Keyword: mineraldust

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  • Do Clouds Come From Outer Space?

    08/08/2009 8:43:34 AM PDT · by neverdem · 48 replies · 2,556+ views
    ScienceNOW Daily News ^ | 5 August 2009 | Phil Berardelli
    Enlarge ImageCloud killer? Research suggests that solar storms interfere with cloud formation on Earth. Credit: ESA/NASA Most of Earth's clouds get their start in deep space. That's the surprising conclusion from a team of researchers who argue that interstellar cosmic rays collide with water molecules in our atmosphere to form overcast skies. As common as clouds are on Earth, the processes that produce them are not well understood. Scientists think particles of dust or pollen can serve as nuclei for water droplets, which in turn gather by the trillions into clouds. That would help explain how clouds form over...
  • Out Of Africa

    10/08/2001 4:51:53 PM PDT · by blam · 3 replies · 731+ views
    Science News Magazine ^ | 9-29-2001 | Sid Perkins
    Out Of AfricaDust, the Thermostat How tiny airborne particles manipulate global climate Sid Perkins On April 15, 1998, Mongolia's Gobi Desert lay between an area of low atmospheric pressure on the eastern end of the country and a zone of high pressure to the west. As swift winds rushed across the desert floor, they lofted sand and dust into the heart of a storm system racing southward into China. During the next 2 days, a yellow, muddy, acidic rain fell in a wide swath that covered Beijing and the Korean peninsula. On April 16, 1998, a strong storm system passing ...
  • Strongest sand storm ever captured on satellite over the Sahara

    03/03/2004 1:51:27 PM PST · by Truth666 · 60 replies · 475+ views
    gsfc ^ | 04/03/03 | gsfc
    Click on link to see the satellite photo. The Canary Islands are the only inhabited area affected.
  • Detritus of life abounds in the atmosphere

    03/31/2005 2:36:28 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 8 replies · 324+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 3/31/05 | Fred Pearce
    Could dandruff be altering the world’s climate? Along with fur, algae, pollen, fungi, bacteria, viruses and various other “bio-aerosols” wafting around in the atmosphere, it may well be. A global study has found that tiny fragments of biological detritus are a major component of the atmosphere, controlling the weather and forming a previously hidden microbial metropolis in the skies. Besides their climatic influence, they may even be spreading diseases across the globe. Scientists have known for some time that aerosols of soot, dust and ash can influence climate by reflecting or absorbing the Sun’s rays and by providing the condensation...
  • Desertification, dust 'global threats'

    06/17/2005 2:49:36 PM PDT · by Tumbleweed_Connection · 17 replies · 384+ views
    Herald Sun ^ | 6/17/05 | Staff
    DESERTIFICATION threatens to drive millions of people from their homes in coming decades while vast dust storms can damage the health of people continents away, an international report said today. "Desertification has emerged as a global problem affecting everyone," said Zafar Adeel, assistant director of the UN University's water academy and a lead author of a report drawing on the work of 1360 scientists in 95 nations. Two billion people live in drylands vulnerable to desertification, ranging from northern Africa to swathes of central Asia, he said. And storms can lift dust from the Sahara Desert, for instance, and cause...
  • The African Source Of The Amazon's Fertilizer

    11/18/2006 4:22:58 PM PST · by blam · 23 replies · 1,078+ views
    Science News Magazine ^ | 11-18-2006 | Sid Perkins
    The African source of the Amazon's fertilizer Sid Perkins In the winter months in the Northern Hemisphere, massive dust storms from the African Sahara waft southwest across the Atlantic to drop tons of vital minerals on the Amazon basin in South America. Now, scientists have pinpointed the source of many of those dust storms and estimated their dust content. ON THE WAY. Satellite photo shows dust (arrow), bound for the Amazon, blowing away from the Sahara's Bodélé depression. NASA The Amazonian rainforest depends on Saharan dust for many of its nutrients, including iron and phosphorus (SN: 9/29/01, p. 200: http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20010929/bob9.asp)....
  • On Top Of The World! Sensational Collection Of Satellite Images Captures Earth's Natural Wonders

    07/25/2009 9:38:51 AM PDT · by Steelfish · 4 replies · 773+ views
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | July 25th 2009
    On top of the world! Sensational collection of satellite images captures Earth's natural wonders from space CHER THORNHILL 25th July 2009 For decades, man has gazed up at the stars and marvelled at the wonders of the universe. But, as this amazing selection of images shows, there are many mind-blowing sights to behold from the other direction. [Pics in URL] Pictures taken by astronauts and Nasa satellites give a fascinating bird's-eye view of Earth's natural wonders - including hurricanes, volcanoes and other powerful weather formations - from space. A mosaic of Nasa satellite images gives the most detailed true-colour image...
  • Mineral dust plays key role in cloud formation and chemistry

    05/10/2013 11:29:47 PM PDT · by neverdem · 11 replies
    Chemistry World ^ | 9 May 2013 | Simon Hadlington
    Scientists flew a plane into high up cirrus clouds and used a sampler that resembled a hair dryer to examine cloud formation © Karl FroydMineral dust that swirls up into the atmosphere from Earth’s surface plays a far more important role in both cloud formation and cloud chemistry than was previously realised. The findings will feed into models of cloud formation and chemistry to help produce more accurate assessments of the role of clouds in climate change.Relatively little is understood about the formation of cirrus clouds, wispy ‘horsetails’ that are made of ice crystals and form at extremely high altitudes...