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Keyword: minoan

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  • The Minoans were Caucasian

    07/12/2014 4:58:18 AM PDT · by Renfield · 38 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 5-16-2013 | Damien Gayle
    DNA analysis has debunked the longstanding theory that the Minoans, who some 5,000 years ago established Europe's first advanced Bronze Age culture, were from Africa. The Minoan civilisation arose on the Mediterranean island of Crete in approximately the 27th century BC and flourished for 12 centuries until the 15th century BC. But the culture was lost until British archaeologist Sir Arthur Evans unearthed its remains on Crete in 1900, where he found vestiges of a civilisation he believed was formed by refugees from northern Egypt. Modern archaeologists have cast doubt on that version of events, and now DNA tests of...
  • DNA Sheds Light On Minoans

    04/04/2008 8:02:26 AM PDT · by blam · 31 replies · 1,101+ views
    Kathimerini ^ | 4-4-2008
    DNA sheds light on Minoans Crete’s fabled Minoan civilization was built by people from Anatolia, according to a new study by Greek and foreign scientists that disputes an earlier theory that said the Minoans’ forefathers had come from Africa. The new study – a collaboration by experts in Greece, the USA, Canada, Russia and Turkey – drew its conclusions from the DNA analysis of 193 men from Crete and another 171 from former neolithic colonies in central and northern Greece. The results show that the country’s neolithic population came to Greece by sea from Anatolia – modern-day Iran, Iraq and...
  • Expedition Seeks Clues To Lost Bronze Age Culture (Minoans - Robert Ballard)

    06/04/2006 4:05:30 PM PDT · by blam · 9 replies · 656+ views
    Yahoo ^ | 6-1-2006 | Richard C. Lewis
    Expedition seeks clues to lost Bronze Age culture By Richard C. Lewis Thu Jun 1, 4:11 PM ETReuters Photo: Deep-sea explorer Robert Ballard speaks at the National Geographic Society in an undated file photo.... PROVIDENCE, Rhode Island (Reuters) - An underwater explorer who found the Titanic and a team of international scientists will soon survey waters off the Greek island of Crete for clues to a once-powerful Bronze Age-era civilization. The expedition about 75 miles northwest of Crete aims to learn more about the Minoans, who flourished during the Bronze Age, and seeks to better understand seafaring four millennia ago,...
  • Ancient Volcano, Seeds And Treerings, Suggest Rewriting Late Bronze Age Mediterranean History (More)

    04/29/2006 12:24:20 PM PDT · by blam · 15 replies · 723+ views
    Cornell University ^ | 4-28-2006 | Alex Kwan
    April 28, 2006Cornell study of ancient volcano, seeds and tree rings, suggests rewriting Late Bronze Age Mediterranean history By Alex Kwan Separated in history by 100 years, the seafaring Minoans of Crete and the mercantile Canaanites of northern Egypt and the Levant (a large area of the Middle East) at the eastern end of the Mediterranean were never considered trading partners at the start of the Late Bronze Age. Until now. Trenchmaster Vronwy Hankey and foreman Antonis Zidianakis excavate storage jars from the Minoan settlement Myrtos-Pyrgos. The jars were analyzed in the Cornell study using radiocarbon analyses. Cultural links between...
  • Minoan civilization was made in Europe

    05/14/2013 12:29:08 PM PDT · by Renfield · 10 replies
    Nature.com ^ | 5-13-2013 | Ewen Callaway
    When the British archaeologist Sir Arthur Evans discovered the 4,000-year-old Palace of Minos on Crete in 1900, he saw the vestiges of a long-lost civilization whose artefacts set it apart from later Bronze-Age Greeks. The Minoans, as Evans named them, were refugees from Northern Egypt who had been expelled by invaders from the South about 5,000 years ago, he claimed. Modern archaeologists have questioned that version of events, and now ancient DNA recovered from Cretan caves suggests that the Minoan civilization emerged from the early farmers who settled the island thousands of years earlier....
  • Greek Island of Santorini Volcano Erupted in 16th Century

    03/22/2014 4:46:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Greek Reporter ^ | March 8, 2014 | Abed Alloush
    According to a recent international study, the volcano of the island Santorini, Greece, erupted in the 16th century BC and not earlier. The survey characterized a number of research studies that took place in the past and have indicated that Santorini's volcano may have erupted a century earlier, as unreliable because the method based on tree-ring measurements that they used, could not provide them with accurate results. An international team of researchers led by Paolo Cherubini from the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL) has demonstrated in the scientific journal Antiquity, that this method cannot provide...
  • Who Were the Hurrians?

