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Keyword: khipu

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  • Untangling an Accounting Tool and an Ancient Incan Mystery

    01/06/2016 12:06:36 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    New York Times ^ | January 2, 2016 | William Neuman
    In a dry canyon strewn with the ruins of a long-dead city, archaeologists have made a discovery they hope will help unravel one of the most tenacious mysteries of ancient Peru: how to read the knotted string records, known as khipus, kept by the Incas. At the site called Incahuasi, about 100 miles south of Lima, excavators have found, for the first time, several khipus in the place where they were used -- in this case, a storage house for agricultural products where they appear to have been used as accounting books to record the amount of peanuts, chili peppers,...
  • Pre-Incas Kept Detailed Records Too

    07/20/2005 6:29:53 PM PDT · by blam · 23 replies · 646+ views
    ABC News ^ | 7-20-2005 | Jude Webber
    Pre-Incas kept detailed records too Jude Webber Wednesday, 20 July 2005 This inhabitant of the ancient Peruvian city of Caral would have used knotted string to communicate sophisticated concepts as long as 5000 years ago (Image: Reuters/ Pilar Olivares) A sophisticated arrangement of knots and strings, found on the site of the oldest city in the Americas, indicates ancient Peruvians were skilled at conveying detailed information much earlier than once thought. Archaeologists say the string arrangement, known as a quipu or khipu, indicates ancient Americans were expert communicators thousands of years earlier. Until now the oldest known quipus, often associated...
  • Fuente Magna (The Rosetta Stone Of The Americas)

    01/03/2006 6:26:08 PM PST · by blam · 23 replies · 1,456+ views
    Geocities ^ | 11-5-2002 | J M Allen
    Fuente Magna Rosetta stone of the Americas "Atlantis: the Andes Solution" by J.M.Allen (pub Windrush Press 1998) and basis of the Discovery film "Atlantis in the Andes" by Lisa Hutchison proposes the question "did anyone ever consider that the first reed boats may have crossed from west to east perhaps following the route from the River Plate eastwards across the Atlantic, past the Cape of Good Hope and via the Indian Ocean to enter the Persian Gulf and Red Sea to found the early civilisations of Mesopotamia and Egypt?" It is obvious that at that time, the author suspected a...
  • ANTHROPOLOGY: Cracking the Khipu Code

    06/12/2003 6:09:19 PM PDT · by Lessismore · 14 replies · 6,326+ views
    Science Magazine ^ | 2003-06-13 | Charles C. Mann
    Researchers take a fresh look at Incan knotted strings and suggest that they may have been a written language, one that used a binary code to store information In the late 16th century, Spanish travelers in central Peru ran into an old Indian man, probably a former official of the Incan empire, which Francisco Pizarro had conquered in 1532. The Spaniards saw the Indian try to hide something he was carrying, according to the account of one traveler, Diego Avalos y Figueroa, so they searched him and found several bunches of the cryptic knotted strings known as khipu. Many khipu...
  • Village high in the Andes protects ancient Inca puzzle

    08/25/2010 5:25:05 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    New York Times ^ | Saturday, August 21, 2010 | Simon Romero, with contribs by Andrea Zarate
    Archaeologists say the Incas, brought down by the Spanish conquest, used khipus -- strands of cords made from the hair of animals such as llamas or alpacas -- as an alternative to writing... San Cristóbal de Rapaz, a village 13,000 feet above sea level... isolation has allowed it to guard an enduring archaeological mystery: a collection of khipus, the cryptic woven knots that may explain how the Incas -- in contrast to contemporaries in the Ottoman Empire and China's Ming dynasty -- ruled a vast, administratively complex empire without a written language. Archaeologists say the Incas, brought down by the...
  • The Monolith of Pokotia (Sumerian Language etched on Ancient Mesopotamian Items)!

    10/19/2002 10:28:48 AM PDT · by vannrox · 35 replies · 6,052+ views
    Bernardo Biadós Yacovazzo & Freddy Arce, ^ | FR Post 10-19-2002 | Bernardo Biadós Yacovazzo & Freddy Arce
    Introduction - Investigations of Bolivia Fuente Magna and the Monolith of Pokotia The following material is reprinted by permission from Bernardo Biadós Yacovazzo & Freddy Arce, OIIB - Omega Institute Investigations (Bolivia), INTI - NonGovernmental Organizacion (Bolivia). A large stone vessel, resembling a libation bowl, and now known as the Fuente Magna, was originally discovered in a rather casual fashion by a country peasant from the ex-hacienda CHUA, property of the Manjon family situated in the surrounding areas of Lake Titicaca about 75/80 km from the city of La Paz. The site where it was found has not been...
  • Scientists untangle Inca number-strings (Kept Track of Tax Payments)

