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Keyword: mammoth

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  • Lost World Shropshire? Mammoths In England Found To Be Most Recent Yet

    06/18/2009 4:06:52 AM PDT · by decimon · 36 replies · 676+ views
    Scientific Blogging ^ | June 17th 2009 | News Staff
    > "Mammoths are conventionally believed to have become extinct in North Western Europe about 21,000 years ago during the main ice advance, known as the 'Last Glacial Maximum'" said Lister. "Our new radiocarbon dating of the Condover mammoths changes that, by showing that mammoths returned to Britain and survived until around 14,000 years ago." >
  • University of Florida: Epic carving on fossil bone found in Vero Beach

    06/04/2009 8:15:37 AM PDT · by BGHater · 50 replies · 2,688+ views
    Vero Beach 32963 ^ | 04 June 2009 | SANDRA RAWLS
    In what a top Florida anthropologist is calling “the oldest, most spectacular and rare work of art in the Americas,” an amateur Vero Beach fossil hunter has found an ancient bone etched with a clear image of a walking mammoth or mastodon. According to leading experts from the University of Florida, the remarkable find demonstrates with new and startling certainty that humans coexisted with prehistoric animals more than 12,000 years ago in this fossil- rich region of the state. No similar carved figure has ever been authenticated in the United States, or anywhere in this hemisphere. The brown, mineral-hardened bone...
  • Waking the Baby Mammoth

    04/17/2009 11:08:33 PM PDT · by JoeProBono · 24 replies · 1,486+ views
    Only a handful have ever been found before. But none like her. Her name is Lyuba. A 1-month-old baby mammoth, she walked the tundra about 40,000 years ago and then died mysteriously. Discovered by a reindeer herder, she miraculously re-appeared on a riverbank in northwestern Siberia in 2007. She is the most perfectly preserved woolly mammoth ever discovered. And she has mesmerized the scientific world with her arrival - creating headlines across the globe. Everyone wants to know... how did she die? What can she tell us about life during the ice age and the Earth's changing climate? Will scientists...
  • Six North American sites hold 12,900-year-old nanodiamond-rich soil

    01/02/2009 10:44:35 AM PST · by Red Badger · 19 replies · 1,155+ views
    www.physorg.com ^ | 01-01-2009 | Source: University of Oregon in Nanotechnology / Materials
    Abundant tiny particles of diamond dust exist in sediments dating to 12,900 years ago at six North American sites, adding strong evidence for Earth's impact with a rare swarm of carbon-and-water-rich comets or carbonaceous chondrites, reports a nine-member scientific team. These nanodiamonds, which are produced under high-temperature, high-pressure conditions created by cosmic impacts and have been found in meteorites, are concentrated in similarly aged sediments at Murray Springs, Ariz., Bull Creek, Okla., Gainey, Mich., and Topper, S.C., as well as Lake Hind, Manitoba, and Chobot, Alberta, in Canada. Nanodiamonds can be produced on Earth, but only through high-explosive detonations or...
  • Volunteers uncovers 58th Mammoth at the Mammoth Site (Hot Springs, SD)

    07/29/2008 1:28:53 AM PDT · by ApplegateRanch · 16 replies · 139+ views
    RapidCityJournal ^ | Friday, July 25, 2008 | Mary Garrigan
    HOT SPRINGS -- Joanne Bugel is happy to be the Earthwatch volunteer who uncovered the 115th tusk at the Mammoth Site and moved the popular Hot Springs tourist site’s mammoth tally to 58. [snip] This group has been a particularly productive bunch, said crew chief Don Morris. [snip] Bones unearthed by 2008 Earthwatch volunteers include: three tusks, a tooth, a patella, six ribs, a fibula, four vertebra and assorted other bones. Neteal Graves, 18, of Kaycee, Wyo., also unearthed some coprolite – [snip] Graves has the Mammoth Site in her bloodline. In 1974, her mother, Cheri Graves, was a college...
  • "Lyuba" Gives Scientists Glimpse Of Mammoth Insides

    04/10/2008 3:48:48 PM PDT · by blam · 19 replies · 442+ views
    Yahoo News ^ | 4-10-2008 | Dmitry Solovyov
    "Lyuba" gives scientists glimpse of mammoth insides By Dmitry Solovyov Thu Apr 10, 1:07 PM ETReuters Photo: The carcass of the 4-month-old mammoth, known to researchers as Lyuba, is seen on an... MOSCOW (Reuters) - Russian scientists say they have obtained the most detailed pictures so far of the insides of a prehistoric animal, with the help of a baby mammoth called Lyuba found immaculately preserved in the Russian Arctic. The mammoth is named after the wife of the hunter who found her last year. The body was shipped back to Russia in February from Japan, where it was studied...
  • Climate Change And Human Hunting Combine To Drive The Woolly Mammoth Extinct