    06/25/2008 6:23:45 PM PDT · by blam · 28 replies · 595+ views
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | July/August 2008 | Andrew Lawler
    Who Were the Hurrians? Volume 61 Number 4, July/August 2008 New discoveries in Syria suggest a little-known people fueled the rise of civilization Excavations at the 3rd millennium city of Urkesh in Syria are revealing new information about the mysterious people who lived there, known as the Hurrians. This view of the city's royal palace shows the service area (left) and living quarters (right). (Ken Garrett) With its vast plaza and impressive stone stairway leading up to a temple complex, Urkesh was designed to last. And for well over a millennium, this city on the dusty plains of what is...
  • Unearthed Hittite artifacts in Istanbul break new ground [sic, Hurrians]

    11/03/2013 9:48:46 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Hurriyet Daily News ^ | Thursday, October 31, 2013 | Omer Erbil
    Traces of the Hurrian civilization discovered in excavations in the ancient city of Bathonea in Istanbul's Küçükçekmece river basin are being hailed as the year's most important discovery as they provide the first ever proof that the Hittites came to Europe and civilisations' long history... The traces from the Hurrian civilization -- the early Hittite era -- were found in the Küçükçekmece river basin in the western parts of the city. The discoveries -- iron god and goddess statues that were found in two different places -- have created great excitement among researchers... Two Hurrian statues, bitumen, tin and...
  • Genetic study proves Israel's wild boars originated in Europe

    11/10/2013 7:44:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | Nov 04, 2013 | Tel Aviv University
    Wild boars look more or less the same in Israel as they do anywhere else: stalky and hairy with big heads, long snouts, and beady eyes. So scientists had no reason to suspect Israeli wild boars were any different than their brothers and sisters roaming the Middle East, from Egypt to Iran... unlike the Near Eastern wild boars in surrounding countries, Israel's wild boars originated in Europe. After a genetic and archaeological analysis, the researchers suggest the wild boars living in Israel are descendants of domesticated pigs brought to Israel starting almost 3,000 years ago by the Philistines and other...
  • 50 Ancient Tombs Uncovered (1400BC, Crete)

    07/18/2004 1:17:56 PM PDT · by blam · 54 replies · 2,126+ views
    The Australian ^ | 7-18-2004
    50 ancient tombs uncovered From correspondents in Athens July 18, 2004 ARCHEOLOGISTS have discovered 50 tombs dating back to the late Minoan period, around 1400 BC, and containing a number of artifacts on the Greek island of Crete, ANA news agency reported today. The tombs were part of the once powerful ancient city of Kydonia, which was destroyed at the time but later rebuilt. The oldest among them contained bronze weapons, jewellery and vases and are similar to the tombs of fallen soldiers of the Mycenaean type from mainland Greece, said the head of the excavations, Maria Vlazaki. The more...
  • Inscription in Carian and Greek

    07/17/2004 6:20:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies · 1,150+ views
    Anistoriton ^ | 27 Dec. 1997 | (editors)
    On 8/9 November 1997 the Swiss newspaper Neue Zurcher Zeitung reported that German and Turks archaeologists, who conducted excavations at the ancient site of Kaunos on Asia Minor coast just across the Greek island of Rhodes, unearthed an inscription in two scripts. The top part is inscribed in the Carian language and the same text is repeated in the lower part in classical Greek. The inscription is a resolution of the city of Kaunos to honor two Athenians, one of whom is Nikokles of Lycekleous a fairly know person and contemporary of Demosthenes. Thus, the stone was safely dated to...
  • In the footsteps of the Bronze Men [ the Carians in Egypt ]

