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Keyword: mastodon

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  • Dinosaurs in St. David Clea Brown shares stories of the dinosaur dig on her family’s ranch

    07/26/2016 1:59:02 PM PDT · by SandRat · 10 replies
    ST. DAVID — There’s no telling how many times Milton Curtis stepped over those odd-looking rocks as he went about the day-to-day business of ranching. Back in 1921, life on Curtis Ranch in St. David was filled with cattle and horses and providing for a young family. Things like dinosaurs really weren’t the topic of discussion, nor did they get much attention. But in 1921, that changed. “What my father thought were rocks were actually the tips of tusks from a giant mastodon dinosaur,” chuckled 98-year-old Clea Brown, her eyes sparkling as she talked about a discovery that launched the...
  • Meet Lyuba

    06/27/2016 6:27:06 AM PDT · by Sean_Anthony · 5 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | 06/27/16 | Dr. Klaus Kaiser
    Just hope that the current interglacial period will last for a few more decades to come. Anything else would spell disaster for much of mankind! Lyuba, of course, is the name bestowed upon the baby mammoth that was found a few years ago in the western Siberian tundra. The baby woolly mammoth is thought to be around 40,000 years old (by now) and is thought to have died by drowning at the age of two months. What’s so remarkable is Lyuba’s state of preservation, almost life-like, with skin and (sparse) hair fully intact. That kind of find is most uncommon.
  • First Images of 12,000-Year-Old Mexican Mammoth Skeleton Emerge

    06/27/2016 11:45:23 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 35 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 25 JUNE 2016 | Harry Yorke
    Paleontologists are in the final stages of extracting the skeleton of a huge mammoth discovered buried two metres underneath a busy street in the Mexican city Tultepec. New images of the excavation site have revealed the sheer size of the prehistoric animal, which experts believe died between 12,000 and 14,000 years ago in what is now the city's suburb of San Antonio Xahuento. With a metre-wide skull and tusks spanning more than ten feet, the skeleton belongs to Mammuthus Columbi, a North American mammoth which expects believe grew sixteen feet high and weighed up to 10 tonnes.
  • Ancient DNA Shows Perfect Storm Felled Ice Age Giants

    06/18/2016 2:53:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | Friday, June 17, 2016 | University of Adelaide, Alan Cooper et al
    "Patagonia turns out to be the Rosetta Stone - it shows that human colonisation didn't immediately result in extinctions, but only as long as it stayed cold," says study leader Professor Alan Cooper, ACAD Director. "Instead, more than 1000 years of human occupation passed before a rapid warming event occurred, and then the megafauna were extinct within a hundred years." The researchers, including from the University of Colorado Boulder, University of New South Wales and University of Magallanes in Patagonia, studied ancient DNA extracted from radiocarbon-dated bones and teeth found in caves across Patagonia, and Tierra del Fuego, to trace...
  • Ancient Humans, Dogs Hunted Mastodon in Florida: Early Dogs Helped Humans Hunt Mammoths

    05/16/2016 2:29:01 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    Discovery News ^ | May 13, 2016 | Jennifer Viegas
    The geology of the site, as well as pollen and algae finds, suggest that the hunter-gatherers encountered the mastodon next to a small pond that both humans and animals used as a water source, the researchers believe. Waters said that the prehistoric "people knew how to find game, fresh water and materials for making tools. These people were well adapted to this environment. The site is a slam-dunk pre-Clovis site with unequivocal artifacts, clear stratigraphy and thorough dating." Another research team previously excavated the site and found what they believed were dog remains, so dogs "would most likely have been...
  • Neanderthal Bone Fragment Identified in Denisova Cave

    04/02/2016 2:37:38 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Tuesday, March 29, 2016 | editors
    Scientists from the University of Oxford and the University of Manchester have used a new technique, "Zooarchaeology by Mass Spectrometry," or ZooMS, to identify more than 2,000 bone fragments recovered from Russia's Denisova Cave. ZooMS analyzes the collagen peptide sequences in bone, which can then be used to identify its species. Among the remains of mammoths, woolly rhino, wolf, and reindeer, the researchers found one Neanderthal bone. "When the ZooMS results showed that there was a human fingerprint among the bones I was extremely excited. ...The bone itself is not exceptional in any way and would otherwise be missed by...
  • Scientists may have discovered 12,000 year old mother's milk, frozen in permafrost

