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Keyword: miltech

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  • The F-35's X-Ray Vision Is The Future Of Naval (And All Other) Warfare

    09/19/2014 11:21:22 AM PDT · by sukhoi-30mki · 19 replies
    Foxtrot Alpha ^ | 19 September 2014 | Tyler Rogoway
    One of the most 'popular' features on the controversial F-35 is the jet's Distributed Aperture System (DAS). DAS creates an all-seeing sphere and classifies and relays data and video to the pilot's helmet and to the jet's mission computers. This game-changing system has now been adapted for the high seas, and it won't stop there. DAS accomplishes its unique task via a constellation of electro-optical cameras installed around the F-35, each staring in a separate direction. Then, a powerful computer processor "stitches" these video images together to create a continuous viewable video "sphere." When the DAS imagery is paired with...
  • The U.S. Air Force's New AC-130 Gunships Are Really Bomb Trucks

    06/03/2014 11:55:09 AM PDT · by sukhoi-30mki · 34 replies
    Foxtrot Alpha ^ | June 1, 2014 | Tyler Rogoway
    The AC-130 flying gunship fleet is one of the most fabled and feared assets in the entire USAF inventory. Known for its ability to unleash a broadside of cannon fire in the dead of night, the newest of the AC-130 lot is more about smart bombs than raining lead and howitzer shells down on the enemy. Before the turn of the decade it became clear that the aging AC-130 fleet was in low supply and exceedingly high demand. As a result the Air Force Special Operations Command decided that it should augment the existing fleet on AC-130H and AC-130Us in...
  • The Navy Is Already Working On A Submarine That Won't Be Ready Until 2030

    02/04/2014 6:53:21 PM PST · by blam · 30 replies
    BI- Military.ComY ^ | 2-4-2014 | Kris Osborn
    The Navy Is Already Working On A Submarine That Won't Be Ready Until 2030 Kris Osborn, Military.com Feb. 4, 2014, 8:54 PM QUONSET POINT, R.I. -- Over the next several years, General Dynamics Electric Boat plans to add several new buildings to its facility here, double its workforce, and invest about $150 million -- all as preparation for the construction of the Navy's next-generation nuclear-armed submarine. Early prototyping is already under way at Electric Boat for the Ohio Replacement Program (ORP), a high-tech, 560-foot long, nuclear-powered submarine. Navy leaders have announced plans to build 12 ORPs, with the first one...
  • Boeing Surveillance Plane Found Not Effective for Mission

    01/24/2014 10:03:13 AM PST · by maddog55 · 23 replies
    Seattle Times ^ | Jan 23, 2014 3:16 PM ET | Tony Capaccio
    A new Boeing Co. (BA) surveillance aircraft deployed to Japan last month isn’t yet effective at hunting submarines or performing reconnaissance over large areas -- two of its main missions, the Pentagon’s weapons tester found. Flaws in the $35 billion program included the plane’s radar performance, sensor integration and data transfer, Michael Gilmore, chief of the Pentagon testing office, wrote in his annual report on major weapons, which has yet to be released. He said the new P-8A Poseidon exhibited “all of the major deficiencies” identified in earlier exercises when subjected to more stressful realistic combat testing from September 2012...
  • New U.S. Army Rifle:

    01/12/2014 8:24:05 AM PST · by umgud · 109 replies
    Blogster ^ | December 14th 2013 | skipper12383
    The MXT135 Counter Defilade Target Engagement System has a range of roughly 7,800 feet - and is to be deployed in Afghanistan soon. I would call it the "Equalizer." Some call it the "Punisher".
  • Former 82nd Airborne Soldier receives helmet that saved his life

    01/08/2014 7:33:15 AM PST · by Londo Molari · 9 replies
    PEO SOLDIER LIVE ^ | 6-January-2014 | ddawson
    SAN ANTONIO – When Chance Darby received the helmet that saved his life in Afghanistan, he said it successfully stopped an enemy rifle bullet but left him with two big headaches. One headache lasted a few days after the impact from a high-velocity round. The other lasted several weeks as he tried to keep the news of the incident from his mother, Lynlee Darby, and his then-fiancée and now wife, Cheryl. Chance proposed to Cheryl shortly before deploying to Afghanistan with the 82nd Airborne Division. On May 31, 2012, Taliban ambushed his platoon while it was dismantling an improvised explosive...
  • I worked on the US drone program. The public should know what really goes on