    04/06/2010 6:03:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies · 317+ views
    Al-Ahram Weekly ^ | Issue No. 992, April 1-7, 2010 | Nevine El-Aref
    When Herodotus toured the known world during the fifth century BC to compile his international history, he did not forget his hometown Caria, now Bodrum in Turkey. Caria (the name means "the steep country") stood in the western part of Anatolia, whose coast, according to the ancient world map, stretched from mid-Ionia to Lycia and east to Phrygia. Mountains and valleys were the main features of the country's scenery, and it was poor in agriculture in comparison with its counterparts at the time: Egypt and Babylonia. Its hilltops were fortified, while villages were scattered in valleys and it was hard...
  • Quarry, Setting and Team Marks: The Carian Connection

    10/08/2004 3:20:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies · 499+ views
    University of Leiden (Netherlands) ^ | 1998 | (about) Sheldon Lee Gosline
    In this paper, the author proposes some specific attributions for signs deriving from the Carian or another West-Anatolian script found on in situ blocks from standing walls: quarry, block positioning, or team marks. The proposals are based on data from three distant yet related sites where such marks have been preserved, among which the Khnum temple terrace on Elephantine. In time, however, the quarry marks at Elephantine do not correspond with the other two sites. Therefore, the author proposes that the terrace was built several hundred years earlier than the Graeco-Roman Period to which the terrace is usually dated, or...
  • "King's" villas cause outrage [Caria, in modern Turkey]

    05/17/2008 11:11:27 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies · 190+ views
    Voices Newspaper ^ | Saturday, May 17, 2008 | editor
  • Illegal excavation reveals an important discovery

    08/10/2010 8:08:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Hurriyet ^ | Sunday, August 8, 2010 | Dogan News Agency
    The Tourism and Culture Ministry started a research investigation into an illegal excavation which took place in the Zeus Karios area in Milas, Bodrum. The illegal excavation revealed the large tomb stone of King Hekataios. The tomb stone was made in 390 B.C. and it is said that the discovery is one of the most important archeological discovery in modern times. Speaking after the research, Undersecretariat of Culture and Tourism Ministry Özgür Özarslan said: "The discovery revealed that the tomb stone belongs to Hekataios's father Mausolos. Mausolos was the satrap of Karia." The tomb stone is thought to have been...
  • Remains of Minoan-style painting discovered during excavations of Canaanite palace

    11/10/2009 8:30:40 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies · 851+ views
    Eurekalert ^ | Monday, November 9, 2009 | Amir Gilat, Ph.D., Rachel Feldman
    The remains of a Minoan-style wall painting, recognizable by a blue background, the first of its kind to be found in Israel, was discovered in the course of the recent excavation season at Tel Kabri. This fresco joins others of Aegean style that have been uncovered during earlier seasons at the Canaanite palace in Kabri. "It was, without doubt, a conscious decision made by the city's rulers who wished to associate with Mediterranean culture and not adopt Syrian and Mesopotamian styles of art like other cities in Canaan did. The Canaanites were living in the Levant and wanted to feel...
  • Bulgarian Archaeology Finds Said to Rewrite History of Black Sea Sailing

    09/14/2011 2:56:24 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Novinite ^ | Monday, September 12, 2011 | Sofia News Agency
    Massive ancient stone anchors were found by divers participating in an archaeological expedition near the southern Bulgarian Black Sea town of Sozopol. The expedition, led by deputy director of Bulgaria's National Historical Museum Dr Ivan Hristov, found the precious artifacts west of the Sts. Cyricus and Julitta island. The 200-kg beautifully ornamented anchors have two holes in them -- one for the anchor rope and another one for a wooden stick. They were used for 150-200-ton ships that transported mainly wheat, but also dried and salted fish, skins, timber and metals from what now is Bulgaria's coast. The anchors' shape...
  • Non-Attic Characters

