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Keyword: milkyway

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  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- New York to London Milky Way

    06/14/2014 5:23:26 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    NASA ^ | June 14, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Bright stars of Sagittarius and the center of our Milky Way Galaxy lie just off the wing of a Boeing 747 in this astronomical travel photo. The stratospheric scene was captured earlier this month during a flight from New York to London, 11,0000 meters above the Atlantic Ocean. Of course the sky was clear and dark at that altitude, ideal conditions for astronomical imaging. But there were challenges to overcome while looking out a passenger window of the aircraft moving at nearly 1,000 kilometers per hour (600 mph). Over 90 exposures of 30 seconds or less were attempted with...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Meteors, Planes, and a Galaxy over Bryce Canyon

    05/19/2014 3:51:18 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    NASA ^ | May 19, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Sometimes land and sky are both busy and beautiful. The landscape pictured in the foreground encompasses Bryce Canyon in Utah, USA, famous for its many interesting rock structures eroded over millions of years. The skyscape above, photogenic in its own right, encompasses the arching central disk of our Milky Way Galaxy, streaks that include three passing airplanes and at least four Eta Aquariid meteors, and bright stars that include the Summer Triangle. The above image is a digital panorama created from 12 smaller images earlier this month on the night May 6. If you missed the recent Eta Aquariids...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- That Night over Half Dome

    05/02/2014 7:21:47 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    NASA ^ | May 02, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Captured one night last May this eight frame mosaic starts on the left, down Northside Drive through Yosemite National Park. It ends thousands of light-years away though, as the arc of the Milky Way tracks toward the center of our galaxy on the right, far beyond the park's rugged skyline. That night was still moonless when the storm clouds retreated, so the rocky faces of the surrounding mountains are lit by campfires and artifical lights. Yosemite Falls is at the left. The granite face of Half Dome juts above the far horizon, near the center of the view. The...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Clouds and Crosses over Haleakala

    04/12/2014 3:18:00 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    NASA ^ | April 12, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Aloha and welcome to a breathtaking skyscape. The dreamlike panoramic view from March 27 looks out over the 10,000 foot summit of Haleakala on Maui, Hawai'i. A cloud layer seeps over the volcanic caldera's edge with the Milky Way and starry night sky above. Head of the Northern Cross asterism, supergiant star Deneb lurks within the Milky Way's dust clouds and nebulae at the left. From there you can follow the arc of the Milky Way all the way to the stars of the more compact Southern Cross, just above the horizon at the far right. A yellowish Mars...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- A Milky Way Dawn

    03/29/2014 5:39:58 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    NASA ^ | March 29, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: As dawn broke on March 27, the center of the Milky Way Galaxy stood almost directly above the European Southern Observatory's Paranal Observatory. In the dry, clear sky of Chile's Atacama desert, our galaxy's dusty central bulge is flanked by Paranal's four 8 meter Very Large Telescope units in this astronomical fisheye view. Along the top, Venus is close to the eastern horizon. The brilliant morning star shines very near a waning crescent Moon just at the edge of one of the telescope structures. Despite the bright pairing in the east, the Milky Way dominates the scene though. Cut...
  • Big Pic: An Ultramassive Black Hole

    01/26/2014 7:26:30 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Popular Science ^ | January 24, 2014 | Francie Diep
    One of the most powerful things in the universe wears a sparkly purple coat. Well, at least it looks that way in this image combining data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Hubble Space Telescope. This is an image of the galaxy cluster RX J1532.9+3021... At the cluster's center is one of the most powerful black holes astronomers have ever found. The black hole is surrounded by hot gas, which appears here in purple. Normally, astronomers would expect dense, hot gas like this to form stars, but they haven't found any evidence of stars here. Instead, they think, the...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- From the Northern to the Southern Cross

    01/27/2014 4:22:54 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    NASA ^ | January 27, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: There is a road that connects the Northern to the Southern Cross but you have to be at the right place and time to see it. The road, as pictured above, is actually the central band of our Milky Way Galaxy; the right place, in this case, is dark Laguna Cejar in Salar de Atacama of Northern Chile; and the right time was in early October, just after sunset. Many sky wonders were captured then, including the bright Moon, inside the Milky Way arch; Venus, just above the Moon; Saturn and Mercury, just below the Moon; the Large and...
  • A cosmic feast! Milky Way’s mysterious black hole set to gobble up giant gas cloud

