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Keyword: literature

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  • My Newest Novel is Out Today (Complete Vanity)

    07/20/2014 11:03:54 AM PDT · by Anitius Severinus Boethius · 23 replies
    ASB | 07/20/2014 | ASB
    This is nothing more or less than a complete vanity. My sixth book is out today and I am thrilled with it. I started my journey as a self-published writer just over two years ago and look forward to doing this as a career for the next few decades. My latest novel is called 'EMP': In a flash of searing light, the world changed. A massive solar flare has crippled the modern world and brought chaos and destruction. David Hartsman is stuck in the remote farm town of his youth on what was expected to be a short visit to...
  • Mildred Lewis Rutherford: Southern Educator and Historian

    07/16/2014 1:35:14 PM PDT · by BigReb555 · 1 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | July 16, 2014 | Calvin E. Johnson, Jr.
    Miss Rutherford lived during a time when people were closer and the pace was slower! “Miss Rutherford writes often about the Confederacy, and Southern traditions, and was overall a champion of all things Southern. While her writings may not be politically correct in today’s world, they are an important look into her era and document views and events from someone who lived through them and knew people who did.”---Kenneth H. Thomas, Jr., Genealogy Columnist, The Atlanta Journal and Constitution
  • Costco Keeps Twisting the Truth about D'Souza and Hillary Books (Vanity)

    07/11/2014 6:23:08 AM PDT · by illiac · 18 replies
    Self | 7/11/14 | Self
    In response to why Hillary's book was not taken off the shelf...here is the reply: Dear XXXX, The decision to keep her book in stock in our locations is purely sales based as well. The books that are currently stocked in our stores have met our sales threshold, and so we continue to carry them. I might suggest visiting Costco.com for further information from our CEO regarding this matter. Thank you, Sarah S. Member Service Center Costco Wholesale Corporation I do know that there hare many copies of her books in the local Costco - habe neen since published....does not...
  • Reply from Costco Regarding D'Souza Book Vanity)

    07/10/2014 7:19:40 AM PDT · by illiac · 25 replies
    Self | 7/10/14 | Self
    Dear XXXX, We appreciate you taking the time to email Costco Wholesale. Costco is not influenced by political considerations in selecting product for sale in our warehouses or on Costco.com. This includes our selection of books. Our book buyers are solely interested in book sales, and do not favor any political persuasion over another. Recently, after deciding to sell the book "America: Imagine the World Without Her", beginning on June 1, a decision was made to pull the book from sale on July 1. This decision was based solely on the number of copies sold during that month, and had...
  • The books many start, but few ever finish: Survey reveals the reads nobody reads (HRC 1.9%)

    07/08/2014 6:44:44 AM PDT · by InvisibleChurch · 87 replies
    ukmail ^ | 7-8-14
    It's the cultural crime we don't dare admit - starting that big, high-brow book with the best intentions before leaving it half-read down the back of the sofa. So those who give up on tough reads will be relieved to hear they're not alone. A mathematics professor has singled out which books are our most 'unread' - and intellectual big-hitters are far and away the worst culprits. Readers in their droves gave up on Hillary Clinton's memoirs, Stephen Hawking's A Brief History of Time and Thomas Piketty's Capital in the Twenty-First Century before they were even a tenth of the...
  • What Are You Reading?

    06/27/2014 8:33:15 AM PDT · by Tax-chick · 274 replies
    Vanity | June 27, 2014 | Tax-chick
    What are you reading? There used to be a quarterly "What are you reading?" thread, but I haven't seen it for a long time. I got a lot of good book suggestions that way, and I miss it. So here's a thread! If you're reading something interesting you think others would like, or something boring you'd recommend we all avoid, jump in! If you have a ping list of FReepers who might be interested, ping them!
  • 23 Books You Didn't Read In High School But Actually Should

    05/30/2014 12:34:14 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 127 replies
    BuzzFeed ^ | July 5, 2013 | Spencer Althouse
    You probably SparkNoted these books before, but now's your chance to read them.
  • Harlan Ellison turns 80 today