    07/18/2004 6:43:19 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies · 951+ views
    University of California, Irvine, Thesaurus Linguae Graecae ^ | September 7 2003 (rev 9-28-2003) | Nick Nicholas
    The first character is the sampi, as it was used (briefly) in the Ionic alphabet as a sibilant. The first question to answer is whether it should be separated from the numerical sampi at all... The second question is what the phonetic value of sampi was... Jeffery (1990:39)... also suspects that sampi was originally borrowed from Carian, and used to express the Carian sibilant in loanwords... In the pre-Hellenic language of Lemnos (possibly related to Etruscan), it is used, but Jeffery has no idea what it sounded like. In the older inscriptions of the non-Hellenic language of Phrygia (related...
  • Syria: Scholar Composes Music from Archaeological Ugaritic Cuneiform Tablet

    07/09/2010 9:34:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies · 2+ views
    Global Arab Network ^ | Thursday, July 8, 2010 | H. Sabbagh
    Musical scholar Ziad Ajjan composed eight poetry and musical pieces from the musical archaeological cuneiform tablet known as "Hymn of Supplication" H6 discovered in Ugarit in the early 20th century. Ajjan composed three musical pieces based on the musical notes in the tablet which dates back to 1400 BC, naming the pieces "Sunrise," "Sunset" and "Holiday in Ugarit." This marks the recording of the oldest music notation in the history of the world. Ajjan said he is still working on the tablet based on information he reached after extensive study and previous experiment, making use of previous research by fellow...
  • Capital City Of Ancient Superpower Discovered (Medes)

    10/26/2002 12:56:48 PM PDT · by blam · 26 replies · 996+ views
    Independent (UK) ^ | 10-26-2002 | David Keys
    Capital city of ancient superpower discovered By David Keys Archaeology Correspondent 26 October 2002 British archaeologists have discovered a capital city of one of the ancient world's most mysterious superpowers. The metropolis, covering more than a square mile, was the main western administrative centre of the ancient Median Empire, a vast Middle Eastern imperial state which flourished in the first half of the 6th century BC between the fall of the Assyrian empire and the rise of Persia. The discovery reveals the sheer scale of the threat which would soon be posed to Europe by the ancient Middle East. For...
  • The Voyage around the Erythraean Sea

    09/12/2004 7:55:44 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies · 858+ views
    Silk Road ^ | 2004 | William H. Schoff
    The Periplus Maris Erythraei (or "Voyage around the Erythraean Sea") is an anonymous work from around the middle of the first century CE written by a Greek speaking Egyptian merchant.  The first part of the work (sections 1-18) describes the maritime trade-routes following the north-south axis from Egypt down the coast of East Africa as far as modern day Tanzania.  The remainder describes the routes of the East-West axis running from Egypt, around the Arabian Peninsula and past the Persian Gulf on to the west coast of India.  From the vivid descriptions of the places mentioned it is generally...
  • Greek Archaeologists Confirm Authenticity Of 'Theseus Ring'

    08/03/2006 3:24:48 PM PDT · by blam · 17 replies · 1,039+ views
    Greek archaeologists confirm authenticity of 'Theseus Ring' Aug 2, 2006, 15:44 GMT Athens - The long-lost 'Theseus Ring,' a gold ring found in the Plaka district of Athens in the 1950s and generally dismissed as a fake, has been identified by Greek archaeologists as a genuine 15th century BC artifact, reports said Wednesday. The Greek press had reported the discovery of a gold signet ring, with dimensions 2.7 x 1.8 cm dating from the Minoan period, and the National Archaeological Museum wanted to purchase it for 75,000 euros from the woman who owned it. There was a huge debate about...
  • Minoan Frescoes at Tel Kabri: Aegean Art in Bronze Age Israel