    03/31/2016 5:54:01 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Siberian Times ^ | March 21, 2016 | reporter
    The carcass of one of a pair of extinct big cat cubs will be scrutinised this autumn with the realistic possibility that a liquid found in the remains of the animal is milk from the mother. Separately, it was recently revealed that samples of the prehistoric infant are being examined by South Korean to clone an animal that once occupied Eurasia from modern day Great Britain to the extreme east of Russia. A source close to the case told The Siberian Times that there is 'hope' the frozen remains of a cave lion cub will show evidence of its mother's...
  • How Mammoths Lost The Extinction Lottery

    11/04/2011 7:25:31 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 44 replies
    Nature ^ | November 2, 2011 | Ewen Callaway
    Woolly mammoths, woolly rhinos and other large animals driven to extinction since the last ice age each succumbed to a different lethal mix of circumstances... Researchers who studied the fate of six species of 'megafauna' over the past 50,000 years found that climate change and habitat loss were involved in many of the extinctions, with humans playing a part in some cases but not others. But there was no clear pattern to explain why the animals died off, and it proved impossible to predict from habitat or genetic diversity which species would go extinct and which would survive. "It almost...
  • Did Humans Kill Huge Animals in Snowmass 50,000 Years Ago?

    02/19/2016 1:40:44 AM PST · by SteveH · 31 replies
    Aspen Journalism ^ | July 3, 2013 | Allan Best
    Do earthquakes explain all those mastodon bones at Snowmass? Not likely, say scientists, although they haven’t completely shelved the idea. And did humans kill a mammoth 50,000 years ago and then cache the meat for later use? Circumstantial evidence of rocks intermixed with bones suggests that was the case. If so, it would rank as one of the major scientific discoveries of the decade, putting people on the North American continent some 36,000 years earlier than what is now generally agreed upon by archaeologists. That intriguing idea also remains on the shelf, just beyond touch for lack of corroborating evidence.
  • Mammoth Bones Unearthed at Oregon State University

    01/27/2016 8:09:14 AM PST · by SteveH · 11 replies
    Oregon Live ^ | 1/26/2016 | John Rose
    The 10,000 year old bones of a mammoth and other extinct mammals have been unearthed in the north end zone of Oregon State University's Reser Stadium. Construction crews digging up earth during the expansion of the Valley Football Center expansion project...
  • Mastodon tusks tell of brutal battles

    12/16/2006 2:17:43 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies · 314+ views
    Australian Broadcasting Corporation ^ | Friday, 27 October 2006 | Jennifer Viegas
    Battle scars on male mastodon tusks show these Ice Age giants were not the peaceful creatures once thought... The scars reveal they fought in brutal combat each year during seasonal phases of heightened sexual activity and aggression. The discovery, announced at a recent Society of Vertebrate Paleontology meeting in Ontario, counters the view that now-extinct mastodons were peaceful, passive creatures that rarely engaged in battles. It also strengthens the link between mastodon and modern elephant behaviour, since male bull elephants also fight seasonal, hormonally-charged battles to show their dominance and win desired mates... "Mastodon tusks curve upward strongly at the...
  • Elephants, Human Ancestors Evolved In Synch, DNA Reveals

    07/26/2007 12:12:38 PM PDT · by blam · 60 replies · 996+ views
    National Geographic ^ | 7-23-2007 | Hope Hamashige
    Elephants, Human Ancestors Evolved in Synch, DNA Reveals Hope Hamashige for National Geographic News July 23, 2007 The tooth of a mastodon buried beneath Alaska's permafrost for many thousands of years is yielding surprising clues about the history of elephants—and humans. A team of researchers recently extracted DNA from the tooth to put together the first complete mastodon mitochondrial genome. The study, published in the journal PLoS Biology, significantly alters the evolutionary timeline for elephants and their relatives. The research may put to rest a contentious debate by showing that woolly mammoths are more closely related to Asian elephants than...
  • Mastodons Driven To Extinction By Tuberculosis, Fossils Suggest

    10/03/2006 3:01:37 PM PDT · by blam · 93 replies · 1,673+ views
    National Geographic ^ | 10-3-2006 | Kimberly Johnson
    Mastodons Driven to Extinction by Tuberculosis, Fossils Suggest Kimberly Johnson for National Geographic News October 3, 2006 Tuberculosis was rampant in North American mastodons during the late Ice Age and may have led to their extinction, researchers say. Mastodons lived in North America starting about 2 million years ago and thrived until 11,000 years ago—around the time humans arrived on the continent—when the last of the 7-ton (6.35-metric-ton) elephantlike creatures died off. Scientists Bruce Rothschild and Richard Laub pieced together clues to the animals' widespread die-off by studying unearthed mastodon foot bones. Rothschild first noticed a telltale tuberculosis lesion on...
  • Activists blamed for causing another elephant to push her down

