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Keyword: ladee

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  • LADEE Sees Zodiacal Light before Crashing into Moon, but Apollo Mystery Remains

    04/24/2014 3:30:32 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 4 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | April 24, 2014 | Bob King on
    With the glow of Earth well-hidden, any dust in the moon’s scant atmosphere around the time of orbital sunrise should become visible. Scientists also expected to see the softly luminous glow of the zodiacal light, an extensive cloud of comet and asteroid dust concentrated in the flat plane of the solar system. The zodiacal light gets its name from the zodiac, that familiar band of constellations the planets pass through as they orbit the sun. Back on Earth, the zodiacal light looks like a big thumb of light standing up from the western horizon a couple hours after sunset in...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Rotating Moon from LRO

    09/16/2013 6:05:02 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    NASA ^ | September 16, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: No one, presently, sees the Moon rotate like this. That's because the Earth's moon is tidally locked to the Earth, showing us only one side. Given modern digital technology, however, combined with many detailed images returned by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), a high resolution virtual Moon rotation movie has now been composed. The above time-lapse video starts with the standard Earth view of the Moon. Quickly, though, Mare Orientale, a large crater with a dark center that is difficult to see from the Earth, rotates into view just below the equator. From an entire lunar month condensed into...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- LADEE Launch Streak

    09/11/2013 3:49:01 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    NASA ^ | September 11, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: On September 6, a starry night and the Milky Way witnessed the launch of a Minotaur V rocket from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility on Wallops Island, Virginia. So did a large part of the eastern United States, as the spectacular night launch was easily visible even from light polluted urban areas. This 35 second exposure captures part of the rocket's initial launch streak and 2nd stage ignition flare along with a brilliant reflection of the fiery sky in calm waters. The stunning view faces south and west from a vantage point overlooking Sinepuxent Bay in Maryland about 20 miles...
  • Moon probe has small glitch after launch, NASA says

    09/07/2013 11:29:29 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 14 replies
    NBC ^ | 1 hour ago | Miriam Kramer, Space.com
    Although the launch was nearly flawless, LADEE ran into some trouble right after its separation from the Minotaur V. The probe's onboard computer shut down LADEE's reaction wheels, which are used to stabilize the attitude of the probe in space, after noticing that they were drawing too much current. Engineers will work to develop a repair plan over the next few days. But there's not a great deal of time pressure at the moment, Worden said. LADEE will take nearly a month to get to the moon on its long and looping route. "The nice thing about this is that...
  • Launch may start something big on Eastern Shore

    09/01/2013 10:04:19 AM PDT · by csvset · 15 replies
    Virginian Pilot ^ | September 1, 2013 | Diane Tennant
    NASA's first deep-space mission to launch from Virginia's Eastern Shore is scheduled for Friday, and while all eyes are on the sky, most of the uncertainty swirls around what will happen on the ground, on tiny Chincoteague Island, where hotels, restaurants and traffic cops must deal with thousands of spectators. On one hand, the town has experience: every summer, it deals with an estimated 15,000 tourists who come for the famous pony roundup. But Friday's spectacle is different in so many ways. NASA's visitor center on Va. 175, a popular spot for watching rocket launches from the Wallops Flight Facility,...