    07/21/2013 3:42:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 38 replies
    Biblical Archaeology Review ^ | 6/21/2013 | Noah Wiener
    Over 100 years of excavations on Crete have exposed elegant Minoan frescoes that once adorned the walls of the island’s Bronze Age palaces. This distinctively colorful Aegean art style flourished in the Middle Bronze Age (1750-1550 B.C.). The nearby inhabitants of Akrotiri, a city on the Cycladic island of Thera (modern Santorini), painted numerous artworks in the style of the Minoan frescoes before the island was decimated by a volcanic eruption in the late 17th or 16th century B.C. Until recently, there was no archaeological evidence of Minoan frescoes beyond the islands of the Aegean. Art exhibiting Aegean characteristics has...
  • Akrotiri, Santorini: the Minoan Pompeii -- part 4

    07/21/2013 11:27:29 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    Examiner ^ | September 4, 2009 | Rachel de Carlos
    While approximately forty buildings have been uncovered at Akrotiri, there are six that have been given more attention than the others. The architecture and function of each building is different. The largest building uncovered so far, Xeste 4, is three stories high and believed to be a public building because of its dimensions. The staircase had fragments of frescoes on either side depicting males ascending in a procession. The second largest building, Xeste 3, was at least two stories high, with fourteen rooms on each floor. The rooms were decorated with paintings and some had more than one door. One...
  • Akrotiri, Santorini: the Minoan Pompeii - part 3

    07/20/2013 10:28:52 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Examiner ^ | September 3, 2009 | Rachel de Carlos
    With the archeological site at Akrotiri closed, and no firm date set for it to reopen, many visitors to the island of Santorini have been disappointed not to see what is inside the Akrotiri enclosure. Although it doesn't replace seeing the amazing number of buildings that have been uncovered, around 40 so far, the museums on the island hold a fair amount of artifacts and photographs of wall paintings. If archeology is at the top of your list of reasons for visiting Santorini, here are some helpful phone numbers to call and confirm hours and days they are open. The...
  • Akrotiri, Santorini: the Minoan Pompeii - part 2

    07/07/2013 6:45:04 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Examiner ^ | August 29, 2009 | Rachel de Carlos
    The excavations at the archeological site at Akrotiri in Santorini are ongoing, so there is scaffolding everywhere and supports in place to stabilize walls, windows and doorways that might otherwise collapse. You need to use your imagination to put yourself back in prehistoric times, but with the help of guides or signs posted along the walkways, you can get a fair idea of what life was like. An excavated toilet, pictured in the slide show, has been left in view for the amusement of the tourists and to demonstrate how advanced the plumbing and drainage system was. The inhabitants had...
  • Olive branch solves a Bronze Age mystery

    04/28/2006 5:59:40 AM PDT · by The_Victor · 14 replies · 737+ views
    Yahoo/MSNBC (Science) ^ | 3:04 p.m. ET April 27, 2006 | Kathleen Wren
    WASHINGTON - Compared to the well-studied world of Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, the civilizations that flourished in the eastern Mediterranean just before Homer’s time are still cloaked in mystery. Even the basic chronology of the region during this time has been heatedly debated. Now, a resolution has finally emerged -- initiated, quite literally, by an olive branch.Scientists have discovered the remains of a single olive tree, buried alive during a massive volcanic eruption during the Late Bronze Age. A study that dates this tree, plus another study that dates a series of objects from before, during and after the eruption,...
  • Which volcanoes impacted ancient climate? Sulphur tells the story

    02/14/2013 2:57:27 PM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 15 replies
    The Register ^ | 14th February 2013 03:57 GMT | Richard Chirgwin
    A staple complaint of the climate sceptic, that it’s impossible to determine the impact of historical volcanic eruptions on the climate, is a step closer to being spiked, courtesy of work at the University of Copenhagen. The university’s Matthew Johnson, an associate professor in the Department of Chemistry, has published work conducted with the Tokyo Institute of Technology in which he uses the isotopes captured in old sulphur to determine the scale of eruptions. As explained in the university’s announcement, the work is designed to resolve the often-conflicting dates attached to recorded eruptions. Dating is difficult from ancient records, since...
  • Computers to translate world's 'lost' languages after program deciphers ancient text