    01/01/2014 2:29:20 PM PST · by Foundahardheadedwoman · 79 replies
    The Guardian ^ | 12/29/13 | Heather Linebaugh
    Comment is free I worked on the US drone program. The public should know what really goes on Few of the politicians who so brazenly proclaim the benefits of drones have a real clue how it actually works (and doesn't) Share 51006 117 inShare158 Email Anonymous woman on grey Heather Linebaugh theguardian.com, Sunday 29 December 2013 07.30 EST Jump to comments (2811) Hermes 450 drone An Elbit Systems Hermes 450 drone. Photograph: AFP/Getty Images Whenever I read comments by politicians defending the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Predator and Reaper program – aka drones – I wish I could ask them a...
  • Advanced Super Hornet Demonstrates Significant Stealth, Range Improvements

    08/28/2013 7:41:41 AM PDT · by sukhoi-30mki · 10 replies
    Boeing ^ | August 28, 2013
    Advanced Super Hornet Demonstrates Significant Stealth, Range Improvements - Tests prove aircraft will outpace future threats ST. LOUIS, Aug. 28, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- During three weeks of flight testing the Advanced Super Hornet, Boeing [NYSE: BA] and partner Northrop Grumman demonstrated that the fighter can outperform threats for decades to come with improvements that make the jet much harder for radar to detect and give it significantly more combat range. Through 21 flights in St. Louis and Patuxent River, Md., that began Aug. 5, the team tested conformal fuel tanks (CFT), an enclosed weapons pod (EWP), and signature enhancements, each...
  • Today's Drone Test Changes Everything About Unmanned Aerial Warfare (Launched from USS GHW Bush)

    07/10/2013 3:15:27 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 15 replies
    Business Insider ^ | July 10, 2013 | Brian Jones
    Today, off the coast of Virginia on the USS George H.W. Bush, the U.S. Navy successfully landed an X-47B drone aboard an aircraft carrier for the first time. "It isn't very often you get a glimpse of the future," Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus said in an official Navy release. The landing of the fighter jet-sized drone, which is larger than the Predator drones common in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Yemen, represents a watershed moment in the wielding of unmanned aerial vehicles. "The operational unmanned aircraft soon to be developed have the opportunity to radically change the way presence and...
  • X-47B Completes First-Ever Carrier-Based Arrested Landing

    07/10/2013 11:12:31 AM PDT · by Daus · 46 replies
    US Navy ^ | 7/10/13 | NA
    USS GEORGE H. W. BUSH, at sea (NNS) -- The X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System (UCAS) demonstrator completed its first-ever carrier-based arrested landing on board USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) off the coast of Virginia July 10. "By evolving and integrating new technology like the X-47B and the unmanned aircraft to follow, carriers will remain relevant throughout their 50-year lifespan," said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. Today's demonstration was the first time a tailless, unmanned autonomous aircraft landed on a modern aircraft carrier. This test marks an historic event for naval aviation that Navy leaders believe will impact...
  • Raytheon ship-defense missile passes Navy testing

    05/30/2013 2:47:08 PM PDT · by sukhoi-30mki · 5 replies
    Raytheon ship-defense missile passes Navy testing The Navy has completed the first series of developmental and operational testing of a ship-defense missile system made by Tucson-based Raytheon Missile Systems. In at-sea testing of Raytheon’s Rolling Airframe Missile Block 2, the system's missiles engaged two targets in “tactical dual-salvo scenarios” designed to demonstrate the advanced missile's defensive capabilities. The missiles “successfully engaged high-speed, maneuvering and sub-sonic, maneuvering targets,” with all four missiles meeting test objectives, Raytheon said in a news release. Raytheon and its manufacturing partner, RAMSYS of Germany, were awarded the second U.S. Navy RAM Block 2 low-rate production contract...
  • The U.S. Navy Rides the Rail

    04/07/2013 12:05:19 PM PDT · by neverdem · 145 replies
    American Thinker ^ | April 6, 2013 | Brendon S. Peck
    Widely held as the Holy Grail of weapons design, the Electromagnetic Rail Gun has been in development for more than a century. Now, thanks to the extraordinary efforts of the U.S. Navy, it will soon be part of our arsenal. Unconventional, Multifunctional and Motivating The rail gun is marvel of modern warfare. Unlike conventional weapons, which are reliant upon an assortment of chemical propellants, the EMRG does not require rocket fuel, gunpowder, or gas. Instead, electromagnetic energy is used to fire shells. To produce this surge of energy, electricity is poured though a pair of parallel rails and the current...
  • Medal of Honor Recipient: New Drone Medal is ‘Ludicrous’

