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Keyword: middleages

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  • Medieval 'pot o' gold' discovered by construction workers

    03/16/2018 1:48:23 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 42 replies
    Just in time for Saint Patrick’s Day — two construction workers in Holland have discovered a real-life “pot o’ gold.” The workers from water company Oasen made the stunning find when they were laying pipes in the new town of Hoef and Haag, in the province of Utrecht, LiveScience reports. During the construction work, they dug up a medieval cooking pot that contained 12 gold and 462 silver coins. The coins have been dated to the 15th century. It's unclear at this point who will keep the coins. After finding the pot, "it literally and figuratively rained coins," the company...
  • 5 things you (probably) didn’t know about Henry VIII

    01/28/2018 9:43:51 AM PST · by beaversmom · 195 replies
    History Extra ^ | January 25, 2018
    1 Henry VIII was slim and athletic for most of his life At six feet two inches tall, Henry VIII stood head and shoulders above most of his court. He had an athletic physique and excelled at sports, regularly showing off his prowess in the jousting arena. Having inherited the good looks of his grandfather, Edward IV, in 1515 Henry was described as “the handsomest potentate I have ever set eyes on…” and later an “Adonis”, “with an extremely fine calf to his leg, his complexion very fair…and a round face so very beautiful, that it would become a pretty...
  • Crusading 101

    03/05/2018 5:45:05 PM PST · by marshmallow · 6 replies
    Catholic World Report ^ | 1/3/18 | Timothy D. Lusch
    How to Plan a Crusade: Religious War in the High Middle Ages, by Oxford professor Christopher Tyerman, demolishes the legend that Western crusaders were mere irrational rabble from Dark Age rubble.It is a mark of our hyper-political and hypocritical age that those who are most ignorant of the crusades should condemn the perceived ignorance of medieval crusaders. Sprinkle in accusations of greed, thuggery, and a moral equivalence with ISIS (see former President Obama’s speech at the National Prayer Breakfast on February 5, 2015) and it pretty much sums up what many people think they know about the crusades. But popular...
  • Possible Crusader Ring Depicting St. Nicholas Unearthed in Israel

    02/28/2018 5:31:11 PM PST · by SJackson · 27 replies
    Live Science ^ | February 28, 2018 | Laura Geggel
    About 700 years ago, a bronze ring depicting St. Nicholas — the saint who inspired the modern-day figure of Santa Claus — slipped off the finger of its owner, likely either a crusader or a pilgrim traveling to the Holy Land. The ring lay buried in the dirt for hundreds of years, until a gardener in Israel found it last week while weeding in Lower Galilee. The gardener, Dekel Ben-Shitrit, 26, turned the unusual ring over to Israel's National Treasures Department, where archaeologists dated the metal artifact to between the 12th and 15th centuries, during the Middle Ages. [The Holy...
  • Are we closer to solving the mystery of the 600-year-old Voynich manuscript?

    01/26/2018 9:01:47 AM PST · by mairdie · 57 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 26 January 2018 | Phoebe Weston
    For centuries people have tried to decipher the meaning of the Voynich manuscript, and now a computer scientist claims to have cracked it using AI. The 600-year-old document is described as 'the world's most mysterious medieval text', and is full of illustrations of exotic plants, stars, and mysterious human figures. The 240-page manual's intriguing mix of elegant writing and drawings of strange plants and naked women has some believing it holds magical powers. But even the cryptographers from Bletchley Park, the team that broke the Nazi enigma code, couldn't make sense of the manuscript. Now a computer scientist says the...
  • Maybe Rats Aren't to Blame for the Black Death

    01/15/2018 6:21:35 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 70 replies
    Nationak Geographic ^ | JANUARY 15, 2018 | Michael Greshko
    A provocative new study suggests that medieval plagues spread via fleas and lice on people.Rats have long been blamed for spreading the parasites that transmitted plague throughout medieval Europe and Asia, killing millions of people. Now, a provocative new study has modeled these long-ago outbreaks and suggests that the maligned rodents may not be the culprits after all. The study, published on Monday in the journal PNAS, instead points the finger at human parasites—such as fleas and body lice—for primarily spreading plague bacteria during the Second Pandemic, a series of devastating outbreaks that spanned from the 1300s to the early...
  • The mummified child who was killed by hepatitis 500 years ago (tr)

    01/04/2018 11:47:36 PM PST · by Oshkalaboomboom · 14 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | Jan 04, 2018 | Phoebe Weston
    A medieval child whose mummified body was thought to show the earliest known case of smallpox was really suffering from hepatitis, scientists say. DNA analysis of the 16th century remains, found in the Basilica of Saint Domenico Maggiore in Naples, revealed the child was infected with an ancient strain of the hepatitis B virus (HBV). The team believe their findings could help shed new light on the ancient origins of the disease which, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO), kills 1.5 million people a year. Previous scientific analysis of the 16th century remains - which did not include DNA...
  • Five year project to investigate the ‘lost kingdoms’ of Northwest Europe

