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Keyword: middleages

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  • Letters to the Crocodile God

    11/11/2007 10:47:56 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies · 114+ views
    Archaeology ^ | Volume 60 Number 6, November/December 2007 | Marco Merola
    The desert swallowed Tebtunis in the twelfth century A.D., so the town does not appear on any maps. We know its name, and a great deal more, from the tens of thousands of papyrus fragments found throughout the twentieth century by a succession of archaeologists, including those working at the site today. These records, which range from pieces found in ancient garbage dumps, to sheets recycled as wrappings for mummies, to five-yard-long scrolls, include literary texts and records of private contracts and public acts. "The papyri give us particular and historic information that cannot be found elsewhere," says Claudio Gallazzi,...
  • Amateur archaeologist finds Denmark’s oldest crucifix

    05/17/2016 8:42:20 AM PDT · by smokingfrog · 14 replies
    cphpost.dk ^ | 5-17-16 | Christian W
    When amateur archaeologist Dennis Fabricius Holm got off work early last Friday and decided to spend a couple of hours searching a little field in Funen with his metal detector, little did he know he was about to make history. Holm stumbled across one of the most extraordinary finds in recent times near the little town of Aunslev when he discovered a crucifix that dates back about 1,100 years – Denmark’s oldest crucifix ever found. It could rewrite Danish history. “It’s a completely sensational find that dates back to the first half of the 900s,” Malene Refshauge Beck, a curator...
  • Leonardo da Vinci's DNA

    05/10/2016 12:57:03 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Vol. 22 Spring 2016 | editors
    Born in Vinci, Italy, Leonardo died in 1519, age 67, and was buried in Amboise, southwest of Paris. His creative imagination foresaw and described innovations hundreds of years before their invention, such as the helicopter and armored tank. His artistic legacy includes the iconic Mona Lisa and The Last Supper. The idea behind the Project, founded in 2014, has inspired and united anthropologists, art historians, genealogists, microbiologists, and other experts from leading universities and institutes in France, Italy, Spain, Canada and the USA, including specialists from the J. Craig Venter Institute of California, which pioneered the sequencing of the human...
  • A High-Tech Hunt for Lost Art

    10/06/2009 6:22:58 PM PDT · by BGHater · 10 replies · 780+ views
    The New York Times ^ | 06 Oct 2009 | JOHN TIERNEY
    If you believe, as Maurizio Seracini does, that Leonardo da Vinci’s greatest painting is hidden inside a wall in Florence’s city hall, then there are two essential techniques for finding it. As usual, Leonardo anticipated both of them. First, concentrate on scientific gadgetry. After spotting what seemed to be a clue to Leonardo’s painting left by another 16th-century artist, Dr. Seracini led an international team of scientists in mapping every millimeter of the wall and surrounding room with lasers, radar, ultraviolet light and infrared cameras. Once they identified the likely hiding place, they developed devices to detect the painting by...
  • Engineers to search for Leonardo fresco [Battle of Anghiari]

    10/28/2007 11:45:44 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies · 428+ views
    Yahoo! ^ | Monday October 22, 2007 | Frances D'Emilio
    The hunt for the "Battle of Anghiari," ...which Leonardo began in 1505 to commemorate the 15th-century Florentine victory over Milan at Anghiari, a medieval Tuscan town... unfinished when Leonardo left Florence in 1506... was given new impetus about 30 years ago, when Seracini noticed a cryptic message on a fresco in the hall by Giorgio Vasari, a 16th-century artist famed for chronicling Renaissance artists' labors. "Cerca, trova" -- "seek and you shall find" -- said the words on a tiny green flag in the "Battle of Marciano in the Chiana Valley." ...A few years ago, using radar and X-ray scans,...
  • Hunt for Da Vinci painting will resume[Missing "Battle of Anghiari"]

    01/14/2007 3:33:39 AM PST · by FLOutdoorsman · 11 replies · 1,290+ views
    AP ^ | 13 Jan 2007 | ARIEL DAVID
    A real-life Da Vinci mystery, complete with tantalizing clues and sharp art sleuths, may soon be solved, as researchers resume the search for a lost Leonardo masterpiece believed to be hidden within a wall in a Florence palace. Culture Minister Francesco Rutelli and officials in the Tuscan city announced this week they had given approval for renewed exploration in the Palazzo Vecchio, the seat of power for various Florence rulers, including the Medici family in the 16th century. There, some researchers believe, a cavity in a wall may have preserved Leonardo's unfinished painted mural of the "Battle of Anghiari" for...
  • On the trail of the lost Leonardo

