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Keyword: middleages

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  • The Shroud Of Turin Is Not Jesus' Burial Cloths

    07/17/2018 1:36:35 AM PDT · by Sontagged · 60 replies
    Patheos ^ | March 2, 2015 | Kermit Zarley
    Tonight, CNN presented a one hour television documentary special entitled “Finding Jesus: Faith, Fact, Forgery.” I thought this title was inappropriate because the entire episode was about whether or not the Shroud of Turin is the burial cloth of Jesus. Thus, the title should have had “Shroud of Turin” in it or the like. CNN did some advertising of this special, so I think they were a bit deceptive about whole thing. They interviewed some scholars, including Ben Witherington III who is a friend of mine. I am always surprised by the attention given the Shroud of Turin by many...
  • Bloodstains on Shroud of Turin are probably fake, experts say

    07/16/2018 12:19:27 AM PDT · by Simon Green · 141 replies
    Fox News ^ | 07/15/18 | Christopher Carbone
    The Shroud of Turin, which has been revered by some Christians as the burial cloth of Jesus, could be a fake, according to a new forensic investigation. The investigation into the bloodstain pattern on the cloth was reported Tuesday in the Journal of Forensic Sciences and is apparently the first such analysis of the controversial shroud. Held in the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist in Turin, Italy, the shroud shows the image of a crucified man and has been analyzed and scrutinized for many, many years. The Vatican regards it as an icon, rather than a religious relic—and the...
  • Indiana Legend Says Welsh Settlers Arrived in the 12th Century

    05/01/2018 12:23:08 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 67 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | September 3, 1989 | Jodi Perras
    On a rugged bluff overlooking the Ohio River, known locally as "Devil's Backbone," centuries of overgrowth obscures a secret of history... In 1799, early settlers found six skeletons clad in breastplates bearing a Welsh coat of arms. Indian legends told of "yellow-haired giants" who settled in Kentucky, southern Indiana, southern Ohio and Tennessee -- a region they called "the Dark and Forbidden Land." Archeologists debunk the legend. They say that evidence indicates that the natives of the region once conducted a vigorous trading network nearby and buried their dead on the bluff... Upstream about 14 miles from Louisville, Ky., the...
  • Archaeologists Find Traces of 251 AD Invasion of Roman Empire by Goths [tr]

    04/03/2018 2:24:44 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    Archaeology In Bulgaria ^ | March 28, 2018 | Ivan Dikov (ouch!)
    Archaeologists have unearthed part of an unknown Roman Era public building in the southern Bulgarian city of Plovdiv which bears traces from the Invasion of the Roman Empire by the Goths in 250-251 AD when the Goths went as far south as Philipopolis (Plovdiv's predecessor) and ransacked it... emergency excavations at Plovdiv's Antiquity Odeon made headlines from the start when the archaeological team discovered a medieval grave from the 11th-12th century with an arrow in the chest of the buried person. Subsequent digs, however, revealed deeper a room from an unknown Antiquity building with three floor levels built one on...
  • Mass grave of 300 mutilated bodies in Derbyshire is the burial site of the Viking Great Army [tr]

    02/03/2018 4:12:21 AM PST · by C19fan · 18 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | February 2, 2018 | Phoebe Weston
    A mass grave of 300 bodies uncovered in Derbyshire could be the burial site of the Viking Great Army's war dead, a new study has found. The mass grave was found in Repton in the 1980s and dating techniques at the time suggested it consisted of bones collected over several centuries.
  • The Viking Great Army: A tale of conflict and adaptation played out in northern England

    03/26/2018 5:15:42 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | Monday, February 12, 2018 | Daniel Weiss
    The Viking Great Army's arrival in 865 was recounted in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle:.. According to the Chronicle, the Vikings spent years campaigning through the territory of the four Anglo-Saxon kingdoms -- East Anglia, Mercia, Northumbria, and Wessex... By 880, all the kingdoms had fallen to the Vikings except Wessex, with which they made peace... Excavations conducted [at Repton, the capital of Mercia] between 1974 and 1993 by Martin Biddle and his late wife, Birthe Kjolbye-Biddle, had revealed a small, heavily defended enclosure covering just an acre or two... some experts took these findings to suggest that the Great Army was...
  • A Medieval Coin in New England Soil