    05/27/2014 10:57:16 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 40 replies
    Multiple links in body of thread | May 27, 2014
    The great writer Harlan Ellison turns 80 today. Ellison has won eight Hugo Awards, a shared award for the screenplay of A Boy and his Dog that he counts as "half an Hugo" and two special awards from annual World SF Conventions; four Nebula Awards of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA); five Bram Stoker Awards of the Horror Writers Association (HWA); two Edgar Awards of the Mystery Writers of America; two World Fantasy Award from annual conventions; and two Georges Méliès fantasy film awards. -- Wikipedia Ellison is known primarily to television viewers as the author...
  • 18 Famous Literary First Lines Perfectly Paired With Rap Lyrics

    05/24/2014 8:32:03 AM PDT · by workerbee · 5 replies
    Mental Floss ^ | 3/24/14 | Arika Okrent
    Are you an aspiring rap lyricist? Have I got the tool for you! RapPad is a site where you can compose your raps with the help of rhyme lookups, syllable counters, and a library of beats. It also puts you in touch with a community for discussion, feedback, and online rap battles. But even if you’re not planning on writing raps, it offers a unique kind of linguistic fun. With the “Generate Line” feature, you can give RapPad a line, and it will write the next line for you by pulling from a library of successful rap songs. I entered...
  • Plan to name cove after Mark Twain scrapped after tribe complains (He was Racist)

    05/19/2014 7:55:43 PM PDT · by equalator · 33 replies
    Fox News ^ | Joshua Miller
    "Samuel Clemens had racist views on the native people of this country and has captured those views in his literature," Cruz wrote in a letter to the board. He also took exception to a Twain quote about Lake Tahoe: "People say that Tahoe means 'Silver Lake' — 'Limpid Water' — 'Falling Leaf.' Bosh! It means grasshopper soup, the favorite dish of the digger tribe — and of the Pi-utes as well."
  • Warning: The Literary Canon Could Make Students Squirm

    05/18/2014 5:44:54 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 38 replies
    The New York Times ^ | May 17, 2014 | Jennifer Medina
    SANTA BARBARA, Calif. — Should students about to read “The Great Gatsby” be forewarned about “a variety of scenes that reference gory, abusive and misogynistic violence,” as one Rutgers student proposed? Would any book that addresses racism — like “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” or “Things Fall Apart” — have to be preceded by a note of caution? Do sexual images from Greek mythology need to come with a viewer-beware label? Colleges across the country this spring have been wrestling with student requests for what are known as “trigger warnings,” explicit alerts that the material they are about to read...
  • 45 Hamlets for Shakespeare's 450th Birthday - in Pictures

    04/23/2014 9:30:51 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 6 replies
    On the 450th anniversary of Shakespeare's birth, Michael Billington has picked the best Hamlets he's seen in each decade of his theatregoing life. To help you choose your own favourite Prince of Denmark, here are 45 actors who've found a method for the character's madness
  • The Loss of Mystery and the Loss of Childhood

    04/17/2014 3:51:40 AM PDT · by NYer · 10 replies
    ZNA ^ | April 17, 2014 | Mitchell Kalpakgian
    In the aftermath of the sexual revolution of 1960s — which espoused sex education, the contraceptive mentality, no-fault divorce, and legalized abortion on demand — an anti-life and anti-child philosophy has prevailed over much of Western civilization, where European nations are barely replacing their populations or suffering a decline in birth rate. In a culture of death that slaughters 1.5 million pre-born babies in the womb each year, permits infanticide in the procedure known as partial-birth abortion, and tolerates physician-assisted suicide in the name of mercy and a quality of life ethic, life is cheap and loses its sacredness. Whenever...
  • English Professors' Moral Panic