    05/16/2006 10:40:00 AM PDT · by Republicanprofessor · 13 replies · 635+ views
    The Times Online UK ^ | 5/16/06 | Mark Irving
    Forget the Da Vinci Code. Dr Seracini thinks he's cracked art's biggest mystery Step by patient step, one man is drawing ever closer to the real Da Vinci mystery: tracking down the master’s greatest painting, lost for four and a half centuries. And it is hidden, he believes, in a room at the heart of political power since the Middle Ages in Florence. For art historians, finding Leonardo’s lost Battle of Anghiari is in the same league as finding the Titanic or the still lost tomb of the Ancient Egyptian architect Imhotep — as big as you can get. The...
  • ART APPECIATION THREAD Is this the Da Vinci Clue? (Vasari fresco holds mystery)

    06/21/2005 3:11:06 PM PDT · by Liz · 16 replies · 1,603+ views
    ASSOCIATED PRESS | Tuesday, June 21, 2005 | ARIEL DAVID
    Maybe Vasari fresco refers to presence of greater art behind it ROME -- "Cerca trova" ("Seek and you shall find") is the tantalizing 5-century-old message painted on a fresco in the council hall of Florence's Palazzo Vecchio. Researchers now believe these cryptic words could be a clue to the location of a long-lost Leonardo da Vinci painting and are pressing local authorities to allow them to search for the masterpiece of Renaissance art. Maurizio Seracini, an Italian art researcher, first noticed the message during a survey of the hall 30 years ago, but his team lacked the technology then to...
  • Medieval Doodles Of A 7-Year Old Boy Hints At The ‘Universality’ Of Daydreaming

    05/02/2016 4:24:27 PM PDT · by Sawdring · 34 replies
    Realm Of History ^ | APRIL 30, 2016 | DATTATREYA MANDAL
    Novgorod or Veliky Novgorod, is one of the major historical cities of Russia, and it started out as a trading station for the Varangians who traveled from the Baltic region to Constantinople by (possibly) late 10th century AD. But as it turns out, this historically significant settlement of northern Russia is also home to around thousand personal ‘tomes’ that are inscribed on bark of birch trees and are almost preserved in perfect condition. In fact, historians hypothesize that there are 20,000 similar specimens still waiting to be salvaged from the conducive anaerobic clay soil layers of the city environs. And...
  • First Discovery Of A Pre-Columbian Port On The Gulf Coast

    04/20/2013 8:33:59 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | Tuesday, April 16, 2013 | INAH
    A retaining pier wall, four shrines and an unusual circular structure dating to over 1000 years old, have recently been found by archaeologists of the National Institute of anthropology and history (INAH) in the pre-Hispanic site of Tabuco in Veracruz... Tabuco is located on the southern bank of the Tuxpan River 5 km from the sea, on a narrow strip of land between the river and to the south are the mangroves of Tumilco. This Huastec site was explored in the 1940s by Gordon Ekholm, who carried out some initial investigations and determined the dates for occupation at between the...
  • 'Sistine Chapel of the Early Middle Ages' buried for a millenium by an earthquake reopens

    03/23/2016 9:35:07 AM PDT · by rdl6989 · 14 replies
    telegraph.co.uk ^ | March 23, 2016 | Nick Squires,
    A 1,500-year-old church which was buried under debris from an earthquake for more than a millennium has reopened to the public after a painstaking restoration of some of the world’s earliest Christian art. The sixth-century church of Santa Maria Antiqua is located in the ancient Roman Forum, at the bottom of the Palatine Hill, where Roman emperors lived for centuries in sumptuous palaces.
  • Persian Coins From Sassanid Era (224-640AD) Discovered In Sweden

    09/08/2002 9:01:14 AM PDT · by blam · 27 replies · 638+ views
    Tehran Times ^ | 9-6-2002
    Persian Coins from Sassanid Era Discovered on Swedish Island BERLIN -- Archaeologists discovered 23 old Persian coins from the Sassanid era on the southeastern Swedish island of Gotland, the press reported here Friday. The latest find, regarded as the biggest archaeological sensation of the century(sic), contained Persian and Byzantine coins in a Viking treasure box which was hidden on the island. The oldest Persian coin in the Viking treasure goes back to 538 A.D. and was specially designed for a king of the Sassanid empire. The discovery is vivid proof that Vikings did sail as far as the Middle East...
  • Danish Archaeologists In Search Of Vikings In Iran

