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Keyword: mycenaean

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  • Helen of Troy: Goddess, Princess, Whore

    10/09/2005 8:29:26 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies · 4,316+ views
    PRNewswire ^ | Sep. 14, 2005 | Melanie Pope of Renault Communications
    While Hughes explores the Late Bronze Age reality behind the story of Helen, she takes in some of the most beautiful scenery of the ancient world, from the magnificent citadel at Mycenae to the spectacular site of the shrine to Helen, high in the hills above Sparta. She also tastes the food of the ancient world -- based on the latest archaeological research -- and discovers how the conflict in Helen's name would really have been fought. Working with weapons experts and accurate replicas of chariots pulled by local gypsy horses, Hughes experiences firsthand how chariots and archers battled beneath...
  • Helen Of Troy Existed?

    10/18/2005 11:08:43 AM PDT · by blam · 108 replies · 2,602+ views
    The Discovery Channel ^ | 10-18-2005 | Jennifer Viegas
    Helen of Troy Existed? By Jennifer Viegas, Discovery NewsWas a Queen of Sparta Helen of Troy? Oct. 17, 2005— Helen of Troy, described in the epic poem The Iliad, was based on a real woman, according to a new book that weaves history, archaeology and myth to recreate the famous ancient Greek beauty's life. According to the new theory proposed by Bettany Hughes, Helen's mythological character was inspired by a wealthy Bronze Age leader from the southern mainland of Greece. Hughes, a former Oxford University scholar who has conducted research in the Balkans, Greece, and Asia Minor, was unavailable for...
  • Ancient Greek palace unearthed near Sparta dates back to 17th century BC

    08/27/2015 1:46:45 PM PDT · by the scotsman · 17 replies
    The Guardian ^ | August 26th 2015 | Agent France-Presse
    Archaeologists discover palace with archaic inscriptions built during the Mycenaean period 'Archaeologists in Greece have discovered the ruins of an ancient palace with important archaic inscriptions dating back to the Mycenaean age, the culture ministry said Tuesday. The palace, likely built around the 17th-16th centuries BC, had around 10 rooms and was discovered near Sparta in southern Greece. At the site, archaeologists found objects of worship, clay figurines, a cup adorned with a bull’s head, swords and fragments of murals.'
  • Archaeologists making exciting discoveries in Laconia

    08/28/2015 5:10:40 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Ekathimerini ^ | Aug 28, 2015 | Unattributed
    Ongoing excavations at a site in the southern Peloponnese are offering rare insight into the ancient past of Laconia, about which very little physical evidence exists, the state-run Athens-Macedonian News Agency cited the Culture Ministry as saying on Tuesday. Covering an expanse of 3.5 hectares, the site on Aghios Vassilios Hill near the village of Xirokambi on the Sparta plain has been under excavation since 2009 and is believed to contain valuable evidence that will shed light on life in the area during the 17th to 16th centuries BC, the announcement said. A palace complex found on the site and...
  • Archaeology professor scrutinizes age-old mystery [ Uluburun wreck excavation]

    11/24/2008 3:39:34 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies · 1,338+ views
    University of Tennessee, Knoxville ^ | Saturday, November 22, 2008 | Kayla Kitts
    In 1983 a sponge diver found funny metal biscuits with ears at the ocean floor. That is how the excavation got started, Hirschfeld said. The ship carried ten tons of copper ingots, which after being analyzed, were determined to be from Cyprus. Each ingot weighs approximately 60 pounds, she said. She and her team also excavated glass ingots, tons of tin, and three Italian swords that were not part of the cargo of the ship. Among the 130 Canaanite jars they found, there were traces of wine in the jars and one was full of glass beads. The team also...
  • Last practitioner of Minoan rituals may have lived in Jerusalem's Old City till '48

    05/04/2015 7:48:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Ha'aretz ^ | April 20, 2015 | Roy (Chicky) Arad
    Midwife Mercada Dasa lived in the Old City of Jerusalem until 1948. In her attic she raised an unusual pet -- a white female snake about a meter and a half long -- and fed it sugar cubes. Just before the entry of the Jordanian Legion she left the besieged city with her family and her pet remained behind. That a midwife, whose family lived in Jerusalem since the time of the Second Temple, carried on a tradition of feeding white female snakes was part of the family's lore, but not something anyone considered significant. Now Mercada's grandson, Benny Avigdory,...
  • A serving of Philistine culture: Boar, dog and fine wine