    09/12/2010 3:35:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    Beachcombing 'blog ^ | September 11, 2010 | eponymous blogger
    It was only when the coin was later identified as Viking that the game heated up. By then poor Mellegren -- who, Beachcombing must say was someone with a reputation for integrity -- had passed away. Beachcombing has no illusions about much of the nonsense written about pre-Columbian visits to North America. But in this case he would give a thumb and a half followed by two cheers and three quarters. There is a good chance that this really is what it seems: A European coin that found its way to North America in the twelfth century. Minted in Norway,...
  • Maine Coon Cat (Straight Dope Mailbag)

    08/05/2004 11:19:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies · 524+ views
    Straight Dope Science Advisory Board ^ | 29-Jun-1999 | SDSTAFF Jill
    One of the oldest breeds of cats in North America is the Maine Coon Cat, and some say 40% of the originals had extra toes. One article said it evolved as a "snowshoe foot" to help these cats walk in the snow. Cute story, but probably [expletive deleted] ...The breed closest to the Maine Coon Cat is the Norwegian Forest Cat which evolved in the same climate and lends credence to one theory that ancestors of the Coon Cat may have even come to the New World onboard Viking ships. I like that theory best.
  • Winterfyre Norwegian Forest Cats

    01/06/2005 8:32:07 AM PST · by theFIRMbss · 107 replies · 1,500+ views
    Winterfyre website ^ | 2005 | Winterfyre
    Philosophy When our breeding endeavor began, we were fortunate to have the opportunity to gain exposure and knowledge through contacts in both the United States and in Europe. Differing opinions are a staple in any community, and the Norwegian Forest cat lovers/breeders are certainly no exception to this rule. We have learned from observing breeding programs and participating in shows both in the United States and in Europe and have developed our own ideas about the Norwegian Forest cat, but our end goal is ultimately the same as breeders around the globe. Our philosophy is quite simple, taking into consideration...
  • VIKING KITTIES

    09/22/2016 1:31:05 PM PDT · by Einherjar · 32 replies
    FACEBOOK ^ | SEPT 21 | SAMME
    You’ve heard of ancient Egyptian cats. But Viking cats? Scientists studying cat DNA say that they found cat remains at a Viking site dating to between the eighth and eleventh century A.D. in northern Germany.
  • The Secret History of the Vikings: New DNA-driven research...

    03/26/2018 2:49:50 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 61 replies
    Discover Magazine ^ | March 2018 | Gemma Tarlach
    More than a thousand years ago, the Vikings arrived on the world stage as swiftly as their longships cut through the waves. They raided and traded, conquered and colonized. They left their mark on four continents -- not just at archaeological sites, but also in the flora and fauna, the languages and local populations. The Viking Age did not last long -- it's generally defined as beginning in the late eighth century and ending in most areas by the early 12th century -- but the explorers still capture our imagination today. "The Vikings epitomized the freedom and strength we like...
  • Medieval 'pot o' gold' discovered by construction workers

    03/16/2018 1:48:23 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 43 replies
    Just in time for Saint Patrick’s Day — two construction workers in Holland have discovered a real-life “pot o’ gold.” The workers from water company Oasen made the stunning find when they were laying pipes in the new town of Hoef and Haag, in the province of Utrecht, LiveScience reports. During the construction work, they dug up a medieval cooking pot that contained 12 gold and 462 silver coins. The coins have been dated to the 15th century. It's unclear at this point who will keep the coins. After finding the pot, "it literally and figuratively rained coins," the company...
  • 5 things you (probably) didn’t know about Henry VIII

    01/28/2018 9:43:51 AM PST · by beaversmom · 195 replies
    History Extra ^ | January 25, 2018
    1 Henry VIII was slim and athletic for most of his life At six feet two inches tall, Henry VIII stood head and shoulders above most of his court. He had an athletic physique and excelled at sports, regularly showing off his prowess in the jousting arena. Having inherited the good looks of his grandfather, Edward IV, in 1515 Henry was described as “the handsomest potentate I have ever set eyes on…” and later an “Adonis”, “with an extremely fine calf to his leg, his complexion very fair…and a round face so very beautiful, that it would become a pretty...
  • Crusading 101

    03/05/2018 5:45:05 PM PST · by marshmallow · 6 replies
    Catholic World Report ^ | 1/3/18 | Timothy D. Lusch
    How to Plan a Crusade: Religious War in the High Middle Ages, by Oxford professor Christopher Tyerman, demolishes the legend that Western crusaders were mere irrational rabble from Dark Age rubble.It is a mark of our hyper-political and hypocritical age that those who are most ignorant of the crusades should condemn the perceived ignorance of medieval crusaders. Sprinkle in accusations of greed, thuggery, and a moral equivalence with ISIS (see former President Obama’s speech at the National Prayer Breakfast on February 5, 2015) and it pretty much sums up what many people think they know about the crusades. But popular...
  • Possible Crusader Ring Depicting St. Nicholas Unearthed in Israel

