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Keyword: marysettegast

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  • Petroglyph in Spain Marks when Atlantic and Mediterranean Cultures Met

    10/06/2015 6:17:04 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 36 replies
    popular-archaeology.com ^ | Mon, Oct 05, 2015 | Staff
    Bronze Age rock carving depicts a Mediterranean style boat. Above: A graphic representation of the Auga dos Cebros petroglyph, showing the obvious boat feature at the bottom. This image is a screenshot of the same as depicted in the YouTube video (see below). =================================================================================================================== A unique petroglyph discovered near the Atlantic coast of northern Spain has provided evidence that contacts between ancient Atlantic cultures and contemporaneous cultures of the Mediterranean were earlier and perhaps more intense than previously thought. The rock art panel, located in the Costa dos Castros region and known as Auga dos Cebros, depicts a boat with...
  • How Neanderthals met a grisly fate: devoured by humans

    05/17/2009 3:55:56 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 65 replies · 2,058+ views
    Guardian ^ | 5/17/09 | Robin McKie
    A fossil discovery bears marks of butchering similar to those made when cutting up a deerOne of science's most puzzling mysteries - the disappearance of the Neanderthals - may have been solved. Modern humans ate them, says a leading fossil expert. The controversial suggestion follows publication of a study in the Journal of Anthropological Sciences about a Neanderthal jawbone apparently butchered by modern humans. Now the leader of the research team says he believes the flesh had been eaten by humans, while its teeth may have been used to make a necklace.
  • Neanderthals in Color

    05/06/2012 7:48:57 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 52 replies
    Archaeology, v65, n3 ^ | May/June 2012 | Zach Zorich
    In 1981, when Wil Roebroeks of Leiden University was beginning his archaeological career, he ran across some red stains in the grayish sediments on the floodplain of the Maas River where his team was excavating. The site, called Maastricht-Belvčdčre, in The Netherlands, was occupied by Neanderthals at least 200,000 years ago. Roebroeks collected and stored samples of the red stains, and 30 years later he received funding to analyze them. It became apparent that he and his team had discovered the earliest evidence of hominins using the mineral iron oxide, also known as ocher. Until now, the use of...
  • New Lemnian Inscription

    12/28/2014 11:18:54 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 39 replies
    Rasenna Blog ^ | December 1, 2010 | rwallace
    A new Lemnian inscription was discovered recently during excavation of an ancient sanctuary at Efestia on the island of Lemnos. The inscription was incised in two lines on the upper portion of a rectangular altar measuring 50 cm. in length and 13.05 cm. in height (see photograph below). The direction of writing is boustrophedon. The upper line reads from left-to-right, the lower line from right-to-left. The inscription has 26 letters plus punctuation marks in the form of three vertically-aligned points separating words. The transcription provided below is that given by de Simone (2009). The letter âi (= palatal sibilant) is...
  • Kerala's possible Mediterranean links unearthed by researchers

    03/19/2010 4:28:26 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies · 320+ views
    Business Ghana ^ | March 9th 2010 | GNA
    A wide range of megalithic burials recently discovered in some northern districts of Kerala during a research project have thrown light on possible links between the Mediterranean and Kerala coasts in the prehistoric stone age that occurred between 6000 BC and 2000 BC. The researchers, however, say further studies and analysis are required to establish the thesis. Interestingly, the finds were unearthed at a time when the researchers have firmly established the maritime links between the Mediterranean region with Kerala since ancient times... The recent study was done by V P Devadas, principal investigator, as part of a project of...
  • Runestone hits the road with U-Haul (MN)

    05/28/2011 11:35:08 PM PDT · by ButThreeLeftsDo · 18 replies
    StarTribune.com ^ | 5/28/22 | Kelly Smith
    A controversial Minnesota artifact is making a name for itself across the country in its next biggest publicity move. The Kensington Runestone, which was unearthed in Minnesota but has been long disputed as a hoax, will now be featured on 2,300 20-foot moving trucks across the country. U-Haul unveiled the image Saturday morning at the Alexandria museum that houses the stone during the city's "Awake the Lakes" celebration. About 1,000 people celebrated the announcement at the Runestone Museum with T-shirts and a truck depicting the stone behind a large Vikings ship -- the fourth image representing Minnesota on the company's...
  • Seafaring in the Aegean: new dates