    01/14/2014 5:41:54 AM PST · by C19fan · 29 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | January 14, 2014 | Ellie Zolfaghasifard
    The Milky Way’s black hole is about to gobble up its first dinner, and astronomers are hoping to have front row seats when it happens. A huge gas cloud, about three times the mass of Earth, is on course to collide with the supermassive black hole at the heart of our galaxy in March. Astronomers expect the gas cloud will swing so close to the black hole that it will heat up to the point where it produces spectacular X-rays.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Local Fluff

    09/24/2013 5:47:12 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    NASA ^ | September 24, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: The stars are not alone. In the disk of our Milky Way Galaxy about 10 percent of visible matter is in the form of gas, called the interstellar medium (ISM). The ISM is not uniform, and shows patchiness even near our Sun. It can be quite difficult to detect the local ISM because it is so tenuous and emits so little light. This mostly hydrogen gas, however, absorbs some very specific colors that can be detected in the light of the nearest stars. A working map of the local ISM within 20 light-years, based on ongoing observations and recent...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Milky Way Over Spain's Bardenas Reales

    09/02/2013 12:33:43 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    NASA ^ | September 02, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What's that below the Milky Way? First, across the top of the above image, lies the faint band that is our planet's sideways view of the central disk of our home Milky Way Galaxy. The Milky Way band can be seen most clear nights from just about anywhere on Earth with a dark sky. What lies beneath is, by comparison, is a much less common sight. It is the striking peak of Castildetierra, a rock formation located in Bardenas Reales, a natural badlands in northeast Spain. Standing 50 meters tall, the rock spire includes clay and sandstone left over...
  • Photograph of the Milky Way taken in Greenhead, Western Australia

    08/16/2013 10:04:31 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 30 replies
    A close-up view of the central bulge of the Milky Way Galaxy, partially obscured by a dark jagged swath of intervening gas and dust. Magnifico!
  • BORREGO STARDANCE

    08/01/2013 3:28:30 PM PDT · by brityank · 3 replies
    Vimeo's Video Site ^ | 29 July, 2013 | Sunchaser Pictures
    BORREGO STARDANCE from Sunchaser Pictures "The Trippiest Time Lapse Video We've Ever Seen" -- POPULAR SCIENCE [O]ur next adventure takes us to the desert town of Borrego Springs, California -- a remarkable hidden gem surrounded by the 600,000 acre Anza-Borrego Desert State Park. Just three hours south of Los Angeles, this unspoiled landscape shines not only for its natural wonders, but for the absolutely amazing, enormous metal sculptures left behind by local business leader Dennis Avery. Dragons, Dinosaurs, Giant Scorpions, Wooly Mammoths, and much more!
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Atacama's Cloudy Night

    07/27/2013 7:56:35 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    NASA ^ | July 27, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Storm clouds do sometimes come to Chile's Atacama desert, known as the driest place on Earth. These washed through the night sky just last month during the winter season, captured in this panoramic view. Drifting between are cosmic clouds more welcome by the region's astronomical residents though, including dark dust clouds in silhouette against the crowded starfields and nebulae of the central Milky Way. Below and right of center lies the Large Magellanic Cloud, appropriately named for its appearance in starry southern skies. City lights about 200 kilometers distant still glow along the horizon at the right, while bright...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Messier's Eleven

    07/12/2013 3:59:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    NASA ^ | July 12, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: This fifteen degree wide field of view stretches across the crowded starfields of Sagittarius toward the center of our Milky Way galaxy. In fact, the center of the galaxy lies near the right edge of the rich starscape and eleven bright star clusters and nebulae fall near the center of the frame. All eleven are numbered entries in the catalog compiled by 18th century cosmic tourist Charles Messier. Gaining celebrity status with skygazers, M8 (Lagoon), M16 (Eagle), M17 (Omega), and M20 (Trifid) show off the telltale reddish hues of emission nebulae associated with star forming regions. But also eye-catching...
  • Earth's Milky Way Neighborhood Gets More Respect

    06/04/2013 8:28:19 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 10 replies
    NRAO ^ | 6/3/13
    Earth's Milky Way Neighborhood Gets More Respect Old picture: Local Arm a small "spur" of Milky Way. New picture: Local Arm probable major branch of Perseus Arm. CREDIT: Robert Hurt, IPAC; Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF. Our Solar System's Milky Way neighborhood just went upscale. We reside between two major spiral arms of our home galaxy, in a structure called the Local Arm. New research using the ultra-sharp radio vision of the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) indicates that the Local Arm, previously thought to be only a small spur, instead is much more like the adjacent major arms,...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Milky Trail

