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Keyword: linearb

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  • Ancient Palace's Painted Floors Display Bronze-Age Creativity

    01/06/2014 7:43:36 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    LiveScience ^ | January 06, 2014 | Denise Chow
    Emily Catherine Egan, a doctoral student at the University of Cincinnati in Ohio, studied the floor of the Throne Room at the Palace of Nestor, one of the best-preserved palaces of Mycenaean Greece, a civilization from the late Bronze Age. She found that the floors of the palace, located in the present-day Greek town of Pylos, were made of plaster, and were often painted with grids of bright patterns or marine animals. The creative decorations show how ancient Mycenaean artists used floors — together with painted ceilings and walls — to impress palace visitors, Egan said. "Mycenaean palatial floor paintings...
  • Computers to translate world's 'lost' languages after program deciphers ancient text

    07/21/2010 12:27:41 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 51 replies
    www.dailymail.co.uk ^ | 7/20/2010 | Niall Firth
    Scientists have used a computer program to decipher a written language that is more than three thousand years old. The program automatically translated the ancient written language of Ugaritic within just a few hours. Scientists hope the breakthrough could help them decipher the few ancient languages that they have been unable to translate so far. Ugaritic was last used around 1200 B.C. in western Syria and consists of dots on clay tablets. It was first discovered in 1920 but was not deciphered until 1932. Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology told the program that the language was related to...
  • Decoding antiquity: Eight scripts that still can't be read

    05/29/2009 9:14:19 PM PDT · by BGHater · 38 replies · 1,621+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 27 May 2009 | Andrew Robinson
    WRITING is one of the greatest inventions in human history. Perhaps the greatest, since it made history possible. Without writing, there could be no accumulation of knowledge, no historical record, no science - and of course no books, newspapers or internet.The first true writing we know of is Sumerian cuneiform - consisting mainly of wedge-shaped impressions on clay tablets - which was used more than 5000 years ago in Mesopotamia. Soon afterwards writing appeared in Egypt, and much later in Europe, China and Central America. Civilisations have invented hundreds of different writing systems. Some, such as the one you are...
  • LINGUISTICS: Early Date for the Birth of Indo-European Languages

    11/28/2003 10:24:23 AM PST · by Lessismore · 36 replies · 3,431+ views
    Science Magazine ^ | 2003-11-28 | Michael Balter
    Ever since British jurist Sir William Jones noted in 1786 that there are marked similarities between diverse languages such as Greek, Sanskrit, and Celtic, linguists have assumed that most of the languages of Europe and the Indian subcontinent derive from a single ancient tongue. But researchers have fiercely debated just when and where this mother tongue was first spoken. Now a bold new study asserts that the common root of the 144 so-called Indo-European languages, which also include English and all the Germanic, Slavic, and Romance languages, is very ancient indeed. In this week's issue of Nature, evolutionary biologist Russell...
  • Mother of all Indo-European languages was born in Turkey

    11/26/2003 5:35:02 PM PST · by a_Turk · 114 replies · 991+ views
    AFP ^ | 11/26/2003 | N/A
    PARIS (AFP) - The vast group of languages that dominates Europe and much of Central and South Asia originated around 8,000 years ago among farmers in what is now Anatolia, Turkey. So say a pair of New Zealand academics who have remarkably retraced the family tree of so-called Indo-European languages -- a linguistic classification that covers scores of tongues ranging from Faroese to Hindi by way of English, French, German, Gujarati, Nepalese and Russian. Russell Gray and Quentin Atkinson, psychologists at the University of Auckland, built their language tree on the same principles as the theory of genetic evolution. According...
  • Who Invented the Alphabet: The Semites or the Greeks?

    01/17/2011 6:27:27 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 51 replies
    Archaeolgy Odyssey ^ | Winter 1998 | Barry B. Powell
    I would make the startling suggestion that the alphabet was invented by a single human being, who created this remarkable technology to record the Greek hexameters of the poet we call Homer. Certainly everyone agrees that the invention of the alphabet made possible the development of philosophy, science and democracy, some of the finest achievements in the history of human culture. But who invented the alphabet? Was it really the Semitic-speaking Phoenicians, as many of us learned in grammar school? Or was it actually the Greeks, to whom the Phoenicians supposedly passed it? I don't believe the Phoenicians actually had...
  • The Riddle Of The Labyrinth: The Quest To Break An Ancient Code

    06/30/2013 2:47:37 PM PDT · by OddLane · 57 replies
    NPR ^ | Jume 30, 2013 | NPR Staff
    Critics have called Margalit Fox's new book, The Riddle of the Labyrinth, a paleographic detective procedural. It follows the story of the laborious quest to crack a mysterious script, unearthed in Crete in 1900, known by the sterile-sounding name Linear B. Fox, an obituary writer for The New York Times, is good at bringing the departed to life. In The Riddle of the Labyrinth, she tells the story of Alice Kober, a classics professor at Brooklyn College, who worked alone over decades and discovered the essential grammar of Linear B, only to die in 1950 before she could complete her...
  • Archaeology meets mythology in Mycenean Pylos (King Nestor)

    09/11/2009 6:02:06 AM PDT · by decimon · 28 replies · 1,295+ views
    Science Codex ^ | Sep 10, 2009 | Unknown
    Close-up of palace walls. Credit: University of Missouri-St.Louis Pylos drain. Credit: University of Missouri-St Louis Clearing thick brush from a mound at his archaeological dig site in Pylos, Greece, Michael Cosmopoulos found a real-life palace dating back to the mythical Trojan War. The palace is from the Mycenaean period (1600-1100 B.C.), famous for such mythical sagas as the Trojan War. It is thought to sit within one of the capital cities of King Nestor, a personality featured in the legends of the war. "We are thrilled, excited and fascinated at the prospect of continuing its excavation," said Cosmopoulos, the Hellenic...
  • Greek treasures unearthed (Minoans, Linear A, Linear B)

    11/12/2005 8:42:00 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies · 945+ views
    News 24 dot com ^ | November 12, 2005 | staff writer
    [T]he finds were excavated at a long-abandoned site on a hill overlooking the port of Chania in Western Crete, which has been identified with the Minoan city of Kydonia. Among the discoveries was an amphora containing an intact text written in linear B, the language of the court at Mycenae where the legendary Agamemnon ruled. Also found were two terracotta tablets containing texts in Linear A, an even older alphabet - used around 1700 years before the common era - which has not yet been deciphered. The ministry said the archaeologists found evidence of a violent fire believed to have...
  • The Linear B Tablets and Mycenaean Social, Political, and Economic Organization

    08/29/2004 8:19:46 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies · 1,656+ views
    Lesson 25, The Prehistoric Archaeology of the Aegean ^ | Revised: Friday, March 18, 2000 | Trustees of Dartmouth College
    KO-RE-TE, PO-RO-KO-RE-TE [koreter, prokoreter] -- Such officials are known at both Knossos and Pylos. The titles bear a suspiciously close resemblance to the Latin terms curator and procurator ("guardian" and "manager, imperial officer/governor" respectively). The Linear B evidence suggests that the koreter was a local official in charge of one of the sixteen major administrative units within the Pylian kingdom, and the prokoreter was evidently his deputy.