    03/02/2012 6:23:34 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Stone Pages ^ | January 21, 2012 | Journal of Archaeological Science
    Seafaring before the Neolithic -- circa 7th millennium BCE -- is a controversial issue in the Mediterranean. However, evidence from different parts of the Aegean is gradually changing this, revealing the importance of early coastal and island environments. The site of Ouriakos on the island of Lemnos (Greece) tentatively dates to the end of the Pleistocene and possibly the beginning of the Holocene, circa 12,000 BP... Obsidian, or 'volcanic glass', has been a preferred material for stone tools wherever it is found or traded. It also absorbs water vapour when exposed to air -- for instance, when it is shaped...
  • Humans worked the Welsh hills 10,000 years ago

    06/17/2009 4:26:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies · 816+ views
    News Wales ^ | Wednesday, June 17, 2009 | unattributed
    Hunters and farmers were using the Clwydian Hills in North Wales 10,000 years ago, new research has revealed. Analysis of a sample of earth extracted from the Clwydian Range has pieced together the timeline of human activity on the hills dating back almost 10,000 years. The sample was taken from Moel Llys y Coed near Cilcain, to provide a picture for the change in the landscape over the years to become the heather moorland seen today... Techniques used included analysis of the pollen present in the sample and radio carbon dating. Evidence of burning in the Mesolithic period (8000-4000BC) implies...
  • Animal Connection: New Hypothesis for Human Evolution and Human Nature

    07/23/2010 3:11:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies · 1+ views
    ScienceDaily ^ | July 20, 2010 | adapted from Penn State material written by Kevin Stacey
    It's no secret to any dog-lover or cat-lover that humans have a special connection with animals.... paleoanthropologist Pat Shipman of Penn State University argues that this human-animal connection goes well beyond simple affection. Shipman proposes that the interdependency of ancestral humans with other animal species... played a crucial and beneficial role in human evolution over the last 2.6 million years... "Having sharp tools transformed wimpy human ancestors into effective predators who left many cut marks on the fossilized bones of their prey," Shipman said. Becoming a predator also put our ancestors into direct competition with other carnivores for carcasses and...
  • A Turkish origin for Indo-European languages

    08/24/2012 8:04:40 AM PDT · by Renfield · 43 replies
    Nature.com ^ | 8-23-2012 | Alyssa Joyce
    Languages as diverse as English, Russian and Hindi can trace their roots back more than 8,000 years to Anatolia — now in modern-day Turkey. That's the conclusion of a study1 that assessed 103 ancient and contemporary languages using a technique normally used to study the evolution and spread of disease. The researchers hope that their findings can settle a long-running debate about the origins of the Indo-European language group...
  • 9500 year old obsidian bracelet shows exceptional craft skills

    12/29/2011 10:36:07 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 74 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | Tuesday, December 27, 2011 | LTDS press release
    Researchers have analysed the oldest obsidian bracelet ever identified, discovered in the 1990s at the site of Asikli Höyük, Turkey. A high level of technical expertise Using high-tech methods developed by LTDS to study the bracelet's surface and micro-topographic features, the researchers have revealed the astounding technical expertise of craftsmen in the eighth millennium BCE. Their skills were highly sophisticated for this period in late prehistory, and on a par with today's polishing techniques. This work is published in the December 2011 issue of Journal of Archaeological Science, and sheds new light on Neolithic societies. Dated to 7500 BCE, the...
  • In Ruin, Symbols on a Stone Hint at a Lost Asian Culture

    05/25/2011 6:02:59 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    New York Times ^ | May 13, 2001 | John Noble Wilford
    In an unexpected benefit of the cold war's end, Russian and American archaeologists say they have discovered an ancient civilization that thrived in Central Asia more than 4,000 years ago, before being lost in the sweep of history. The people of that area, the archaeologists say, built oasis settlements with imposing mud-brick buildings and fortifications. They herded sheep and goats and grew wheat and barley in irrigated fields. They had bronze axes, fine ceramics, alabaster and bone carvings and jewelry of gold and semiprecious stones. They left luxury goods in the graves of an elite class. The accomplishments of those...
  • Hunting for the Dawn of Writing, When Prehistory Became History

    10/30/2010 7:17:25 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    New York Times ^ | October 19, 2010 | Geraldine Fabrikant
    One of the stars of the Oriental Institute's new show, "Visible Language: Inventions of Writing in the Ancient Middle East and Beyond," is a clay tablet that dates from around 3200 B.C. On it, written in cuneiform, the script language of ancient Sumer in Mesopotamia, is a list of professions, described in small, repetitive impressed characters that look more like wedge-shape footprints than what we recognize as writing. In fact "it is among the earliest examples of writings that we know of so far," according to the institute's director, Gil J. Stein, and it provides insights into the life of...
  • Signs of world's first pictograph found in Gobeklitepe