    01/23/2005 3:35:39 PM PST · by blam · 29 replies · 1,017+ views
    Payvand ^ | 1-20-2005
    1/20/05Danish Archaeologists in Search of Vikings in Iran Tehran, Jan. 20 (Iranian Cultural Heritage News Agency) – Researchers from the Copenhagen Museum in Denmark have traveled to the coasts of the Caspian Sea, northern Iran, in search of clues of relationships between Iranians and Vikings. A few years ago, a researcher from the Copenhagen Museum, Nadia Haupt, discovered more than one thousand coins and relics that did not belong to the Danish or other Scandinavian cultures, and therefore set to find out more about the historical roots of the Danish civilization. The ancient items that took the attention of experts...
  • Buddha statue from 6th c found in Viking hoard in Helgo, Sweden

    04/26/2005 11:26:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies · 2,840+ views
    Biblical Archaeology Review ^ | March/April 2005 | "Worldwide" editor
    This fifth or sixth century A.D. statue of the Buddha from northern India was found in a Viking treasure horde on the Swedish island of Helgö. Globalization is clearly not a recent phenomenon... [F]ew people got around as much as the Vikings. From their Scandinavian coves they visited, raided, traded with and settled in lands from Newfoundland to Baghdad. They conquered Britain, terrorized Ireland and France, settled Iceland, raided Spain and ranged throughout the Mediterranean basin. They established a major presence in Russia, the Ukraine and the Crimea, sending their longboats down the Volga into the Black Sea. They raided...
  • Graves Hint At Contact With Romans (Sweden)

    11/09/2006 3:36:23 PM PST · by blam · 25 replies · 623+ views
    The Local ^ | 11-8-2006
    Graves hint at contact with Romans Published: 8th November 2006 19:18 CET Archaeologists excavating ancient graves in western Sweden have found shards from ceramic vessels made in the Roman Empire, in a find that could challenge assumptions about contacts between people in Sweden and the Romans. The graves in Stenungsund, around 45 kilometres north of Gothenburg, have been dated to between the years 1 and 300 AD. The remains of burned bones from two people were found, along with the pieces of ceramic. "There are pieces from four or five vessels in each grave, and we have never previously found...
  • Crystal Amulet Poses Question On Early Christianity (Denmark - 100AD)

    03/09/2007 11:37:30 AM PST · by blam · 88 replies · 2,310+ views
    Denmark DK ^ | 3-9-2007
    9 March 2007 Crystal amulet poses question on early Christianity An overlooked crystal amulet in the National Museum suggests new understandings about Christianity's origins in Denmark King Harold Bluetooth brought Christianity to Denmark roughly 1100 years ago. At least that's what he declared on the Jelling Stone located in Jutland: 'King Haraldr ordered this monument made in memory of Gormr, his father, and in memory of Thyrvé, his mother; that Haraldr who won for himself all of Denmark and Norway and made the Danes Christian.' A tiny crystal amulet in the National Museum's archives suggests something quite different though, that...
  • Report: Ancient Roman graveyard found in suburban Copenhagen

    10/11/2007 11:55:59 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies · 309+ views
    IHT ^ | October 10, 2007 | Associated Press / Roskilde Dagblad
    Archaeologists have discovered a Roman cemetery from about 300 A.D. in suburban Copenhagen with about 30 graves, a newspaper reported Wednesday. "It is something special and rare in Denmark to have so many (ancient Roman) graves in one place," archaeologist Rune Iversen was quoted as saying by the Roskilde Dagblad newspaper. The graveyard's exact location in Ishoej, southwest of downtown Copenhagen, was being kept secret until the archaeologists from the nearby Kroppedal Museum have completed their work, the newspaper wrote... Archaeologists found necklaces and other personal belongings, as well as ceramics for containing food. "It shows that we're dealing with...
  • Swedes Find Viking-Era Arab Coins

    04/04/2008 7:50:12 AM PDT · by blam · 29 replies · 1,087+ views
    BBC ^ | 4-4-2008
    Swedes find Viking-era Arab coinsThe Arab coins reveal where they were minted and the date Swedish archaeologists have discovered a rare hoard of Viking-age silver Arab coins near Stockholm's Arlanda airport. About 470 coins were found on 1 April at an early Iron Age burial site. They date from the 7th to 9th Century, when Viking traders travelled widely. There has been no similar find in that part of Sweden since the 1880s. Most of the coins were minted in Baghdad and Damascus, but some came from Persia and North Africa, said archaeologist Karin Beckman-Thoor. The team from the Swedish...
  • Two Iron Age Sites Discovered in Finland

