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Keyword: medicine

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  • Evidence Grows That Cancer Has Its Own Stem Cells

    08/01/2012 1:45:54 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 15 replies
    US News – HealthDay ^ | August 1, 2012 | Lisa Esposito
    While scientists hotly debate the existence of cancer stem cells, three related new studies, all conducted on mice, provide some supporting evidence. Stem cells are the foundation for healthy cell growth in the body. Some researchers believe that malignant stem cells also exist—so-called cancer stem cells that generate tumors and resist treatment by simply re-growing afterward. "Cancer stem cells are still controversial, but with progress in studies like these, it's less about whether they exist and more about 'what does this mean?'" said Dr. Max Wicha, director of the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, who is familiar with the...
  • How Come People Rarely Die of Dementia in Poor Countries?

    07/31/2012 10:28:54 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 25 replies
    PJMedia ^ | 07/31/2012 | THEODORE DALRYMPLE
    When I was a young doctor working in poor countries, I made a casual observation that old people in them did not seem to suffer very often from dementia. It occurred to me that properly conducted surveys, of the kind that I was not suited to performing, might be valuable, because a difference in the incidence and prevalence of dementia in various countries might offer a clue to the cause of the disease. As populations throughout the world age, this is a matter of increasing importance.But was my initial casual observation true? And, if true, might the explanation not be...
  • Rationing Begins: States Limiting Drug Prescriptions for Medicaid Patients

    07/31/2012 9:04:32 AM PDT · by IbJensen · 43 replies
    CNS News ^ | 7/30/2012 | Melanie Hunter
    CNSNews.com) – Sixteen states have set a limit on the number of prescription drugs they will cover for Medicaid patients, according to Kaiser Health News. Seven of those states, according to Kaiser Health News, have enacted or tightened those limits in just the last two years. Medicaid is a federal program that is carried out in partnership with state governments. It forms an important element of President Barack Obama's health-care plan because under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act--AKA Obamcare--a larger number of people will be covered by Medicaid, as the income cap is raised for the program. With...
  • Britain’s NHS: No Fun and Games (Why on earth was the NHS celebrated in the London Olympics?)

    07/30/2012 9:46:30 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 29 replies
    National Review ^ | 07/30/2012 | John Fund
    The International Olympic Committee decided not to include in the opening ceremony a moment of silence to honor the eleven Israeli athletes killed by Palestinian gunmen during the 1972 games in Munich. That move drew the ire of NBC’s Bob Costas. During Friday’s ceremony, he commented that, although a private moment of silence was held before a mere 100 people this week at the Athlete’s Village, “for many, tonight, with the world watching, is the true time and place to remember those who were lost and how and why they died.” Instead, the Olympic ceremony featured a weird, politically correct...
  • Doctor of Colorado suspect had been disciplined by medical board

    07/29/2012 1:37:33 AM PDT · by Cincinatus' Wife · 55 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | July 29, 2012 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske
    <p>AURORA, Colo. -- Dr. Lynne Fenton, the University of Colorado psychiatrist who was treating James E. Holmes, according to a court filing by his attorneys, was disciplined by the Colorado Medical Board in 2005.</p> <p>Fenton was also reprimanded for failing to maintain a medical chart or to enter appropriate entries for the charts relating to herself, her husband or the employee, 7News reported.</p>
  • 'Bionic eye' implant restores sight

    07/23/2012 12:13:06 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 16 replies
    The Guide and Gazette ^ | July 23, 2012
    BBC News today reported that “two blind British men have had electronic retinas fitted”. Chris James, 54, and Robin Millar, 60, took part in a clinical trial coordinated by Oxford University and funded by the National Institute of Health Research. Both men have retinitis pigmentosa, a rare hereditary condition that causes gradual deterioration of the light-detecting cells in the retina, which can lead to blindness. The electronic retinas are implants containing light detectors designed to replace the lost light-detecting cells. Immediately following the procedures, when the implants were switched on, both men were able to detect light and are now...
  • Report: 83 percent of doctors have considered quitting over Obamacare

    07/09/2012 11:54:34 AM PDT · by Nachum · 27 replies
    Daily Caller ^ | 7/9/12 | Sally Neilson
    Eighty-three percent of American physicians have considered leaving their practices over President Barack Obama’s health care reform law, according to a survey released by the Doctor Patient Medical Association. The DPMA, a non-partisan association of doctors and patients, surveyed a random selection of 699 doctors nationwide. The survey found that the majority have thought about bailing out of their careers over the legislation, which was upheld last month by the Supreme Court. Even if doctors do not quit their jobs over the ruling, America will face a shortage of at least 90,000 doctors by 2020. The newly passed health care...
  • Synthetic protein kick-starts the immune system to prevent all strains of the flu