    04/01/2008 12:57:30 PM PDT · by blam · 25 replies · 89+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 4-1-2008 | PLoS Biology
    Climate Change And Human Hunting Combine To Drive The Woolly Mammoth ExtinctWoolly mammoths were driven to extinction by climate change and human impacts. (Credit: Mauricio Anton) ScienceDaily (Apr. 1, 2008) — Does the human species have mammoth blood on its hands" Scientists have long debated the relative importance of hunting by our ancestors and change in global climate in consigning the mammoth to the history books. A new paper uses climate models and fossil distribution to establish that the woolly mammoth went extinct primarily because of loss of habitat due to changes in temperature, while human hunting acted as the...
  • Trade in mammoth ivory, helped by global thaw, flourishes in Russia

    03/26/2008 5:00:22 PM PDT · by BGHater · 37 replies · 1,749+ views
    IHT ^ | 25 Mar 2008 | Andrew E. Kramer
    NOVY URENGOI, Russia: As Viktor Seliverstov works in his makeshift studio in this hardscrabble Siberian town he is enveloped in a cloud of ivory dust. His electric carving tool whirrs over the milky surface of teeth and tusks, as he whittles them into key fobs, knife handles and scrimshaw figurines. But these are not whale bones or walrus tusks he is working on. The ivory in this part of the world comes from the remains of extinct woolly mammoths, as they emerge from the tundra where they have been frozen for thousands of years. It is a traditional Russian business...
  • Cause Of Death Of Russian Baby Mammoth Discovered

    03/20/2008 3:15:56 PM PDT · by blam · 26 replies · 1,536+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 3-20-2008 | Informnauka (Informscience) Agency.
    Cause Of Death Of Russian Baby Mammoth Discovered ScienceDaily (Mar. 20, 2008) — On September 27, 2004, the front part of a baby mammoth’s body was found in Olchan mine in the Oimyakon Region of Yakutia. Specialists of the Museum of Mammoth of the Institute of Applied Ecology of the North, Academy of Sciences of Sakha Republic (Yakutia), have been thoroughly studying the finding and they have published the first outcomes. There remained only the head, part of the proboscis, the neck area and part of the breast of the baby mammoth’s body. The body is practically cut off behind...
  • The Mystery Of Mammoth Tusks With Iron Fillings

    03/08/2008 2:03:28 PM PST · by blam · 99 replies · 2,731+ views
    Alaska Report News ^ | 3-5-2008 | Ned Rozell
    The mystery of mammoth tusks with iron fillings By By Ned RozellMarch 5, 2008 A giant meteor may have exploded over Alaska thousands of years ago, shooting out metal fragments like buckshot, some of which embedded in the tusks of woolly mammoths and the horns of bison. Simultaneously, a large chunk of the meteor hit Alaska south of Allakaket, sending up a dust cloud that blacked out the sun over the entire state and surrounding areas, killing most of the life in the area. Embedded iron particles surrounded by carbonized rings in the outer layer of a mammoth tusk from...
  • Mammoth Hunters' Camp Site Found In Russia's Far East (15KYA)

    11/13/2007 2:48:56 PM PST · by blam · 35 replies · 401+ views
    Novosti ^ | 11-12-2007
    Mammoth hunters' camp site found in Russia's Far East 13:02 | 12/ 11/ 2007 KHABAROVSK, November 12 (RIA Novosti) - Archaeologists have found a 15,000 year-old hunters' camp site from the Paleolithic era near Lake Evoron in Russia's Far East, a source in the Khabarovsk archaeology museum said on Monday. "The site dates back to the end of the Ice Age, a period which is poorly studied" Andrei Malyavin, chief of the museum's archaeology department said. "That is why any new site from this period is a discovery in itself." The site, found during a 2007 archaeological expedition to Lake...
  • Ancient drawing of mammoth found in Cheddar caves

    11/02/2007 8:50:40 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies · 3,636+ views
    PhysOrg ^ | August 15, 2007 | University of Bristol
    Jill Cook, Deputy Keeper in the Department said: "Had I been shown this outline of a mammoth during a visit to one of the well known cave art sites in France or Spain, I would have nodded and been able to accept it in the context of other more obvious pictures. At Gough's, or anywhere in England, it is not so easy. Cave art is so rare here that we must always question and test to make sure we are getting it right. Opinions on this may differ but we do seem to be looking at an area of ancient...
  • Mammoth graveyard may someday be open to public

