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Keyword: mammoth

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  • Woolly Mammoths Are Coming Back, Say Cloning Scientists

    03/16/2014 10:39:35 AM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 80 replies
    DVICE ^ | March 14, 2014 | Michael Trei
    Woolly mammoths are coming back, say cloning scientists In what sounds like it could be the plot for the next Jurassic Park movie, a team of scientists in Siberia says there's a 'high chance' that they will be able to clone a woolly mammoth. The breakthrough comes as a result of last year's discovery of an incredibly well-preserved mammoth carcass, frozen in the permafrost of Siberia's Malolyakhovskiy island. The scientists estimate that the animal is about 43,000 years old, and was 50-60 years old when it died in distress after getting stuck in the ice. In the ten months since...
  • Wooly Mammoth Mystery Finally Solved?

    02/28/2014 12:56:27 PM PST · by fishtank · 58 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | 2-28-14 | Jake Hebert
    Wooly Mammoth Mystery Finally Solved? by Jake Hebert, Ph.D. * Researchers claim to potentially have solved the mystery of the wooly mammoth’s mass extinction.1 After drilling permafrost cores in Alaska, Canada, and northern Russia, a team led by Eske Willerslev of the University of Copenhagen analyzed DNA remnants of Arctic vegetation within those cores. Based upon their analysis of the cores, they concluded that edible plants called forbs (which include sagebrush, yarrow, and mums) were once much more abundant upon the Arctic steppes. Furthermore, the stomach contents within mammoth and other animal carcasses seem to indicate that the mammoths preferred...
  • The Mammoth Cometh

    02/27/2014 11:44:06 AM PST · by Theoria · 67 replies
    The New York Times ^ | 27 Feb 2014 | NATHANIEL RICH
    Bringing extinct animals back to life is really happening — and it’s going to be very, very cool. Unless it ends up being very, very bad. The first time Ben Novak saw a passenger pigeon, he fell to his knees and remained in that position, speechless, for 20 minutes. He was 16. At 13, Novak vowed to devote his life to resurrecting extinct animals. At 14, he saw a photograph of a passenger pigeon in an Audubon Society book and “fell in love.” But he didn’t know that the Science Museum of Minnesota, which he was then visiting with a...
  • DNA study suggests hunting did not kill off mammoth

    09/11/2013 3:59:46 AM PDT · by Renfield · 54 replies
    BBC News ^ | 9-10-2013 | Pallab Ghosh
    Researchers have found evidence to suggest that climate change, rather than humans, was the main factor that drove the woolly mammoth to extinction. A DNA analysis shows that the number of creatures began to decrease much earlier than previously thought as the world's climate changed. It also shows that there was a distinct population of mammoth in Europe that died out around 30,000 years ago. The results have published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. The view many researchers had about woolly mammoths is that they were a hardy, abundant species that thrived during their time on the...
  • Ancient Siberians may have rarely hunted mammoths

    06/15/2013 9:54:20 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Science News ^ | Wednesday, June 12, 2013 | Bruce Bower
    Contrary to their hunting reputation, Stone Age Siberians killed mammoths only every few years when they needed tusks for toolmaking, a new study finds. People living between roughly 33,500 and 31,500 years ago hunted the animals mainly for ivory, say paleontologist Pavel Nikolskiy and archaeologist Vladimir Pitulko of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Hunting could not have driven mammoths to extinction, the researchers report June 5 in the Journal of Archaeological Science. On frigid tundra with few trees, mammoth tusks substituted for wood as a raw material for tools, they propose. Siberian people ate mammoth meat after hunts, but food...
  • Russian scientists find 'blood' in 10000-year-old mammoth (Rare find boosts chances of cloning)

    06/13/2013 2:18:30 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 32 replies
    San Jose Mercury News ^ | 05/29/2013 | AFP
    <p>MOSCOW — Russian scientists claimed Wednesday they have discovered blood in the carcass of a woolly mammoth, adding that the rare find could boost their chances of cloning the prehistoric animal.</p> <p>An expedition led by Russian scientists earlier this month uncovered the well-preserved carcass of a female mammoth on a remote island in the Arctic Ocean.</p>
  • Russian scientists make rare find of 'blood' in mammoth

    05/29/2013 4:21:52 PM PDT · by dsrtsage · 32 replies
    AP ^ | 5/29/2013
    Russian scientists claimed Wednesday they have discovered blood in the carcass of a woolly mammoth, adding that the rare find could boost their chances of cloning the prehistoric animal. Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-05-russian-scientists-rare-blood-mammoth.html
  • Reviving the Woolly Mammoth: Will De-Extinction Become Reality?