    07/09/2012 10:44:45 AM PDT · by CutePuppy · 7 replies
    Gizmag / Dan Diego State University ^ | July 09, 2012 | Darren Quick
    We've seen promising moves towards developing a universal or near-universal influenza vaccine, but researchers at the Donald P. Shiley BioScience Center have taken a different tack to ward of the crafty virus. Although the flu virus actively keeps the immune system from detecting it for a few days, giving it time to gain a foothold, the researchers have found that a powerful synthetic protein, known as EP67, can kick start the immune system so that it reacts almost immediately to all strains of the virus. Previously, EP67 had primarily been used to help activate the immune response by being added...
  • Henninger: ObamaCare's Lost Tribe: Doctors

    07/08/2012 5:47:58 PM PDT · by george76 · 9 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | July 5, 2012 | Henninger
    Back at the at the dawn of ObamaCare in June 2009, speaking to the American Medical Association's annual meeting, President Obama said: "No matter how we reform health care, we will keep this promise: If you like your doctor, you will be able to keep your doctor. Period." But will your doctor be able to keep you? Or will your doctor even want to keep you, rather than quit medicine? ... Have you noticed what got lost in this historic rumble? Doctors. Remember them? ObamaCare has been a war over the processing of insurance claims. It has been fought by...
  • Child heart surgery units to learn fate (UK to close 40% if units)

    07/04/2012 6:01:30 AM PDT · by Islander7 · 5 replies
    BBC ^ | July 4, 2012 | By Nick Triggle
    The hospitals that perform child heart surgery are due to learn which will have to stop performing operations. There are 10 units in England, but an official consultation has proposed up to four should cease doing surgery. The NHS review was carried out amid fears expertise was spread too thinly, and has already concluded surgery should be concentrated on fewer sites. Centres in Leicester, Leeds, Newcastle, Southampton, Bristol and London are under threat.
  • The Healthcare Myths We Must Confront

    06/29/2012 7:28:02 PM PDT · by neverdem · 21 replies
    The American ^ | June 29, 2012 | Cliff Asness
    As debate about whether ObamaCare is a good idea continues, rejecting four major misconceptions about healthcare is crucial to any chance of our eventually emerging with a better system. In the wake of the Supreme Court’s ObamaCare decision, we must refocus. The Court’s decision was never about whether ObamaCare was a good idea, only about whether it was constitutional. The Court found a convoluted way to uphold the law.That’s done, but the debate on whether ObamaCare’s provisions are good ideas will continue. To date, this debate has been unable to shake off a lot of mythology—things believed about healthcare and...
  • The Changing of the Guards - Not Good

    06/29/2012 3:52:39 AM PDT · by Accepting The Truth · 31 replies
    6/28/2012 | Betty Harmon
    I never will forget when I persuaded my husband to vote for Obama as I just knew he was THE man. Now, I feel guilty and cannot believe that I was so taken in by his smoothe personality and the moment. When I hear comments that our country is spiraling out of control I now connect the dots and think of it as a battle already lost to one that doesn’t deserve it. We’ve become a gullible people and are deceived by a selfish and materialistic world. We look over the rough spots because we cannot look upon the truth...
  • How little government sponsored Healthcare do we need? {Vanity}

    06/25/2012 1:20:10 AM PDT · by Cronos · 17 replies
    Cronos ^ | 19 June 2012 | Cronos
    I've been thinking about this for years and want to get my fellow Freeper's opinions --> how little healthcare/medicare do we need as a nation?There are two extremes: government is not involved in any medicare at all, or the other extreme is ObamacareAs a young adult, I'm inclined to the zero government, zero tax-money going to healthcare/medicare. However, I also believe that we young have an obligation to take care of our parents and our other aged relatives. That being said, I look on it as a Christian duty, separate from gubmint. What do you freepers think? Where along the...
  • Tumor op in womb saves fetus

    06/24/2012 2:09:48 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 4 replies
    BBC News ^ | 22 June 2012 | Last updated at 05:15 ET
    Surgeons have removed a tumor from the mouth of a fetus, in what has been described as a "world first" procedure. After a scan at 17 weeks, mother Tammy Gonzalez said she "could see a bubble" coming out of her baby's mouth. Doctors said it was a very rare tumor called an oral teratoma and there was little chance her daughter would survive. After the pioneering operation, baby Leyna was born five months later. Doctors at the Jackson Memorial Hospital in Florida, said this type of tumor was so rare it had been seen only once in 20 years at...
  • Surgery Removed Rare Tumor in Utero [Media Admits Womb-Dwellers Are Persons!]