    03/14/2013 1:10:05 PM PDT · by Saint X · 29 replies
    U.S. Naval Institute ^ | 3/14/2013 | U.S. Naval Institute
    The creation of the new medal honoring unmanned vehicle pilots and cyber troops, “is a telling and sad commentary on the judgment of those who are responsible for the creation and approval of this award,” Jack Jacobs, Medal of Honor recipient and Vietnam veteran, told USNI News on Wednesday.
  • The Greatest Investment Opportunity Since 1984 (Drones)

    03/13/2013 8:02:47 AM PDT · by blam · 6 replies
    TBI ^ | 3-13-2013 | Andrew Snyder
    The Greatest Investment Opportunity Since 1984 Companies / Sector AnalysisMarch 12, 2013 - 06:03 PM GMT By: Investment U Andrew Snyder writes: There are three reasons investors absolutely must have their eye on the world’s booming unmanned aircraft market. Not one of them involves a 13-hour rant by Rand Paul or Obama’s ability to kill American citizens on American soil. But the recent political brouhaha is proof that you need to move. If you’ve followed the press, you’ve undoubtedly heard today’s drone market compared to the computer industry in the early 1980s. In fact, on January 25, Yahoo!ran a headline...
  • Northrop Grumman gets $71.6B Fire Scout contract to be assembled in Moss Point (Mississippi)

    03/13/2013 3:21:41 AM PDT · by Islander7 · 11 replies
    Sun Herald ^ | March 12, 2013 | By MARY PEREZ
    Tuesday was a banner day for Gulf Coast industry as the U.S. Navy announced it awarded Northrop Grumman Corp. a $71.6 million contract to produce the next generation of Fire Scout unmanned helicopters, assembled in Moss Point. In addition, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal announced Lockheed Martin Corp. will invest $3 million and create 166 new jobs to build tanks for liquefied natural gas at the Michoud Assembly plant in New Orleans, where the space shuttle tanks were built. The initial 88-foot-long tanks will be used to fuel ships and transport fuel. And at Chevron's 2013 Security Analyst Meeting on...
  • USAF developing terrifying swarms of tiny unmanned drones that can hover, crawl and even kill

    02/21/2013 4:22:10 PM PST · by null and void · 27 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 19:11 EST, 19 February 2013 | Michael Zennie
    The U.S. Air Force is developing tiny unmanned drones that will fly in swarms, hover like bees, crawl like spiders and even sneak up on unsuspecting targets and execute them with lethal precision. The Air Vehicles Directorate, a research arm of the Air Force, has released a computer-animated video outlining the the future capabilities of Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs). The project promises to revolutionize war by down-sizing the combatants.
  • US Army seeks new ways to treat facial skin injuries

    02/16/2013 5:36:07 AM PST · by the scotsman · 1 replies
    BBC News ^ | 16th February 2013 | Jonathan Amos
    'It is extraordinary that doctors were able to do anything for Todd Nelson. The former US Army master sergeant's injuries were so bad the medics thought he would not survive. "I was on my 300th-plus convoy across Kabul, Afghanistan," he recalls. "We were headed home for the night when we passed next to a typical yellow and white sedan. When they saw us getting ready to pass, they flipped the switch. "The blast came in my side of the truck; I was on the passenger side. "It flipped the truck through a brick wall and put shrapnel through my right...
  • Bell Helicopters' upgraded H-1 generates foreign interest

    02/03/2013 12:40:50 AM PST · by sukhoi-30mki · 1 replies
    Reuters ^ | Thu Jan 31, 2013 | Andrea Shalal-Esa
    Bell Helicopters' upgraded H-1 generates foreign interest (Reuters) - As U.S. budget pressures mount, the U.S. Marine Corps says growing foreign demand could help drive down the unit cost of its new upgraded H-1 utility and attack helicopters built by Bell Helicopter, a unit of Textron Inc (TXT.N). Major General John Croley, assistant deputy commandant for aviation, said the new helicopters had greater range and capabilities that would enhance the Marines' ability to work with allies across the Asia-Pacific region. He said increased interest from countries in Asia and the Middle East could help lower the cost of the new...
  • Boeing Successfully Tests Microwave Missile That Takes Out Electronic Targets

    10/25/2012 12:44:32 PM PDT · by neverdem · 36 replies
    CBS St. Louis ^ | October 25, 2012 | NA
    HILL AIR FORCE BASE, Utah (CBS St. Louis) — Boeing successfully tests a new missile that can take out electronic targets with little collateral damage. The aerospace company tested the microwave missile last week on a two-story building on the Utah Test and Training Range where computers and electronic systems were turned on to gauge the effects of the missile’s radio waves, according to a Boeing press release. The missile, known as CHAMP (Counter-electronics High-powered Advanced Missile Project), fired a burst of High Powered Microwaves at the building, successfully knocking out the electronic systems and computers, and even taking out...
  • Next generation military robots have minds of their own