    04/15/2014 7:12:24 AM PDT · by Academiadotorg · 13 replies
    Accuracy in Academia ^ | April 14, 2014 | Malcolm A. Kline
    If you love literature, you might find it easier to actually buy it than take a course in it. “According to the most recent comprehensive report on staffing by the Modern Language Association and the Association of Departments of English, published in 2008, English lost 3,000 tenure-track positions from 1993 to 2004, roughly 10 percent of the total,” Marc Bousquet writes in The Chronicle of Higher Education. “Even that understates the case, since more than a third of the new tenurable hires have not been in traditional literary fields but in composition, rhetoric, theory, cultural studies, new media, and digital...
  • Garcia Marquez Leaves Hospital, in 'Delicate' State

    04/08/2014 5:24:23 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 3 replies
    Straits Times ^ | Apr 9, 2014
    Nobel literature laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez returned to his Mexico City home on Tuesday, April 8, 2014, after a week-long hospitalisation for a lung infection, but officials said he remains in "delicate" condition.
  • Rush Limbaugh selection in children’s book competition causes a stir

    03/21/2014 8:04:13 AM PDT · by Hojczyk · 41 replies
    CNN Politics ^ | March 20,2014 | CNN's Dana Davidsen
    Rush Limbaugh - radio host, conservative firebrand and... children's book author of the year? The Children’s Book Council and its Every Child a Reader program released on Thursday their author-of-the-year finalists for their annual Children’s and Teen Choice Book Awards. Limbaugh is one of the four finalists, and his nomination has prompted outrage on social media, given the host’s often-incendiary nature. Limbaugh's book is titled, "Rush Revere and The Brave Pilgrims: Time-Travel Adventures with Exceptional Americans" – a time-traveling tale of colonial America and the latest of two books in the "Rush Revere Series" published last year by Simon &...
  • Tales of Futures Past: Soviet Science Fiction of the Cold War

    03/16/2014 7:35:17 AM PDT · by lbryce · 12 replies
    Space.com ^ | March 14, 2014 | Jill Scharr,
    In 1898, British writer H. G. Wells wrote "The War of the Worlds," a science-fiction novel in which Martians invade the Earth and nearly decimate humanity. A decade later, in what was then the Russian Empire, writer and Marxist revolutionary Alexander Bogdanov wrote his novel "Red Star," also about Martians landing on Earth. But in Bogdanov's novel, the Martians are not violent or monstrous. Instead, they invite the main character, a young Russian student named Leonid, back to the Red Planet to see the Martians' civilization: a thriving, peaceful — and communist — utopia. The optimism of "Red Star" was...
  • The Top Ten Books People Lie About Reading

    02/03/2014 2:13:32 PM PST · by jocon307 · 393 replies
    The Federalist ^ | 01/16/2014 | Ben Domenech
    Have you ever lied about reading a book? Maybe you didn’t want to seem stupid in front of someone you respected. Maybe you rationalized it by reasoning that you had a familiarity with the book, or knew who the author was, or what the story was about, or had glanced at its Wikipedia page. Or maybe you had tried to read the book, even bought it and set it by your bed for months unopened, hoping that it would impart what was in it merely via proximity (if that worked, please email me).
  • Stand up for true English!

    01/14/2014 9:28:06 AM PST · by WesternCulture · 14 replies
    01-14-2014 | WesternCulture
    What was so great about Chaucer? Some people seem to think he more or less invented the English language. Well, did he? By no means. Discussing authors, should anyone ever compare Chaucer to the likes of Hamlet, Petrarch or Dante? Never. Geoffrey's major source of influence, Giovanni Boccaccio, was a pretty good writer of short stories, but on the other hand, Western literature really could've done without him. In style as well as content, Chaucer was an unaccomplished Boccaccio impersonator. There are plenty of good reasons to admire Britain, but contrary to what is regarded as an axiomatic truth in...
  • 43 Books About War Every Man Should Read

    01/10/2014 5:48:26 PM PST · by dynachrome · 141 replies
    Art of Manliness ^ | 12-2-13 | Ryan Holiday.
    War is unquestionably mankind at his worst. Yet, paradoxically, it is in war that men — individual men — often show the very best of themselves. War is often the result of greed, stupidity, or depravity. But in it, men are often brave, loyal, and selfless. I am not a soldier. I have no plans to become one. But I’ve studied war for a long time. I am not alone in this. The greats have been writing and reading about war — its causes, its effects, its heroes, its victims — since the beginning of written text. Some of our...
  • America's Knockout Novel: The Adventures of Huck Finn