    03/16/2013 2:32:30 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 24 replies
    Yahoo News | Live Science ^ | 3/15/13 | Megan Gannon
    Biologists briefly brought the extinct Pyrenean ibex back to life in 2003 by creating a clone from a frozen tissue sample harvested before the goat's entire population vanished in 2000. The clone survived just seven minutes after birth, but it gave scientists hope that "de-extinction," once a pipedream, could become a reality. Ten years later, a group of researchers and conservationists gathered in Washington, D.C., today (March 15) for a forum called TEDxDeExtinction, hosted by the National Geographic Society, to talk about how to revive extinct animals, from the Tasmanian tiger and the saber-toothed tiger to the woolly mammoth and...
  • World’s Earliest Figurative Sculpture - Ice Age Lion Man (40,000 Year-Old Mammoth Ivory Statue)

    02/08/2013 8:19:54 PM PST · by DogByte6RER · 20 replies
    The Art Newspaper ^ | Saturday 9 Feb 2013 | The Art Newspaper
    Ice Age Lion Man is world’s earliest figurative sculpture • Work carved from mammoth ivory has been redated and 1,000 new fragments discovered—but it won’t make it to British Museum show The star exhibit initially promised for the British Museum’s “Ice Age Art” show will not be coming—but for a good reason. New pieces of Ulm’s Lion Man sculpture have been discovered and it has been found to be much older than originally thought, at around 40,000 years. This makes it the world’s earliest figurative sculpture. At the London exhibition, which opens on 7 February, a replica from the Ulm...
  • Boy discovers almost complete woolly mammoth carcass

    10/04/2012 12:47:07 PM PDT · by Renfield · 22 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 10-4-2012 | Joanna Carver
    An 11-year-old Russian boy stumbled across the 30,000-year-old remains of a woolly mammoth, an experience that was surely either incredibly exciting or permanently traumatising. According to the Moscow News, Yevgeny Salinder found the 500-kilogram beast in the tundra of the Taymyr peninsula in northern Russia. Scientists laboured for a week with axes and steam to dig it out of the permafrost it's been encased in for centuries. Woolly mammoths have been found in the permafrost in Siberia since at least 1929, but this is one of the best preserved. Its tusks, mouth and rib cage are clearly visible....
  • Mammoth fragments raise cloning hopes

    09/15/2012 11:44:55 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    Telegraph (UK) ^ | Tuesday, September 11, 2012 | AP
    Well-preserved frozen woolly mammoth fragments have been discovered deep in Siberia that may contain living cells, edging a tad closer to the possibility of cloning a prehistoric animal, the mission's organiser has said. Russia's North-Eastern Federal University said an international team of researchers had discovered mammoth hair, soft tissues and bone marrow some 328 feet (100 meters) underground during a summer expedition in the northeastern province of Yakutia. Expedition chief Semyon Grigoryev said Korean scientists with the team had set a goal of finding living cells in the hope of cloning a mammoth. Scientists have previously found bones and fragments...
  • Mammoth tooth found at Transbay dig

    09/13/2012 1:22:15 AM PDT · by thecodont · 11 replies
    San Francisco Chronicle / SFGate.com ^ | Updated 10:55 p.m., Wednesday, September 12, 2012 | Michael Cabanatuan
    A seemingly ordinary day at the Transbay Transit Center construction site became a mammoth day of discovery Monday when a mild-mannered crane operator reached deep into the earth and pulled out a tooth. This was no ordinary tooth. The 10-inch-long brown, black and beige chomper, broken in two and missing a chunk, once belonged to a woolly mammoth, an elephantine creature that roamed the grassy valley that's now San Francisco Bay 10 million to 15 million years ago in the Pleistocene epoch. Other woolly mammoth fossils have been found in the Bay Area, including in San Francisco about 2 miles...
  • Humans Did Not Kill Off Mammoths; Comet, Climate Change Helped, Studies Show