    03/09/2004 9:22:41 AM PST · by Dane · 18 replies · 131+ views
    SF Gate. Com ^ | 3/8/04 | Demian Bulwa
    <p>Calle the ailing elephant died at the San Francisco Zoo on Sunday morning, hours after another elephant attacked her -- an attack that zoo officials are blaming on animal rights demonstrators who they say agitated the beasts.</p> <p>Zoo veterinarians quietly euthanized Calle, a 37-year-old female Asian elephant, at about 5 a.m., after she dropped to her belly and rolled on her side.</p>
  • Peaches The Elephant Has Died In Chicago

    01/22/2005 3:00:35 PM PST · by Scenic Sounds · 29 replies · 843+ views
    San Diego Union-Tribune ^ | January 22, 2005 | By Craig Gustafson
    SAN PASQUAL VALLEY – For 50 years she called San Diego County home. That's why animal-welfare activists are upset that Peaches, the oldest African elephant in the country, died earlier this week at Chicago's Lincoln Park Zoo. Activists are criticizing the San Diego Wild Animal Park for its decision to move Peaches and two other older elephants, Wankie and Tatima, to the cold-weather city in early 2003. With two of those elephants now dead, they called the move "grossly irresponsible." Peaches, 55, died of "complications due to old age," according to Lincoln Park officials. She was found lying on the...
  • Inspiration for 'Babar the Elephant' Dies , 99

    04/08/2003 12:36:26 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 17 replies · 243+ views
    Yahoo! News ^ | 3/8/03 | AP - Paris
    PARIS - Cecile de Brunhoff, the inspiration for Babar, the enchanting little elephant whose adventures captivated generations of children, has died in Paris. She was 99. De Brunhoff suffered a stroke Saturday night and died Monday in a hospital in Paris, where she lived, said Mathieu de Brunhoff, one of her sons. She first invented the tale of a little elephant as a bedtime story for her boys in 1931. They in turn told their father, painter Jean de Brunhoff, who illustrated the story and filled in details, naming the elephant Babar and creating Celeste, Zephir and the "Old Lady,"...
  • Oregon Zoo staff infected by tuberculosis after exposure to infected elephants

    01/08/2016 9:52:00 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 7 replies
    oregonlive ^ | 01/08/2016 | Lynne Terry
    The good news is that even though TB is highly contagious, the three infected elephants at the zoo did not spread the disease to visitors, including those who attended one of Rama's painting parties in which he created splatter paintings. About 5 percent of the captive Asian elephants in North America are infected. The disease can be deadly to elephants. Three pachyderms at an exotic animal farm in Illinois died from the disease between 1994 and 1996, according to the CDC. One handler in that outbreak got sick as well. At the Oregon Zoo, the first case popped up in...
  • This Ancient, Deadly Disease Is Still Killing In Europe

    12/30/2011 3:33:45 PM PST · by blam · 38 replies
    TBI ^ | 12-30-3011 | John Donnelly
    This Ancient, Deadly Disease Is Still Killing In Europe John Donnelly, GlobalPost Dec. 30, 2011, 12:53 PM GENEVA, Switzerland – On the sidelines of a conference in Baku, Azerbaijan, just three months ago, a senior health official from Belarus met privately with Mario Raviglione, whose job here at the World Health Organization’s headquarters is to control the spread of tuberculosis around the world. Belarus needed help. It had just confirmed a study that found 35 percent of all TB cases in the capital of Minsk were multi-drug resistant TB (MDR-TB) – the highest rate in the world ever recorded for...
  • Research Casts New Light On History Of North America

    07/01/2008 10:26:26 AM PDT · by blam · 27 replies · 408+ views
    Newswise ^ | 7-1-2008 | Valparaiso University
    Research Casts New Light on History of North America Research by a Valparaiso University geography professor and his students lends support to evidence the first humans to settle the Americas came from Europe, rather than crossing a Bering Strait land-ice bridge. Valparaiso’s research shows the Kankakee Sand Islands – a series of hundreds of small dunes in the Kankakee River area of Northwest Indiana and northeastern Illinois – were created 14,500 to 15,000 years ago and that the region could not have been covered by ice as previously thought. Newswise — Research by a Valparaiso University geography professor and his...
  • First Humans To Settle Americas Came From Europe, Not From Asia Over Bering Strait -