    06/22/2012 5:56:04 AM PDT · by SoFloFreeper · 10 replies
    NBC MIAMI ^ | 6/21/12 | DIANA GONZALEZ
    Leyna Gonzalez is now a happy, active 20-month-old. However, when she was in her mother's womb a rare tumor was rapidly growing in her mouth. But in the first case of its kind, UM/Jackson fetal surgeons were able to penetrate the amniotic sac with a small scope and successfully remove the tumor in utero. The tumor can easily be seen in a routine ultrasound taken at 17 weeks.
  • Alzheimer's gene 'diabetes link'

    06/21/2012 7:49:52 PM PDT · by CutePuppy · 11 replies
    BBC ^ | June 15, 2012 | BBC
    Scientists say they have identified a possible genetic link between diabetes and Alzheimer's disease. It has been known for some time that people with diabetes have a much higher risk of developing Alzheimer's, but not why this is so.Now US researchers writing in Genetics say a study of worms has indicated a known Alzheimer's gene also plays a role in the way insulin is processed. ..... < snip > ..... A key indication of Alzheimer's, which can only be seen after death, is the presence of sticky plaques of amyloid protein in decimated portions of patients' brains. Scientists have already...
  • Notebooks Shed Light on an Antibiotic’s Contested Discovery

    06/17/2012 7:36:45 PM PDT · by neverdem · 14 replies
    NY Times ^ | June 11, 2012 | PETER PRINGLE
    NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. — For as long as archivists at Rutgers University could remember, a small cardboard box marked with the letter W in black ink had sat unopened in a dusty corner of the special collections of the Alexander Library. Next to it were 60 sturdy archive boxes of papers, a legacy of the university’s most famous scientist: Selman A. Waksman, who won a Nobel Prize in 1952 for the discovery of streptomycin, the first antibiotic to cure tuberculosis. The 60 boxes contained details of how streptomycin was found — and also of the murky story behind it, a...
  • ER doctor's quick action saved life of 8-year-old girl Girl sent to Detroit

    06/10/2012 1:50:46 PM PDT · by Former Proud Canadian · 82 replies
    Windsor Star ^ | June 8, 2012 | Monica Wolfson
    A critically ill eight-year-old child is alive today because a Windsor emergency room doctor refused to wait for provincial approval to send the child to a Detroit hospital, according to the patient’s mother and hospital doctor. “She needed emergency surgery and if you don’t operate she was going to die,” said Dr. David Adekoya, Windsor Regional Hospital’s chief of emergency surgery who was at the hospital when the girl was treated. “She needed to be at a facility within an hour. We needed to make a decision and not wait around.” .... After the transfer to Detroit was arranged, CritiCall...
  • Psychiatric Drug May Kill Cancer Stem Cells

    05/31/2012 11:44:24 PM PDT · by neverdem · 6 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 24 May 2012 | Jocelyn Kaiser
    Enlarge Image Root killer. Cancer-like stem cells treated with the antipsychotic drug thioridazine (right) are scarce compared with control cells. Credit: E. Sachlos et al., Cell, 149 (8 June), ©2012 Elsevier Inc. A well-known drug for treating schizophrenia may be a cancer killer, too. In lab studies, the drug wiped out a precursor to leukemia cells without harming normal cells. That means it could give doctors a long-sought way to eliminate every trace of leukemia in patients so that the cancer can never come back. Even though surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation can get rid of a tumor or leukemia...
  • Chagas: Is tropical disease really the new AIDS?

    05/31/2012 10:53:19 AM PDT · by nuconvert · 15 replies
    Chagas, a tropical disease spread by insects, is causing some fresh concern following an editorial—published earlier this week in a medical journal—that called it "the new AIDS of the Americas." More than 8 million people have been infected by Chagas, most of them in Latin and Central America. But more than 300,000 live in the United States. The editorial, published by the Public Library of Science's Neglected Tropical Diseases, said the spread of the disease is reminiscent of the early years of HIV. "There are a number of striking similarities between people living with Chagas disease and people living with...