    06/12/2012 7:03:32 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 115 replies
    Indian Country Today ^ | June 13, 2012 | ICTMN Staff
    Although human hunting played a part in the demise of the woolly mammoth about 10,000 years ago, homo sapiens were but bit players in a global drama involving climate change, comet impact and a multitude of other factors, scientists have found in separate studies. Previous research had blamed their demise on tribal hunting. But new findings “pretty much dispel the idea of any one factor, any one event, as dooming the mammoths,” said Glen MacDonald, a researcher and geographer at the University of California in Los Angeles, to LiveScience.com. In other words, hunting didn’t help, but it was not instrumental....
  • Perfectly Preserved Woolly Mammoth Discovered in Siberia

    04/05/2012 10:22:55 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 11 replies
    Yahoo! News ^ | April 5, 2012 | Melissa Knowles
    Scientists in search of ancient tusks made a startling discovery. They uncovered the nearly perfectly preserved remains of a woolly mammoth in northern Siberia. The juvenile mammoth is believed to be more than 10,000 years old, but was only 3 to 4 years old when it died. It is unlike any other mammoth that has been unearthed before. The scientists reveal their discovery, which they named "Yuka," in a BBC documentary. Yuka has strawberry blond hair, unlike the dark hair that other mammoths have been found to have. Plus, Yuka's footpads are incredibly well preserved, but some of his bones...
  • Clovis Comet Gets Second Look

    04/06/2012 9:21:52 AM PDT · by baynut · 17 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | March 16, 2012 | Matt Ridley
    Scientists, it's said, behave more like lawyers than philosophers. They do not so much test their theories as prosecute their cases, seeking supportive evidence and ignoring data that do not fit—a failing known as confirmation bias. They then accuse their opponents of doing the same thing. This is what makes debates over nature and nurture, dietary fat and climate change so polarized. But just because the prosecutor is biased in favor of his case does not mean the defendant is innocent. Sometimes biased advocates are right. An example of this phenomenon is now being played out in geology over the...
  • Young Mammoth Likely Butchered by Humans

    04/04/2012 3:32:01 PM PDT · by Renfield · 16 replies
    Discovery News ^ | 4-4-2012 | Jennifer Viegas
    A juvenile mammoth, nicknamed "Yuka," was found entombed in Siberian ice near the shores of the Arctic Ocean and shows signs of being cut open by ancient people. The remarkably well preserved frozen carcass was discovered in Siberia as part of a BBC/Discovery Channel-funded expedition and is believed to be at least 10,000 years old, if not older. If further study confirms the preliminary findings, it would be the first mammoth carcass revealing signs of human interaction in the region. The carcass is in such good shape that much of its flesh is still intact, retaining its pink color. The...
  • Well preserved mammoth from Siberia shows signs of early man stealing from lions

    04/05/2012 7:24:06 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 21 replies
    http://www.physorg.com ^ | 04-05-2012 | Bob Yirka
    An exceedingly well preserved juvenile mammoth carcass has been found in Siberia near the Arctic Ocean and it shows signs of having been attacked by a cave lion and then partially butchered by humans. Dubbed Yuka by the Mammuthus organization, which is studying the remains, the six foot long creature was believed to have been a year and a half to perhaps three or four years old at the time of its death. The mammoth was found by tusk hunters in Northern Siberia, who then turned it over to scientists with the Mammuthus organization. The BBC and Discovery have been...
  • Preserved in the ice for 10,000 years: Ginger-haired baby mammoth shows signs of death struggle

    04/04/2012 2:45:19 PM PDT · by C19fan · 29 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | April 4, 2012 | Rob Waugh
    A ginger-haired mammoth baby found in Siberia could have been snatched by hungry human hunters from the jaws of a lion 10,000 years ago. The body of the beast - the first ever found with its distinctive 'strawberry blonde' hair - has been described as being of 'huge' significance. It's could be evidence that ancient humans attacked and fed on mammoths in Siberia, with the body of 'Yuka' showing wounds consistent with an attack by lions AND people.
  • New evidence supporting extraterrestrial impact at the start of the Younger Dryas

    03/12/2012 4:54:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies · 1+ views
    Watts Up With That 'blog ^ | Monday, March 12, 2012 | Anthony Watts
    We report the discovery in Lake Cuitzeo in central Mexico of a black, carbon-rich, lacustrine layer, containing nanodiamonds, microspherules, and other unusual materials that date to the early Younger Dryas and are interpreted to result from an extraterrestrial impact. These proxies were found in a 27-m-long core as part of an interdisciplinary effort to extract a paleoclimate record back through the previous interglacial. Our attention focused early on an anomalous, 10-cm-thick, carbon-rich layer at a depth of 2.8 m that dates to 12.9 ka and coincides with a suite of anomalous coeval environmental and biotic changes independently recognized in other...
  • Pterosaur-like Creatures Reported in Papua New Guinea