    07/16/2008 8:02:06 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 36 replies · 1,253+ views
    ScienceDaily ^ | July 17, 2008
    Land-ice Bridge, New Research Suggests -- Research by a Valparaiso University geography professor and his students on the creation of Kankakee Sand Islands of Northwest Indiana is lending support to evidence that the first humans to settle the Americas came from Europe, a discovery that overturns decades of classroom lessons that nomadic tribes from Asia crossed a Bering Strait land-ice bridge. Valparaiso is a member of the Council on Undergraduate Research. Dr. Ron Janke began studying the origins of the Kankakee Sand Islands – a series of hundreds of small, moon-shaped dunes that stretch from the southern tips of Lake...
  • Woolly mammoth extinction 'not linked to humans'

    08/18/2010 11:32:29 AM PDT · by decimon · 61 replies
    BBC ^ | August 17, 2010 | Pallab Ghosh
    Woolly mammoths died out because of dwindling grasslands - rather than being hunted to extinction by humans, according to a Durham University study.After the coldest phase of the last ice age 21,000 years ago, the research revealed, there was a dramatic decline in pasture on which the mammoths fed. The woolly mammoth was once commonplace across many parts of Europe. It retreated to northern Siberia about 14,000 years ago, where it finally died out approximately 4,000 years ago.
  • Farmer digs up woolly mammoth bones in Michigan soy field

    10/03/2015 12:37:51 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Washington Post ^ | October 2, 2015 | Rachel Feltman
    James Bristle of Lima Township was digging in a soybean field Monday when he and his friend pulled up what they first thought was a bent, muddy old fence post. But it was actually the rib bone of an ancient woolly mammoth... University of Michigan professor Daniel Fisher... believes that the mammoth died between 11,000 and 15,000 years ago. Most mammoths were gone by 10,000 years ago... “We get calls once or twice a year about new specimens like this,” Fisher told The Washington Post. But they’re usually mastodons. It’s a bit more unusual to find a mammoth, the group...
  • Mammoth bones found, reburied

    12/08/2006 8:15:53 PM PST · by Dysart · 17 replies · 535+ views
    Star-Telgram ^ | 12-8-06 | BILL TEETER
    GRAPEVINE — These bones won’t talk — at least not until they’re unearthed again.Still smarting over the theft of dinosaur footprints this spring, the Army Corps of Engineers and the city of Grapevine have reburied parts of a Columbian mammoth that were found along the receding shore line.Visitors came across a jawbone and part of a tusk, and there may be more bones in the area, but there are no plans to study the location that is somewhere on 1,200 acres of Corps property under lease to the city, said Dale King, a conservation specialist with the corps. The find...
  • Russia: New laboratory to study mammoth cloning

    09/01/2015 10:39:31 AM PDT · by McGruff · 21 replies
    BBC News ^ | 9/1/2015
    Russia has opened a laboratory in Siberia devoted to the study of extinct animal DNA in the hope of creating clones, it's reported. The new lab in Yakutsk - often called the world's coldest city - will "seek out live cells with a view to cloning", says Semen Grigoryev, director of the Mammoth Museum at the city's Northeastern Federal University. He tells Ogonek magazine that "the priority is to look into bringing back the mammoth", adding that the Beijing Institute of Genomics and South Korea's Sooam Biotech company, which has pioneered dog cloning, will be involved in the study.
  • 'Super-Predator' Humans Force Evolution in Animals

    01/14/2009 1:56:00 PM PST · by em2vn · 33 replies · 615+ views
    Foxnews ^ | 01-14-09 | Robert Britt
    Acting as super-predators, humans are forcing changes to body size and reproductive abilities in some species 300 percent faster than would occur naturally, a new study finds. Hunting and fishing by individual sportsmen as well as large-scale commercial fishing are also outpacing other human influences, such as pollution, in effects on the animal kingdom.
  • Mammoths killed by abrupt climate change