    09/29/2012 4:31:11 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 8 replies
    BBC Future ^ | 9/28/28 | Sharon Weinberger
    A number of robots in development for the military are being given increasing amounts of autonomy. The question is now how they will be used. But, despite widespread press about armed drones hunting down terrorists and insurgents in Afghanistan and Pakistan and the increasing use of ground robots to fight roadside bombs, the truth is that most military robots are still pretty dumb. In fact, almost all unmanned systems involve humans in almost every aspect of their operations—it’s just that instead of sitting in a cockpit or behind the wheel of a vehicle, humans are operating the systems from a...
  • US Army Announces Greatest inventions of 2011

    09/23/2012 3:03:25 PM PDT · by lbryce · 31 replies
    Defence Talk ^ | September 21,2012 | Staff
    U.S. Army officials announced the winners of its greatest inventions competition Sept. 19.A team of combat veteran non-commissioned officers, as well as U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command field-grade officers, reviewed and voted for the Army Greatest Inventions of 2011. Dale Ormond, director of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, commended the scientists and engineers for their efforts to empower, unburden and protect Soldiers. “The contributions made by these teams promise to improve the well-being of Soldiers and the Army’s capability to contribute to quality of life and our national security,” Ormond said. “All of the nominated inventions...
  • Who Really Invented the Internet?

    07/23/2012 7:06:51 AM PDT · by Pharmboy · 239 replies
    The Wall Street Journal ^ | July 23, 2012 | L. GORDON CROVITZ
    Contrary to legend, it wasn't the federal government, and the Internet had nothing to do with maintaining communications during a war. A telling moment in the presidential race came recently when Barack Obama said: "If you've got a business, you didn't build that. Somebody else made that happen." He justified elevating bureaucrats over entrepreneurs by referring to bridges and roads, adding: "The Internet didn't get invented on its own. Government research created the Internet so that all companies could make money off the Internet." It's an urban legend that the government launched the Internet. The myth is that the Pentagon...
  • Kodak confirms it had weapons-grade uranium in underground lab

    05/16/2012 7:40:05 AM PDT · by Abathar · 54 replies
    CNN ^ | Wed May 16, 2012 | Dugald McConnell and Brian Todd
    -- Kodak -- the company known for decades for its cameras and film -- this week confirmed it used weapons-grade uranium in an underground lab in upstate New York for upwards of 30 years. A company spokesman and a former scientist for the firm say there was not enough material to sustain a nuclear chain reaction. Former Kodak researcher Albert Filo said the uranium was alloyed with aluminum in plates sealed in sleeves that were not moved for three decades. The amount of fuel was about 3½ pounds, which experts say is less than one-tenth of the amount necessary to...
  • Boeing shows off new Super Hornet display

    04/17/2012 9:24:43 PM PDT · by sukhoi-30mki · 24 replies
    Flight Global ^ | April 18, 2012 | Dave Majumdar
    Boeing shows off new Super Hornet display Boeing is showing off some of the advanced features it is proposing for the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet. Some of these include conformal fuel tanks, an external weapons pod to reduce the jet's radar cross-section, better engines, and a new missile warning system among other improvements. Inside the cockpit (both cockpits in the case of the F-model) is a new single-screen color LCD display. But what is truly impressive is a new 3D situational awareness display mode--it overlays various threats and displays them in an easy to understand graphic. Terrain can be overlaid on...
  • F-35: UK House of Commons Issues Status Report on JSF

    04/05/2012 1:57:53 AM PDT · by U-238 · 1 replies
    Defense Talk ^ | 4/5/2012 | UK Government News
    The F-35 Joint Strike Fighter will be the new multirole fast jet for the Royal Navy and Royal Air Force. It will serve as the strike capability for the new Queen Elizabeth Aircraft Carrier and will partner the Typhoon to form the future fast jet fleet for the RAF. It is a multinational acquisition programme led by the United States in partnership with eight other nations, including the UK. There are three variants of the F-35: F-35A Conventional Takeoff and Landing (CTOL) F-35B Short Takeoff/Vertical Landing (STOVL) F-35C Carrier Variant (CV) The UK selected the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) in...
  • B-2 Spirit Stealth Bomber Completes First Ever Polar Test Mission