    09/20/2007 6:21:38 AM PDT · by Dysart · 49 replies · 199+ views
    Star-Telegram ^ | 9-20-07 | R.A. DYER
    WACO -- Not far from modest suburban homes in the middle of some thick Texas woods lies a secret boneyard.Surrounded by a tall chain-link fence and covered by what looks like a red-and-white circus tent, the site contains the remains of towering monsters. Remains of at least 25 mammoths, signs of a big saber-toothed cat and a long extinct camel have been found at the site.This is the Waco Mammoth Site, a collection of prehistoric fossils embedded in the dirt not far from the Bosque River. The site could be a potent educational resource if it were not off-limits to...
  • Mammoth Discovery

    07/11/2007 4:17:12 PM PDT · by dynachrome · 55 replies · 1,634+ views
    cnn.com ^ | 7-11-07 | Cnn
    A mammoth that died 10,000 years ago was unearthed in Siberia.
  • Freep a Poll! (CNN. Should scientists clone a mammoth if DNA available?)

    07/11/2007 3:58:49 PM PDT · by dynachrome · 19 replies · 343+ views
    cnn.com ^ | 7-11-07 | Cnn
    Should scientists try to clone a mammoth if DNA is obtained from remains found in Siberia? Yes No
  • Frozen baby mammoth to be sent to Japan for research(near-perfect preservation: photo)

    07/10/2007 1:48:34 AM PDT · by TigerLikesRooster · 84 replies · 4,449+ views
    Kyodo News ^ | 07/06/07
    Frozen baby mammoth to be sent to Japan for research (Kyodo) _ A frozen mammoth found recently in Russia in unprecedented good condition is set to be sent to a Japanese university for examination, several experts told Kyodo News on Friday. The mammoth, thought to be a six-month-old female, was found in the best state of preservation among all frozen mammoths ever recovered, said the experts. "The mammoth has no defects except that its tail was bit off," said Alexei Tikhonov, vice director of the Zoological Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences. "In terms of its state of preservation,...
  • 35,000-Year -Old Mammoth Sculpture Found In Germany

    06/20/2007 3:48:04 PM PDT · by blam · 30 replies · 1,515+ views
    Spiegel ^ | 6-20-2007
    35,000-Year-Old Mammoth Sculpture Found in Germany In southwestern Germany, an American archaeologist and his German colleagues have found the oldest mammoth-ivory carving known to modern science. And even at 35,000 years old, it's still intact. The 35,000-year-old mammoth figurine was revealed on Wednesday. REUTERS Archaeologists at the University of Tübingen have recovered the first entirely intact woolly mammoth figurine from the Swabian Jura, a 220-meter long plateau in the state of Baden-Württemberg, thought to have been made by the first modern humans some 35,000 years ago. It is believed to be the oldest ivory carving ever found. "You can be...
  • Ancient DNA Traces The Wooly Mammoth's Disappearance

    06/11/2007 10:35:44 AM PDT · by blam · 42 replies · 1,273+ views
    Psysorg ^ | 6-7-2007
    Ancient DNA traces the woolly mammoth's disappearanceSome ancient-DNA evidence has offered new clues to a very cold case: the disappearance of the last woolly mammoths, one of the most iconic of all Ice Age giants, according to a June 7th report published online in Current Biology. DNA lifted from the bones, teeth, and tusks of the extinct mammoths revealed a “genetic signature” of a range expansion after the last interglacial period. After the mammoths’ migration, the population apparently leveled off, and one of two lineages died out. “In combination with the results on other species, a picture is emerging of...
  • Experts doubt Clovis people were first in Americas

    02/23/2007 9:34:17 AM PST · by george76 · 100 replies · 1,975+ views
    yahoo...Reuters ^ | Feb 22 | Will Dunham
    The Clovis people, known for their distinctive spear points, likely were not the first humans in the Americas, according to research placing their presence as more recent than previously believed. Using advanced radiocarbon dating techniques, researchers writing in the journal Science on Thursday said the Clovis people, hunters of large Ice Age animals like mammoths and mastodons, dated from about 13,100 to 12,900 years ago. That would make the Clovis culture, known from artifacts discovered at various sites including the town of Clovis, New Mexico, both younger and shorter-lived than previously thought. Previous estimates had dated the culture to about...
  • Fla. teen stumbles upon mammoth tooth