    07/25/2015 4:58:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Hurriyet Daily News ^ | July 15, 2015 | Anadolu Agency
    Turkey's Göbeklitepe, the site of the world's oldest temple, may be the home of the first pictograph, according to a scene etched into an obelisk. A scene on an obelisk found during excavations in Göbeklitepe, a 12,000-year-old site in the southeastern province of Sanliurfa, could be humanity's first pictograph, according to researchers... Ercan said the artifacts found in Göbeklitepe provided information about ancient burial traditions. "There were no graves 12,000 years ago. The dead bodies were left outdoors and raptors ate them. In this way, people believed the soul goes to the sky," he added. Ercan said it was called...
  • Inside Lascaux: Rare, Unpublished (cave drawings - link only)

    09/23/2010 4:59:37 AM PDT · by decimon · 24 replies · 1+ views
    LIFE ^ | September 8, 2010 | Unknown
    Link only: An 'orse, of course
  • Religious beliefs are the basis of the origins of Palaeolithic art

    03/31/2010 6:33:04 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies · 371+ views
    Eurekalert ^ | Friday, March 26, 2010 | FECYT & SINC
    This statement isn't new, but for years anthropologists, archaeologists and historians of art understood these artistic manifestations as purely aesthetic and decorative motives. Eduardo Palacio-Pérez, researcher at the University of Cantabria (UC), now reveals the origins of a theory that remains nowadays/lasts into our days. "This theory is does not originate with the prehistorians, in other words, those who started to develop the idea that the art of primitive peoples was linked with beliefs of a symbolic-religious nature were the anthropologists"... This idea appeared at the end of the XIX century and the beginning of the XX century. Up until...
  • The writing on the wall: Symbols from the Palaeolithic

    03/22/2012 5:23:51 AM PDT · by Renfield · 6 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | 3-12-2012
    In 2009, a ground-breaking study by Genevieve von Petzinger revealed that dots, lines and other geometric signs found in prehistoric European caves may be the precursor to an ancient system of written communication dating back nearly 30,000 years. Von Petzinger, with University of Victoria anthropology professor April Nowell, compiled the markings from 146 different sites in Ice Age France, making it possible to compare the signs on a larger scale than had ever previously been attempted. What made her research ‘new’ was that she was able to use a whole range of modern technology to compare inventories and digital images...
  • Were Cavemen Painting For Their Gods?

    03/06/2005 3:20:58 PM PST · by blam · 45 replies · 4,470+ views
    Were cavemen painting for their gods? (Filed: 23/02/2005) The meaning of Ice Age art has been endlessly debated, but evidence is increasing that some was religiously motivated, says Paul Bahn At least 70,000 years ago, our ancestors began to adorn their bodies with beads, pendants and perhaps tattoos; by 35,000 years ago, they had begun to paint and engrave animals, people and abstract motifs on cave walls, like those in Lascaux, France, and Altamira in Spain. They sculpted voluptuous figurines in ivory or stone, such as the Venus of Willendorf. Underestimating art: 35,000 years ago, our ancestors began painting representations...
  • Macro-Etymology: Paleosigns [writing 20,000 years ago?]

    05/19/2005 11:00:18 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies · 782+ views
    Macro-Etymology Website ^ | prior to May 20, 2005 | the webmasters thereof
    Examples of (a) Upper Paleolithic signs, and characters in three of the early written languages which resemble the Paleolithic marks: (b) Indus Valley signs, (c) Greek (western branch), (d) Runic... Correlation of the symbols found accompanying Magdalenian cave art with symbols from other ancient cultures shows a nearly-complete match, after Forbes and Crowder, "The Problem of Franco-Cantabrian Abstract Signs: Agenda for a New Approach." World Archaeology 10 (1979): 350-66... These illustrations show (a) the collection of symbols that accompany the Magdalenian cave art in France, from 20,000 years ago or less, and characters in three of the early written languages...
  • Did Stone Age cavemen talk to each other in symbols?

    03/12/2012 9:25:34 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies · 2+ views
    The Observer ^ | Saturday, March 10, 2012 | Robin McKie
    Not surprisingly, these paintings attract tens of thousands of visitors every year. However, there is another aspect to this art that often escapes attention, but which is now providing scientists with fresh insights into our recent evolution. Instead of studying those magnificent galloping horses and bisons, researchers are investigating the symbols painted beside them. These signs are rarely mentioned in most studies of ancient cave art. Some are gathered in groups, some appear in ones or twos, while others are mixed in with the caves' images of animals. There are triangles, squares, full circles, semicircles, open angles, crosses and groups...