    04/05/2012 1:42:31 AM PDT · by U-238 · 1 replies
    Defense Talk ^ | 3/4/2012 | Northrop Grumman
    Under contract to the U.S. Air Force, Northrop Grumman's B-2 Spirit stealth bomber has completed its first 18.5-hour sortie over the North Pole to validate new flight management software. The computer upgrade system, which is the cornerstone for all future B-2 upgrades, is now ready to enter low-rate initial production. The Extremely High Frequency (EHF) Increment 1 system verification review demonstrated the computer upgrade program successfully satisfied the government's requirements. The sortie also included air-refueling to and from the North Pole from Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. The verification reviews and flight test were the culmination of over two years...
  • U.S. Gov Official: Current Generation of Policymakers Lack Understanding of Technology

    04/04/2012 12:48:40 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 10 replies
    Dailytech ^ | - April 3, 2012 12:52 PM | Tiffany Kaiser
    Rose Gottemoeller said the next generation will change how cyber defense is handled A U.S. government official said that cyber defense has been slow-moving due to the current generation of policymaker's lack of technological understanding. Rose Gottemoeller, U.S. Acting Undersecretary for Arms Control and International Security, recently visited the Estonian IT College in Tallinn to deliver a speech about cyber attacks and defense. In this lecture, she noted that a major issue with current cyber defense is the fact that many policymakers around the world don't fully understand technology used today. "The truth is there are a lot of senior...
  • Pentagon focused on resolving F-35 software issues

    04/01/2012 9:20:55 PM PDT · by U-238 · 41 replies
    Reuters ^ | Reuters
    The Pentagon is focused on resolving complex software issues on the new Lockheed Martin Corp F-35 fighter jet, even as it struggles to drive down costs, a top Pentagon official said on Friday, noting that software failures could "bring us to our knees." Air Force Major General John Thompson, the No. 2 official in charge of the huge multi-nation warplane development program, said the latest restructuring of the program had given officials enough resources and time to address future challenges. "Both the hardware and the software issues that we're addressing are all within the realm of being resolved," Thompson told...
  • Laser Horizons

    04/01/2012 8:34:03 PM PDT · by U-238 · 5 replies
    Air Force Magazine ^ | 4/1/2012 | John A. Tirpak
    Functional laser weapons are just five years away. Advocates hope that won’t always be the case. The Air Force has been working on airborne laser weapons for more than 40 years, but a fielded system remains elusive. Experts also warn that the US does not enjoy a commanding lead in laser research. And the Air Force’s flagship laser weapon program, the Airborne Laser (later called the Airborne Laser Testbed) was terminated late last year and is now being dismantled. Still, service and industry experts predict there is plenty of reason for realistic optimism. Operational laser systems that can perform a...
  • F-35A completes first night refueling mission

    03/26/2012 5:54:59 PM PDT · by U-238 · 1 replies · 8+ views
    Lockheed Martin ^ | 3/26/2012 | Lockheed Martin
    The first night refueling in the history of the Lockheed Martin F-35 program was completed Thursday at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. Piloted by U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Peter Vitt, AF-4, an F-35A conventional takeoff and landing variant, rendezvoused with an Air Force KC-135 tanker and successfully received fuel through the F-35’s boom receptacle. Vitt’s sortie lasted more than three hours. In addition to qualifying with the KC-135, the F-35 Integrated Test Force at Edwards AFB will also conduct night refueling tests with the KC-10.
  • No Go On A Nuclear-Powered Unmanned Aerial Vehicle?

    03/26/2012 6:27:31 PM PDT · by U-238 · 4 replies · 11+ views
    Ottawa Citizen ^ | 3/26/2012 | :David Pugliese
    There have been a number of articles lately about the U.S. developing a new unmanned aerial vehicle in secret. Dave Majumdar, at Air Force Times, recently had an article about how the U.S. Air Force’s decision to postpone development of a next generation unmanned combat aircraft suggests that service might be developing something else in the “black world.” The article quoted USAF intelligence chief Lt.-Gen. Larry James who said that there is no immediate need for a next generation replacement for the General Atomics MQ-9 Reaper. And the Predator-C Avenger UAV the USAF is buying will be used only as...
  • New device invisible to magnetic fields