    07/24/2015 10:12:25 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 75 replies
    http://phys.org ^ | July 23, 2015 | Provided by: University of Adelaide
    This image shows mammoth vertebrae in ice, Yukon Territory, Canada. Credit: Photo Kieren Mitchell, University of Adelaide ******************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************* New research has revealed abrupt warming, that closely resembles the rapid man-made warming occurring today, has repeatedly played a key role in mass extinction events of large animals, the megafauna, in Earth's past. Using advances in analysing ancient DNA, radiocarbon dating and other geologic records an international team led by researchers from the University of Adelaide and the University of New South Wales (Australia) have revealed that short, rapid warming events, known as interstadials, recorded during the last ice age or Pleistocene...
  • Researcher unravels century-old woolly tale to find truth behind massive bones

    07/06/2015 8:16:58 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 9 replies
    PHYS.ORG ^ | Jul 03, 2015 | by Mark Johnson, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
    Animals go extinct, places too. And stories change. Boaz, a small village in Richland County, Wis., has only 156 people these days. There are a half-dozen streets, a couple of taverns, a small park with a baseball diamond and, on the outskirts, a historic marker describing the village's lone claim to fame: "the Boaz Mastodon." The story on the marker is the one that's been told to schoolchildren for almost a century as they stare up at the mastodon skeleton, enshrined in the University of Wisconsin-Madison Geology Museum. It is a story that, until now, has endured largely unchanged: One...
  • Woolly Mammoth Clones Closer Than Ever, Thanks to Genome Sequencing

    07/05/2015 7:03:27 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 23 replies
    Live Science ^ | 07/03/2015 | by Tia Ghose, Senior Writer
    Scientists are one step closer to bringing a woolly mammoth back to life. A new analysis of the woolly mammoth genome has revealed several adaptations that allowed the furry beasts to thrive in the subzero temperatures of the last ice age, including a metabolism that allowed them to pack on insulating fat, smaller ears that lost less heat and a reduced sensitivity to cold. The findings could enable researchers to "resurrect" the ice-age icon — or at least a hybridized Asian elephant with a few of the physical traits of its woolly-haired cousin, said study co-author Vincent Lynch, an evolutionary...
  • BOFFIN: Will I soon be able to CLONE a MAMMOTH? YES. Should I? NO

    07/04/2015 1:40:42 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 34 replies
    theregister.co.uk ^ | ,3 Jul 2015 at 09:28, | Lewis Page
    It will definitely be possible within the foreseeable future to bring back the long-extinct woolly mammoth, a top geneticist has said. However, in his regretful opinion such a resurrection should not be carried out. The assertion comes in the wake of a new study of mammoth genetics as compared to their cousins the Asian and African elephants, which live in warm habitats very different from the icy northern realms of the woolly giant. The new study offers boffins many revelations as to the differences which let the elephants and mammoths survive in such different conditions. “This is by far the...
  • First comprehensive analysis of the woolly mammoth genome completed

    07/02/2015 1:34:26 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 38 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 07-02-2015 | Provided by University of Chicago Medical Center
    The first comprehensive analysis of the woolly mammoth genome reveals extensive genetic changes that allowed mammoths to adapt to life in the arctic. Credit: Giant Screen Films © 2012 D3D Ice Age, LLC ======================================================================== The first comprehensive analysis of the woolly mammoth genome reveals extensive genetic changes that allowed mammoths to adapt to life in the arctic. Mammoth genes that differed from their counterparts in elephants played roles in skin and hair development, fat metabolism, insulin signaling and numerous other traits. Genes linked to physical traits such as skull shape, small ears and short tails were also identified. As a...
  • Alaska's first full mammoth skeleton may be lurking under Arctic lake

    05/09/2015 8:12:29 PM PDT · by skeptoid · 31 replies
    Alaska Dispatch ^ | Yereth Rosen
    Alaska's first full mammoth skeleton may be lurking under Arctic lake. When an aquatic ecologist was surveying shallow lakes in Northwest Alaska three years ago, she and the pilot who traveled with her came upon an unusual sight in the treeless Arctic region: a pair of terns that kept flying around and perching on what appeared to be a log sticking out of a muddy area. The protruding object, it turns out, was no log. It was the large and well-preserved leg bone of a woolly mammoth. Right by it was another bone, perfectly articulated, that was clearly from the...
  • Russian Hunters Discover 10,000-year-old Frozen Woolly Rhino in River