    12/17/2016 10:50:34 AM PST · by LouieFisk · 16 replies
    Archaeology News from Past Horizons ^ | December 16, 2016 | Archaeology News from Past Horizons
    The nature of the societies that filled the chasm left by the demise of the Roman Empire in the 5th century AD remains one of the relative unknowns of history. While there has been focus on the ways in which famous kingdoms such as those of Anglo-Saxon England or Frankia emerged, there has been little study of how the societies that lived beyond the limits of the Roman world were similarly transformed in this period.
  • 17th century alchemist's scroll giving instructions for the 'elixir of life'

    12/17/2017 2:27:40 PM PST · by mairdie · 62 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 17 December 2017 | Sophie Inge
    An incredibly rare 17th century alchemist's scroll giving instructions for the elixir of life has sold for a magical 585,000 [pounds]. The delicate manuscript was an illustrative methodology of 15th century scientist George Ripley's recipe for the philosophers' stone which made a potion that supposedly granted the drinker eternal life. It also gave instructions for turning base metals into gold. Although the instructions were impossibly cryptic - there is one reference to using dragon's blood - it didn't stop scholars of the time, including Sir Isaac Newton, giving it a go.
  • Bones of Thomas Becket to Return to Canterbury - via Hungary

    01/22/2016 6:27:35 AM PST · by marshmallow · 22 replies
    The Daily Telegraph (UK) ^ | 1/21/16 | John Bingham
    Relics which escaped Reformation and became a symbol of resistance to Communism return to site of murder after 800 years in gesture of unity between Anglicans and CatholicsA fragment of bone believed to come from the body of Thomas Becket is to return to England from Hungary for the first time in more than 800 years in a vivid symbol of reconciliation between Anglicans and Roman Catholics. The relic, held in the Basilica of Esztergom, the country's most important Catholic church, is to form the centrepiece of an elaborate week-long "pilgrimage" to London and Canterbury involving the Hungarian President Janos...
  • Witch Prison Found in 15th Century Scottish Church: Medieval Chapel Was Used to Hold Suspects

    07/22/2016 11:51:35 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 34 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 22 July 2016 | Richard Gray
    Witch prison found in 15th century Scottish church: Medieval chapel was used to hold suspects before they were killed and burnedIn the years before the Reformation, a small chapel in a church on the outskirts of Aberdeen had provided a quiet place for Catholic women to pray in peace. But within 30 years of the switch from Catholicism to the Protestant faith, St Mary's Chapel at the Kirk of St Nicholas in Aberdeen took on a far darker and sinister role. Historians have uncovered evidence that the chapel, built during the 15th century, served as a prison for suspected witches...
  • The Legend of Ludgar the War Wolf, King of the Trebuchets

    05/01/2017 11:45:06 AM PDT · by C19fan · 12 replies
    Popular Mechanics ^ | May 1, 2017 | William Gurstelle
    Let's get this out of the way: England's King Edward I was an ass. You may remember Longshanks from his villainous turn in Braveheart. Tall, forbidding, and bad-tempered, the 14th century monarch stomped his Welsh neighbors in submission, taxed the Irish into poverty, and stole money from his Jewish subjects, killing many of them and expelling the rest. When he was done with that he engineered a takeover of Scotland using tactics that would make Machiavelli blanch, including inflicting an unbelievably cruel death upon the leader of the Scots, William Wallace, that's familiar to movie fans.
  • How did ISLAM lead to the DARK AGES, then RENAISSANCE & REFORMATION?

    03/04/2017 9:57:23 AM PST · by Perseverando · 31 replies
    American Minute ^ | Undated | William Federer
    Caliph Umar fought alongside of Mohammed in nearly all his battles. Umar's daughter Hafsa was one of Mohammed's wives. Waging jihad, Umar conquered enormous areas, including: -Eastern Roman Empire -Mesopotamia, -parts of Persia, -Egypt, -Palestine, -Syria, -North Africa, -Armenia, -Anatolia -Damascus, and -Jerusalem. Muslim pirates terrorized the Mediterranean, blockading trade. This caused an economic disaster in Roman Europe by diminishing products moving from North Africa and the Middle East to Rome. An important item no longer shipped was papyrus -- reeds from the Nile delta which were used for paper in Europe. The sudden shortage of paper resulted in a...
  • Johann von Staupitz (c. 1460-1524) on God’s eternal predestination