    07/20/2006 7:42:59 PM PDT · by DaveLoneRanger · 309 replies · 16,006+ views
    E-Media Newswire ^ | July 20, 2006 | Staff
    Intermittent expeditions on Umboi Island, Papua New Guinea, from 1994 through 2004, resulted in the compilation of eyewitness testimonies that substantiated a hypothesis that pterosaurs may not be extinct. Long Beach, Calif. (PRWEB) July 20, 2006 -- The conflict between evolution and creation took a new form with an investigation of reports of a pterosaur-like creature in Papua New Guinea. According to standard models of science, all pterosaurs became extinct by about 65-million years ago, but traditional interpretations of the Bible suggest that they lived in human times. According to Jonathan Whitcomb, a forensic videographer who interviewed native islanders in...
  • A Real-Life Jurassic Park

    01/31/2006 8:22:33 AM PST · by Calpernia · 31 replies · 1,333+ views
    MSNBC ^ | Jan. 30, 2006 | Mac Margolis
    (snip) Most scholars now agree that hunters—more than climate change or a mystery epidemic—are what doomed the mammoths. Whatever the cause, by 11,000 years ago the king of the Pleistocene was a goner. (snip) If a group of devotees has its way, this shaggy ice-age mascot—and a host of other bygone megafauna besides—may yet walk again. (snip) The scientists, in other words, had managed to assemble half the woolly-mammoth genome; they claimed that in three years they could finish the job. That would put scientists within striking distance of an even greater feat: repopulating the earth with creatures that vanished...
  • Pleistocene Park? On the reintroduction of species

    08/20/2005 2:15:44 PM PDT · by sociotard · 30 replies · 796+ views
    NewScientist.com ^ | 17 August 2005 | Kurt Kleiner
    Sorry if this is a repost. Elephants and lions unleashed on North America? 18:00 17 August 2005 NewScientist.com news service Kurt Kleiner Elephants, lions, cheetahs and camels could one day roam the western US under a proposal to recreate North American landscapes as they existed more than 13,000 years ago, when humans first encountered them. The plan, proposed in a commentary in Nature and co-authored by 13 ecologists and conservation biologists, would help enrich a North American ecosystem that was left almost devoid of large mammals at the end of the Pleistocene period. It would also help preserve wildlife that...
  • Call to restock North America’s large mammals (Lions, Tigers,Bears Alert)

    08/17/2005 10:56:34 AM PDT · by 11th_VA · 109 replies · 1,897+ views
    NewScientist.com ^ | 18:00 17 August 2005 | Kurt Kleiner
    Elephants, lions, cheetahs and camels could one day roam the western US under a proposal to recreate North American landscapes as they existed more than 13,000 years ago, when humans first encountered them. The plan, proposed in a commentary in Nature and co-authored by 13 ecologists and conservation biologists, would help enrich a North American ecosystem that was left almost devoid of large mammals at the end of the Pleistocene period. It would also help preserve wildlife that faces the threat of extinction in Africa and Asia. Between 50,000 and 10,000 years ago, 97 of 150 genera of large mammals...
  • Ice age bacteria brought back to life

    02/25/2005 12:57:59 PM PST · by aimhigh · 108 replies · 2,309+ views
    www.NewScientist.com ^ | 2/25/2005 | Kelly Young
    A bacterium that sat dormant in a frozen pond in Alaska for 32,000 years has been revived by NASA scientists. Once scientists thawed the ice, the previously undiscovered bacteria started swimming around on the microscope slide. The researchers say it is the first new species of microbe found alive in ancient ice. Now named Carnobacterium pleistocenium, it is thought to have lived in the Pleistocene epoch, a time when woolly mammoths still roamed the Earth. NASA astrobiologist Richard Hoover, who led the team, said the find bolsters the case for finding life elsewhere in the universe, particularly given this week's...
  • Uncovering Ice Age Archaeology In Jordan

