Keyword: madcowdisease

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  • Concerns Grow That Infections From 'Zombie Deer' Meat Can Jump To Humans

    01/18/2018 7:54:31 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 22 replies
    NPR ^ | January 17, 20181:25 PM ET | Sam Brasch
    Would you eat venison if there was a chance it could slowly eat away at your brain? If there's a slight possibility, it doesn't bother Patrick States. On the menu this evening for his wife and two daughters at their Northglenn, Colo., home are pan-seared venison steaks with mashed potatoes and a whiskey cream sauce. "We each have our specialty, actually," says States as the steak sizzles. "The girls made elk tamales this morning, but we use [venison or elk] in spaghetti, chili, soup, whatever." The States take pride in skipping the butcher counter at the grocery store. The red...
  • Rosie O’Donnell Could Be Facing Prison Time And A $12 MILLION FINE For Bribery

    12/21/2017 4:57:39 AM PST · by Helicondelta · 71 replies
    After ex-comedian Rosie O’Donnell’s meltdown on Twitter before the Senate’s big tax vote Tuesday night, President Donald Trump can reasonably direct federal authorities to lock her up Even after another Twitter user, Louise Mensch, replied that O’Donnell was irresponsibly advocating bribery, O’Donnell doubled down. Federal law addresses O’Donnell’s actions. 18 U.S. Code § 201 criminalizes the attempted bribery of federal officials by whoever “directly or indirectly, corruptly gives, offers or promises anything of value to any public official … with intent to influence any official act.” The penalty? For Rosie, she could spend up to 15 years in jail
  • He’s a ‘mole!’ ‘The View’ co-host has bombshell REPUGNANT theory about Kate Steinle murder

    07/11/2015 11:04:13 PM PDT · by Impala64ssa · 59 replies
    BizPac Review ^ | 7/10/14 | Michael Shauss
    A leading member of the liberal media is trying to link Donald Trump‘s presidential campaign to an outrageous murder allegedly committed by an illegal immigrant. Raven-Symoné Pearman of ABC’s “The View” showed her conspiratorial side when she told her co-hosts that the murder of Kate Steinle, 32, by an illegal alien in San Francisco might have been connected to, if not orchestrated by, Trump’s campaign. According to The Wrap, the newest co-host of ABC’s daytime talk show started explaining her theory by weighing in on why she thinks Trump is running for president. Apparently it’s all a vast conspiracy to...
  • Mad Cow Disease In Texas Man Has Mysterious Origin

    04/16/2015 10:41:02 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 8 replies
    NPR ^ | APRIL 16, 2015 | MICHAELEEN DOUCLEFF
    It began with anxiety and depression. A few months later, hallucinations appeared. Then the Texas man, in his 40s, couldn't feel or move the left side of his face. He thought the symptoms were because of a recent car accident. But the psychiatric problems got worse. And some doctors thought the man might have bipolar disorder. Cattle feeding practices have been changed in an effort to halt the spread of mad cow disease. THE SALT Mad Cow Disease: What You Need To Know Now Eventually, he couldn't walk or speak. He was hospitalized. And about 18 months after symptoms began,...
  • Inside Rosie O’Donnell’s Dramatic Exit From ‘The View’

    02/09/2015 1:30:37 PM PST · by Zakeet · 64 replies
    Variety ^ | February 9, 2015 | Ramin Setoodeh
    When Rosie O’Donnell made her triumphant return to “The View” in September, she promised a calmer version of the host who previously fled the program in 2007 after a single season. But O’Donnell’s unhappiness at “The View” led her to announce on Friday, via a story in the New York Post’s Page Six section, that she was exiting the show after five months. ABC executives agreed to release her early from a 11-month contract, estimated to be worth $5 million. In a brief interview with “Entertainment Tonight” over the weekend, O’Donnell attributed her departure to a desire to focus on...
  • US to resume first beef imports from Ireland since mad cow

    01/05/2015 7:50:54 AM PST · by Olog-hai · 10 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Jan 5, 2015 8:38 AM EST
    Ireland says the United States will permit imports of beef from the country—the first European Union state allowed to resume sales since the mad cow disease scare over 15 years ago. Simon Coveney, Ireland’s minister for agriculture, food and the marine, issued a statement Monday announcing that access to the lucrative U.S. market came after American authorities inspected Ireland’s beef production systems. Authorities estimate annual exports could be worth at least €25 million ($30 million). …
  • Rachel Maddow Busted Using Multiple Fake Twitter Accounts To Boost Mentions Of Her Show

