Keyword: knossos

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  • Making merry at Knossos

    05/15/2009 7:44:43 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies · 637+ views
    The Economist ^ | May 14th 2009 | unattributed
    Archaeology is an inexact science, as Sir Arthur Evans, a flamboyant early practitioner, knew... an excavator can always promote an extravagant theory under the guise of interpreting the finds. As he started to unearth a prehistoric mound at Knossos in Crete at the turn of the 20th century, Evans put his imagination into high gear. He rebuilt parts of a 3,500-year-old palace in modernist style using cement and reconstructed fragmentary frescoes to suit his views on Bronze Age religion and politics. Evans boldly argued that the Minoans, as he called the early islanders, shunned warfare, conveniently forgetting about the ruined...
  • The Riddle Of The Labyrinth: The Quest To Break An Ancient Code

    06/30/2013 2:47:37 PM PDT · by OddLane · 57 replies
    NPR ^ | Jume 30, 2013 | NPR Staff
    Critics have called Margalit Fox's new book, The Riddle of the Labyrinth, a paleographic detective procedural. It follows the story of the laborious quest to crack a mysterious script, unearthed in Crete in 1900, known by the sterile-sounding name Linear B. Fox, an obituary writer for The New York Times, is good at bringing the departed to life. In The Riddle of the Labyrinth, she tells the story of Alice Kober, a classics professor at Brooklyn College, who worked alone over decades and discovered the essential grammar of Linear B, only to die in 1950 before she could complete her...
  • Which volcanoes impacted ancient climate? Sulphur tells the story

    02/14/2013 2:57:27 PM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 15 replies
    The Register ^ | 14th February 2013 03:57 GMT | Richard Chirgwin
    A staple complaint of the climate sceptic, that it’s impossible to determine the impact of historical volcanic eruptions on the climate, is a step closer to being spiked, courtesy of work at the University of Copenhagen. The university’s Matthew Johnson, an associate professor in the Department of Chemistry, has published work conducted with the Tokyo Institute of Technology in which he uses the isotopes captured in old sulphur to determine the scale of eruptions. As explained in the university’s announcement, the work is designed to resolve the often-conflicting dates attached to recorded eruptions. Dating is difficult from ancient records, since...
  • Athenian 'Snake Goddess' Gets New Identity

    01/17/2013 8:11:31 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    LiveScience ^ | Tuesday, January 8, 2013 | Stephanie Pappas
    A mysterious "snake goddess" painted on terracotta and discovered in Athens may actually be Demeter, the Greek goddess of the harvest. Once linked to the worship of the dead, the goddess is flanked by two snakes on a slab of terracotta about the size of a piece of notebook paper. She has her hands up above her head, which has given her the nickname "the touchdown goddess"... This unusual piece of art was found amid a jumble of gravel and other terracotta fragments in 1932 in what was once the Athenian agora, or public square. The catch, however, is that...
  • Making Merry at Knossos or their's a sucker born every minute

    01/03/2013 7:17:33 AM PST · by Beowulf9 · 19 replies
    The Economist ^ | May 14th 2009 | unknown
    ARCHAEOLOGY is an inexact science, as Sir Arthur Evans, a flamboyant early practitioner, knew. However painstaking the digging process, an excavator can always promote an extravagant theory under the guise of interpreting the finds. As he started to unearth a prehistoric mound at Knossos in Crete at the turn of the 20th century, Evans put his imagination into high gear. He rebuilt parts of a 3,500-year-old palace in modernist style using cement and reconstructed fragmentary frescoes to suit his views on Bronze Age religion and politics.
  • Modernist minotaurs

    06/25/2009 5:52:26 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies · 324+ views
    Times Online ^ | June 3, 2009 | Tom Holland
    Arthur Evans, the eccentric Englishman who led the excavations, was, if anything, even more creative in his reconstruction of the Bronze Age than Schliemann had earlier been. The fabulously ancient palace of Knossos enjoys, as Gere points out in her arresting first sentence, "the dubious distinction of being one of the first reinforced concrete buildings ever erected on the island". The complex of buildings gawped at by thousands upon thousands of tourists every year owes less to the masons of the Minoan age than it does to the example of modernist architecture. On Crete, the archaic and the contemporary, both...