    12/10/2013 3:45:54 PM PST · by Kaslin · 22 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | December 10, 2013 | Lee Culpepper
    With recent footage of black teenagers cold-cocking random strangers in a deadly game known as “Knockout,” Americans should recognize how badly our country needs a selfless voice of leadership heard in all of our homes. But until the dignified message of someone like Dr. Ben Carson becomes mainstream, Mark Twain’s classic punch to the face has always packed the power to knock some sense in to people who need it the most. Nearly 130 years after The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn was published, Twain’s timeless lessons on race and humanity continue to offer America a remedy to racial bigotry --...
  • Socialist, Communist authors make Obama administration reading list

    11/25/2013 12:15:42 PM PST · by markomalley · 4 replies
    The Daily Caller ^ | 11/25/2013 | Patrick Howley
    Socialist, Communist, and McCarthy-era blacklisted writers appear on the U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) new “Books That Shaped Work in America” list celebrating the department’s 100th anniversary.A Socialist leader, two Stalin apologists, two blacklisted ’50s screenwriters, and a suspected Marxist are included on the list, which DOL compiled based on recommendations from various figures in the community. Labor Secretary Thomas Perez described the program as an “online book club.”Better not invite Tailgunner Joe McCarthy.The first two reds on the list are Sidney and Beatrice Webb, who made it for their 1897 work “Industrial Democracy,” recommended by Carter administration Labor Secretary...
  • Cornell vs. Literature

    11/25/2013 8:26:40 AM PST · by Academiadotorg · 7 replies
    Accuracy in Academia | November 25, 2013 | Malcolm A. Kline
    Malcolm A. Kline, Share/Save If you love literature and go to Cornell, you’re probably in the wrong place. The poets, playwrights and novelists you might not seek out on your own who would, conversely, enrich your life or at least your vocabulary, make but cameo appearances. Rather, as an English major, you can expect to be exposed to: ENGL 2090 – Introduction to Cultural Studies ENGL 2100 – Medieval Romance: Voyage to the Otherworld ENGL 2150 – The American Musical ENGL 2160 – Television ENGL 2511 – Introduction to Women Writers ENGL 2620 – Introduction to Asian American Literature ENGL...
  • Who Was C.S. Lewis?

    11/22/2013 6:48:42 AM PST · by SoFloFreeper · 32 replies
    ligonier.org ^ | 11/22/13 | Sinclair Ferguson
    November 22, 1963, the date of President Kennedy’s assassination, was also the day C.S. Lewis died. Seven years earlier he had thus described death: “The term is over: the holidays have begun. The dream is ended: this is the morning.” The metaphor inherent in these words is striking. It comes from the world of students and pupils, but only a teacher would employ it as a metaphor for death. The words (from The Last Battle) bring down the curtain — or perhaps better, close the wardrobe door — on Lewis’ Chronicles of Narnia. But they also open a window into...
  • Doris Lessing, Nobel Prize-winning author, dies aged 94

    11/17/2013 8:29:12 AM PST · by GSWarrior · 9 replies
    BBCNews ^ | 11/17/13
    British Nobel Prize-winning author Doris Lessing has died aged 94. A statement from her publisher, Harper Collins, said she "passed away peacefully at her London home in the early hours of this morning". Her best-known works include The Golden Notebook, Memoirs of a Survivor and The Summer Before the Dark.
  • Alice Munro wins 2013 Nobel Prize in Literature

    10/10/2013 6:03:41 AM PDT · by WesternCulture · 19 replies
    www.thelocal.se ^ | 10/10/2013 | TT/The Local/dl
    Munro, 82, was called "The master of the contemporary short story" by Swedish Academy Permanent Secretary Peter Englund when he emerged to make the announcement at 1pm. Before he announced Munro's name, Englund let the room full of journalists know that the winner this year "would be a woman", prompting the room to erupt with cheers. Munro's writing career began when she was a teenager growing up in Ontario. She began studying journalism and English at the University of Western Ontario, but left university when she got married in 1951, eventually moving with her husband to British Columbia where they...
  • Wausau Schools Issue Edict to Limit Religious Music... At Christmas

