Free Republic 1st Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $71,719
81%  
Woo hoo!! And now less than $16.3k to go!! And $7.5 to the YELLOW!! Let's get 'er done. Thank you all very much!!

Keyword: middleages

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • The Sack Of Baghdad In 1258 – One Of The Bloodiest Days In Human History

    02/21/2019 4:45:37 AM PST · by vannrox · 32 replies
    War History Online ^ | 15feb19 | Jay Hemmings
    The Sack Of Baghdad In 1258 – One Of The Bloodiest Days In Human History MEDIEVALFeb 15, 2019 Jay Hemmings   SHARE:FacebookTwitter When we think of the darkest, most bloody days of human history, our minds inevitably turn to the horrors of modern warfare. We think of battles like The Somme in WW1, or Stalingrad or Leningrad in WW2, or murderous regimes like Pol Pot’s or Hitler’s.As bloody and brutal as these events were, they were often spread over periods of weeks, months, or years. Their huge death tolls accumulated over time.However, when talking about the biggest loss of life...
  • Archaeologists on the trail of a completely preserved, almost 2,000 years old settlement

    02/15/2019 11:37:39 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    PAP - Science in Poland, ^ | Szymon Zdziebiowski (szz/ zan/ kap/)
    Cultivated fields with bounds, farms, buildings and even roads - archaeologists discovered a completely preserved layout of an ancient settlement from nearly 2,000 years ago in the Tuchola Forest. It is a unique site in Europe, emphasize the authors of the discovery. The area of the Tuchola Forest on the border of the Kuyavian-Pomeranian province and the Pomeranian province is overgrown with a thick forest. It is one of the least-explored areas in terms of archaeology in Poland... According to the researchers, the relics come from the first centuries of our era... Archaeologists remind that after hundreds of years, old...
  • Charles-Henri Sanson: The Royal Executioner Of 18th-Century France

    02/14/2019 5:42:33 AM PST · by vannrox · 40 replies
    All that is interesting ^ | 13FB19 | By Andrew Lenoir
    From the days of the sword through the advent of the guillotine, Charles-Henri Sanson killed some 3,000 people during his bloody career. On Jan. 5, 1757, King Louis XV of France departed the Palace of Versailles. While he was walking toward his carriage, a strange man suddenly shoved past the palace guards, striking the king in the chest with a penknife. The assailant was arrested and the king was ushered inside, bleeding from what turned out to be a minor chest wound. No longer fearing for his life, King Louis’ concern shifted from his own bodily injury to the kind...
  • "X-ray gun" helps researchers pinpoint the origins of pottery found on ancient shipwreck

    02/11/2019 7:54:37 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    The Field Museum ^ | February 8, 2019 | press release
    About eight hundred years ago, a ship sank in the Java Sea off the coast of the islands of Java and Sumatra in Indonesia. There are no written records saying where the ship was going or where it came from -- the only clues are the mostly-disintegrated structure of the vessel and its cargo, which was discovered on the seabed in the 1980s. Since the wreck's recovery in the 1990s, researchers have been piecing together the world that the Java Sea Shipwreck was part of. In a new study in the Journal of Archaeological Science, archaeologists have demonstrated a new...
  • Flecks of Blue on Old Teeth Reveal a Medieval Surprise

    01/15/2019 4:54:41 PM PST · by SJackson · 35 replies
    Newser ^ | 1*10*19 | John Johnson
    Discovery suggests women worked as top artists in Middle Ages more often than thought They couldn't figure out the blue. Scientists studying tartar from the teeth of medieval skeletons hoped to learn a thing or two of about diets of the Middle Ages. But when they put the teeth and jaw of one woman under a microscope, they were surprised to see hundreds of tiny flecks of blue, reports the BBC. After much sleuthing, they figured out that the blue came from lapis lazuli, a rare and expensive stone ground into powder to make dye for sacred manuscripts. Typically, male...
  • Blue tooth reveals unknown female artist from medieval times

    01/09/2019 11:28:27 AM PST · by rdl6989 · 27 replies
    BBC ^ | Jan 9, 2019 | Matt McGrath
    he weird habit of licking the end of a paintbrush has revealed new evidence about the life of an artist more than 900 years after her death. Scientists found tiny blue paint flecks had accumulated on the teeth of a medieval German nun. The particles of the rare lapis lazuli pigment likely collected as she touched the end of her brush with her tongue. The researchers say it shows women were more involved in the illumination of sacred texts than previously thought.
  • 1019 first quarter prediction.