    02/21/2007 8:03:15 PM PST · by george76 · 73 replies · 2,109+ views
    yahoo ^ | Feb 20 | ap
    archaeologists say could be the biggest fossil find in Pinellas County in nearly a century... The jaw and tooth weigh 65 pounds and are about a yard long. Sarti-Sweeney took the bones home and, after some online research with her older brother, determined the football-sized rock was actually the tooth of a long-extinct mammoth. Paleontology and archaeology experts have confirmed the find, and recent digging at the site has turned up teeth and bones from a second mammoth, giant sloths, camels, turtles with shells up to 6-feet-long, saber-toothed cats and giant armadillos the size of Volkswagen Beetles. Scientists believe the...
  • Mammoth bones found, reburied

    12/08/2006 8:15:53 PM PST · by Dysart · 16 replies · 535+ views
    Star-Telgram ^ | 12-8-06 | BILL TEETER
    GRAPEVINE — These bones won’t talk — at least not until they’re unearthed again.Still smarting over the theft of dinosaur footprints this spring, the Army Corps of Engineers and the city of Grapevine have reburied parts of a Columbian mammoth that were found along the receding shore line.Visitors came across a jawbone and part of a tusk, and there may be more bones in the area, but there are no plans to study the location that is somewhere on 1,200 acres of Corps property under lease to the city, said Dale King, a conservation specialist with the corps. The find...
  • What killed the mammoths and other behemoths?

    06/05/2002 3:34:28 PM PDT · by vannrox · 95 replies · 3,710+ views
    FR Post 6-6-2 | Interview with Ross MacPhee
    Interview with Ross MacPhee What killed the mammoths and other behemoths that once roamed the Americas? This mammalogist thinks it may have been hyperlethal disease Image: Clare Flemming Around 11,000 years ago, at the end of the Pleistocene epoch, North America witnessed an extinction that claimed its mammoths, giant ground sloths, camels and numerous other large-bodied animals. Exactly what happened to these megafauna is unknown. Indeed, researchers have puzzled over their disappearance for decades. Traditional explanations hold that either dramatic climate shifts, or human hunting (overkill) extinguished these species. But in recent years a new hypothesis has emerged. According...
  • DNA scholars hope to stock Siberia 'park' with mammoths

    08/22/2002 9:12:32 AM PDT · by Korth · 23 replies · 648+ views
    Japan Times ^ | August 20, 2002 | JULIAN RYALL
    "Jurassic Park" was a work of fiction. Pleistocene Park is in the process of becoming fact. A joint team of Japanese and Russian scientists arrived in the Siberian province of Yakutsk late last month to excavate a number of creatures that have been extinct for millennia -- including mammoths and woolly rhinoceroses. They plan to extract DNA from the frozen remains, cross-breed the retrieved nuclei with the creatures' modern-day counterparts and return the resurrected dinosaurs to a vast "safari park" in northern Siberia. "It probably sounds a little far-fetched, but it's absolutely possible to do this," said professor Akira Iritani,...
  • Cambridge Scholar Makes Rare 30,000-Year-Old Find

    08/03/2006 10:34:52 AM PDT · by blam · 12 replies · 847+ views
    Psysorg.com ^ | 8-3-2006
    Cambridge scholar makes rare 30,000-year-old find Archaeologists have unearthed a pair of tiny bone fragments dating back almost 30,000 years and featuring minute designs carved by some of our earliest European ancestors. The thumbnail-sized bone fragments are engraved with parallel lines and match similar artefacts uncovered in the same area during the 19th century. They were carved by hunter-gatherers as they slowly made their way north in pursuit of moving populations of mammoth and reindeer 25-30,000 years ago. The unusual find was made by a Cambridge scholar, Becky Farbstein, who has been working at Predmosti in north Moravia, in the...
  • 2,300-Year-Old Artefacts May Change Ashoka-Buddhist History

    07/04/2006 3:25:30 PM PDT · by blam · 46 replies · 1,081+ views
    2,300-year-old artefacts may change Ashoka-Buddhist history (FOC) BHUBANESWAR: Orissa Institute of Maritime and South East Asian Studies (OIMSEAS) has unearthed some 2,300-year-old artefacts at Jajpur district in Orissa, which, it claimed, could change some historical narratives on the Ashokan period. The description of Chinese pilgrim Hieun-Tsang about Ashoka that he had constructed 10 stupas in Odra country where Buddha had preached may come true. Earlier, historians refused to accept the narrative. We have already analysed five stupas and found three more similar structures,” OIMSEAS Director Debaraj Pradhan told mediapersons here. He said a huge inscribed monolithic stupa along with other...
  • Mammoths may roam again after 27,000 years