    12/27/2016 1:56:11 PM PST · by Greetings_Puny_Humans · 29 replies
    OCTOBER 30, 2013 Johann von Staupitz (c. 1460-1524) on God’s eternal predestination Towards the end of the Middle Ages there was what one may describe as a Neo-Augustinian renaissance which included a number of outstanding theologians such as Gregory of Rimini. This increased interest in Augustine’s writings to a large extent set the table for the Protestant Reformation, specifically with regard to the doctrine of predestination. Johann von Staupitz (c. 1460-1524) was Vicar-General of the Augustinian Order in Germany and a very influential mentor of the young monk Martin Luther. Von Staupitz, however, later had to release Luther from the...
  • Letters to the Crocodile God

    11/11/2007 10:47:56 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies · 114+ views
    Archaeology ^ | Volume 60 Number 6, November/December 2007 | Marco Merola
    The desert swallowed Tebtunis in the twelfth century A.D., so the town does not appear on any maps. We know its name, and a great deal more, from the tens of thousands of papyrus fragments found throughout the twentieth century by a succession of archaeologists, including those working at the site today. These records, which range from pieces found in ancient garbage dumps, to sheets recycled as wrappings for mummies, to five-yard-long scrolls, include literary texts and records of private contracts and public acts. "The papyri give us particular and historic information that cannot be found elsewhere," says Claudio Gallazzi,...
  • Amateur archaeologist finds Denmark’s oldest crucifix

    05/17/2016 8:42:20 AM PDT · by smokingfrog · 14 replies ^ | 5-17-16 | Christian W
    When amateur archaeologist Dennis Fabricius Holm got off work early last Friday and decided to spend a couple of hours searching a little field in Funen with his metal detector, little did he know he was about to make history. Holm stumbled across one of the most extraordinary finds in recent times near the little town of Aunslev when he discovered a crucifix that dates back about 1,100 years – Denmark’s oldest crucifix ever found. It could rewrite Danish history. “It’s a completely sensational find that dates back to the first half of the 900s,” Malene Refshauge Beck, a curator...
  • Leonardo da Vinci's DNA

    05/10/2016 12:57:03 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Vol. 22 Spring 2016 | editors
    Born in Vinci, Italy, Leonardo died in 1519, age 67, and was buried in Amboise, southwest of Paris. His creative imagination foresaw and described innovations hundreds of years before their invention, such as the helicopter and armored tank. His artistic legacy includes the iconic Mona Lisa and The Last Supper. The idea behind the Project, founded in 2014, has inspired and united anthropologists, art historians, genealogists, microbiologists, and other experts from leading universities and institutes in France, Italy, Spain, Canada and the USA, including specialists from the J. Craig Venter Institute of California, which pioneered the sequencing of the human...
  • A High-Tech Hunt for Lost Art

    10/06/2009 6:22:58 PM PDT · by BGHater · 10 replies · 780+ views
    The New York Times ^ | 06 Oct 2009 | JOHN TIERNEY
    If you believe, as Maurizio Seracini does, that Leonardo da Vinci’s greatest painting is hidden inside a wall in Florence’s city hall, then there are two essential techniques for finding it. As usual, Leonardo anticipated both of them. First, concentrate on scientific gadgetry. After spotting what seemed to be a clue to Leonardo’s painting left by another 16th-century artist, Dr. Seracini led an international team of scientists in mapping every millimeter of the wall and surrounding room with lasers, radar, ultraviolet light and infrared cameras. Once they identified the likely hiding place, they developed devices to detect the painting by...
  • Engineers to search for Leonardo fresco [Battle of Anghiari]

    10/28/2007 11:45:44 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies · 428+ views
    Yahoo! ^ | Monday October 22, 2007 | Frances D'Emilio
    The hunt for the "Battle of Anghiari," ...which Leonardo began in 1505 to commemorate the 15th-century Florentine victory over Milan at Anghiari, a medieval Tuscan town... unfinished when Leonardo left Florence in 1506... was given new impetus about 30 years ago, when Seracini noticed a cryptic message on a fresco in the hall by Giorgio Vasari, a 16th-century artist famed for chronicling Renaissance artists' labors. "Cerca, trova" -- "seek and you shall find" -- said the words on a tiny green flag in the "Battle of Marciano in the Chiana Valley." ...A few years ago, using radar and X-ray scans,...
  • Hunt for Da Vinci painting will resume[Missing "Battle of Anghiari"]

    01/14/2007 3:33:39 AM PST · by FLOutdoorsman · 11 replies · 1,290+ views
    AP ^ | 13 Jan 2007 | ARIEL DAVID
    A real-life Da Vinci mystery, complete with tantalizing clues and sharp art sleuths, may soon be solved, as researchers resume the search for a lost Leonardo masterpiece believed to be hidden within a wall in a Florence palace. Culture Minister Francesco Rutelli and officials in the Tuscan city announced this week they had given approval for renewed exploration in the Palazzo Vecchio, the seat of power for various Florence rulers, including the Medici family in the 16th century. There, some researchers believe, a cavity in a wall may have preserved Leonardo's unfinished painted mural of the "Battle of Anghiari" for...