    12/27/2018 12:23:49 PM PST · by Fhios · 73 replies
    12/27/2018 | Vanity
    All indicators are in and it looks like Trump is having a banner year for the economy. Record Christmas sales, Record travel, record DNC tears. So with all these records being broken what are the intrigant reason for the end of year crash? Can we blame DNC and the left wing fringe conspiring? or do we just go a solo Soros narrative. Regardless here is my prediction. By the middle of the fourth month the dow will be back up into record territory, lead by marquee corporations. Apple, google, walmart, amazon, verizon, intel, AMD, GEFORCE. So if your favorite tec...
  • Ancient ring found by TV-inspired metal detector

    12/20/2018 2:52:45 AM PST · by csvset · 28 replies
    A silver medieval ring thought to be up to 600 years old has been unearthed by a man who took up metal detecting after watching a TV sitcom. The gold-gilded ring was found by Gordon Graham in a field in the north of the Isle of Man. Archaeologists believe the piece, which is engraved with geometric shapes, dates from between 1400 and 1500 AD. An inquest hearing at Douglas Courthouse declared the ring can be officially classed as treasure. Allison Fox, a curator of archaeology at Manx National Heritage, said it may date back to the time when the first...
  • 500-Year-Old Body of Man Wearing Thigh-High Boots Found in London Sewer Construction

    12/10/2018 5:22:36 AM PST · by vannrox · 48 replies
    livescience ^ | 5DEC18 | By Megan Gannon
    During the construction of London's massive "super sewer," archaeologists discovered something unusual in the mud: a 500-year-old skeleton of a man still wearing his thigh-high leather boots. The Museum of London Archaeology (MOLA) announced this week that the skeleton was unearthed on the shores of the Thames, near a bend in the river downstream from the Tower of London. "By studying the boots, we've been able to gain a fascinating glimpse into the daily life of a man who lived as many as 500 years ago," said Beth Richardson, a finds specialist who analyzes artifacts at MOLA Headland, a consortium...
  • medieval treasure trove of 2,200 pieces of silver, 21 Islamic gold coins and a stunning signet ring

    11/16/2017 3:24:23 PM PST · by mairdie · 23 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 16 November 2017 | Shivali Best
    Archaeologists have discovered an 'exceptional' treasure trove of precious objects at the Abbey of Cluny, a former Benedictine monastery in France's Saône-et-Loire More than 2,000 objects have been found, including silver deniers - or pennies - Islamic gold coins, a signet ring and several gold items. The discovery is the first time that gold coins from the Arab lands, silver French deniers and a signet ring have ever been found together in a single, enclosed complex. Researchers from the Universite Lumiere Lyon discovered the items as part of an archaeological dig at the Abbey of Cluny, which started in 2015....
  • 700-year-old Danish 'Civil War' coins uncovered

    02/13/2016 1:07:58 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    The Local ^ | Wednesday, February 10, 2016 | unattributed
    A horde of 700 year-old coins has been found by a group of metal detectors in a Jutland field being excavated by archaeologists, the Viborg Museum announced on Wednesday. Coins dating back to a tumultuous period of civil war in Denmark were found in a field south of Foulum and are being put on display at the Viborg Museum. The museum said that three members of the Central Jutland Detector Society (Midtjysk Detektorforening) discovered the mediaeval coins, which are thought to have been hidden during the first half of the 1300s, a period of internal unrest in Denmark which culminated...
  • A 1,000-year-old road lost to time

    12/05/2018 2:39:13 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 13 replies
    In 990AD, the Archbishop of Canterbury named Sigeric the Serious had a more practical reason to walk to Rome. Having risen into his prestigious office, he needed to visit the Vatican to be ordained and collect his official garments. At the time he made the journey, there were many different paths to Rome. But Sigeric, who’d left from Canterbury, wrote down his route home through Italy, Switzerland, France and into the UK, cataloguing the towns he stayed in on his journey. The route he took now makes up the official Via Francigena. The only part that cannot be completed on...
  • The Viking Torture Method So Grisly Some Historians Don’t Believe It Actually Happened

    11/23/2018 8:05:31 PM PST · by vannrox · 72 replies
    All that's Interesting ^ | November 5, 2018 | William DeLong
    Viking sagas describe the ritual execution of blood eagle, in which victims were kept alive while their backs were sliced open so that their ribs, lungs, and intestines could be pulled out into the shape of bloody wings. PinterestA blood eagle execution. The Vikings didn’t come into towns walking on moonbeams and rainbows. If their sagas are to be believed, the Vikings cruelly tortured their enemies in the name of their god Odin as they conquered territory. If the suggestion of a blood eagle was even uttered, one left town and never looked back. Viking sagas define blood eagle as...
  • Why 536 was ‘the worst year to be alive’