    08/24/2004 8:05:50 AM PDT · by blam · 11 replies · 506+ views
    Daily Star ^ | 8-24-2004 | Staff
    Uncovering Ice Age archaeology in JordanEarly humans hunted large game near now-vanished lakes By Daily Star Staff Tuesday, August 24, 2004 AMMAN: The early prehistory and archaeology of the Middle Pleistocene, or Ice Age, is being revealed in remarkable detail in studies in southern Jordan. The work, begun in the late 1990s, has documented the presence of Homo erectus, our ancient ancestor, at a series of archaeological sites at Ayoun Qedim in the al-Jafr Basin. Today al-Jafr Basin is one of the most arid places in the Middle East. During the Pleistocene, the basin was filled with an enormous freshwater...
  • Mammoth Mystery: The Beasts' Final Years

    09/04/2008 10:42:29 AM PDT · by decimon · 25 replies · 304+ views
    Live Science ^ | Sep 4, 2008 | Charles Q. Choi
    Woolly mammoths' last stand before extinction in Siberia wasn't made by natives - rather, the beasts had American roots, researchers have discovered. Woolly mammoths once roamed the Earth for more than a half-million years, ranging from Europe to Asia to North America. These Ice Age giants vanished from mainland Siberia by 9,000 years ago, although mammoths survived on Wrangel Island in the Arctic Ocean until roughly 3,700 years ago. "Scientists have always thought that because mammoths roamed such a huge territory - from Western Europe to Central North America - that North American woolly mammoths were a sideshow of no...
  • LIVE Woolly Mammoth Spotted in Siberia (video/pic)

    02/10/2012 1:56:59 AM PST · by Reaganite Republican · 36 replies
    Reaganite Republican ^ | February 10, 2012 | Reaganite Republican
    Scepitical? Look at the clip and you tell me Red furry coat, giant tusks... elephants of any sort not native to the region, either! The Siberian Woolly Mammoth -which we are taught disappeared abruptly at the end of the last Ice Age (~8000 B.C.)- has long been a source of fascination, as on occasion examples are found in a highly-preserved, mummified state under the Arctic territory's thick layer of permafrost.  Similar in appearance to a modern elephant, the Mammoth was actually only slightly larger (~3m at the shoulder) yet with a shorter trunk, longer tusks, ears only 10% the size of their contemporary brethren,...
  • 'Woolly mammoth' spotted in Siberia

    02/08/2012 2:52:34 PM PST · by Red Badger · 139 replies
    The Sun - UK ^ | Wed Feb 08, 2012 | Staff
    A BEAST lurches through icy waters in a sighting a paranormal investigator thinks could prove woolly mammoths are not extinct after all. The animal – thought to have mostly died out roughly 4,000 years ago – was apparently filmed wading through a river in the freezing wilds of Siberia. The jaw-dropping footage was caught by a government-employed engineer last summer in the Chukotka Autonomous Okrug region of Siberia, it is claimed. He filmed the elephant-sized creature as it struggled against the racing water. Its hair matches samples recovered from mammoth remains regularly dug up from the permafrost in frozen Russia....
  • Mammoth Mummies Mysteries

    12/10/2011 8:32:01 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies · 1+ views
    Scientific American 'blogs ^ | December 8, 2011 | David Bressan
    Natural mummies can be preserved in bog deposits, in tar pits, deep inside caves, glacier ice or permafrost -- an environment too cold for an effective decomposition of organic matter. At least 16 species of ice age mammals have been found mummified complete or partially: woolly mammoth, Shasta-, Jefferson´s- and Patagonian ground sloth, woolly rhinoceros, Yukon horse, steppe bison, helmeted muskox, Harrington´s mountain goat, caribou, giant moose, black-footed ferret, collared pika, snowshoe hare, arctic ground squirrel and vole. The ground sloths and mountain goats were found inside of caves. The woolly rhinoceros and mammoth of Starunia (Ukraine) became "pickled" in...
  • Neandertals' mammoth building project: Extinct hominids may have been first to build with bones

    12/07/2011 8:13:47 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies · 1+ views
    Science News ^ | Friday, December 2nd, 2011 | Bruce Bower
    Neandertals... constructed a large, ring-shaped enclosure out of 116 mammoth bones and tusks at least 44,000 years ago in West Asia, say archaeologist Laëtitia Demay of the National Museum of Natural History in Paris and her colleagues. The bone edifice, which encircles a 40-square-meter area in which mammoths and other animals were butchered, cooked and eaten, served either to keep out cold winds or as a base for a wooden building... Mammoth-bone huts previously discovered at Homo sapiens sites in West Asia date to between 27,500 and 15,000 years ago. The new discovery comes from Molodova, a Ukrainian site first...
  • Woolly Mammoth to Be Cloned