    06/01/2013 9:05:25 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    NASA ^ | June 01, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Have you ever hiked the Queen's Garden trail in Bryce Canyon, Utah, USA, planet Earth? Walking along that path in this dark night skyscape, you can almost imagine your journey continues along the pale, luminous Milky Way. Of course, the name for our galaxy, the Milky Way (in Latin, Via Lactea), does refer to its appearance as a milky band or path in the sky. In fact, the word galaxy itself derives from the Greek for milk. Visible on moonless nights from dark sky areas, though not so bright or quite so colorful as in this image, the glowing...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- One-Armed Spiral Galaxy NGC 4725

    05/30/2013 2:48:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | May 30, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: While most spiral galaxies, including our own Milky Way, have two or more spiral arms, NGC 4725 has only one. In this sharp color composite image, the solo spira mirabilis seems to wind from a prominent ring of bluish, newborn star clusters and red tinted star forming regions. The odd galaxy also sports obscuring dust lanes a yellowish central bar structure composed of an older population of stars. NGC 4725 is over 100 thousand light-years across and lies 41 million light-years away in the well-groomed constellation Coma Berenices. Computer simulations of the formation of single spiral arms suggest that...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Waterfall and the World at Night

    05/17/2013 3:56:40 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    NASA ^ | May 17, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Above this boreal landscape, the arc of the Milky Way and shimmering aurorae flow through the night. Like an echo, below them lies Iceland's spectacular Godafoss, the Waterfall of the Gods. Shining just below the Milky Way, bright Jupiter is included in the panoramic nightscape recorded on March 9. Faint and diffuse, the Andromeda Galaxy (M31) appears immersed in the auroral glow. The digital stitch of four frames is a first place winner in the 2013 International Earth and Sky Photo Contest on Dark Skies Importance organized by The World at Night. An evocative record of the beauty of...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Milky Way and Stone Tree

    04/29/2013 7:22:49 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    NASA ^ | April 29, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What's that next to the Milky Way? An unusual natural rock formation known as Roque Cinchado or Stone Tree found on the Spanish Canary Island of Tenerife. A famous icon, Roque Cinchado is likely a dense plug of cooled volcanic magma that remains after softer surrounding rock eroded away. Majestically, the central band of our Milky Way Galaxy is visible arcing across the right of the above seven image panoramic mosaic taken during the summer of 2010. On the far right is the Teide volcano complete with a lenticular cloud hovering near its peak.
  • Dung beetles guided by Milky Way

    01/24/2013 11:33:39 AM PST · by skinkinthegrass · 38 replies
    nbcnews.com ^ | Jan. 21, 2013 | Alan Boyle
    When dung beetles roll their tiny balls of poop across the sands of South Africa on a moonless night, they look to the glow of our Milky Way galaxy as a navigational aid, researchers report. "Even on clear, moonless nights, many dung beetles still manage to orientate along straight paths," Marie Dacke, a biologist at Sweden's Lund University, said in a news release. "This led us to suspect that the beetles exploit the starry sky for orientation — a feat that had, to our knowledge, never before been demonstrated in an insect."
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Grand Spiral Galaxy NGC 7424

    01/08/2013 6:47:16 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    NASA ^ | January 08, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: The grand, winding arms are almost mesmerizing in this face-on view of NGC 7424, a spiral galaxy with a prominent central bar. About 40 million light-years distant in the headlong constellation Grus, this island universe is also about 100,000 light-years across making it remarkably similar to our own Milky Way. Following along the winding arms, many bright clusters of massive young stars can be found. The star clusters themselves are several hundred light-years in diameter. And while massive stars are born in the arms of NGC 7424, they also die there. Notably, this galaxy was home to a powerful...
  • Study: Billions of Earth-size planets in Milky Way (In search of a 'Goldilocks' zone planet)

    01/07/2013 12:04:14 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 49 replies
    Yahoo ^ | 1/7/13 | Associated Press
    LONG BEACH, Calif. (AP) — Astronomers hunting for Earth-like planets now have many places to look. A new estimate released Monday suggested the Milky Way galaxy is home to at least 17 billion planets similar in size to our planet. It doesn't mean all are potentially habitable, but the sheer number of Earth-size planets is a welcome starting point in the search for worlds like our own. Scientists have yet to find a twin Earth — one that's not only the right size but also located in the so-called Goldilocks zone, a place that's not too hot and not too...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- M33: Triangulum Galaxy