    03/24/2012 11:19:51 PM PDT · by U-238 · 26 replies · 1+ views
    Defense Talk ^ | 3/24/2012 | Defense Talk
    European researchers said Thursday they have created a device invisible to a static magnetic field that could have practical military and medical applications. Fedor Gomory and colleagues in Slovakia and Spain designed a cloak for a direct current, or dc, magnetic field that is static and produced by a permanent magnet or coil carrying a direct current. DC magnetic fields are used in MRI imaging devices, in hospitals and in security systems, such as those in airports. The researchers' device, described in a study in Friday's edition of the journal Science, features a cylinder with two concentric layers. While the...
  • F-35 Reaches Critical Juncture After Strong Year, Official Says

    03/21/2012 4:34:17 PM PDT · by U-238 · 6 replies · 1+ views
    Defense Talk ^ | Wednesday, March 21st, 2012 | American Forces Press Service
    The F-35 Lightning II joint strike fighter program -- the centerpiece of future tactical aviation and a key to implementing new military strategic guidance -- made strong progress in its development last year, a defense official said today. Frank Kendall, acting undersecretary of defense for acquisition, technology and logistics, told the House Armed Services Committee that the fighter aircraft is essential to the Defense Department, and that it made "strong progress" in 2011. "Last fall, the department engaged in a strategy and budget review, where everything -- and I do mean everything -- was on the table," Kendall said. "After...
  • Military-Funded Brain Science Sparks Controversy

    03/21/2012 1:57:55 AM PDT · by U-238 · 11 replies
    Live Science ^ | 3/21/2012 | Charles Choi
    Brain research and associated advances such as brain-machine interfaces that are funded by the U.S. military and intelligence communities raise profound ethical concerns, caution researchers who cite the potentially lethal applications of such work and other consequences. Rapid advances in neuroscience made over the last decade have many dual-use applications of both military and civilian interest. Researchers who receive military funding — with the U.S. Department of Defense spending more than $350 million on neuroscience in 2011 — may not fully realize how dangerous their work might be, say scientists in an essay published online today (March 20) in the...
  • The Science of Rail Guns

    03/20/2012 9:44:57 PM PDT · by U-238 · 43 replies
    i09 ^ | 3/20/2012 | Keith Veronese
    Ubiquitous in science fiction, rail guns are a hot area of military research in real life too. But will we ever really get to use them the way people in science fiction do? And could rail guns be used for a non-violent reason — inexpensively launching payload into space? Halo Reach ends with your Spartan taking up a mounted rail gun to destroy an incoming Covenant ship. Rail guns are the basis for a funny aside in Mass Effect 2. They're used in Babylon 5 and Stargate Atlantis and The Last Starfighter. And they're a devastating hand-held weapon in the...
  • National Lab Seeks Partner to Commercialize Self-Guided Bullet

    03/15/2012 7:05:29 PM PDT · by U-238 · 17 replies
    Wharton Aerospace ^ | 2/02/2012 | Wharton Aerospace
    Sandia National Laboratories is seeking a partnership with a private company to commercialize a new guided bullet that its engineers have invented, according to the U.S. government lab, which is managed by Lockheed Martin. The Sandia researchers, Red Jones and Brian Kast and their colleagues, created a dart-like self-guided bullet for small-caliber firearms that uses laser guidance to hit targets more than a mile away. "We have a very promising technology to guide small projectiles that could be fully developed inexpensively and rapidly," Jones said. The prototype was built using commercially available components and the initial testing in computer simulations...
  • Should Russia sell SU-35 to China?

    03/13/2012 7:24:45 PM PDT · by U-238 · 27 replies · 1+ views
    The Diplomat ^ | 3/12/2012 | Harry Kazianis
    Russia is reportedly close to finalizing a major sale of advanced fighter aircraft to China worth $4 billion. Such a sale, newsworthy in itself, would have been hard to imagine as recently as a few years ago considering the history of previous agreements. The anticipated deal, first reported by Kommersant, sees the two sides “practically agreed on the delivery of 48 Su-35 multirole fighters, worth $4 billion, to China.” Some reports suggest that Chinese officials have dismissed talk of such a deal. But if true, an agreement like this would certainly make sense for Beijing, giving China access to an...
  • DARPA Unveils Drone-Slaying War Laser

    03/11/2012 10:30:14 PM PDT · by U-238 · 38 replies
    Fast Company ^ | 3/08/2012 | Neil Ungerleider
    DARPA is unveiling a portable laser weapons system, HELLADS, which seems like something out of a sci-fi movie. The new laser application, created by General Atomics Aeronautical Systems with a custom power system from Saft Batteries, will help change the way the American military fights future wars. Current military laser systems are bulky contraptions which are mainly the size of a passenger jet, while the proposed DARPA weapon can fit on the back of a flatbed truck. The 150-kilowatt, solid state laser weapon is strong enough to take down drones or other aerial targets; a prototype is expected to be...
  • F-35 Program Head Expresses 'Great Confidence' in Stealth, Sensors