    07/21/2010 12:27:41 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 51 replies
    www.dailymail.co.uk ^ | 7/20/2010 | Niall Firth
    Scientists have used a computer program to decipher a written language that is more than three thousand years old. The program automatically translated the ancient written language of Ugaritic within just a few hours. Scientists hope the breakthrough could help them decipher the few ancient languages that they have been unable to translate so far. Ugaritic was last used around 1200 B.C. in western Syria and consists of dots on clay tablets. It was first discovered in 1920 but was not deciphered until 1932. Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology told the program that the language was related to...
  • Earliest Sample of Minoan Hieroglyphics Found in Western Crete

    11/18/2011 7:13:57 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Greek Reporter ^ | Thursday, November 17, 2011 | Stella Tsolakidou
    A four-sided red jasper sealstone is among the finds unearthed during this season's excavation of the Minoan peak sanctuary at Vrysinas, located south of the city of Rethymnon. The whole area was officially announced and included in the archaeological sites list by the Central Archaeological Council of Greece. The sealstone, which is carved on all four surfaces with characters of the Minoan Hieroglyphic script, constitutes the sole evidence to date for the presence of this earliest Minoan style of writing in Western Crete. The excavation, which began in 2004, is conducted by the Ephorate of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities under...
  • Unraveling the Etruscan Enigma

    10/15/2010 10:02:40 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Archaeology mag ^ | November/December 2010 | Rossella Lorenzi
    They taught the French to make wine and the Romans to build roads, and they introduced writing to Europe, but the Etruscans have long been considered one of antiquity's great enigmas. No one knew exactly where they came from. Their language was alien to their neighbors. Their religion included the practice of divination, performed by priests who examined animals' entrails to predict the future. Much of our knowledge about Etruscan civilization comes from ancient literary sources and from tomb excavations, many of which were carried out decades ago. But all across Italy, archaeologists are now creating a much richer picture...
  • Fortifications on Gournia Debunk Myth of Peaceful Minoan Society

    05/04/2010 5:03:47 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies · 451+ views
    Heritage Key ^ | Tuesday, May 4, 2010 | Owen Jarus
    A team of archaeologists, led by Professor Vance Watrous and Matt Buell of the University at Buffalo, have discovered a fortification system at the Minoan town of Gournia. The discovery rebukes the popular myth that the Minoans were a peaceful society with no need for defensive structures. That idea arose from work done in the early 20th century by Sir Arthur Evans... The town was originally excavated from 1901-1904 by Harriet Boyd Hawes, a pioneering women who was among the first to excavate a Minoan settlement. Located on the north coast, Gournia was in use during the "neo-palatial" period (ca....
  • Decoding antiquity: Eight scripts that still can't be read

    05/29/2009 9:14:19 PM PDT · by BGHater · 38 replies · 1,621+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 27 May 2009 | Andrew Robinson
    WRITING is one of the greatest inventions in human history. Perhaps the greatest, since it made history possible. Without writing, there could be no accumulation of knowledge, no historical record, no science - and of course no books, newspapers or internet.The first true writing we know of is Sumerian cuneiform - consisting mainly of wedge-shaped impressions on clay tablets - which was used more than 5000 years ago in Mesopotamia. Soon afterwards writing appeared in Egypt, and much later in Europe, China and Central America. Civilisations have invented hundreds of different writing systems. Some, such as the one you are...
  • Santorini Eruption Much larger Than Originally Believed

    08/23/2006 5:58:47 PM PDT · by blam · 109 replies · 3,769+ views
    University Rhode Island ^ | 8-23-2006 | Todd McLeish
    Santorini eruption much larger than originally believed Media Contact: Todd McLeish, 401-874-7892 Santorini eruption much larger than originally believed; likely had significant impact on civilization KINGSTON, R.I. – August 23, 2006 – An international team of scientists has found that the second largest volcanic eruption in human history, the massive Bronze Age eruption of Thera in Greece, was much larger and more widespread than previously believed. During research expeditions in April and June, the scientists from the University of Rhode Island and the Hellenic Center for Marine Research found deposits of volcanic pumice and ash 10 to 80 meters thick...
  • Unprecedented mathematical knowledge found in (Minoan) Bronze Age wall paintings.