    12/19/2012 9:29:54 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    NASA ^ | December 20, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: The small, northern constellation Triangulum harbors this magnificent face-on spiral galaxy, M33. Its popular names include the Pinwheel Galaxy or just the Triangulum Galaxy. M33 is over 50,000 light-years in diameter, third largest in the Local Group of galaxies after the Andromeda Galaxy (M31), and our own Milky Way. About 3 million light-years from the Milky Way, M33 is itself thought to be a satellite of the Andromeda Galaxy and astronomers in these two galaxies would likely have spectacular views of each other's grand spiral star systems. As for the view from planet Earth, this sharp composite image, a...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Yosemite Winter Night

    12/25/2012 8:30:36 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    NASA ^ | December 25, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: In this evocative night skyscape a starry band of the Milky Way climbs over Yosemite Valley, Sierra Nevada Range, planet Earth. Jupiter is the brightest celestial beacon on the wintry scene, though. Standing nearly opposite the Sun in the constellation Taurus, the wandering planet joins yellowish Aldebaran and the Hyades star cluster. Below, Orion always comes up sideways over a fence of mountains. And from there the twin stars of Gemini rise just across the Milky Way. As this peaceful winter night began, they followed Auriga the charioteer, its alpha star Capella near the top of the frame.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Milky Way Over Quiver Tree Forest

    12/11/2012 9:40:55 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    NASA ^ | December 12, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: In front of a famous background of stars and galaxies lies some of Earth's more unusual trees. Known as quiver trees, they are actually succulent aloe plants that can grow to tree-like proportions. The quiver tree name is derived from the historical usefulness of their hollowed branches as dart holders. Occurring primarily in southern Africa, the trees pictured in the above 16-exposure composite are in Quiver Tree Forest located in southern Namibia. Some of the tallest quiver trees in the park are estimated to be about 300 years old. Behind the trees is light from the small town of...
  • Galaxy Grande: Milky Way May Be More Massive Than Thought

    12/03/2012 10:02:45 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 22 replies
    Scientific American ^ | 12/3/12 | Ken Croswell
    Hubble observations of a speedy galaxy weigh on the Milky Way and indicate that our galaxy is at least a trillion times as massive as the sunMilky Way GREAT GALAXY: The Milky Way maintains a fleet of some two dozen satellite galaxies whose motions help reveal its mass. Image: NASA/ESA/Hubble Heritage Team Although scientists know the masses of the sun and Earth, it's a different story for the galaxy. Mass estimates range widely: At the low end, some studies find that the galaxy is several hundred billion times as massive as the sun whereas the largest values exceed two trillion...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Zodiacal Light and Milky Way

    10/21/2012 6:20:33 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    NASA ^ | October 20, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Ghostly apparitions of two fundamental planes in planet Earth's sky span this October all-sky view. The scene was captured from a lakeside campsite under dark skies in northern Maine, USA. In it, the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy arcs above faint airglow along the horizon. Zodiacal light, a band of dust scattering sunlight along the solar system's ecliptic plane, stretches almost horizontally across the wide field and intersects the Milky way near a point marked by bright planet Jupiter. Right of Jupiter, past the Pleiades star cluster, is the brightening of the Zodiacal band known as the Gegenschein,...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Milky Way Over the Bungle Bungles

    09/11/2012 4:21:41 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    NASA ^ | September 11, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Which part of this picture do you find more interesting -- the land or the sky? Advocates for the land might cite the beauty of the ancient domes of the Bungle Bungle Range in Western Australia. These picturesque domes appear as huge layered beehives and are made of sandstones and conglomerates deposited over 350 million years ago. Advocates for the sky might laud the beauty of the Milky Way's central band shown arching from horizon to horizon. The photogenic Milky Way band formed over 10 billion years ago and now includes many well-known nebulae and bright stars. Fortunately, you...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Milky Way Over Monument Valley