    03/09/2012 5:55:54 PM PST · by U-238 · 7 replies
    AOL Defense ^ | 3/8/2012 | AOL Defense
    The program executive officer for the problem-plagued F-35 said Thursday he has "great confidence" the multi-service fighter can deliver the oft-promised stealth and the sophisticated package of sensors. Vice Adm. David Venlet said he has "measured data" to show that. In a late afternoon address to an audience of defense and financial industry representatives, Venlet said all the current problems with the Lockheed Martin-built aircraft that have been highlighted in the media and congressional hearings "are in the normal range of fighter aircraft development." The problems Venlet cited included the sophisticated helmet that should allow the pilot to see on...
  • An Inexpensive Solution for Quickly Launching Military Satellites Into Space

    03/06/2012 6:57:53 PM PST · by U-238 · 59 replies · 1+ views
    National Defense Magazine ^ | 3/1/2012 | William I. Oberholtzer
    During a recent trip to Yuma Proving Ground, in Arizona, I passed a unique looking artillery piece in a remote area of the installation. It has an extremely long barrel and appeared to be anchored in a concrete abutment. Having more than a passing interest in ordnance I made some inquiries as to origins and purpose of the gun. What I had stumbled across, on that hot desert day, was one of three unique guns that had been part of a very ambitious undertaking called the “High Altitude Research Project,” or HARP. The brainchild of Jerry Bull (of “Iranian Super...
  • Air Force Playing Hardball With Space Industry

    03/06/2012 6:48:11 PM PST · by U-238 · 14 replies
    National Defense Magazine ^ | 2/29/2012 | National Defense Magazine
    Over the past decade, the Air Force has poured more than $80 billion into space technologies, including new satellites, launch services and information systems. The plan for the coming years is to spend considerably less as pressure grows to reduce the U.S. defense budget. The Air Force still intends to modernize key satellite constellations and provide space-based communications and surveillance services for the military and intelligence community. But program costs are going to be scrutinized at an unprecedented level of detail, Air Force officials said. Every major space program is now the subject of “should-cost” reviews, which is the Pentagon’s...
  • U.S. Air Force space plane marks one year in orbit

    03/05/2012 7:05:31 PM PST · by U-238 · 6 replies
    Spaceflight Now ^ | 3/4/2012 | Stephen Clark
    The U.S. Air Force's second X-37B space plane marked one year in orbit Monday, continuing its clandestine mission more than 200 miles above Earth. The robotic spacecraft's purpose is secret, but Air Force officials acknowledge the vehicle is performing well one year after it blasted off on a United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket on March 5, 2011. "We are very pleased with the results of the on-going X-37B experiments," said Lt. Col. Tom McIntyre, X-37B program director in the Air Force's Rapid Capabilities Office. "The X-37B program is setting the standard for a reusable space plane and, on this...
  • US mothballs airborne laser missile defense weapon

    03/04/2012 11:28:49 PM PST · by U-238 · 51 replies
    CBS News ^ | 3/1/2012 | CBS News
    The Pentagon has mothballed a laser-equipped jumbo jet after 15 years and $5 billion worth of research to develop an airborne missile defense system. Budget cuts shot down the Airborne Laser Test Bed but some research into anti-missile lasers will continue, according to the U.S. Missile Defense Agency. "We didn't have the funding to continue flying the aircraft," agency spokeswoman Debra Christman told the Los Angeles Times (http://lat.ms/xEnw3z ). The plane, a Boeing 747 mounted with a high-energy chemical laser, has been sent into storage at Davis Monthan Air Force Base, the agency said. The base near Tucson, Ariz., serves...
  • Chinese Drones Will Use Genetic Algorithms to Learn to Hunt For Submarines

    03/02/2012 1:18:39 AM PST · by U-238 · 27 replies · 135+ views
    Popular Mechanics ^ | 2/29/2012 | Clay Dillow
    China usually holds its military hand very close to the vest--that, or things “mysteriously” leak that it doesn’t (does) want the world to know about--so we’re left to wonder why the People’s Republic has decided to publish this in the journal Advanced Materials Research. Nonetheless, it’s pretty interesting. Chinese navy researchers have plans for a new submarine hunting scheme that uses ship-launched UAVs running genetic algorithms. Genetic algorithms narrow down a range of possibilities to an optimal solution much the way evolution does (at least in a simplified sense)--by weeding out the weaker offspring and mating the best with the...
  • New 'thinking cap' technologies that control weaponry 'a step closer'