    09/03/2012 6:21:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Thursday, September 6, 2012 | unattributed
    In the autumn of 2010, local amateur archaeologists discovered a large harbor, dating from around 1000-1200 AD, in Ahvenkoski village, at the mouth of western branch of the Kymijoki River in Finland. The findings included a smithy, a iron smelting furnace, forceps, as well as hundreds of iron objects such as boat rivets, similar to those found at Viking settlements in different parts of the Baltic, Scandinavia, Scotland and Iceland. More recently, in August of 2012 and in the same area, a 2 x 3 meter wide late Viking Age or Crusade period cremation grave was uncovered. Artifacts included a...
  • New Iron Age Sites Discovered in Finland [Roman era]

    01/11/2014 9:30:28 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Friday, January 10, 2014 | unattributed
    Artifacts included a battle axe, a knife, and a bronze buckle, all associated with burned human bones, initially thought to be dated to around 1000 - 1200 CE before analysis. Similar objects have been discovered in the Baltic Sea area and in Ladoga Karelia. Identical cape buckles have also been found in Gotland. But based on the University of Helsinki analysis, the cremation grave finds date to a time that is significantly earlier -- during the Viking Age between 775-980 CE, based on their application of AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) techniques... ...in the area between the towns of Loviisa and...
  • The Viking’s Jötunvillur Runic Code is Solved

    02/12/2014 6:45:06 PM PST · by P.O.E. · 48 replies
    On this stick from the 1200s found in Bergen, two men named Sigurd and Lavran have written their names both in code and with regular runes. This helped runologist Jonas Nordby to solve the Jötunvillur code. For the first time, the Jötunvillur runic code is cracked. It can help to solve the mystery of the Vikings’ secret codes. Why did the Vikings use codes when they wrote runes? Was it a secret message or other reasons that they encrypted runic texts? This, we still know little about. But runologist Jonas Nordby think he may be one step closer to the...
  • A Viking Burial Described by Arab Writer Ahmad ibn Fadlan

    09/27/2014 2:26:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 57 replies
    Thor News ^ | May 12, 2012 | unattributed
    ...A 10th century Arab Muslim writer named Ahmad ibn Fadlan produced a description of a funeral of a Scandinavian, Swedish, chieftain who was on an expedition on the eastern route. The account is a unique source on the ceremonies surrounding the Viking funeral, of a chieftain. The dead chieftain was put in a temporary grave which was covered for ten days until they had sewn new clothes for him. One of his thrall women volunteered to join him in the afterlife and she was guarded day and night, being given a great amount of intoxicating drinks while she sang happily......
  • Scandinavian trade 'triggered' the Viking Age

    05/09/2015 6:31:38 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | May 7, 2015 (bravo, Cameron!) | David Garner, University of York
    Archaeologists from the University of York have played a key role in Anglo-Danish research which has suggested the dawn of the Viking Age may have been much earlier -- and less violent -- than previously believed. The study by Dr Steve Ashby, of the Department of Archaeology at York, working with colleagues from York and Aarhus University, identified the first signs of the Viking Age around 70 years before the first raid on England. Previously, the start of the Viking Age has been dated to a June 793 raid by Norwegian Vikings on Lindisfarne. But the new research published in...
  • Why was a 9th century Viking woman buried with a ring that says ‘for Allah’ on it?

    02/05/2016 12:57:25 PM PST · by beaversmom · 90 replies
    Washington Post ^ | March 18, 2015 | Adam Taylor
    By Adam Taylor March 18, 2015 Follow @mradamtaylor (Statens historiska museum / Christer Ahlin) In the modern-era, Scandinavian countries have become known for their sometimes awkward embrace of migrants from the Arab and Muslim world. But the history behind that relationship goes back far further than you might expect.Consider the case of a ring discovered in a Viking grave in Birka, a historic trading center in what is now Sweden. The woman in the grave died in the 9th century and was discovered around a thousand years later by the famous Swedish archaeologist Hjalmar Stolpe, who spent years excavating...
  • 1,100 year-old Denmark crucifix ‘may change history’

    03/17/2016 12:25:44 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 71 replies
    www.thelocal.dk ^ | 03-17-2016 | Staff
    A cross discovered by an amateur Danish archaeologist may "change history" according to an expert, who believes the cross may date from before Christianity is thought to have reached Denmark. An amateur archaeologist on the island of Funen made a startling discovery last week – a necklace resembling Jesus on the cross. But after posting a picture of the discovery on Facebook, Dennis Fabricius Holm quickly found that the item may have a lot more significance than he had initially thought. “I finished work early last Friday, so I decided to spend a couple of hours searching with my metal...
  • What Can the Middle Ages Teach Us About US Naval Strategy?

