they don't know whether to attribute that to some sort of misconfiguration, or deliberate behavior...
  • Gunplay blamed for Internet slowdown ( fiber optic cables shot with guns)

    08/21/2007 9:14:34 AM PDT · by LurkedLongEnough · 84 replies · 2,276+ views
    Network World ^ | August 20, 2007 | Robert McMillan, IDG News Service
    ISPs in the U.S. experienced a service slowdown Monday after fiber-optic cables near Cleveland were apparently sabotaged by gunfire. TeliaSonera, which lost the northern leg of its U.S. network to the cut, said that the outage began around 7 p.m. Pacific Time on Sunday night. When technicians pulled up the affected cable, it appeared to have been shot. "Somebody had been shooting with a gun or a shotgun into the cable," said Anders Olausson, a TeliaSonera spokesman. The damage affected a large span of cable, more than two-thirds of a mile [1.1 km] long, near Cleveland, TeliaSonera said. The company...
  • Giuliani Skipped Iraq Study Panel for Speeches

    06/19/2007 7:47:22 AM PDT · by jdm · 14 replies · 451+ views
    NewsMax ^ | June 19, 2007 | Staff
    Rudy Giuliani quit an elite Iraq study panel last spring after he failed to show up for a single official group meeting, citing "previous time commitments” – a speaking tour that brought in $11.4 million in 14 months. The 10-member panel, known as the Baker-Hamilton commission, was chartered by Congress and encouraged by President Bush to explore U.S. policy in Iraq. On May 18, 2006, when the panel gathered in Washington, Giuliani gave a $100,000 speech on leadership at a business awards breakfast in Atlanta, Newsday reports. The month before, he skipped another panel session to deliver the keynote speech...
  • Court: Web site liable for postings

    05/17/2007 9:03:16 AM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 53 replies · 1,555+ views
    GOPUSA ^ | May 17, 2007 | UPI Staff (United Press International)
    SAN FRANCISCO (UPI) -- A court in San Francisco ruled that a roommate-matching Web site may be held accountable for what users say about their preferences. A three-judge panel of the federal appeals court ruled in favor of two California fair housing groups that brought the complaint against Roommate.com, saying the Web site violates the Fair Housing Act by allowing users to specify roommate preferences based on sex, race, religion and sexual orientation, The New York Times reported Wednesday. The ruling took away the main argument of the defense: that a 1996 ruling granting immunity to Internet service providers that...
  • Your ability to get broadband might be at risk

    04/28/2007 7:30:35 PM PDT · by The Watcher · 18 replies · 1,018+ views
    self | self
    I have posted several times in the past about this topic, this is just an update for you techheads who might be interesetd...oh, and anyone who uses the internet... which is...everyone. Most people have no idea what CALEA is. It is a law to assist law enforcement's ability to intercept phone calls. It was written and passed and signed into law in 1994 by Congress. It mandated that digital switching equipment technology be required to have certain specific capabilities which would make tapping a person's phone calls, and making the call history easier to get. Congress ante'd up millions to...
  • Test Your Internet Speed

    03/06/2007 5:24:30 PM PST · by aft_lizard · 262 replies · 5,209+ views
    Speedtest.net ^ | 6-Mar-2007
    Test your internet connection speed and post it here, for fun, bragging rights and to see if you are getting the speed you really pay for.
  • Texas phone firms reap $1.3 billion in subsidies

    01/14/2007 6:37:10 PM PST · by Dubya · 13 replies · 672+ views
    Associated Press ^ | BOB PORTERFIELD
    SAN FRANCISCO — Cellular subscribers are paying hundreds of millions of dollars each year to subsidize landline telephone service, enriching big telecommunications companies while providing little or no benefit to cell phone users. The subsidies are intended to reimburse the companies for providing traditional phone service in rough terrain and rural areas where stringing lines can be costly. But rampant development has transformed some of these backwaters into booming subdivisions, with no real adjustment to the distribution formula; others, like the oceanfront celebrity playground of Malibu, are receiving subsidies simply because of their difficult topography. Outdated formulas for tabulating the...
  • FBI director wants ISPs to track users