    03/02/2012 12:49:11 AM PST · by U-238 · 7 replies · 35+ views
    The Telegraph ^ | 3/1/2012 | The Telegraph
    Researchers believe that new "thinking caps", could help provide super-human strength, highly enhanced concentration or thought-controlled weaponry. A British ethics group is investigating the ethical dilemmas posed by inventions that interfere with the brain's inner workings. The Nuffield Council on Bioethics (NCB) has launched a consultation on the risks posed by such new technologies, the global market for which it says is worth $8bn (£5bn) and "growing fast. With the prospect of future conflicts between armies controlling weapons with their minds, the Council, an independent body, is wanting to identify what issues that come with blurring the lines between humans...
  • Boeing Completes F/A-18E/F, EA-18G Multi-Year Procurement

    02/26/2012 10:52:14 PM PST · by U-238 · 1 replies
    Space War ^ | 2/27/2012 | Space War
    Boeing has announced that it has completed delivery of 257 F/A-18E/F Super Hornet strike fighters and EA-18G Growler electronic attack aircraft to the U.S. Navy. Each aircraft was delivered ahead of schedule and within the contract budget. The aircraft were delivered to the Navy from 2007 through 2011 under a multi-year procurement (MYP) contract awarded to Boeing on Dec. 29, 2003. The Navy purchased the aircraft during fiscal years 2005-2009. Multi-year procurement contracts provide a stable production environment that enables manufacturers and suppliers to reduce cost through bulk purchasing and productivity enhancements. "Super Hornets and Growlers provide unmatched, proven and...
  • Lockheed Martin's Fighting Falcon Evolves With New F-16V

    02/26/2012 10:48:34 PM PST · by U-238 · 3 replies
    Srace War ^ | 2/27/2012 | Space War
    Lockheed Martin has unveiled a new version of the F-16 at the Singapore Airshow. The F-16V will feature enhancements including an active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar, an upgraded mission computer and architecture, and improvements to the cockpit - all capabilities identified by the U.S. Air Force and several international customers for future improvements. With nearly 4,500 F-16s delivered, this is a natural step in the evolution of the world's most successful 4th generation fighter. The Fighting Falcon program has continually evolved as it began with the F-16 A/B as the lightweight fighter then transitioned to F-16 C/D and Block...
  • New Bomber Program 'Underway' But Cloaked in Secrecy

    02/24/2012 9:09:08 PM PST · by U-238 · 90 replies · 1+ views
    AolDefense ^ | 2/24/2012 | Colin Clark
    America's new long-range bomber program is "underway," will involve somewhere between 80 and 100 planes and will be delivered sometime in the mid-2020's. "And that's about all we're saying," Air Force Secretary Mike Donley told reporters. It's been known for some time that the bombers will not fly alone but will be part of a family of systems that may include UAVs and other systems. The really interesting part of all this is the secrecy and why it's so dark. It would seem to indicate several things: that the U.S. does not want potential competitors such as China or Russia...
  • 5TH Graders Design Improved Military Helmet (Video)

    02/21/2012 10:08:12 AM PST · by JerseyanExile · 14 replies · 1+ views
    Platts Energy Week ^ | February 16, 2012 | Mike Hydeck
    We made two stops for this Cool Schools report: Leesburg, Va. and the White House. A team of fifth graders came up with an invention so impressive, the President of the United States even noticed! Learning about the war in Afghanistan could be pretty daunting and the graphic scenes can be scary, but for these 11 year olds, it was a motivation to do something positive. Jack Dudley, a student at Stone Hill Middle School in Ashburn, Va. told us, "Our inspiration for the project...Specialist Robert Warren lost part of his skull in an IED blast in Afghanistan." Virginia 5th...
  • Lockheed Martin Unveils New F-16V to Complement F-35, F-22

    02/18/2012 11:31:11 AM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 18 replies
    Dailytech ^ | - February 16, 2012 9:26 AM | Shane McGlaun (Blog)
    New version of the fighter gets radar improvements and more The Lockheed Martin F-16 Fighting Falcon has been around for over three decades and so far there have been nearly 4,500 delivered. The F-16 will continue for many years to come and Lockheed Martin has today unveiled a new version called F-16V. The new version of the fighter jet was unveiled at the Singapore Airshow and has new feature enhancements to make the aircraft more formidable. The F-16 V gets new active electronically scanned array radar (AESA), an upgraded mission computer and architecture, along with improvements inside the cockpit. Lockheed...