    08/15/2006 4:46:58 AM PDT · by thiscouldbemoreconfusing · 182 replies · 2,880+ views
    Times on line/ Drudgereport ^ | Aug. 15, 2006 | Mark Henderson, Science Editor Times on line
    BODIES of extinct Ice Age mammals, such as woolly mammoths, that have been frozen in permafrost for thousands of years may contain viable sperm that could be used to bring them back from the dead, scientists said yesterday. Research has indicated that mammalian sperm can survive being frozen for much longer than was previously thought, suggesting that it could potentially be recovered from species that have died out. Several well-preserved mammoth carcasses have been found in the permafrost of Siberia, and scientists estimate that there could be millions more. Last year a Canadian team demonstrated that it was possible to...
  • Ice Age DNA May Now Be Sequenced

    08/15/2006 2:33:09 PM PDT · by blam · 11 replies · 571+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 8-15-2006
    Ice Age DNA may now be sequenced 15 August 2006 JURASSIC PARK here we come? Not quite, but we might now be able to sequence the genomes of mammoths and even Neanderthals, thanks to a new way to correct the errors in sequencing ancient DNA that are made because it degrades over time. When Svante Pääbo's group at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, analysed DNA from 50 to 50,000-year-old bone samples from wolves, a single error stood out: one of DNA's "letters", cytosine, had degraded in such a way that sequencing machines misinterpreted it as...
  • Mammoths may roam again after 27,000 years

    08/15/2006 10:23:52 AM PDT · by freedom44 · 34 replies · 972+ views
    Times UK ^ | 8/15/06 | Times UK
    BODIES of extinct Ice Age mammals, such as woolly mammoths, that have been frozen in permafrost for thousands of years may contain viable sperm that could be used to bring them back from the dead, scientists said yesterday. Research has indicated that mammalian sperm can survive being frozen for much longer than was previously thought, suggesting that it could potentially be recovered from species that have died out. Several well-preserved mammoth carcasses have been found in the permafrost of Siberia, and scientists estimate that there could be millions more. Last year a Canadian team demonstrated that it was possible to...
  • Mammoth plan for giant comeback

    12/20/2005 5:56:21 AM PST · by Grendel9 · 30 replies · 1,126+ views
    news.Telegraph.uk
    (Filed: 20/12/2005) The first serious possibility that the woolly mammoth, or something like it, could walk on Earth again was raised yesterday by an international team of scientists. Woolly mammoths died out approximately 10,000 years ago A portion of the genetic code of the mammoth has been reconstructed and, to the surprise of scientists, the team that carried out the feat believes that it will be possible to decode the entire genetic make-up. The tusked beast stood 12-feet tall, weighed up to seven tons and had a shaggy dark brown coat that hung from its belly. DNA was extracted from...
  • Cranbrook officials eager to share mastodon find [ Rochester Hills ]

    07/12/2006 10:26:41 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies · 239+ views
    Oakland Press ^ | July 12, 2006 | Bob Gross
    The find, he said, gives residents a window into a time thousands of years ago when beasts such as mastodons and woolly mammoths roamed the familiar hills and glaciercarved valleys of the area... Stafford, who holds a doctorate in archaeology, and Cranbrook geologist John Zawiskie worked from about 5:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday to dig up and remove enough bones from the site to fill a truck bed. Mastodons - ancient relatives of elephants - roamed Michigan from about 3.75 million to 11,000 years ago. There are about 250 sites in the state where mastodon remains have been found,...
  • Mammoths may roam again after 27,000 years

    08/14/2006 9:17:59 PM PDT · by peyton randolph · 129 replies · 3,440+ views
    Times Online (U.K.) ^ | 08/15/2006 | Mark Henderson
    BODIES of extinct Ice Age mammals, such as woolly mammoths, that have been frozen in permafrost for thousands of years may contain viable sperm that could be used to bring them back from the dead, scientists said yesterday. Research has indicated that mammalian sperm can survive being frozen for much longer than was previously thought, suggesting that it could potentially be recovered from species that have died out...
  • Mammoths may roam again after 27,000 years

    08/16/2006 6:25:32 PM PDT · by annie laurie · 52 replies · 957+ views
    Times Online (UK) ^ | August 15, 2006 | Mark Henderson
    BODIES of extinct Ice Age mammals, such as woolly mammoths, that have been frozen in permafrost for thousands of years may contain viable sperm that could be used to bring them back from the dead, scientists said yesterday. Research has indicated that mammalian sperm can survive being frozen for much longer than was previously thought, suggesting that it could potentially be recovered from species that have died out. Several well-preserved mammoth carcasses have been found in the permafrost of Siberia, and scientists estimate that there could be millions more. Last year a Canadian team demonstrated that it was possible to...
  • Disgraced Embryonic Stem Cell Researcher Used Money to Clone Mammoths