    04/09/2015 10:06:56 AM PDT · by Utilizer · 41 replies
    OutdoorHub ^ | 2/27/15 | Daniel Xu
    Paleontologists are calling a recent find in the Russian region of Yakutia a “sensation.” Last September, Aleksandr Banderov and his hunting party were traveling near the Semyulyakh River when they uncovered the preserved carcass of an adolescent wholly rhinoceros, a species that roamed the frozen landscapes of Europe and northern Asia during the last Ice Age. The hunters initially thought it was a reindeer frozen in the ice, but quickly realized it was something much older. “We were sailing past a ravine and noticed hair hanging on the top of it,’ Alexander told The Siberian Times. “At first we thought...
  • Scientists Take DNA Sample From Woolly Mammoth Leg for Cloning Project

    03/17/2015 10:56:20 AM PDT · by C19fan · 66 replies
    NBC News ^ | March 16, 2015 | Devin Coldewey
    A group of Russian and South Korean researchers has begun their attempt to clone a woolly mammoth, starting by extracting DNA from a spectacularly well-preserved specimen discovered in the Siberian permafrot in 2013. The project is led by Hwang Woo-Suk, a Korean cloning scientist who was the focus of a scandal in 2006 involving fraudulent research on human stem cells. Hwang has had success with animals, however, reportedly creating the world's first cloned dog and several cloned coyotes.
  • When Did Humans Come to the Americas?

    01/27/2013 9:08:44 PM PST · by Theoria · 35 replies
    Smithsonian Mag ^ | Feb 2013 | Guy Gugliotta
    Recent scientific findings date their arrival earlier than ever thought, sparking hot debate among archaeologists For much of its length, the slow-moving Aucilla River in northern Florida flows underground, tunneling through bedrock limestone. But here and there it surfaces, and preserved in those inky ponds lie secrets of the first Americans.For years adventurous divers had hunted fossils and artifacts in the sinkholes of the Aucilla about an hour east of Tallahassee. They found stone arrowheads and the bones of extinct mammals such as mammoth, mastodon and the American ice age horse.Then, in the 1980s, archaeologists from the Florida Museum of...
  • Butchered Bones Found in Yukon Cave Bear Marks of Early Americans, Study Finds

    02/13/2015 12:15:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Western Digs ^ | February 12, 2015 | Blake de Pastino
    They're probably about half as old as scientists once thought they were. But a pair of butchered bones found in a cave near the Alaska-Yukon border are "definite" evidence of human presence in North America just after the end of the last Ice Age, perhaps as much as 14,000 years ago, according to a new study. The bones were originally discovered in the late 1970s by Canadian archaeologist Dr. Jacques Cinq-Mars at a site known as Bluefish Caves, high in northwestern Yukon Territory. In one of the caves, dubbed Cave 2, archaeologists found more than 18,000 fragments of bones from...
  • Indian DNA Links To 6 'Founding Mothers'

    03/13/2008 2:04:39 PM PDT · by blam · 72 replies · 1,801+ views
    Yahoo News/AP ^ | 3-13-2008 | Malcom Ritter
    Indian DNA links to 6 'founding mothers' By MALCOLM RITTER, AP Science Writer NEW YORK - Nearly all of today's Native Americans in North, Central and South America can trace part of their ancestry to six women whose descendants immigrated around 20,000 years ago, a DNA study suggests. Those women left a particular DNA legacy that persists to today in about 95 percent of Native Americans, researchers said. The finding does not mean that only these six women gave rise to the migrants who crossed into North America from Asia in the initial populating of the continent, said study co-author...
  • Mastodons Disappeared From Ancient Beringia Before Humans Arrived

    12/04/2014 6:03:43 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Monday, December 1, 2014 | press releases
    A re-dating of mastodon bones reveals that the extinct mammals, related to the modern day elephant, disappeared from the area during a glacial period more than 50,000 years earlier than previously thought. Existing age estimates of American mastodon fossils indicate that these extinct relatives of elephants lived in the Arctic and Subarctic when the area was covered by ice caps—a chronology that is at odds with what scientists know about the massive animals' preferred habitat: forests and wetlands abundant with leafy food... Over the course of the late Pleistocene, between about 10,000 and 125,000 years ago, the American mastodon (Mammut...
  • Origins of underwater stones a mystery

    02/09/2009 11:42:11 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies · 1,521+ views
    United Press International ^ | Monday, February 9, 2009 | unattributed
    An archaeologist says it remains a mystery how a circle of stones initially arrived at the floor of Michigan's Grand Traverse Bay. Underwater archeologist Mark Holley said while he first discovered the underwater stones in 2007, no one has been able to prove whether the rocks were placed there by nature or by mankind, the Chicago Tribune reported Sunday. "The first thing I said when I came out of the water was, 'Oh no, I wish we wouldn't have found this,'" Holley said of his discovery. "This is going to invite so much controversy that this is where we're going...
  • Reviving the Woolly Mammoth: Will De-Extinction Become Reality?