    10/07/2013 7:35:19 PM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 24 replies
    Right Wisconsin Perspectives ^ | 10-6-13 | Charlie Sykes
    We’ve seen this play before haven’t we? Wausau’s school district decides that there is way too much Christmas music during "holiday concerts" and issues a directive "to limit religious music in December." Too much Handel, Bach, Mozart for Wausau, apparently. But this edict seems especially petty and, not surprisingly, there is considerable push back. The district's elite and very popular Master Singers choir decided to temporarily disband rather than comply with the religious cleansing order and a Facebook-based petition campaign to reverse the decision has caught fire. From the Wausau Daily Herald: WAUSAU — A local high school’s elite Master...
  • Humble Chinese Village Basks in Legacy of Three Kingdoms Era

    09/23/2013 4:52:17 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 10 replies
    New York Times ^ | September 22, 2013 | Edward Wong
    In the shadow of a lush mountain and near a slow-moving river in southeast China sits this village, whose name means Dragon Gate. There are narrow alleys and whitewashed homes and the flesh of sliced bamboo drying on the ground. Its humble appearance, though, belies the fact that it played a role in the famous Three Kingdoms era, when kings leading rival states fought in the third century over the right to succeed the Han empire. The blood-drenched stories were immortalized in a 14th-century classic by Luo Guanzhong, “The Romance of the Three Kingdoms,” which in turn has spawned countless...
  • Harper Lee reaches settlement in ‘Mockingbird’ copyright case

    09/07/2013 7:03:10 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 17 replies
    NY Post ^ | 9-6-13 | Rich Colder
    Harper Lee, the aging author of “To Kill a Mockingbird,” has reached a settlement in principle on a lawsuit alleging she was scammed into signing over the copyright to her classic novel by an unscrupulous literary agent who took advantage of her failing hearing and eyesight, a lawyer in the case says. Lee had filed suit in May against Samuel Pinkus and others — including disgraced journalist Gerald Posner — to reclaim the copyright. However, dismissal papers were filed in Manhattan federal court today by Lee’s lawyer removing both Posner and Lee Ann Winick, Pinkus’ wife and another defendant, of...
  • Striving to Preserve the Rich Heritage of Yiddish

    09/02/2013 3:25:37 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 15 replies
    As the number of Yiddish speakers declines, those who love the language look for ways to ensure its survival.In the misery of a Jewish ghetto in German-occupied Poland, Jack Lewin remembers, the books helped him survive. Reading the Yiddish words late into the night, Lewin could forget the hunger that sometimes brought him to tears. "I lived with the characters of the books," he says in his home near Wilshire Boulevard, his green-and-gray eyes distant with memory. Maybe it was those books that made it possible for him and the others to be human after Auschwitz. Now he traces his...
  • Iain Banks dies of cancer aged 59 (author)

    06/10/2013 10:14:21 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 8 replies
    BBC News ^ | June 9, 2013
    Author Iain Banks has died aged 59, two months after announcing he had terminal cancer, his family has said. Banks, who was born in Dunfermline, Fife, revealed in April he had gall bladder cancer and was unlikely to live for more than a year. He was best known for his novels The Wasp Factory, The Crow Road and Complicity.
  • Harper Lee sues agent over To Kill a Mockingbird copyright

    05/04/2013 1:41:37 PM PDT · by ConservativeStatement · 98 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | May 4, 2013 | David Batty
    Harper Lee, the author of To Kill A Mockingbird, has sued her literary agent for allegedly duping her into assigning him the copyright on the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel. In the lawsuit filed in federal court in Manhattan, Lee says Samuel Pinkus, the son-in-law of Lee's long-time agent, Eugene Winick, took advantage of her failing hearing and eyesight to transfer the rights on the book, which has sold more than 30 million copies worldwide and became an Oscar-winning film. The 87-year-old says she has no memory of agreeing to relinquish her rights or signing the agreement that cements the purported transfer.
  • Teacher Buys Student "Fifty Shades of Grey" for Reading Class