    07/25/2006 11:36:25 AM PDT · by wagglebee · 37 replies · 829+ views
    LifeNews ^ | 7/25/06 | Steven Ertelt
    Seoul, South Korea (LifeNews.com) -- Disgraced scientist Hwang Woo-suk, whose team became an international laughingstock after they faked their entirety of their embryonic stem cell research, appeared in court on Monday in a trial about charges that he embezzled public and private research funds. Hwang admitted he spent more than one million in attempting to clone a mammoth. Hwang was indicted in May by South Korean government prosecutors who say that Hwang misspent public and private dollars intended for research. On Monday, Hwang admitted he spent part of the money, some $1.05 million in failed attempts to clone mammoths, extinct...
  • Gene Reveals Mammoth Coat Colour

    07/06/2006 12:43:11 PM PDT · by blam · 38 replies · 1,370+ views
    BBC ^ | 7-6-2006 | Rebecca Morelle
    Gene reveals mammoth coat colour By Rebecca Morelle Science reporter, BBC News Woolly mammoths had both dark and light coats The coat colour of mammoths that roamed the Earth thousands of years ago has been determined by scientists. Some of the curly tusked animals would have sported dark brown coats, while others had pale ginger or blond hair. The information was extracted from a 43,000-year-old woolly mammoth bone from Siberia using the latest genetic techniques. Writing in the journal Science, the researchers said a gene called Mc1r was controlling the beasts' coat colours. This gene is responsible for hair-colour in...
  • Mammoth Skeleton Found In Siberia

    05/23/2006 1:17:52 PM PDT · by blam · 38 replies · 1,229+ views
    BBC ^ | 5-23-2006 | James Rodgers
    Mammoth skeleton found in Siberia By James Rodgers BBC News, Moscow It is rare to find mammoth remains in such good condition Fishermen in Siberia have discovered the complete skeleton of a mammoth - a find which Russian experts have described as very rare. The remains appeared when flood waters receded in Russia's Krasnoyarsk region. The mammoth's backbone, skull, teeth and tusks all survived intact. It appears to have died aged about 50. Mammoths lived in Africa, Europe, Asia and North America between about 1.6 million years ago and 10,000 years ago, during the Pleistocene epoch. Alexander Kerzhayev, deputy director...
  • Moose, not men, blamed for mammoth extinction

    05/11/2006 7:11:10 PM PDT · by SJackson · 56 replies · 1,502+ views
    Globe and Mail ^ | 5-11-06 | ANNE MCILROY
    Humans have been blamed for slaughtering woolly mammoths and other large ice-age animals into extinction, but new evidence from Yukon suggests this isn't the case. Moose were to blame, at least in part, says Dale Guthrie, a researcher at the University of Alaska. He has found evidence that the climate in Yukon and Alaska was warming between 13,000 and 10,000 years ago, around the time a wave of human hunters moved into North America from Asia. The North was changing from a grassland to a boreal forest and tundra, he says. Moose also arrived, and were better adapted to digest...
  • Climate killed off mammoths, not humans: scientist

    05/10/2006 1:38:20 PM PDT · by Bubba_Leroy · 24 replies · 622+ views
    reuters.com ^ | May 10, 2006 | Reuters
    Climate shifts were probably responsible for the extinction of the mammoth and other species more than 10,000 years ago, not over-hunting by humans, according to new research published on Wednesday. Radiocarbon dating of 600 bones of bison, moose and humans that survived the mass extinction and remains of the mammoth and wild horse which did not, suggests humans were not responsible. "That is what this new data points out," said Dr Dale Guthrie of the University of Alaska in Fairbanks. "It is not that people weren't hunting these creatures. But climate would have reduced the numbers considerably," he added in...
  • Humor: Airbus to build seven story airliner

    04/20/2006 1:34:59 PM PDT · by Paul Ross · 60 replies · 4,149+ views
    Travel Fox ^ | July 5, 2004 | Unknown
    Airbus to build seven story airliner Passengers will have choice of restaurants and theatres TOULOUSE, FRANCE -- With delivery of its first 555 passenger, double-deck commercial airliner expected to take place later this year, Airbus announced today that it has initiated preliminary studies for the design and manufacture a 2600 passenger airplane. The aircraft on the drawing board will have ten decks—seven for passengers, three for cargo and baggage. A prototype of the new aircraft, based on the company's Super Transporter design, will be called the "Airbus A390." The plane is targeted for international service of flights of over 9,000...
  • Mammoth meals helped early tribes thrive