    08/01/2012 2:07:49 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    NASA ^ | August 01, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: You don't have to be at Monument Valley to see the Milky Way arch across the sky like this -- but it helps. Only at Monument Valley USA would you see a picturesque foreground that includes these iconic rock peaks called buttes. Buttes are composed of hard rock left behind after water has eroded away the surrounding soft rock. In the above image taken about two months ago, the closest butte on the left and the butte to its right are known as the Mittens, while Merrick Butte can be seen just further to the right. High overhead stretches...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Milky Way Above Easter Island

    06/18/2012 2:39:51 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    NASA ^ | June 18, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Why were the statues on Easter Island built? No one is sure. What is sure is that over 800 large stone statues exist there. The Easter Island statues, stand, on the average, over twice as tall as a person and have over 200 times as much mass. Few specifics are known about the history or meaning of the unusual statues, but many believe that they were created about 500 years ago in the images of local leaders of a lost civilization. Pictured above, some of the stone giants were illuminated in 2009 under the central band of our Milky...
  • Milky Way Time Lapse ....Excerpts from Temporal Distortion Extended Cut

    06/06/2012 10:55:07 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 30 replies
    DakotaLapse ^ | june 6, 2012 | myself
    Excerpts from Temporal Distortion Extended CutThe Milky way views are excellent....it is preceded by short commercials ....
  • Milky Way Galaxy Doomed to Head-On Crash with Andromeda (We'Re DooMed In 4 billion years Alert!! )

    05/31/2012 6:54:00 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 73 replies
    SPACE.com ^ | 5/31/12 | Mike Wall
    Four billion years from now, the Milky Way galaxy as we know it will cease to exist. Our Milky Way is bound for a head-on collision with the similar-sized Andromeda galaxy, researchers announced today (May 31). Over time, the huge galactic smashup will create an entirely new hybrid galaxy, one likely bearing an elliptical shape rather than the Milky Way's trademark spiral-armed disk. "We do know of other galaxies in the local universe around us that are in the process of colliding and merging," Roeland van der Marel, of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, told reporters today. "However,...
  • Has Dark Matter Gone Missing?

    04/19/2012 9:54:03 PM PDT · by neverdem · 41 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 19 April 2012 | Adrian Cho
    Enlarge Image Home sweet home. In the vicinity of the sun, our Milky Way galaxy seems to contain no dark matter, one team of astronomers claims. Credit: Serge Brunier/NASA If a new study is true, then the search for dark matter just got a lot weirder. Our little corner of the Milky Way contains no observable concentration of the mysterious stuff whose gravity binds the galaxy, claims one team of astronomers. That finding would present a major problem for models of how galaxies form and may undermine the whole notion of dark matter, the researchers claim. But some scientists...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Rocket Trails in the Milky Way

    03/28/2012 9:12:55 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    NASA ^ | March 29, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: On March 27, five sounding rockets leapt into early morning skies from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. Part of the Anomalous Transport Rocket EXperiment (ATREX), begining at 4:58 am EDT the rockets launched consecutively at 80 second intervals. Releasing a chemical tracer they created luminous white clouds within Earth's ionosphere at altitudes above 60 to 65 miles, swept along by the poorly understood high-altitude jet stream. (Not the same jet stream that airliners fly through at altitudes of 5 to 6 miles.) Seen along the mid-atlantic region of the United States, the clouds drifted through starry skies, captured...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- A Wide Field Image of the Galactic Center

    01/06/2012 2:27:26 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    NASA ^ | January 06, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: From Sagittarius to Scorpius, the central Milky Way is a truly beautiful part of planet Earth's night sky. The gorgeous region is captured in this wide field image spanning about 30 degrees. The impressive cosmic vista, taken in 2010, shows off intricate dust lanes, bright nebulae, and star clusters scattered through our galaxy's rich central starfields. Starting on the left, look for the Lagoon and Trifid nebulae, the Cat's Paw, while on the right lies the Pipe dark nebula, and the colorful clouds of Rho Ophiuchi and Antares (right). The actual center of our Galaxy lies about 26,000 light...
  • Astronomy Picture (not APOD, afaik)

    11/18/2011 11:33:40 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 15 replies
    Too beautiful not to post. What you're looking at is a close-up shot up of the central bulge of a giant spiral galaxy viewed edge on. Can you see it? The bulge, that is? It's that glowing lens-shaped mass that's trying unsuccessfully to hide behind those dark foreground clouds. Yes, of course, it's the central bulge of our own Milky Way Galaxy! :-) We're looking at the "lens" edge-on from our vantage point here in the Orion Spur (a minor spiral arm) of the Milky Way, 30,000 light years from the galaxy's center. Some "close-up," huh? We see the central...
  • ERIS: World's first realistic simulation of the formation of the Milky Way