    03/12/2015 11:35:30 AM PDT · by C19fan · 33 replies
    The Diplomat ^ | March 12, 2015 | Franz-Stefan Gady
    “To wage war, you need first of all money; second, you need money, and third, you also need money,” goes the famous saying of Raimondo Graf Montecúccoli, an Italian who served in the armies of the Holy Roman Empire of German Nations. Consequently, with the debate on the U.S. Navy’s budget for the next fiscal year raging on (see here and here), it is perhaps time to assess not how much money is spent on the American navy, but whether it is spent wisely. The discussion surrounding China’s anti-access/area denial (A2/AD) capabilities and the costs that these capabilities impose on...
  • 800-year-old shipwreck found off Salento coast

    12/28/2015 10:37:12 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    The Local ^ | Monday, December 28, 2015 | sources
    The wreck of a ship, thought to date back to either the 12th or 13th century, has been found off the coast of Salento. The sunken ship, made almost entirely of wood and measuring 18 metres by 4.5 metres, has lain for years untouched near the coastline of Salento, in the southern tip of the Puglia region, La Stampa reported. The wreck was found in the Porto Cesareo Marine Protected Area, where human activity is restricted in order to conserve the area's natural resources. Pasquale De Braco, a fisherman and adviser to the protected area, notified local authorities of its...
  • Archaeologists unearth new evidence of Roman and medieval Leicester

    12/12/2015 10:23:29 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    University of Leicester Press Office ^ | December 10, 2015 | posted by ap507, contact Mathew Morris, John Thomas
    Archaeologists, led by John Thomas and Mathew Morris of ULAS, have been investigating a series of medieval and post-medieval backyards dating from the 12th century through to the 16th century... Evidence recorded includes stone-lined pits (possibly storage pits or cisterns), rubbish pits, latrines, wells, boundary walls and a possible late 15th or 16th century cellar. Such activity, and the evidence carefully collected and recorded from it, will give important new insights into the lifestyles and industry of the people living along one of Leicester's principle medieval streets... The site lies at the heart of Leicester's historic core, close to significant...
  • Viking hoard discovery reveals little-known king 'airbrushed from history'

    12/12/2015 5:43:43 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies
    A hoard of Viking coins could change our understanding of English history, after showing how Alfred the Great 'airbrushed' out a rival king A Viking hoard discovered by an amateur metal detectorist could prompt the re-writing of English history, after experts claimed it shows how Alfred the Great "airbrushed" a rival king from history. Ceolwulf II of Mercia is barely mentioned in contemporary records and largely forgotten by history, only briefly described in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle as an "unwise King's thane". But as of today, his reputation might be rescued after a haul of coins dug up after more than...
  • Tuscan 'Excalibur' Mystery To Be Unearthed

    03/02/2004 7:24:15 PM PST · by blam · 88 replies · 1,553+ views
    Discovery ^ | 3-1-2004 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Tuscan 'Excalibur' Mystery to be Unearthed By Rossella Lorenzi, Discovery News The Sword in The Stone March 1, 2004 — Archaeological digging might soon unveil the mystery surrounding a sword buried in a Gothic abbey in Tuscany, Italian researchers announced. Known as the "sword in the stone," the Tuscan "Excalibur" is said to have been plunged into a rock in 1180 by Galgano Guidotti, a medieval knight who renounced war and worldly goods to become a hermit. Built in Galgano's memory, the evocative Gothic abbey at Montesiepi, near the city of Siena, still preserves the sword in a little chapel....
  • Tuscany's Excalibur Is The Real Thing, Say Scientists