    03/16/2013 2:32:30 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 24 replies
    Yahoo News | Live Science ^ | 3/15/13 | Megan Gannon
    Biologists briefly brought the extinct Pyrenean ibex back to life in 2003 by creating a clone from a frozen tissue sample harvested before the goat's entire population vanished in 2000. The clone survived just seven minutes after birth, but it gave scientists hope that "de-extinction," once a pipedream, could become a reality. Ten years later, a group of researchers and conservationists gathered in Washington, D.C., today (March 15) for a forum called TEDxDeExtinction, hosted by the National Geographic Society, to talk about how to revive extinct animals, from the Tasmanian tiger and the saber-toothed tiger to the woolly mammoth and...
  • Boy discovers almost complete woolly mammoth carcass

    10/04/2012 12:47:07 PM PDT · by Renfield · 22 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 10-4-2012 | Joanna Carver
    An 11-year-old Russian boy stumbled across the 30,000-year-old remains of a woolly mammoth, an experience that was surely either incredibly exciting or permanently traumatising. According to the Moscow News, Yevgeny Salinder found the 500-kilogram beast in the tundra of the Taymyr peninsula in northern Russia. Scientists laboured for a week with axes and steam to dig it out of the permafrost it's been encased in for centuries. Woolly mammoths have been found in the permafrost in Siberia since at least 1929, but this is one of the best preserved. Its tusks, mouth and rib cage are clearly visible....
  • Humans Did Not Kill Off Mammoths; Comet, Climate Change Helped, Studies Show

    06/12/2012 7:03:32 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 115 replies
    Indian Country Today ^ | June 13, 2012 | ICTMN Staff
    Although human hunting played a part in the demise of the woolly mammoth about 10,000 years ago, homo sapiens were but bit players in a global drama involving climate change, comet impact and a multitude of other factors, scientists have found in separate studies. Previous research had blamed their demise on tribal hunting. But new findings “pretty much dispel the idea of any one factor, any one event, as dooming the mammoths,” said Glen MacDonald, a researcher and geographer at the University of California in Los Angeles, to LiveScience.com. In other words, hunting didn’t help, but it was not instrumental....
  • Gene Reveals Mammoth Coat Colour

    07/06/2006 12:43:11 PM PDT · by blam · 39 replies · 1,370+ views
    BBC ^ | 7-6-2006 | Rebecca Morelle
    Gene reveals mammoth coat colour By Rebecca Morelle Science reporter, BBC News Woolly mammoths had both dark and light coats The coat colour of mammoths that roamed the Earth thousands of years ago has been determined by scientists. Some of the curly tusked animals would have sported dark brown coats, while others had pale ginger or blond hair. The information was extracted from a 43,000-year-old woolly mammoth bone from Siberia using the latest genetic techniques. Writing in the journal Science, the researchers said a gene called Mc1r was controlling the beasts' coat colours. This gene is responsible for hair-colour in...
  • Preserved in the ice for 10,000 years: Ginger-haired baby mammoth shows signs of death struggle

    04/04/2012 2:45:19 PM PDT · by C19fan · 29 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | April 4, 2012 | Rob Waugh
    A ginger-haired mammoth baby found in Siberia could have been snatched by hungry human hunters from the jaws of a lion 10,000 years ago. The body of the beast - the first ever found with its distinctive 'strawberry blonde' hair - has been described as being of 'huge' significance. It's could be evidence that ancient humans attacked and fed on mammoths in Siberia, with the body of 'Yuka' showing wounds consistent with an attack by lions AND people.
  • Perfectly Preserved Woolly Mammoth Discovered in Siberia

    04/05/2012 10:22:55 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 11 replies
    Yahoo! News ^ | April 5, 2012 | Melissa Knowles
    Scientists in search of ancient tusks made a startling discovery. They uncovered the nearly perfectly preserved remains of a woolly mammoth in northern Siberia. The juvenile mammoth is believed to be more than 10,000 years old, but was only 3 to 4 years old when it died. It is unlike any other mammoth that has been unearthed before. The scientists reveal their discovery, which they named "Yuka," in a BBC documentary. Yuka has strawberry blond hair, unlike the dark hair that other mammoths have been found to have. Plus, Yuka's footpads are incredibly well preserved, but some of his bones...
  • Clovis Comet Gets Second Look