    11/16/2018 6:12:12 AM PST · by artichokegrower · 135 replies
    Science ^ | Nov. 15, 2018 | Ann Gibbons
    Ask medieval historian Michael McCormick what year was the worst to be alive, and he's got an answer: "536." Not 1349, when the Black Death wiped out half of Europe. Not 1918, when the flu killed 50 million to 100 million people, mostly young adults. But 536. In Europe, "It was the beginning of one of the worst periods to be alive, if not the worst year," says McCormick, a historian and archaeologist who chairs the Harvard University Initiative for the Science of the Human Past.
  • Fern plant infusion keeps the doctor away in Medieval Europe

    11/06/2018 8:57:35 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | November 5, 2018 | University of York
    The remains of a medieval skeleton has shown the first physical evidence that a fern plant could have been used for medicinal purposes in cases such as alopecia, dandruff and kidney stones. The skeleton of a male aged between 21 and 30 years found buried in the medieval necropolis of Can Reiners on the Spanish Balearic Islands, had traces of starch grains consistent with cereal plants, such as wheat and rye, and significantly, a collection of cells in which spores are formed from the underside of a fern leaf... Although there is no way of telling from the skeletal remains...
  • Medieval Knight Re-enactor Killed After Accidentally Impaling Himself with His Lance

    10/11/2018 6:27:33 PM PDT · by 11th_VA · 44 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | Oct 10, 2018
    Friends and family of a beloved Medieval knight re-enactor have been left “stunned” after the Virginia man accidentally impaled himself with his lance during a re-enactment event over the weekend. Peter Barclay, 53, was competing in an equestrian game in front of a crowd in Williamstown, Kentucky Saturday when he was fatally injured. Participating in events under the knight name of Master Terafan Greydragon, Peter went to spear a paper plate while on horseback when something went wrong and his lance impaled him under his sternum, WLWT confirms. Peter, a military veteran, was airlifted to a hospital but died en...
  • Girl, 8, pulls a 1,500-year-old sword from a lake in Sweden

    10/04/2018 7:10:29 PM PDT · by DUMBGRUNT · 90 replies
    BBC ^ | 4 Oct 2018
    Saga Vanecek found the relic in the Vidöstern lake while at her family's holiday home in Jönköping County. The sword was initially reported to be 1,000 years old, but experts at the local museum now believe it may date to around 1,500 years ago.
  • Light in the Dark Ages: The Church and the saints shined bright during medieval times

    08/15/2018 12:42:13 PM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 5 replies
    Our Sunday Visitor ^ | 2016 | Robert P. Lockwood
    “At the first glance as you entered Clairvaux ... you could see that it was a temple of God; and the still, silent valley, in the modest simplicity of its buildings, spoke of the sincere humility of Christ’s poor. Moreover, in this valley full of men, where no one was permitted to be idle, where one and all were occupied with their allotted tasks, a silence as deep as that of night prevailed. The sounds of labor, or the chanting of the brethren in the choral service, were the only exceptions …. As I watch them singing without fatigue from...
  • The Shroud Of Turin Is Not Jesus' Burial Cloths

    07/17/2018 1:36:35 AM PDT · by Sontagged · 60 replies
    Patheos ^ | March 2, 2015 | Kermit Zarley
    Tonight, CNN presented a one hour television documentary special entitled “Finding Jesus: Faith, Fact, Forgery.” I thought this title was inappropriate because the entire episode was about whether or not the Shroud of Turin is the burial cloth of Jesus. Thus, the title should have had “Shroud of Turin” in it or the like. CNN did some advertising of this special, so I think they were a bit deceptive about whole thing. They interviewed some scholars, including Ben Witherington III who is a friend of mine. I am always surprised by the attention given the Shroud of Turin by many...
  • Bloodstains on Shroud of Turin are probably fake, experts say

    07/16/2018 12:19:27 AM PDT · by Simon Green · 141 replies
    Fox News ^ | 07/15/18 | Christopher Carbone
    The Shroud of Turin, which has been revered by some Christians as the burial cloth of Jesus, could be a fake, according to a new forensic investigation. The investigation into the bloodstain pattern on the cloth was reported Tuesday in the Journal of Forensic Sciences and is apparently the first such analysis of the controversial shroud. Held in the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist in Turin, Italy, the shroud shows the image of a crucified man and has been analyzed and scrutinized for many, many years. The Vatican regards it as an icon, rather than a religious relic—and the...