    03/02/2006 5:01:38 AM PST · by S0122017 · 51 replies · 2,327+ views
    www.nature.com/news ^ | 28 February 2006 | Philip Ball
    Published online: 28 February 2006; | doi:10.1038/news060227-3 Were ancient Minoans centuries ahead of their time? Unprecedented mathematical knowledge found in Bronze Age wall paintings. Philip Ball Did the Minoans understand the Archimedes' spiral more than 1,000 years before him? A geometrical figure commonly attributed to Archimedes in 300 BC has been identified in Minoan wall paintings dated to over 1,000 years earlier. The mathematical features of the paintings suggest that the Minoans of the Late Bronze Age, around 1650 BC, had a much more advanced working knowledge of geometry than has previously been recognized, says computer scientist Constantin Papaodysseus of...
  • A Minoan Settlement After Destruction By Earthquakes

    01/22/2006 10:36:49 AM PST · by blam · 13 replies · 637+ views
    Kathimerini ^ | 1-21-2006 | Iota Sykka
    A Minoan settlement after destruction by earthquakesDig at Fournoi Afiatis on Karpathos uncovers ancient buildings A view of the flat area with the roof knocked down by the earthquake, along with part of the supporting wall and the adjoining wall. By Iota Sykka - Kathimerini Earthquakes were responsible for the destruction of a Minoan settlement on the island of Karpathos. That was the conclusion drawn following excavations conducted last year at Fournoi Afiatis on Karpathos under the direction of Manolis Melas, a professor of archaeology. The dig was part of a research program by the Dimokritio University of Thrace. The...
  • Protopalatial Sanctuary at Anemospilia (Archanes), More on the Peaceful Minoans

    07/30/2005 7:03:20 PM PDT · by Little Bill · 23 replies · 1,084+ views
    Web Site ^ | Temple of the Sacred Sprial
    Excavated in the summer of 1979, this four-room building set within a low enclosure (temenos) wall serves as a reminder that our views about a past culture may be subject to sudden and drastic change as the result of a single new discovery. The building, oriented roughly to the cardinal points and entered from the north, lies on the northern slopes of Mt. Iuktas some seven kilometers south of Knossos . In plan, it consists of an east-west corridor at the front off of which open three non-connecting rectangular rooms oriented north-south. In the east room were found large numbers...
  • Bulgarian Archaeologists Uncover Treasure Of Thousands Of Golden Ornaments

    08/17/2005 4:37:50 PM PDT · by blam · 27 replies · 959+ views
    Canadian Press ^ | 8-17-2005
    Bulgarian archeologists uncover treasure of thousands of golden ornaments Canadian Press Wednesday, August 17, 2005 SOFIA, Bulgaria (AP) - Archeologists working a dig in central Bulgaria have unearthed some 15,000 miniature rings and other gold ornaments that date to the end of the third millennium BC - a find they say matches the famous treasure of Troy, scholars announced Wednesday. The 4,100- to 4,200-year-old golden ornaments have been gradually unearthed over the past year from an ancient tomb near the central village of Dabene, 120 kilometres east of the capital, Sofia, according to Prof. Vasil Nikolov, the consultant on the...
  • German Scientists: Europe's Oldest Script Found In Bulgaria (Minoan)

    05/19/2005 2:56:33 PM PDT · by blam · 49 replies · 1,140+ views
    German Scientists: Europe's Oldest Script Found in Bulgaria Lifestyle: 18 May 2005, Wednesday. Ancient tablets found in South Bulgaria are written in the oldest European script found ever, German scientists say. The tablets, unearthed near the Southern town of Kardzhali, are over 35-centuries old, and bear the ancient script of the Cretan (Minoan) civilization, according to scientists from the University of Heidelberg, who examined the foundings. This is the Cretan writing, also known as Linear A script, which dates back to XV-XIV century B.C. The discovery proves the theory of the Bulgarian archaeologists that the script on the foundings is...
  • East Bulgaria Reveals Minoan Pertainence