    04/17/2006 7:13:44 PM PDT · by george76 · 49 replies · 1,199+ views
    The Times ^ | April 18, 2006 | Mark Henderson
    REGULAR meals of mammoth meat helped some early human tribes to expand more quickly than their largely vegetarian contemporaries, according to a genetic study. Human populations in east Asia about 30,000 years ago developed at dramatically different rates, following a pattern that appears to reflect the availability of mammoths and other large game. In the part of the region covering what is now northern China, Mongolia and southern Siberia, vast plains teemed with mammals such as mammoths, mastodons and woolly rhinoceroses and the number of early human beings grew between 34,000 and 20,000 years ago. Further south, where the terrain...
  • Mammoth Findings: Asian Elephant Is Closest Living Kin

    01/02/2006 3:57:57 PM PST · by blam · 8 replies · 771+ views
    Science News ^ | 12-24-2005 | Sid Perkins
    Mammoth Findings: Asian elephant is closest living kin Sid Perkins A study of a woolly mammoth that died in Siberia several millennia ago has yielded the complete DNA sequence of the creature's mitochondria, the energy factories of the animal's cells. Comparison with the mitochondrial genomes of living elephants indicates that the mammoth is slightly more closely related to the Asian elephant than to the African elephant. COUSIN HAIRY. A new genetic analysis suggests that the woolly mammoth is more closely related to the Asian elephant than to the African elephant. J. Tucciarone Fossil evidence had suggested that woolly mammoths and...
  • Woolly mammoth genome comes to life (Jurassic Park, here we come)

    12/22/2005 9:33:04 PM PST · by DaveLoneRanger · 65 replies · 3,289+ views
    EurekAlert! ^ | December 22, 2005 | Staff
    Decoding extinct genomes now possible, says geneticist A McMaster University geneticist, in collaboration with genome researchers from Penn State University and the American Museum of Natural History has made history by mapping a portion of the woolly mammoth's genome. The discovery, which has astounded the scientific world, surpasses an earlier study released today by Nature that also concerns the woolly mammoth. Hendrik Poinar, a molecular evolutionary geneticist in the department of anthropology and pathology at McMaster University, says his study involves the vital nuclear DNA within a Mammoth rather than the lesser mitochondria, on which the Nature study is based....
  • Extinct mammoth DNA decoded

    12/18/2005 9:21:33 PM PST · by planetesimal · 51 replies · 1,233+ views
    BBC News ^ | Sunday, 18 December 2005 | Helen Briggs
    Scientists have pieced together part of the genetic recipe of the extinct woolly mammoth. The 5,000 DNA letters spell out the genetic code of its mitochondria, the structures in the cell that generate energy. The research, published in the online edition of Nature, gives an insight into the elephant family tree. It shows that the mammoth was most closely related to the Asian rather than the African elephant. The three groups split from a common ancestor about six million years ago, with Asian elephants and mammoths diverging about half a million years later. "We have finally resolved the phylogeny of...
  • Supernova Storm Wiped Out Mammoths?

    10/04/2005 11:47:27 PM PDT · by planetesimal · 84 replies · 3,723+ views
    Discovery News ^ | 09/28/05 | Jennifer Viegas
    A supernova blast 41,000 years ago started a deadly chain of events that led to the extinction of mammoths and other animals in North America, according to two scientists. If their supernova theory gains acceptance, it could explain why dozens of species on the continent became extinct 13,000 years ago.
  • Mammoth's remains found at homes' construction site(12Ft Fossil far too ancient for carbon dating)

    04/11/2005 11:51:17 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 28 replies · 1,151+ views
    Michael Owen Baker ^ | April 10, 2005 | Michael Owen Baker
    Fossil that stood 12 feet tall is far too ancient for carbon datingMOORPARK, CALIF. - The remarkably well-preserved remnants of an estimated half-million-year-old mammoth — including both tusks — were discovered at a new housing development in Southern California. An onsite paleontologist found the remains, which include 50 percent to 70 percent of the Ice Age creature, as crews cleared away hillsides to prepare for building, Mayor Pro Tem Clint Harper said. Paleontologist Mark Roeder estimated the mammoth was about 12 feet tall, Harper said. Roeder believed it was not a pygmy or imperial mammoth, but he had not yet...
  • Mammoth remains unearthed in California (SoCal - Moorpark)