    04/06/2012 9:21:52 AM PDT · by baynut · 17 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | March 16, 2012 | Matt Ridley
    Scientists, it's said, behave more like lawyers than philosophers. They do not so much test their theories as prosecute their cases, seeking supportive evidence and ignoring data that do not fit—a failing known as confirmation bias. They then accuse their opponents of doing the same thing. This is what makes debates over nature and nurture, dietary fat and climate change so polarized. But just because the prosecutor is biased in favor of his case does not mean the defendant is innocent. Sometimes biased advocates are right. An example of this phenomenon is now being played out in geology over the...
  • Young Mammoth Likely Butchered by Humans

    04/04/2012 3:32:01 PM PDT · by Renfield · 16 replies
    Discovery News ^ | 4-4-2012 | Jennifer Viegas
    A juvenile mammoth, nicknamed "Yuka," was found entombed in Siberian ice near the shores of the Arctic Ocean and shows signs of being cut open by ancient people. The remarkably well preserved frozen carcass was discovered in Siberia as part of a BBC/Discovery Channel-funded expedition and is believed to be at least 10,000 years old, if not older. If further study confirms the preliminary findings, it would be the first mammoth carcass revealing signs of human interaction in the region. The carcass is in such good shape that much of its flesh is still intact, retaining its pink color. The...
  • Well preserved mammoth from Siberia shows signs of early man stealing from lions

    04/05/2012 7:24:06 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 21 replies
    http://www.physorg.com ^ | 04-05-2012 | Bob Yirka
    An exceedingly well preserved juvenile mammoth carcass has been found in Siberia near the Arctic Ocean and it shows signs of having been attacked by a cave lion and then partially butchered by humans. Dubbed Yuka by the Mammuthus organization, which is studying the remains, the six foot long creature was believed to have been a year and a half to perhaps three or four years old at the time of its death. The mammoth was found by tusk hunters in Northern Siberia, who then turned it over to scientists with the Mammuthus organization. The BBC and Discovery have been...
  • New evidence supporting extraterrestrial impact at the start of the Younger Dryas

    03/12/2012 4:54:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies · 1+ views
    Watts Up With That 'blog ^ | Monday, March 12, 2012 | Anthony Watts
    We report the discovery in Lake Cuitzeo in central Mexico of a black, carbon-rich, lacustrine layer, containing nanodiamonds, microspherules, and other unusual materials that date to the early Younger Dryas and are interpreted to result from an extraterrestrial impact. These proxies were found in a 27-m-long core as part of an interdisciplinary effort to extract a paleoclimate record back through the previous interglacial. Our attention focused early on an anomalous, 10-cm-thick, carbon-rich layer at a depth of 2.8 m that dates to 12.9 ka and coincides with a suite of anomalous coeval environmental and biotic changes independently recognized in other...
  • Scientific consensus fails again: Start of “Anthropocene” pushed back to Late Pleistocene,......

    11/03/2011 9:59:14 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 12 replies
    watts up with that? ^ | November 2, 2011 | by David Middleton
    Guest Post by David MiddletonFrom The Seattle TimesSEATTLE (AP) – It’s not unusual for an archaeologist to get stuck in the past, but Carl Gustafson may be the only one consumed by events on the Olympic Peninsula in 1977.That summer, while sifting through earth in Sequim, the young Gustafson uncovered something extraordinary _ a mastodon bone with a shaft jammed in it. This appeared to be a weapon that had been thrust into the beast’s ribs, a sign that humans had been around and hunting far earlier than anyone suspected.Unfortunately for Gustafson, few scientists agreed. He was challenging orthodoxy with...
  • Dozer Driver Makes Fossil Discovery of the Century

    11/23/2010 9:21:20 AM PST · by Squidpup · 63 replies · 2+ views
    FoxNews ^ | November 20, 2010 | Loren Grush
    An accidental discovery by a bulldozer driver has led to what may be the find of the century: an ice-age burial ground that could rival the famed La Brea tar pits. After two weeks of excavating ancient fossils at the Ziegler Reservoir near Snowmass Village, Colorado, scientists from the Denver Museum of Natural Science returned home Wednesday with their unearthed treasures in tow -- a wide array of fossils, insects and plant life that they say give a stunningly realistic view of what life was like when ancient, giant beasts lumbered across the Earth. Since the team’s arrival in mid-October,...