    09/24/2001 7:46:55 PM PDT · by blam · 53 replies · 2,702+ views
    The Observer ^ | 9-16-2001 | Rory Carroll
    Tuscany's Excalibur is the real thing, say scientists Rory Carroll in Rome Sunday September 16, 2001 The Observer The sword of St Galgano, said to have been plunged into a rock by a medieval Tuscan knight, has been authenticated, bolstering Italy's version of the Excalibur legend. Galgano Guidotti, a noble from Chiusdano, near Siena, allegedly split the stone with his sword in 1180 after renouncing war to become a hermit. For centuries the sword was assumed to be a fake. but research revealed last week has dated its metal to the twelfth century. Only the hilt, wooden grip and ...
  • There's a Real Sword in the Stone, & It Belonged to the RCC’s First Official Saint

    10/22/2014 9:09:45 AM PDT · by millegan · 23 replies
    ChurchPOP ^ | 2014 | ChurchPOP
    You saw the Disney movie as a kid. You may have read the book. But did you know some of it was based on real history? While the story of King Arthur, Merlin, and all the rest may not be true, there really is a centuries-old sword stuck in a stone. In the small Italian town of Chiusdino, there’s a small chapel near Saint Galgano Abbey known as Montesiepi chapel. And inside you’ll find a big slab of stone in the floor with the handle of a sword sticking out of it.
  • The Sword in the Stone at the Monte Siepi Chapel

    12/08/2015 11:55:37 AM PST · by Talisker · 47 replies
    Historic Mysteries ^ | JULY 26, 2011 | Shelly Barclay
    Judging by a real artifact, the sword in the stone legend may be partially based on true events. No one pulled a sword from a stone and went on to become a king, as far as we know. In fact, the sword that exists in reality rather than legend is still stuck in its stone. However, there is no denying that such a sword exists. The stone and sword in question are located at Monte Siepi Chapel in the San Galgano Abbey in Tuscany. The abbey is in Italy and the history of it has naught to do with England....
  • Vikings' mysterious abandonment of Greenland was not due to climate change, study suggests

    12/07/2015 6:24:36 PM PST · by skeptoid · 47 replies
    The Washington Post via Alaska Dispatch News ^ | December 7, 2015 | Chris Mooney
    It has often been cited as one of the classic examples of how changes in climate have shaped human history. Circa the year 985, Erik the Red led 25 ships from Iceland to Greenland, launching a Norse settlement there and giving the vast ice continent the name "Greenland." Within just a few decades, the Norse -- sometimes also dubbed Vikings -- would make it to Newfoundland as well. They maintained settlements of up to a few thousand people in southwest Greenland for several centuries, keeping livestock and hunting seals, building churches whose ruins still stand today, and sending back valuable...
  • Syphilis widespread in Central Europe even before Columbus' voyage to America

    11/23/2015 9:54:22 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    Journal of Biological and Clinical Anthropology via Health Canal ^ | November 19, 2015 | Johanna Sophia Gaul, Karl Grossschmidt, Christian Gusenbauer and Fabian Kanz
    In 1495, a "new" disease spread throughout Europe: syphilis. Christopher Columbus was said to have brought this sexually transmitted disease back from his voyage to America. At least, that has been the accepted theory up until now. Using morphological and structural evidence, researchers from the Department of Forensic Medicine and the Center for Anatomy and Cell Biology (bone laboratory) at MedUni Vienna have now identified several cases of congenital syphilis dating back to as early as 1320 AD in skeletons from excavations at the cathedral square of St. Polten, Austria... Congenital syphilis, which is passed from a pregnant mother to...
  • Chartres Cathedral: Sooty-Dark or Sparkling White, It’s Still Saving Souls

    10/24/2015 2:00:54 PM PDT · by NYer · 60 replies
    Aletelia ^ | October 24, 2015 | WILLIAM NEWTON
    If you have not been following the art and architecture comentariat of late—and after all, that’s what you read me for—then you may be unaware of a tempest brewing around the restoration of the Cathedral of Notre Dame in Chartres, France. Universally considered to be one of the greatest works of architecture on the planet, the Medieval architecture of Chartres and its magnificent stained-glass windows have inspired writers, artists and composers, as well as many imitators. Beginning in 2008 the French government began to restore the building and in the process has removed much of the soot, dust and...
  • Hiker finds 1,200-yr-old Viking sword

    10/21/2015 2:09:26 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 61 replies
    The Local ^ | Wednesday, October 21, 2015 | unattributed
    A hiker travelling the ancient route between western and eastern Norway found a 1,200-year-old Viking sword after sitting down to rest after a short fishing trip. The sword, found at Haukeli in central southern Norway will be sent for conservation at the The University Museum of Bergen. Jostein Aksdal, an archeologist with Hordaland County said that the sword was in such good condition that if it was given a new grip and a polish, it could be used today. "The sword was found in very good condition. It is very special to get into a sword that is merely lacking...
  • Hiker taking a rest finds a 1,200-year-old Viking sword in great condition