    01/23/2005 4:25:15 PM PST · by blam · 9 replies · 446+ views
    Novinite ^ | 1-18-2005
    East Bulgaria Reveals Minoan Pertainence 18 January 2005, Tuesday. The Eastern Rhodopes revealed an old-times funeral site obviously pertaining to an ancient Crete-Micenae cult dating 3,500 years ago. The demographic researcher Mincho Gumarov of Kardzhali has donated the local museum with unique finds of ceramics, bronze and silver. The artifacts from the late bronze epoch were found in the nearby Samara cave. The find's pertainence to the epoch of legendary Micenae derives from the found labris (short two-face ritual axe, characteristic of that civilisation) and a silver amulet of the cult to Mother Earth, as well as pieces of surgery...
  • Ancient Treasure Trove Uncovered

    12/18/2002 9:37:24 AM PST · by blam · 12 replies · 418+ views
    Ananova ^ | 12-18-2002
    Ancient treasure trove uncovered Archaeologists have found a 2,700-year-old temple which contains objects from across the ancient world. Gold and silver figures, jewellery and shells from throughout the Mediterranean were gathered in one place on the small Greek island of Kithnos in the Aegean Sea. The finds suggest the temple was for a female god. Many of the objects were originally from Egypt, Italy and Phoenicia which is now Lebanon and Israel. The ancient city was founded during the 10th century BC and abandoned four centuries later, said Alexander Mazarakis-Ainian, over seeing the dig. He is an associate professor at...
  • The Search For Atlantis 'Ends At Ayia Napa' (Cyprus)

    09/27/2003 5:01:50 PM PDT · by blam · 86 replies · 4,413+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 9-28-2003 | Fiona Govan
    The search for Atlantis 'ends at Ayia Napa' By Fiona Govan (Filed: 28/09/2003) It may be the answer generations of experts on the ancient world have been looking for. New research claims that the fabled ancient civilisation of Atlantis is located close to Cyprus. After nearly 10 years of research using ocean mapping technology and accounts from ancient texts, an American explorer says he has evidence that Atlantis lies beneath the deep blue waters off the southern tip of the island.Robert Sarmast, a self-proclaimed mythologist and expert on the ancient world, makes this claim in his book, Discovery of Atlantis...
  • New Ice-Core Evidence Challenges the 1620s age for the Santorini (Minoan) Eruption

    07/29/2004 12:25:45 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 64 replies · 4,057+ views
    Journal of Archaeological Science, Volume 25, Issue 3, March 1998, Pages 279-289 ^ | 13 July 1997 | Gregory A. Zielinski, Mark S. Germani
    Determining a reliable calendrical age of the Santorini (Minoan) eruption is necessary to place the impact of the eruption into its proper context within Bronze Age society in the Aegean region. The high-resolution record of the deposition of volcanically produced acids on polar ice sheets, as available in the SO42-time series from ice cores (a direct signal), and the high-resolution record of the climatic impact of past volcanism inferred in tree rings (a secondary signal) have been widely used to assign a 1628/1627 age to the eruption. The layer of ice in the GISP2 (Greenland) ice core corresponding to...
  • Debate Erupts Anew: Did Thera's Explosion Doom Minoan Crete?

    10/23/2003 2:47:33 PM PDT · by blam · 83 replies · 1,645+ views
    International Herald Tribune ^ | 10-23-2003 | William J. Broad
    Debate erupts anew: Did Thera's explosion doom Minoan Crete? William J. Broad Thursday, October 23, 2003 For decades, scholars have debated whether the eruption of the Thera volcano in the Aegean more than 3,000 years ago brought about the mysterious collapse of Minoan civilization at the peak of its glory. The volcanic isle (whose remnants are known as Santorini) lay just 110 kilometers from Minoan Crete, so it seemed quite reasonable that its fury could have accounted for the fall of that celebrated people. . This idea suffered a blow in 1987 when Danish scientists studying cores from the Greenland...