    08/14/2005 10:47:40 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 20 replies · 760+ views
    news@nature.com ^ | 11 August 2005 | Andreas von Bubnoff
    Knotted threads carry signs of ancient accountancy.Scientists have picked apart some 500-year-old calculations from the Inca empire. The team deciphered the maths from a series of 'khipus': elaborate structures of coloured, knotted strings. Researchers have long known that the Inca, who lived along the west coast of South America from AD 1400-1532, used such cords to record numbers. But this is the first mathematical relationship found between khipu. And that may help to work out what kind of information they stored. Khipus encode numbers as knots in strings hanging from a cord. The closer a knot is to the cord,...
  • Incan Counting System Decoded?

    01/30/2004 8:10:33 AM PST · by blam · 16 replies · 804+ views
    Discovery News ^ | 1-30-2004 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Incan Counting System Decoded? By Rossella Lorenzi, Discovery News Learn how to add 9+7 on the yupana abacus. Jan. 29, 2004 — The Inca invented a powerful counting system that could be used to make complex calculations without the tiniest mistake, according to an Italian engineer who claims to have cracked the mathematics of this still mysterious ancient population. Begun in the Andean highlands in about 1200, the Inca ruled the largest empire on Earth by the time their last emperor, Atahualpa, was garroted by Spanish conquistadors in 1533. Long been considered the only major Bronze Age civilization without a...
  • Incan Counting System Decoded?

    02/03/2004 6:04:59 AM PST · by vannrox · 96 replies · 6,390+ views
    Discovery News ^ | Feb 3 2004 | By Rossella Lorenzi
    Incan Counting System Decoded? By Rossella Lorenzi, Discovery News Learn how to add 9+7 on the yupana abacus. Jan. 29, 2004 ? The Inca invented a powerful counting system that could be used to make complex calculations without the tiniest mistake, according to an Italian engineer who claims to have cracked the mathematics of this still mysterious ancient population. Begun in the Andean highlands in about 1200, the Inca ruled the largest empire on Earth by the time their last emperor, Atahualpa, was garroted by Spanish conquistadors in 1533. Long been considered the only major Bronze Age civilization without a...
  • Inca May Have Used Knot Computer Code To Bind Empire

    06/22/2003 8:08:43 PM PDT · by blam · 20 replies · 485+ views
    Independent (UK) ^ | 6-23-2003 | Steve Conner
    Inca may have used knot computer code to bind empire By Steve Connor, Science Editor 23 June 2003 They ran the biggest empire of their age, with a vast network of roads, granaries, warehouses and a complex system of government. Yet the Inca, founded in about AD1200 by Manco Capac, were unique for such a significant civilisation: they had no written language. This has been the conventional view of the Inca, whose dominions at their height covered almost all of the Andean region, from Colombia to Chile, until they were defeated in the Spanish conquest of 1532. But a leading...
  • Did ancient Inca communicate through knots?

    08/11/2005 1:18:17 PM PDT · by wallcrawlr · 16 replies · 806+ views
    Associated Press ^ | August 11, 2005 | August 11, 2005
    WASHINGTON — Three figure-eight knots tied into strings may be the first word from the ancient Inca in centuries. While the Incan empire left nothing that would be considered writing by today's standards, it did produce knotted strings in various colors and arrangements that have long puzzled historians and anthropologists. Many of these strings have turned out to be a type of accounting system, but interpreting them has been complex. Now, Gary Urton and Carrie J. Brezine of Harvard University say they have found a three-knot pattern in some of the strings, called khipu, that they believe identifies them as...
  • Professor Works To Unravel Mysteries Of Khipu: Colored, Knotted Strings Used By The Ancient Incas

    01/05/2004 9:13:02 AM PST · by blam · 24 replies · 562+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 1-5-2004 | University At Buffalo
    Source: University At Buffalo Date: 2004-01-05 Professor Works To Unravel Mysteries Of Khipu: Colored, Knotted Strings Used By The Ancient Incas BUFFALO, N.Y. -- Although the ancient Inca are renowned for their highly organized society and extraordinary skill in working with gold, stone and pottery, few are familiar with the khipu -- an elaborate system of colored, knotted strings that many researchers believe to be primarily mnemonic in nature, like a rosary -- that was used by the ancient conquerors to record census, tribute, genealogies and calendrical information. Because the Inca didn't employ a recognizable system of writing, researchers like...