    05/03/2013 9:40:59 AM PDT · by ransomnote · 47 replies
    nbcphiladelphia.com ^ | May 3, 2013 | By Vince Lattanzio
    A Philadelphia mother wants her son’s high school teacher fired after he bought the teen the novel Fifty Shades of Grey for in-class reading. Maya Ladson says she was shocked to find a copy of the racy read in her 14-year-old’s book bag back on March 9. That shock turned to outrage when she found out how he got the book. “The minute I found out about it, it raised concern,” the mother told NBC10.com Thursday. “This is not OK to me. This is major.” Ladson's son, who is a 9th grade student at Eastern University Academy Charter School in...
  • Woe to Those Who Call Trash Treasure and Treasure Trash!

    05/01/2013 5:21:43 AM PDT · by NYer · 14 replies
    Crisis Magazine ^ | May 1, 2013 | Steven Jonathan Rummelsburg
    Ah, to know the mind of Aristotle, the man whom Dante called “the teacher of those who know.” How magnificent to commune with the intellect of Plato, of whom Alfred North Whitehead dared to say: “the European philosophical tradition consists of a series of footnotes to Plato.” Many other ancient writers by their enduring works have bequeathed to us the gift of remarkable clarity on our unchanging human nature, a clarity which is conspicuously absent from most of the literature churned out in this Dark Age.Contrast the lasting classics of the Great Western Tradition with the divergent and self-conscious works...
  • Thesis Hatement

    04/05/2013 6:57:46 AM PDT · by Borges · 51 replies
    slate ^ | 4/5/2013 | y Rebecca Schuman
    Getting a literature Ph.D. will turn you into an emotional trainwreck, not a professor. Who wouldn’t want a job where you only have to work five hours a week, you get summers off, your whole job is reading and talking about books, and you can never be fired? Such is the enviable life of the tenured college literature professor, and all you have to do to get it is earn a Ph.D. So perhaps you, literature lover, are considering pursuing this path. Well, what if I told you that by “five hours” I mean “80 hours,” and by “summers off”...
  • LGBT-themed books included in California public schools' reading list

    03/22/2013 11:10:02 AM PDT · by massmike · 40 replies
    <p>Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender literature are included in the California Department of Education's newest reading list for students,prompting complaints from critics who say a leftist agenda is being pushed on kids, the San Jose Mercury News reported.</p> <p>Controversial topics have been introduced to California students in the past, but this is the first time the state has put forth works celebrated by the Stonewall Book Awards, which since 1971 has recognized LGBT literature, according to the newspaper.</p>
  • The Freeman's Defence [Excerpt from "Uncle Tom's Cabin", Fits America Today!]

    02/03/2013 1:04:06 PM PST · by SoFloFreeper · 7 replies
    "Uncle Tom's Cabin" (free ebook) ^ | 1852 | Harriet Beecher Stowe
    [Quoting from escaped slave George to his wife]: "O! Eliza, if these people [slaveholders] only knew what a blessing it is for a man to feel that his wife and child belong to HIM!...Why, I feel rich and strong, though we have nothing but our bare hands. I feel as if I could scarcely ask God for any more.... yet if they will only let me alone now, I will be satisfied--thankful; I will work...As to my old master, he has been paid five times over for all he ever spent for me. I don't owe him anything." [Quoting from...
  • LES MISERABLES... AND THE POWER OF CHRISTIAN LOVE

    12/26/2012 5:29:03 PM PST · by SoFloFreeper · 13 replies
    The Perfect Depiction of Christian Love in Victor Hugo's Jean Valjean "Religions pass away but God remains..." Victor Hugo. It should be no surprise that the great French novelist Victor Hugo was a passionate believer in God and in the power of prayer for this powerfully comes across in his wonderful and inspiring novel Les Miserables, now, of course, also a successful Broadway and West End musical, with lyrics by Herbert Kretzmer and music by Claude-Michel Schonberg (original French lyrics by Alain Boubil)... Unfortunately, Victor Hugo has rarely been credited as being a Christian writer - partly because of his...
  • Seek Suggestions for 17 Year Old Grandson's Chirstmas Present:

    11/30/2012 8:05:10 PM PST · by Vinylly · 98 replies
    I have a 16 year old grandson that spends too much time on the computer and playing X games. He doesn't read books. So, I am thinking of giving him a couple of books for his christmas present. Two books I am thinking of is; 'The Richest Man In Babylon' by George Clasan and 'Anthem' by Ayn Rand. I would like suggestions from other writers that counter act the teaching he is getting in his school, and still be interesting for a 16 year old.
  • PARAPROSDOKIANS

    11/27/2012 6:39:51 AM PST · by knarf · 20 replies
    e-mail | November 27, 2012 | unknown, knarf
    Paraprosdokians are figures of speech in which the latter part of a sentence or phrase is surprising or unexpected; frequently humorous. 17. I'm supposed to respect my elders, but its getting harder and harder for me to find one now.
  • Wolves in Petticoats: The Victorian Werewolf

    09/14/2012 3:33:24 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 5 replies
    The Freehold ^ | September 14, 2012 | Jonathan David Baird
    This is a rough excerpt from the introduction of a book on Victorian werewolves I am writing right now. It should be finished sometime around March 2013. (I have way too many projects to give it my full attention this year) Introduction It has been suggested that the Vampire legend, largely created by Bram Stoker, is the most enduring and famous creature mythos to emerge out of popular Gothic literature. While this may be true the lowly werewolf must also be given a place of distinction. The literature of the Victorian era werewolf has nowhere near the enduring popularity of...
  • Gothic Monsters- The Litany of Fear in H.G. Wells’ The Island of Doctor Moreau

    09/14/2012 11:00:33 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 1 replies
    The Freehold ^ | September 13, 2012 | Jonathan David Baird
    H.G. Wells may be known as one of the first writers of science fiction but his novel The Island of Doctor Moreau is one of the first modern horror stories and hits upon four of the greatest fears of the Victorian age. His work does this in such a subtle and inventive way that we may need to reevaluate Wells and name him one of the modern fathers of horror fiction as well. The four fears that Wells so intricately weaves into his story are the fear of science, the fear of internal corruption, the fear of reverse colonization, and...
  • Classics given a steamy Fifty Shades of Grey makeover

    07/18/2012 7:16:19 AM PDT · by C19fan · 15 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | July 17, 2012 | Emily Andrews
    Devotees of Jane Austen or the Bronte sisters may wish to loosen their corsets and have the smelling salts within reach. Some of the greatest works of English literature have been controversially ‘sexed up’ for the 21st century. Following the success of erotic novel Fifty Shades of Grey, one enterprising publisher has given classics such as Pride and Prejudice, Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights a bawdy makeover.
  • Iowa teacher's aide reportedly fired for calling 'Huckleberry Finn' racist

    07/16/2012 10:04:42 AM PDT · by onlylewis · 53 replies
    foxnews.com ^ | 7/16/12 | foxnews.com
    A teaching associate at a private school in Iowa has reportedly been fired for allegedly telling students that “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” is a “racist” novel. Naiya Galloway, 31, was fired by Hillcrest Family Services, a privately run K-12 school that caters to students who have mental health issues or behavioral problems, The Des Moines Register reports. Galloway has denied allegations that she questioned the school’s use of the book, but acknowledged she disrupted a classroom discussion of the Ku Klux Klan because it had triggered “flashbacks,” noting that she’s both black and Japanese, the newspaper reports.
  • Where the Wild Things Are ...fairytale for the post-Sixties era of navel-gazing psychobabble