    12/06/2011 12:40:09 PM PST · by Fractal Trader · 69 replies
    Discovery News ^ | 5 December 2011 | Jennifer Viegas
    Within five years, a woolly mammoth will likely be cloned, according to scientists who have just recovered well-preserved bone marrow in a mammoth thigh bone. Japan's Kyodo News first reported the find. You can see photos of the thigh bone at this Kyodo page. Russian scientist Semyon Grigoriev, acting director of the Sakha Republic's mammoth museum, and colleagues are now analyzing the marrow, which they extracted from the mammoth's femur, found in Siberian permafrost soil. Grigoriev and his team, along with colleagues from Japan's Kinki University, have announced that they will launch a joint research project next year aimed at...
  • Smithsonian does not dispute authenticity of archaeological find in Vero Beach [13K old]

    10/26/2010 8:40:44 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Indian River County ^ | Wednesday, October 20, 2010 | Elliott Jones
    The Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., has found no reason to dispute the authenticity of an one-of-a-kind archaeological discovery that might help confirm a human presence here up to 13,000 years ago at the end of the last Ice Age. In early 2009, local fossil collector James Kennedy cleaned off an old bone he found two years earlier and noticed some lines on it -- lines that turned out to be a clear etching of a walking mammoth with tusks. The location where he found it hasn't been disclosed, except that it came from an area north of Vero Beach....
  • Scientists reveal a first in Ice Age art

    06/21/2011 11:16:04 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 66 replies
    PhysOrg.com ^ | 06-21-2011 | Provided by Smithsonian
    Researchers from the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Florida have announced the discovery of a bone fragment, approximately 13,000 years old, in Florida with an incised image of a mammoth or mastodon. This engraving is the oldest and only known example of Ice Age art to depict a proboscidean (the order of animals with trunks) in the Americas. The team's research is published online in the Journal of Archaeological Science. The bone was discovered in Vero Beach, Fla. by James Kennedy, an avocational fossil hunter, who collected the bone and later while cleaning the bone, discovered the engraving. Recognizing...
  • Woolly mammoth's secrets for shrugging off cold points toward new artificial blood for humans

    09/14/2011 8:55:20 AM PDT · by decimon · 17 replies
    American Chemical Society ^ | September 14, 2011 | Unknown
    The blood from woolly mammoths—those extinct elephant-like creatures that roamed the Earth in pre-historic times—is helping scientists develop new blood products for modern medical procedures that involve reducing patients' body temperature. The report appears in ACS' journal Biochemistry. Chien Ho and colleagues note that woolly mammoth ancestors initially evolved in warm climates, where African and Asian elephants live now, but migrated to the cold regions of Eurasia 1.2 million – 2.0 million years ago in the Pleistocene ice age. They adapted to their new environment by growing thick, "woolly" fur and smaller ears, which helped conserve heat, and possibly by...
  • Reindeer Herder Finds Baby Mammoth in Russia Arctic

    08/19/2011 5:44:20 PM PDT · by FrogMom · 78 replies
    Reuters ^ | Aug 19, 2011 | Alissa de Carbonnel
    A reindeer herder in Russia's Arctic has stumbled on the pre-historic remains of a baby woolly mammoth poking out of the permafrost, local officials said on Friday.
  • Remains of 60th mammoth found in Hot Springs; Mammoth Site could hold as many as 100

    07/10/2011 9:52:05 PM PDT · by ApplegateRanch · 31 replies
    Daily Journal ^ | July 10, 2011 | none listed
    The Mammoth Site in Hot Springs recently yielded the remains of a 60th mammoth, the giant, extinct creatures that once roamed the continent. [just a teaser--AP story]
  • Protein from Bones of 600,000-Year-Old Mammoth Extracted Successfully

    06/14/2011 4:30:01 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | June 4, 2011 | University of York
    Using an ultra-high resolution mass spectrometer, bio-archaeologists were able to produce a near complete collagen sequence for the West Runton Elephant, a Steppe Mammoth skeleton which was discovered in cliffs in Norfolk in 1990. The remarkable 85 per cent complete skeleton -- the most complete example of its species ever found in the world -- is preserved by Norfolk Museums and Archaeology Service in Norwich. Bio-archaeologist Professor Matthew Collins, from the University of York's Department of Archaeology, said: "The time depth is absolutely remarkable... We believe protein lasts in a useful form ten times as long as DNA which is...
  • Researchers solve mammoth evolutionary puzzle: The woollies weren't picky, happy to interbreed