    10/24/2015 5:33:35 PM PDT · by ETL · 31 replies
    FoxNews.Com ^ | October 23, 2015 | Jenn Gidman
    Goran Olsen was enjoying a leisurely hike recently in Norway when he stopped near the fishing village of Haukeli, about 150 miles west of Oslo. Under some rocks along a well-traversed path, he made a discovery that's now the envy of every detectorist in Scandinavia: a 30-inch wrought-iron Viking sword, estimated to be about 1,200 years old, CNN reports. One would think a sword that old would be so decrepit it could never be wielded again, but a Hordaland County archaeologist says it just needs a little polish and a new grip to be good to go. "The sword was...
  • Carly Fiorina Says Degree In Medieval History Will Help Her Defeat Isis

    10/05/2015 8:07:39 AM PDT · by jimbo123 · 45 replies
    ABC News ^ | 10/5/15 | JORDYN PHELPS
    For over three decades, Carly Fiorina's bachelor's degree from Stanford University in medieval history and philosophy has had little real-world application. But as she mounts a presidential bid, the Republican candidate says her degree is finally of use as she considers how she would deal with ISIS as commander-in-chief. "Finally my degree in medieval history and philosophy has come in handy," Fiorina said Sunday night, "because what ISIS wants to do is drive us back to the Middle Ages, literally." Fiorina was responding to a question from a member of the military at a town hall in Windham, New Hampshire,...
  • Answering Long-standing Questions about Enigmatic Little Ice Age

    02/03/2012 9:32:32 AM PST · by null and void · 41 replies
    A new study appears to answer contentious questions about the onset and cause of Earth’s Little Ice Age, a period of cooling temperatures that began after the Middle Ages and lasted into the late 19th century. According to the new study, the Little Ice Age began abruptly between A.D. 1275 and 1300, triggered by repeated, explosive volcanism and sustained by a self-perpetuating sea ice-ocean feedback system in the North Atlantic Ocean, according to University of Colorado Boulder Professor Gifford Miller, who led the study. The primary evidence comes from radiocarbon dates from dead vegetation emerging from rapidly melting icecaps on Baffin...
  • Did King Harold II Die With an Arrow in His Eye?

    05/09/2015 9:08:43 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 43 replies
    NBC News ^ | October 13, 2014 | unattributed
    King Harold II, the last Anglo-Saxon king of England, has long been thought to have been killed at the Battle of Hastings in 1066. But British archaeologists are to test a theory he survived on the anniversary of the famous battle this Tuesday. The battle, on Oct. 14, 1066, marked a turning point in British history as the Normans conquered medieval England. There are different accounts of how he was killed, one of them pictured in the Bayeux Tapestry, which appears to have him gripping an arrow that had pierced his eye. Another account has Harold being killed by knights...
  • Climate Cycles in China as Revealed by a Stalagmite from Buddha Cave(Journal Review)

    07/08/2003 3:48:19 PM PDT · by PeaceBeWithYou · 65 replies · 1,131+ views
    CO2 Science Magazine ^ | July 08, 2003 | Staff
    Reference Paulsen, D.E., Li, H.-C. and Ku, T.-L. 2003. Climate variability in central China over the last 1270 years revealed by high-resolution stalagmite records. Quaternary Science Reviews 22: 691-701. What was done In the words of the authors, "high-resolution records of ð13C and ð18O in stalagmite SF-1 from Buddha Cave [33°40'N, 109°05'E] are used to infer changes in climate in central China for the last 1270 years in terms of warmer, colder, wetter and drier conditions." What was learned Among the climatic episodes evident in the authors' data were "those corresponding to the Medieval Warm Period, Little Ice Age and...
  • Considering the Crusades in the Context of the Current Conflict with Radical Islamists

    02/17/2015 6:53:46 AM PST · by Salvation · 72 replies
    Archdiocese of Washington ^ | 02-16-15 | Msgr. Charles Pope
    Considering the Crusades in the Context of the Current Conflict with Radical Islamists By: Msgr. Charles PopeRecent and persistent attacks by radical Muslims, especially the most recent beheadings of 21 Egyptian Christians, have many asking what can or should be done to end such atrocities. Military actions by numerous countries, including our own, are already underway. Most feel quite justified in these actions and many are calling for more concerted efforts to eliminate ISIS and related zealots who seem to know no pity, no reason, and no limits. I do not write here to opine on the need for...
  • Anglo-Saxon cow bile and garlic potion kills MRSA