    03/01/2013 8:36:47 PM PST · by icwhatudo · 133 replies
    Twitter ^ | 3/1/13 | @LeftyBollocks
    A poster on Twitter, upon seeing what he thought were very similar posts referencing MSNBC host Rachel Maddow's show, did some searching and found out that Maddow has been using phony twitter accounts to boost her "mentions" on the popular website. As can be seen by screenshots collected by a tweeter named @LeftyBollocks, Maddow has massive amount of accounts posting the exact same claim that "Confession: I yell at my TV while watching Rachel #Maddow talk about filibuster reform in the same way most people do during football." With so many supposedly unique accounts mentioning her name, the term #Maddow...
  • Proteins behind mad-cow disease also help brain to develop

    02/15/2013 1:15:08 AM PST · by neverdem · 3 replies
    Nature News ^ | 14 February 2013 | Mo Costandi
    When not misfolded, prions lend a hand in forming neuronal connections. Prions are best known as the infectious agents that cause ‘mad cow’ disease and the human versions of it, such as variant Creutzfeldt–Jakob Disease. But the proteins also have at least one known useful function, in the cells that insulate nerves, and are suspected to have more. Now researchers have provided the first direct evidence that the proteins play an important role in neurons themselves. The team reports in the Journal of Neuroscience1 that prions are involved in developmental plasticity, the process by which the structure and function of...
  • Mad Cow Disease Found in US Cow

    04/24/2012 4:53:35 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 13 replies
    ABC News ^ | April 24, 2012 | Carrie Gann and Dan Childs
    The Department of Agriculture today confirmed a case of mad cow disease found in a dairy cow in central California. In a press briefing today, John Clifford, the USDA's chief veterinary officer, said the cow's meat did not enter the food supply and the carcass will be destroyed. The animal was found at a rendering facility run by Baker Commodities in Hanford, Calif. The disease was discovered when the company selected the cow for random sampling, Baker Commodities executive vice president Dennis Luckey told The Associated Press. The Agriculture Department confirmed today that the cow is the fourth discovered in...
  • Bad prion breath: Mad cow disease agent can infect via the air

    01/13/2011 11:18:22 PM PST · by LucyT · 8 replies
    Scientific American ^ | Jan 13, 2011 06:25 PM | Philip Yam
    As if it weren't bad enough that deadly prions can survive boiling and radiation, now comes word that aerosolized forms of the pathogen can enter the nose and find their way to the brain, with fatal consequences. Prions, you may recall, were the reason you avoided beef in Europe in the 1990s. They triggered the infamous mad cow disease epidemic in the U.K., which spread to the rest of Europe and other parts of the world. Prions are proteins that all animals produce, but sometimes, toxic mutant versions are made. These malformed versions can cause ..."
  • Backflip over mad cow beef ban

    03/08/2010 5:18:32 PM PST · by myknowledge · 2 replies · 30+ views
    The Australian ^ | March 9, 2010 | Nicola Berkovic
    THE importation of beef from countries that have had outbreaks of mad cow disease will be delayed by at least two years following a backdown by the Rudd government. Agriculture Minister Tony Burke yesterday bowed to community pressure and ordered a full risk analysis of beef imports from countries where bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or mad cow disease, had been reported. The review comes eight days after the lifting of a ban on beef imports from countries that have had the disease. That decision followed a threat by meat exporters, including Canada, to go to the World Trade Organisation over unfair...
  • MSNBC’s Maddow Regrets Misquoting Senator Inhofe But Then Misquotes Him Again, Says Inhofe’s Office

    02/16/2010 5:08:58 AM PST · by IbJensen · 53 replies · 2,535+ views
    CNS News ^ | February 16, 2010 | Nicholas Ballasy
    (CNSNews.com) – MSNBC news host Rachel Maddow corrected the record for misquoting Sen. James Inhofe (R-Okla.) on her Feb. 9 broadcast -- when she incorrectly claimed that the senator had praised federal economic stimulus spending. But she apparently has misquoted the senator again and, as Inhofe’s office told CNSNews.com, “We appreciate that Rachel is a proud liberal defending the massive government spending bills now flowing out of Washington, but hope she will consider making another correction.” Maddow, host of “The Rachel Maddow Show,” a political news and commentary program on MSNBC, said on Feb. 9, “Senator Jim Inhofe of denying...
  • The pain in Spain: Vultures are hungry, need meat

    03/17/2009 2:11:21 PM PDT · by JoeProBono · 12 replies · 406+ views
    Spanish vultures are hungry, even starving — and the regional government in Madrid plans to do something about it. EU laws aimed at halting the spread of mad cow disease require the countryside to be kept clear of dead livestock even if they died of natural causes. But Juan Carlos Atienza of the Spanish Ornithological Organization says the lack of animal corpses since the law was introduced in Spain in 2002 has hit certain vultures very hard. Esperanza Aguirre, president of Madrid's regional government, said Monday the capital aims to ease the vultures' hunger by allowing some dead animals to...
  • A Whiff of Mad Cow