    05/30/2011 5:45:00 PM PDT · by decimon · 40 replies
    McMaster University ^ | May 30, 2011 | Unknown
    A DNA-based study sheds new light on the complex evolutionary history of the woolly mammoth, suggesting it mated with a completely different and much larger species. The research, which appears in the BioMed Central's open access journal Genome Biology, found the woolly mammoth, which lived in the cold climate of the Arctic tundra, interbred with the Columbian mammoth, which preferred the more temperate regions of North America and was some 25 per cent larger. "There is a real fascination with the history of mammoths, and this analysis helps to contextualize its evolution, migration and ecology" says Hendrik Poinar, associate professor...
  • West Runton Elephant helps unlock the past

    03/30/2011 8:41:23 AM PDT · by decimon · 12 replies
    University of York ^ | March 30, 2011 | Unknown
    Researchers from the University of York and Manchester have successfully extracted protein from the bones of a 600,000 year old mammoth, paving the way for the identification of ancient fossils.Using an ultra-high resolution mass spectrometer, bio-archaeologists were able to produce a near complete collagen sequence for the West Runton Elephant, a Steppe Mammoth skeleton which was discovered in cliffs in Norfolk in 1990. The remarkable 85 per cent complete skeleton – the most complete example of its species ever found in the world - is preserved by Norfolk Museums and Archaeology Service in Norwich. Bio-archaeologist Professor Matthew Collins, from the...
  • Mammoth remains discovered near Castroville

    03/25/2011 4:00:12 AM PDT · by csvset · 14 replies
    The bones of a juvenile Ice Age Columbian mammoth have been found in a field near Castroville, the first discovery of its kind in Monterey County. The remains were uncovered by earthmoving equipment in December, said Mark Hylkema, Santa Cruz District archaeologist for the state Department of Parks. The precise location of the find is being kept under wraps to discourage souvenir hunters from damaging, looting or contaminating the site. Hylkema has specialized in the study of Native American culture on the Central Coast. He is recommending that a controlled excavation of the site be done "with a particular goal...
  • Archeologists Say They've Found Mammoth Bones in Monterey County (California)

    03/23/2011 11:12:53 PM PDT · by SteveH · 11 replies
    KION TV 46 ^ | Mar 22, 2011
    Archeologist says Mammoth Bones Discovered On Central Coast MONTEREY COUNTY, Calif. - The chances of finding mammoth fossils on the Central Coast are very likely. Experts say mammoth skeletons have been found throughout the state, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, the Channel Islands, and the Central Valley. "There have been small finds of teeth and tusks. We do have a tusk at the museum," said Annie Holdren, Pacific Grove Museum Curator. But no "find" like the mammoth bones that were found somewhere in Monterey County three weeks ago. Mark Hylkema, Archaeologist with California State Parks, told Central Coast News his team...
  • The earliest rock art engraving of an American mammoth?

    02/21/2011 9:30:31 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    Stone Pages ^ | http://www.stonepages.com/news/archives/004237.html | Edited from NatGeo News Watch
    On a cliff overlooking the floodplain of the San Juan River (Utah, USA), rock art specialists Ekkehart Malotki and Henry Wallace have examined several highly stylized images carved into the rock face including what they believe to be the first example of prehistoric Native American rock art to show a mammoth. While such images are common in the caves of Europe, they are surprisingly unknown in the New World.
  • Did the ancient Egyptians know of pygmy mammoths? Well, there is that tomb painting.

    01/20/2011 6:38:56 AM PST · by Palter · 31 replies
    Tetrapod Zoology ^ | 19 Jan 2011 | Darren Naish
    One of the things that came up in the many comments appended to the article on Bob's painting of extinct Maltese animals was the famous Egyptian tomb painting of the 'pygmy mammoth'. You're likely already familiar with this (now well known) case: here's the image, as it appears on the beautifully decorated tomb wall of Rekhmire, 'Governor of the Town' of Thebes, and vizier of Egypt during the reigns of Tuthmose III and Amenhotep II (c. 1479 to 1401 BCE) during the XVIII dynasty... In 1994, Baruch Rosen published a brief article in Nature in which he drew attention to...
  • Researchers aim to resurrect Mammoth in five years