    04/07/2005 9:28:36 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 52 replies · 1,652+ views
    Monterey Herald ^ | 4/7/05 | AP
    MOORPARK, Calif. - The remarkably well-preserved remnants of an estimated half-million-year-old mammoth - including both tusks - were discovered at a new housing development in Southern California. An onsite paleontologist found the remains, which include 50 percent to 70 percent of the Ice Age creature, as crews cleared away hillsides to prepare for building, Mayor Pro Tem Clint Harper said. Paleontologist Mark Roeder estimated the mammoth was about 12 feet tall, Harper said. Roeder believed it was not a pygmy or imperial mammoth, but he had not yet determined its exact type, Harper said. "It's considered a very significant find,...
  • Md. considers surcharge on mammoth SUVs ($750)

    02/15/2005 8:41:50 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 35 replies · 765+ views
    ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) - Driving a super-sized sport utility vehicle on Maryland roads would cost $750 more a year under a measure being considered by state lawmakers. Delegate Bill Bronrott is promoting the registration renewal surcharge for owners of SUVs that weigh more than 6,000 pounds. "This bill is ... about the largest, heaviest passenger vehicles that are the least fuel efficient and the most toxic to our air, land and water," the Democrat told a House committee hearing Tuesday. SUVs covered by the legislation include the Hummer H2, Cadillac Escalade ESV, Lincoln Navigator and the GMC Yukon XL. "They...
  • Major Resort Hotel to Rise in Mammoth Lakes

    01/07/2005 9:19:27 PM PST · by lainie · 27 replies · 681+ views
    Hotels Magazine/LAT ^ | 1/7/2005 | Roger Vincent
    Developers hoping to turn the homey Eastern Sierra town into an upscale ski resort said Wednesday that construction of the area's first luxury hotel would begin with the spring snowmelt. Intrawest Corp., a Canadian developer that has spent the last 15 years working to remake Mammoth, said it would erect a 230-room, $140-million Westin hotel. It is scheduled to open in the spring of 2007. Dubbed the Westin Monache, the hotel would be the largest in town and the first to bear the nameplate of an upscale hostelry. It is the centerpiece of Intrawest's planned $1-billion makeover of Mammoth. "The...
  • Mammoths stranded on Bering Sea island delayed extinction

    06/17/2004 8:07:34 PM PDT · by ckilmer · 27 replies · 457+ views
    University of Alaska Fairbanks ^ | 16-Jun-2004 | Contact: Marie Gilbert
    Public release date: 16-Jun-2004 Contact: Marie Gilbert marie.gilbert@uaf.edu 907-474-7412 University of Alaska Fairbanks Mammoths stranded on Bering Sea island delayed extinction Fossil is first record in the Americas of a mammoth population to have survived the Pleistocene Woolly mammoths stranded on Pribilofs delayed extinction Fossil is first record in the Americas of a mammoth population to have survived the Pleistocene St. Paul, one of the five islands in the Bering Sea Pribilofs, was home to mammoths that survived the extinctions that wiped out mainland and other Bering Sea island mammoth populations. In an article in the June 17, 2004 edition...
  • Mammoth Herds 'Roamed Fertile Bering Strait In Ice Age'

    06/04/2003 3:39:25 PM PDT · by blam · 96 replies · 2,902+ views
    Ananova ^ | 6-5-2003
    Mammoth herds 'roamed fertile Bering Strait in Ice Age' Huge herds of mammoth, wild horses and bison once roamed the land bridge between North America and Siberia, new evidence suggests. Plant fossils have shown that 24,000 years ago, during the last Ice Age, dry grassland covered much of region. The vegetation would have allowed large populations of mammals to survive all year round on the now-submerged landmass known as Beringia or the Bering Strait. Scientists writing in the journal Nature said the animals would have been sustained by a diet rich in prairie sage, bunch grasses, and other grass-like plants....
  • Ancient dung reveals a picture of the past

    04/23/2003 9:41:25 AM PDT · by SteveH · 37 replies · 814+ views
    ABC Science Online (Australia) ^ | 4/18/03 | Abbie Thomas
    News in Science 18/4/2003 Ancient dung reveals a picture of the past [This is the print version of story http://www.abc.net.au/science/news/stories/s833847.htm] An arctic mound of soil covering a core of solid ice in northeastern Siberia (Pic: Science) The successful dating of the most ancient genetic material yet may allow scientists to use preserved DNA from sources such as mammoth dung to help paint a picture of past environments. An international research effort led by Eske Willerslev of the University of Copenhagen in Denmark reports in today?s issue of the journal Science it has extracted well preserved animal and plant DNA from...