    09/03/2011 8:01:38 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies
    YouTube ^ | August 22, 2011 | cscsch
    For almost 20 years astrophysicists have been trying to recreate the formation of spiral galaxies such as our Milky Way realistically. Now astrophysicists from the University of Zurich present the world's first realistic simulation of the formation of our home galaxy together with astronomers from the University of California at Santa Cruz. The new results were partly calculated on the computer of the Swiss National Supercomputing Center (CSCS) and show, for instance, that there has to be stars on the outer edge of the Milky Way. See also the interview with Lucio Mayer from the University of Zurich explaining the...
  • Tempest Milky Way ( A mosaic & video with Music )

    08/24/2011 10:10:23 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 13 replies
    dakotalapse ^ | August 23, 2011 3:23 pm | Randy Halverson
    One of the challenges in making this video, was trying to get good storm and star shots. The opportunity doesn’t come along very often, the storm has to be moving the right speed and the lightning can overexpose the long exposures. I had several opportunities this summer to get storm and star shots. In one instance, within a minute of picking up the camera and dolly, 70mph winds hit. One storm was perfect, it came straight towards the setup, then died right before it reached it. At the 1:57 mark a Whitetail buck came in to check out the setup....
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Milky Way Over Abandoned Kilns

    07/25/2011 3:25:06 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    NASA ^ | July 25, 2011 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What's that below the Milky Way? Historic kilns. Built in the 1870s in rural Nevada, USA to process local wood into charcoal, the kilns were soon abandon due to a town fire and flooding, but remain in good condition even today. The above panorama is a digital conglomerate of five separate images taken in early June from the same location. Visible above the unusual kilns is a colorful star field, highlighted by the central band of our Milky Way Galaxy appearing along a diagonal toward the lower right. Many famous sites in our Galaxy are visible, including the Pipe...
  • The Night Sky As You Have Never Seen It Before (Must See To Believe)

    07/13/2011 3:50:10 PM PDT · by OneVike · 50 replies
    Gate ^ | 7/13/11
    This is a stunning 360 degree panorama of the night sky that was stitched together from 37,000 images by Nick Risinger, a native of Seattle.  Nick trekked more than 60,000 miles around the western United States and South Africa to create the largest-ever true-color image of the stellar sphere. The final result is an interactive zoomable sky map showing the Milky Way as it has never been seen before. Including stars, planets, galaxies and the nebulae around it. "The genesis of this was to educate and enlighten people about the natural beauty that is hidden, but surrounds us," Risinger...
  • NASA: Exceptional object in our cosmic neighborhood

    11/12/2010 7:38:04 PM PST · by Flavius · 61 replies · 1+ views
    nasa ^ | 11/11/10 | nasa
    - NASA Announces Televised Chandra News Conference - NASA will hold a news conference at 12:30 p.m. EST on Monday, Nov. 15, to discuss the Chandra X-ray Observatory's discovery of an exceptional object in our cosmic neighborhood.
  • Massive gamma ray bubbles discovered in galaxy center

    11/09/2010 5:57:02 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 28 replies
    AFP on Yahoo ^ | 11/9/10 | AFP
    WASHINGTON (AFP) – Two huge, unexplained gamma ray emitting bubbles have been discovered at the center of the Milky Way galaxy, US astronomers said Tuesday. Masked by a fog of gamma rays that appears throughout the sky, the bubbles form a feature spanning 50,000 light-years and could be the remnant of a supersized black hole eruption or the outflows from a burst of star formation, the astronomers said. The structure spans more than half of the visible sky, from the constellation Virgo to the constellation Grus, and it may be millions of years old, the astronomers said in a paper...
  • Milk: 2 glasses a day tones muscles, keeps the fat away in women, study shows (after weight-lifting)

    05/26/2010 11:44:20 AM PDT · by decimon · 58 replies · 988+ views
    McMaster University ^ | May 26, 2010 | Unknown
    HAMILTON, CANADA – Women who drink two large glasses of milk a day after their weight-lifting routine gained more muscle and lost more fat compared to women who drank sugar-based energy drinks, a McMaster study has found. The study appears in the June issue of Medicine and Science in Sport and Exercise. "Resistance training is not a typical choice of exercise for women," says Stu Phillips, professor in the Department of Kinesiology at McMaster University. "But the health benefits of resistance training are enormous: It boosts strength, bone, muscular and metabolic health in a way that other types of exercise...
  • Every Star in the Sky, in One Picture [Help - It's ABSOLUTELY AMAZING]