    06/26/2012 8:40:17 AM PDT · by Cincinatus' Wife · 14 replies
    Telegraph - UK ^ | June 26, 2012 | Brendan O'Neill
    Where the Wild Things Are was the perfect fairytale for the post-Sixties era of navel-gazing psychobabble Maurice Sendak, author of a children's book so wildly popular that there was even a copy of it in the largely bookless house I grew up in, has died. He will always be remembered for Where the Wild Things Are...it will be the simple story of a naughty boy called Max who gets sent to bed and encounters various wild things, told in just nine sentences, for which Sendak will win his place in literary history. It is appropriate that Where the Wild Things...
  • Shameless Self Promotion, Vanity

    06/24/2012 1:24:18 PM PDT · by DC Bound · 13 replies
    Cold Quiet Country ^ | 11/13/2012 | Clayton Lindemuth
    A novel about justice. Set in small town Wyoming in 1971 and unfolding in a single day, Cold Quiet Country explores corruption, morality, and revenge. Published by MP Publishing from the Isle of Man. Edited by Guy Intoci. Please be warned, the novel's main theme is delivering justice to sexual predators, and the beginning is quite coarse. My hope is that by dealing with the subject matter honestly, I can increase awareness and encourage victims to speak out. If the introductory chapter piques your interest, please consider helping me expand my reach by recommending the page to others. I appreciate...
  • Joel Rosenberg's Implosion Releases today

    06/12/2012 6:53:05 AM PDT · by cdga5for4 · 8 replies
    Joel Rosenberg web site ^ | June 12, 2012 | Joel Rosenberg
    Bestselling author and international political expert Joel C. Rosenberg tackles the question: Is America an empire in decline or a nation poised for a historic Renaissance? America teeters on a precipice. In the midst of financial turmoil, political uncertainty, declining morality, the constant threat of natural disasters, and myriad other daunting challenges, many wonder what the future holds for this once-great nation. Will history’s greatest democracy stage a miraculous comeback, returning to the forefront of the world’s economic and spiritual stage? Can America’s religious past be repeated today with a third Great Awakening? Or will the rise of China, Russia,...
  • Orson Scott Card: Thoughts on Ray Bradbury

    06/08/2012 6:42:18 PM PDT · by neverdem · 28 replies
    National Review Online ^ | June 7, 2012 | Orson Scott Card
    The year was 1969. I was 18 or so.I stood in front of the small science-fiction section of the Brigham Young University bookstore, taking I Sing the Body Electric from the shelf, hefting it, opening it, reading just a little, then putting it back.I had too much respect for books in general, and for this book in particular, even to imagine reading the whole thing without paying for it.But it was a hardcover. Not a discounted book-club edition — the real thing, at full price. And I was a college student, pretty close to broke. Buying this book would...
  • Author Ray Bradbury Dies At 91

    06/06/2012 8:04:35 AM PDT · by Iron Munro · 88 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | June 6, 2012 | Lynell George
    Ray Bradbury, the writer whose expansive flights of fantasy and vividly rendered space-scapes have provided the world with one of the most enduring speculative blueprints for the future, has died. He was 91. Bradbury's daughter confirmed his death to the Associated Press on Wednesday morning. She said her father died Tuesday night in Southern California. Author of more than 27 novels and story collections — most famously “The Martian Chronicles,” “Fahrenheit 451,” “Dandelion Wine” and “Something Wicked This Way Comes” — and more than 600 short stories, Bradbury has frequently been credited with elevating the often maligned reputation of science...
  • Critic's Notebook: Literature of 1992 L.A. riots is fragmented

    04/22/2012 1:25:01 AM PDT · by thecodont · 23 replies
    Los Angeles Times/LATimes.com ^ | April 22, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
    One of my favorite pieces of writing to emerge from the 1992 Los Angeles riots is a poem by a writer named Nicole Sampogna, called "Another L.A." In it, the poet traces the odd dislocation of living on the Westside while so much of the city burns. "They send us home early, again," she begins, "supposedly for curfew sake, / but I know it's to beat the traffic." And then: "over there the smoke rises, / horns blare, streets scream, / shoot, loot, / bash windows, bash heads, / lights out / knocked out / by a black & white...