    03/30/2015 2:58:04 PM PDT · by DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis · 81 replies
    Telegraph UK ^ | 3/30/15 | Sarah Knapton
    A thousand-year-old medieval remedy for eye infections which was discovered in a manuscript in the British Library has been found to kill the superbug MRSA. Anglo-Saxon expert Dr Christina Lee, from the School of English, at Nottingham University, recreated the 10th century potion to see if it really worked as an antibacterial remedy. The 'eyesalve' recipe calls for two species of Allium (garlic and onion or leek), wine and oxgall (bile from a cow’s stomach). It describes a very specific method of making the topical solution including the use of a brass vessel to brew it, a strainer to purify...
  • Medieval Education and the University

    03/21/2015 10:07:12 AM PDT · by walkinginthedesert · 5 replies
    The foundation of Education and the University during the Middle AgesAnti Catholic HistoryIt is the main point of this section to point out some of the contributions which the Catholic Church made specifically in regards to education and the University in the Middle Ages. Before I start this section I think it would be good to point out two simple facts regarding this time period. The first one is simply the fact that much of the history regarding this time period (at least until recent scholarship) was vehemently anti-Catholic which Hilaire Belloc points out in his book Europe and the...
  • The Not "So" Dark Ages

    03/21/2015 10:09:27 AM PDT · by walkinginthedesert · 28 replies
    A Reassessment of the Medieval TimesThe Medieval era is perhaps one, if not the most misunderstood times in history. Ask people what they know of the medieval times, and most will tell you that they were a time of mere superstition, rampant barbarism and wars, oppression of women and minorities, scientific ignorance, totalitarianism, and a host of many other things.Nothing could be further from the truth, not in an era were reasonable thinking with scholasticism and Thomism were present, or the development of education, including that of the university system. An era were scientific development was starting out, and were...
  • Bavarian Archaeologists Find 250-Year-Old Pretzel

    03/12/2015 4:12:23 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 28 replies
    The Local ^ | 11 Mar 2015
    Archaeologists have made a remarkable - and delicious - discovery in Bavaria, where during an excavation they dug up a 250 year-old pretzel. Silvia Codreanau-Windauer from the Bavarian Bureau for the Conservation of Historic Monuments confirmed that: "this is definitely the oldest pretzel ever found" - although she would give no word on whether it was past its expiration date. Alongside the remains of the pretzel, archaeologists also found the charred remains of a bread roll and a croissant - suggesting that someone missed out on quite the historical breakfast buffet in the 18th century, the period the find has...
  • The Real History of the Crusades

    02/11/2015 5:54:13 AM PST · by Biggirl · 28 replies
    Crisis Magazine ^ | March 19, 2011 | Thomas F. Madden
    Many historians had been trying for some time to set the record straight on the Crusades — misconceptions are all too common. These historians are not revisionists, but mainstream scholars offering the fruit of several decades of very careful, very serious scholarship. For them, current interest is a “teaching moment,” an opportunity to explain the Crusades while people are actually listening. It won’t last long, so here goes.
  • How Dark Were the Dark Ages? (Video)

    02/05/2015 10:40:09 PM PST · by Arthur McGowan · 61 replies
    Prager University ^ | 26 Jan 2015 | Anthony Esolen
    Were the Middle Ages, also known as the Dark Ages, characterized by oppression, ignorance, and backwardness in areas like human rights, science, health, and the arts? Or were they marked by progress and tolerance? Anthony Esolen, an English Literature professor at Providence College, explains.
  • Archaeologists find 'lost' medieval village... [Scotland]

    05/01/2014 12:13:06 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 49 replies
    Culture24 ^ | 28 April 2014 | Ben Miller
    German and Dutch pots, jugs and mugs, coins including an American cent, spindles, a sheep skull and horse teeth have been found by archaeologists digging in the Scottish Borders, where doors integrated into walls have revealed a “lost” Medieval village of families, farmyards and hearths. Between Edinburgh and the Northumberland National Park, the outskirts of Selkirk have previously been associated with the Battle of Philiphaugh, a 1645 victory for the Scottish Covenanter Army against their under-strength Royalist enemies... A pipeline-laying project by Scottish Water, though, has found stone brick structures including two pivot stones, used as hinges for doors between...