    01/18/2011 8:21:13 AM PST · by Scythian · 48 replies
    TOKYO (AFP) – Japanese researchers will launch a project this year to resurrect the long-extinct mammoth by using cloning technology to bring the ancient pachyderm back to life in around five years time. The researchers will try to revive the species by obtaining tissue this summer from the carcass of a mammoth preserved in a Russian research laboratory, the Yomiuri Shimbun reported. "Preparations to realise this goal have been made," Akira Iritani, leader of the team and a professor emeritus of Kyoto University, told the mass-circulation daily. Under the plan, the nuclei of mammoth cells will be inserted into an...
  • Researchers aim to resurrect mammoth in five years

    01/17/2011 7:17:28 PM PST · by Germanicus Cretorian · 62 replies
    Yahoo/AFP ^ | Jan. 17 | Shingo Ito
    Japanese researchers will launch a project this year to resurrect the long-extinct mammoth by using cloning technology to bring the ancient pachyderm back to life in around five years time. The researchers will try to revive the species by obtaining tissue this summer from the carcass of a mammoth preserved in a Russian research laboratory, the Yomiuri Shimbun reported. "Preparations to realise this goal have been made," Akira Iritani, leader of the team and a professor emeritus of Kyoto University, told the mass-circulation daily. Under the plan, the nuclei of mammoth cells will be inserted into an elephant's egg cell...
  • Mammoth 'could be reborn in four years'

    01/14/2011 12:08:20 AM PST · by bogusname · 33 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 13 Jan 2011 | Julian Ryall
    The woolly mammoth, extinct for thousands of years, could be brought back to life in as little as four years thanks to a breakthrough in cloning technology.
  • Mammoth 'could be reborn in four years'

    01/13/2011 7:32:15 PM PST · by Nachum · 81 replies
    Telegraph [UK] ^ | 1/13/11 | Julian Ryall
    The woolly mammoth, extinct for thousands of years, could be brought back to life in as little as four years thanks to a breakthrough in cloning technology. Previous efforts in the 1990s to recover nuclei in cells from the skin and muscle tissue from mammoths found in the Siberian permafrost failed because they had been too badly damaged by the extreme cold. But a technique pioneered in 2008 by Dr. Teruhiko Wakayama, of the Riken Centre for Developmental Biology, was successful in cloning a mouse from the cells of another mouse that had been frozen for 16 years.
  • African elephant is two species, researchers say

    12/21/2010 6:00:58 PM PST · by decimon · 14 replies
    BBC ^ | December 21, 2010 | Richard Black
    Genetic researchers may have resolved a long-standing dispute by proving there are two species of African elephant.Savannah and forest elephants have been separated for at least three million years, they say, and are as distinct from each other as Asian elephants are from the extinct woolly mammoth. The researchers also made what they say are the first sequences of nuclear DNA from the extinct American mastodon. > "The divergence of the two species took place around the time of the divergence of the Asian elephant and woolly mammoths," said Michi Hofreiter, a specialist in ancient DNA at the UK's York...
  • Ski on July 4 Weekend. Seriously.

    06/30/2010 11:21:47 PM PDT · by Berlin_Freeper · 6 replies
    New York Times ^ | June 30, 2010 | MONICA DRAKE
    When most skiers think of slopes to try come July, Chile and Argentina come to mind. But this year, a couple of ski resorts that don’t require a passport are taking advantage of the buckets of snow that fell this winter to extend their seasons through July 4 weekend. Mammoth resort in California is making a virtue of the snow and sun by offering a ski, bike and golf package — yes, all in one day — for $99. Or, if three activities in one day is too much for you, Mammoth is offering a ski and golf package for...
  • Next stop France for oldest baby mammoth

    06/26/2010 10:43:31 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Yahoo ^ | Monday, June 21, 2010 | Patrick Filleux (AFP)
    Name: Khoma. Looks like: A baby mammoth. Age: somewhere above 50,000 years. Discovered in the permafrost of northern Siberia just last year, this rare example of prehistoric monster is on its way to Paris to be analysed, treated for the germs it's harbouring and eventually placed on display... Khoma is the eldest of six baby mammoths found in Siberia over the past 200 years, said Bernard Buigues, a noted French expert on the herbivores who works in close collaboration with Russian authorities... "It wasn't possible to use carbon 14 to date it, which means it's more than 50,000 years old...