    02/28/2018 5:31:11 PM PST · by SJackson · 27 replies
    Live Science ^ | February 28, 2018 | Laura Geggel
    About 700 years ago, a bronze ring depicting St. Nicholas — the saint who inspired the modern-day figure of Santa Claus — slipped off the finger of its owner, likely either a crusader or a pilgrim traveling to the Holy Land. The ring lay buried in the dirt for hundreds of years, until a gardener in Israel found it last week while weeding in Lower Galilee. The gardener, Dekel Ben-Shitrit, 26, turned the unusual ring over to Israel's National Treasures Department, where archaeologists dated the metal artifact to between the 12th and 15th centuries, during the Middle Ages. [The Holy...
  • Are we closer to solving the mystery of the 600-year-old Voynich manuscript?

    01/26/2018 9:01:47 AM PST · by mairdie · 57 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 26 January 2018 | Phoebe Weston
    For centuries people have tried to decipher the meaning of the Voynich manuscript, and now a computer scientist claims to have cracked it using AI. The 600-year-old document is described as 'the world's most mysterious medieval text', and is full of illustrations of exotic plants, stars, and mysterious human figures. The 240-page manual's intriguing mix of elegant writing and drawings of strange plants and naked women has some believing it holds magical powers. But even the cryptographers from Bletchley Park, the team that broke the Nazi enigma code, couldn't make sense of the manuscript. Now a computer scientist says the...
  • Maybe Rats Aren't to Blame for the Black Death

    01/15/2018 6:21:35 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 70 replies
    Nationak Geographic ^ | JANUARY 15, 2018 | Michael Greshko
    A provocative new study suggests that medieval plagues spread via fleas and lice on people.Rats have long been blamed for spreading the parasites that transmitted plague throughout medieval Europe and Asia, killing millions of people. Now, a provocative new study has modeled these long-ago outbreaks and suggests that the maligned rodents may not be the culprits after all. The study, published on Monday in the journal PNAS, instead points the finger at human parasites—such as fleas and body lice—for primarily spreading plague bacteria during the Second Pandemic, a series of devastating outbreaks that spanned from the 1300s to the early...
  • The mummified child who was killed by hepatitis 500 years ago (tr)

    01/04/2018 11:47:36 PM PST · by Oshkalaboomboom · 14 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | Jan 04, 2018 | Phoebe Weston
    A medieval child whose mummified body was thought to show the earliest known case of smallpox was really suffering from hepatitis, scientists say. DNA analysis of the 16th century remains, found in the Basilica of Saint Domenico Maggiore in Naples, revealed the child was infected with an ancient strain of the hepatitis B virus (HBV). The team believe their findings could help shed new light on the ancient origins of the disease which, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO), kills 1.5 million people a year. Previous scientific analysis of the 16th century remains - which did not include DNA...
  • Five year project to investigate the ‘lost kingdoms’ of Northwest Europe

    12/17/2016 10:50:34 AM PST · by LouieFisk · 16 replies
    Archaeology News from Past Horizons ^ | December 16, 2016 | Archaeology News from Past Horizons
    The nature of the societies that filled the chasm left by the demise of the Roman Empire in the 5th century AD remains one of the relative unknowns of history. While there has been focus on the ways in which famous kingdoms such as those of Anglo-Saxon England or Frankia emerged, there has been little study of how the societies that lived beyond the limits of the Roman world were similarly transformed in this period.
  • 17th century alchemist's scroll giving instructions for the 'elixir of life'

    12/17/2017 2:27:40 PM PST · by mairdie · 62 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 17 December 2017 | Sophie Inge
    An incredibly rare 17th century alchemist's scroll giving instructions for the elixir of life has sold for a magical 585,000 [pounds]. The delicate manuscript was an illustrative methodology of 15th century scientist George Ripley's recipe for the philosophers' stone which made a potion that supposedly granted the drinker eternal life. It also gave instructions for turning base metals into gold. Although the instructions were impossibly cryptic - there is one reference to using dragon's blood - it didn't stop scholars of the time, including Sir Isaac Newton, giving it a go.