    12/30/2008 1:45:55 AM PST · by neverdem · 3 replies · 403+ views
    ScienceNOW Daily News ^ | 23 December 2008 | Rachel Zelkowitz
    Enlarge ImagePotent protein. The normal version of a pathological prion protein (in green) is expressed in the cells that make up the olfactory system, fine-tuning the mouse's sense of smell.Credit: Claire Le Pichon and Matt Valley Talk about Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Misfolded proteins known as prions cause mad cow disease and other fatal neurodegenerative illnesses. But in their properly folded form, the proteins may be important to survival, helping mice and other animals keep their sniffing skills sharp, new research shows. Prions get the bad reputation--and the lion's share of research attention--but interest in the normal form...
  • Mad Cow Rules Hit Sperm Banks' Patrons (desperate quest for Nordic sperms)

    08/13/2008 5:14:22 AM PDT · by TigerLikesRooster · 66 replies · 294+ views
    WP ^ | 08/13/08 | Rob Stein
    Mad Cow Rules Hit Sperm Banks' Patrons By Rob Stein Washington Post Staff Writer Wednesday, August 13, 2008; Page A01 When Julie Peterson decided to have a baby on her own two years ago, she picked a tall, blond, blue-eyed Danish engineer as a sperm donor to match her own Scandinavian heritage. But when she went back to the sperm bank to use the same donor to have another child, she was stunned to discover that the federal government had made it impossible. "I just cried," said Peterson, 43, who lives in North Carolina. "I was in complete shock. I...
  • Britain Drops 'War on Terror' Label

    01/01/2008 12:15:19 AM PST · by america4vr · 36 replies · 75+ views
    Military.com ^ | December 28, 2007 | Staff
    The words "war on terror" will no longer be used by the British government to describe attacks on the public, the country's chief prosecutor said Dec. 27. Sir Ken Macdonald said terrorist fanatics were not soldiers fighting a war but simply members of an aimless "death cult." The Director of Public Prosecutions said: 'We resist the language of warfare, and I think the government has moved on this. It no longer uses this sort of language." London is not a battlefield, he said. "The people who were murdered on July 7 were not the victims of war. The men who...
  • Why you shouldn't eat your mother (Prions)

    09/24/2007 6:21:25 AM PDT · by Renfield · 4 replies · 135+ views
    We live in the age of the prion, says New York writer DT Max in his introduction to this neat little medical whodunit. The claim sounds worthy of a car advert. You are never alone with a prion. That sort of thing. In fact, the prion is a strange, non-living infectious agent whose behaviour was widely disputed until US medical researcher Stanley Prusiner confirmed its existence in a series of elegant experiments that won him a Nobel Prize for physiology in 1997. Now, most scientists accept prions are responsible for a range of modern curses: mad cow disease, the fatal...
  • Humane Society of US again scaring people away from good diets?

    07/19/2007 12:50:37 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 6 replies · 710+ views
    AG WEEKLY ^ | June 25, 2007 | Dennis T. Avery
    The Humane Society of the U.S. has, for years, been trying to frighten people away from consuming meat, milk and eggs -- but its recent testimony before a congressional committee reached a new low when the HSUS president, Wayne Pacelle, made the unsupported claim that pigs could be harboring the infamous and deadly British ‘mad cow” disease. Swine veterinarians quickly pointed out that “mad cow,” or bovine spongiform encephalopathy, has never occurred naturally in swine. At the height of the British “mad cow” epidemic, both swine and cattle were exposed to the tissues from thousands of infected cattle and the...
  • Early Fix: Prion disease remedied in mice

    02/10/2007 10:41:41 AM PST · by neverdem · 1 replies · 280+ views
    Science News Online ^ | Feb. 3, 2007 | Nathan Seppa
    Mad cow disease and other brain disorders stemming from prion proteins have long resisted cure. Now, in a test in mice, a prion disease caught early has been reversed. Prions—misfolded versions of a natural protein called PrP—trigger normal PrP to misfold in the same way. Over time, prion infection kills so many neurons that the brain becomes riddled with holes. In the new study, neurologist Giovanna R. Mallucci of the Institute of Neurology in London and her colleagues tested whether shutting off the prions' supply of PrP could alter the course of disease. They worked with genetically engineered mice that...
  • Could Genetic Engineering Eradicate Mad Cow Disease?

    01/02/2007 7:31:55 PM PST · by indcons · 17 replies · 412+ views
    Medical News Today ^ | 02 Jan 2007 | Catharine Paddock
    dozen calves that don't have prions - the infectious proteins that cause mad cow disease. The research project is reported in the online journal Nature Biotechnology. Preliminary tests suggest that the brains of the genetically engineered calves are immune to Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE, or mad cow disease). The scientists verified this by trying to infect post mortem brain tissue from two of the 20-month old calves with prions, but the tissue remained healthy. This follows a long process using donor cattle cells in which the gene known to trigger the production of prions was "switched off". The cells were...