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Keyword: lixus

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  • Romans In Brazil During The Second Third Century?

    12/10/2003 5:37:14 PM PST · by blam · 99 replies · 7,762+ views
    Romans in Brazil During the Second or Third Century? Ex-marine and underwater explorer/archaeologist/treasure-hunter Robert Marx states rather flatly: Amongst my most notable discover[ies] was that of a 2nd century BC Roman shipwreck in the Bay of Guanabara, near Rio de Janeiro. This is a discovery that has received little to no examination, much less validation, from the realm of mainstream archaeology, no doubt in part because Marx is not a Ph.D. archaeologist. Scouring the web for more information about this finding, I did find a reference to the discovery in an article from Dr. Elizabeth Lyding Will, an expert on...
  • Romans in Brazil During the Second or Third Century?

    10/17/2004 7:47:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies · 1,059+ views
    Mysterious Earth ^ | June 20, 2003 | "Michael"
    This is a discovery that has received little to no examination, much less validation, from the realm of mainstream archaeology, no doubt in part because Marx is not a Ph.D. archaeologist. Scouring the web for more information about this finding, I did find a reference to the discovery in an article from Dr. Elizabeth Lyding Will, an expert on Roman amphoras (clay vessels used to store and ship goods during the Roman era). Dr. Will apparently has a piece of an amphora recovered from Marx's Brazil discovery. Of it, she says: The highly publicized amphoras Robert Marx found in the...
  • The Roman Head From Tecaxic-Calixtlahuaca, Mexico: A Review Of The Evidence

    12/18/2004 4:26:41 PM PST · by blam · 19 replies · 1,546+ views
    University Of New Mexico ^ | 4-18/22-2001 | Romeo H. Hristov/Santiago Genoves T.
    The Roman Head from Tecaxic-Calixtlahuaca, Mexico: A Review of the evidence Paper prepared for the 66th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology in New Orleans, Louisiana (April 18-22, 2001). Romeo H. Hristov (b) and Santiago Genovés T. (b) (a) Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM 8713 1, U.S.A. (b) Instituto de Investigaciones Antropológicas-UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria 04510, México, D.F., MEXICO Abstract: Since the publication of the complementary research on the apparently Roman head found in Central Mexico (Hristov, Romeo and Santiago Genovés 1999 "Mesoamerican Evidence of Pre-Columbian Transoceanic Contacts, Ancient Mesoamerica. 10 (2): 207-213) this find...
  • Ancient Romans In Texas?

    04/14/2002 6:23:47 AM PDT · by Hellmouth · 141 replies · 7,016+ views
    Science Frontiers online ^ | Nov-Dec 1993 | William Corliss
    ANCIENT ROMANS IN TEXAS? If one searches long enough and hard enough, one can discover hints that just about any ancient culture you care to name set foot in the New World well before the Vikings and Columbus. Old coins, inscriptions, language concordances, and the like are taken by many as proofs that Egyptians visited Oklahoma, the Chinese moored along the Pacific coast, the Celts toured New England, and so on. Now, according to Professor V. Belfiglio, the ancient Romans had Texas on their itineraries. Belfiglio's evidence is fourfold, and so are mainstream criticisms: Roman coins found in Texas....
  • The Lowly Amphora (and ancient contact across the oceans)

    06/01/2015 10:43:47 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 68 replies
    The Mathisen Corollary ^ | Monday, February 6, 2012 | David Warner Mathisen
    Professor Elizabeth Lyding Will (1924 - 2009...) was one of the world's leading authorities on amphoras, an ancient two-handled container that her research demonstrated to be vitally important for tracing ancient trade patterns and for opening windows on tremendous amounts of information about ancient life and commerce. In a 2000 article entitled "The Roman Amphora: learning from storage jars," she discusses the diverse uses of "the lowly Roman amphora -- a two-handled clay jar used by the Canaanites, Phoenicians, Greeks and Romans to ship goods," describing both its main usage for the transportation of liquids including wine, olive oil, and...
  • The enigmatic Mzora stone ring in Morocco

    02/02/2011 7:29:43 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies · 1+ views
    Stone Pages ^ | Monday, January 31, 2011 | The Heritage Journal
    In Morocco, not far from the Atlantic coast and away from major tourist attractions, lies a remarkable and enigmatic megalithic site. The Mzora stone ring (also spelled variously as Msoura/Mezorah) is situated roughly 11km from the nearest town of Asilah and about 27km from the ruins of ancient Lixus. It is not easy to reach and a small display in the archaeological museum at Tetouan is the most the majority of visitors see or hear of this very interesting site. Plutarch, in the first century CE, may have referred to Mzora in his Life of Sertorius. He describes the Roman...