    02/25/2010 4:28:52 PM PST · by XBob · 43 replies · 2,698+ views
    ABC News/Technology ^ | 24 Feb 10 | Ned Potter
    "It's just so amazing to see the band of the Milky Way arcing from one end of the horizon straight above you to the other," he said in an interview with ABC News. "And if you're in a really dark place, the light of the Milky Way can actually cast a shadow."
  • Physicist Makes New High-resolution Panorama Of Milky Way

    11/01/2009 10:24:21 AM PST · by Frenchtown Dan · 10 replies · 858+ views
    Sciens Daily ^ | Axel Mellinger
    Cobbling together 3000 individual photographs, a physicist has made a new high-resolution panoramic image of the full night sky, with the Milky Way galaxy as its centerpiece. Axel Mellinger, a professor at Central Michigan University, describes the process of making the panorama in the November issue of Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific.
  • Massive Gas Cloud Speeding Toward Collision With Milky Way

    11/01/2009 10:32:54 AM PST · by Frenchtown Dan · 37 replies · 1,204+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 01/13/08 | Felix J. Lockman
    A giant cloud of hydrogen gas is speeding toward a collision with our Milky Way Galaxy, and when it hits -- in less than 40 million years -- it may set off a spectacular burst of stellar fireworks.
  • "Asteroid Impacts are the Biggest Threat to Advanced Life in the Milky Way" -Stephen Hawking

    09/26/2009 9:43:01 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 24 replies · 1,597+ views
    Daily Galaxy ^ | 9/26/09 | Stephen Hawking
    Stephen Hawking believes that one of the major factors in the possible scarcity of intelligent life in our galaxy is the high probability of an asteroid or comet colliding with inhabited planets. We have observed, Hawking points out in Life in the Universe, the collision of a comet, Schumacher-Levi, with Jupiter (below), which produced a series of enormous fireballs, plumes many thousands of kilometers high, hot "bubbles" of gas in the atmosphere, and large dark "scars" on the atmosphere which had lifetimes on the order of weeks. It is thought the collision of a rather smaller body with the Earth,...
  • New Views of Our Milky Way Revealed

    09/22/2009 4:54:35 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 12 replies · 1,114+ views
    Space.com ^ | 9/22/09 | Clara Moskowitz
    New photographs of the center of the Milky Way reveal the chaotic environment at the heart of our galaxy, where a supermassive black hole is thought to lurk. The close-up views come from two recent projects - one undertaken by an amateur astronomer. Stephane Guisard, an engineer at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) in Chile, used his personal 10-cm telescope to take 1,200 individual images over 29 nights during his free time. He then combined the photos, which took a total of more than 200 hours of exposure time, into a stunning mosaic image of the Milky Way's center. The...
  • Milky Way Expected to Survive a Beating

    09/07/2009 11:35:33 AM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 29 replies · 1,472+ views
    Space.com on Yahoo ^ | 9/7/09 | Clara Moskowitz
    Though the Milky Way is taking a good beating from nearby mini-galaxies that sometimes slam into it, our galaxy is not likely to de destroyed by this process as some scientists had predicted, a new study finds. Circling around the Milky Way are between 20 and 25 known satellite dwarf galaxies, which are smaller clumps of stars bound in orbit around the Milky Way by gravitational attraction. Some pessimists predicted the Milky Way was doomed to a grizzly death by dismemberment if enough of these galaxies collide with it. In fact, scientists think many satellite galaxies have already rammed into...
  • Milky Way may have a huge hidden neighbour....

    08/21/2009 12:46:43 PM PDT · by TaraP · 45 replies · 1,685+ views
    A LARGE satellite galaxy may be lurking, hidden from view, next door to our own. Sukanya Chakrabarti and Leo Blitz of the University of California, Berkeley, suspected that the gravity of a nearby galaxy was causing perturbations that have been observed in gas on the fringes of the Milky Way. "We did a large range of simulations where we varied the mass of the perturber and the distance of closest approach," says Chakrabarti. In the best-fitting simulation, the unseen galaxy has about 1 per cent of the Milky Way's mass, or 10 billion times the mass of the sun. That's...