    10/18/2006 8:33:53 AM PDT · by Dr. Marten · 35 replies · 1,342+ views
    CNET ^ | Declan McCullagh
    FBI Director Robert Mueller on Tuesday called on Internet service providers to record their customers' online activities, a move that anticipates a fierce debate over privacy and law enforcement in Washington next year. "Terrorists coordinate their plans cloaked in the anonymity of the Internet, as do violent sexual predators prowling chat rooms," Mueller said in a speech at the International Association of Chiefs of Police conference in Boston. "All too often, we find that before we can catch these offenders, Internet service providers have unwittingly deleted the very records that would help us identify these offenders and protect future victims,"...
  • FBI director wants ISPs to track users

    10/17/2006 10:08:05 PM PDT · by Panerai · 73 replies · 1,821+ views
    Cnet ^ | 10/17/2006 | Declan McCullagh
    FBI Director Robert Mueller on Tuesday called on Internet service providers to record their customers' online activities, a move that anticipates a fierce debate over privacy and law enforcement in Washington next year. "Terrorists coordinate their plans cloaked in the anonymity of the Internet, as do violent sexual predators prowling chat rooms," Mueller said in a speech at the International Association of Chiefs of Police conference in Boston. "All too often, we find that before we can catch these offenders, Internet service providers have unwittingly deleted the very records that would help us identify these offenders and protect future victims,"...
  • ISP Recommendations? [Vanity]

    06/03/2006 3:12:10 PM PDT · by my_pointy_head_is_sharp · 58 replies · 566+ views
    June 3, 2006 | my_pointy_head_is_sharp
    I've searched extensively online for a new ISP. No luck. I think I'll have better luck with recommendations from my FReeper FRiends. Requirements: 1) It must be cheap. No more than $140-$180 a year ($15 a month max) or not much higher. 2)It must be faster than 46.6 kbps. (That's the fastest speed I can log on at now.) Would prefer 50.6 kbps or higher. Thank you for any recommendations.
  • Terrorism invoked in ISP snooping proposal (Gonzales changing tune)

    05/31/2006 7:40:43 PM PDT · by SubGeniusX · 21 replies · 1,592+ views
    Cnet news.com ^ | May 30, 2006 | Declan McCullagh
    In a radical departure from earlier statements, Attorney General Alberto Gonzales has said that requiring Internet service providers to save records of their customers' online activities is necessary in the fight against terrorism, CNET News.com has learned. Gonzales and FBI Director Robert Mueller privately met with representatives of AOL, Comcast, Google, Microsoft and Verizon last week and said that Internet providers--and perhaps search engines--must retain data for two years to aid in anti-terrorism prosecutions, according to multiple sources familiar with the discussion who spoke on condition of anonymity on Tuesday. "We want this for terrorism," Gonzales said, according to one...
  • What is Free Republic worth to you?

    04/09/2006 4:27:27 PM PDT · by philetus · 49 replies · 2,983+ views
    april 9 | me
    A BigMac and large chocolate shake will cost you more than $5.00.Two gallons of gas will cost you more than $5.00.A pack of cigarettes, around $5.00A movie tickets will cost more than $5.00 Most of us blow five bucks on crap several times a month.If everyone gave 5.00 a month to FR, we wouldn't need Freepathons any longer.Heck, it's worth five bucks a month just to be IBTZ.Help keep FR up and running.
  • Feds Cast a Wide Net: DOJ Subpoena Highlights (Not just Google, MSN, Yahoo)

    03/31/2006 7:58:40 AM PST · by af_vet_rr · 4 replies · 412+ views
    Information Week ^ | Mar 30, 2006 | Information Week
    The U.S. Department of Justice has gone far beyond Google, MSN, and AOL in its quest to justify the anti-pornography Child Online Protection Act: The DOJ actually subpoenaed at least 34 Internet service providers, search companies, and security software firms. InformationWeek obtained copies of the subpoenas, replies, and other supporting documents through a Freedom of Information Act request. (You can download the subpoenas here at Information Week)