    09/03/2007 8:38:36 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies · 259+ views
    Ha'aretz ^ | Monday, September 3, 2007 | Ofri Ilani
    Research into the dispersal of Philistine cooking methods among various populations in Israel shows that the Philistines spread their culture beyond the areas under their control... Unlike most of the peoples living in the region in the biblical era, the Philistines were not Semites... They prepared meals in a characteristic sealed pottery vessel suited to long cooking times at low heat, while most inhabitants of Canaan at the time used open pots and faster cooking methods. The bones found at the Philistine cities showed that... the Philistines ate mainly pork, with an occasional meal of dog meat. The Philistines' wine...
  • Cultural connections with Europe found in ancient Jordanian settlement

    01/27/2014 8:33:42 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    University of Gothenburg ^ | January 16, 2014 | Thomas Melin
    Swedish archaeologists in Jordan led by Professor Peter M. Fischer from the University of Gothenburg have excavated a nearly 60-metre long well-preserved building from 1100 B.C. in the ancient settlement Tell Abu al-Kharaz. The building is from an era characterised by major migration... Pottery from one of the rooms from 1100 B.C.‘We have evidence that culture from present Europe is represented in Tell Abu al-Kharaz. A group of the Sea Peoples of European descent, Philistines, settled down in the city,’ says Peter Fischer. ‘We have, for instance, found pottery resembling corresponding items from Greece and Cyprus in terms of form...
  • Mythic Birthplace of Zeus Said Found

    02/09/2009 1:15:59 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 26 replies · 767+ views on Yahoo ^ | 2/9/09 | Heather Whipps
    The Greek god of thunder and lightning had Earthly beginnings, and scientists think they finally know where. Ancient Greeks first worshipped the omnipotent Zeus at a remote altar on Mount Lykaion, a team of Greek and American archaeologists now think. During a recent dig at the site, the researchers found ceremonial goods commonly used in cult activity and dated at over three millennia old, making them the earliest known "appearance" of Zeus in Greece. The discovery challenges the idea that Zeus worship began on the Greek island of Crete, which at least one classical historian names as the god's mythic...
  • New Evidence From Excavations In Arcadia, Greece, Supports Theory Of 'Birth Of Zeus'

    02/02/2009 7:56:24 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies · 502+ views
    ScienceDaily ^ | Monday, February 2, 2009 | University of Pennsylvania
    A Greek and American team of archaeologists working on the Mt. Lykaion Excavation and Survey Project believe evidence indicates that Zeus' worship was established on Mt. Lykaion as early as the Late Helladic period, if not before, more than 3,200 years ago... Over fifty Mycenaean drinking vessels, or kylikes, were found on the bedrock at the bottom of the trench along with fragments of human and animal figurines and a miniature double headed axe. Also found were burned animal bones, mostly of goats and sheep, another indication consistent with Mycenaean cult activity... Evidence from subsequent periods in the same trench...

    01/24/2008 3:20:28 PM PST · by blam · 15 replies · 405+ views
    Penn Museum ^ | 1-24-2008 | PennMuseum
    NEW DISCOVERIES AT THE ASH ALTAR OF ZEUS, MT LYKAION, OFFER INSIGHTS INTO EARLY ORIGINS OF ANCIENT GREECE’S MOST POWERFUL GOD Mt. Lykaion Excavation and Survey Project Finds Early Activity Atop Arcadia’s Famous Mountain The Greek traveler, Pausanias, living in the second century, CE, would probably recognize the spectacular site of the Sanctuary of Zeus at Mt. Lykaion, and particularly the altar of Zeus. At 4,500 feet above sea level, atop the altar provides a breathtaking, panoramic vista of Arcadia. “On the highest point of the mountain is a mound of earth, forming an altar of Zeus Lykaios, and from...
  • By Zeus! (Greeks return to paganism)

    02/07/2007 8:11:30 AM PST · by NYer · 50 replies · 803+ views
    Guardian ^ | February 1, 2007
    It was high noon when Doreta Peppa, a woman with long, dark locks and owlish eyes, entered the Sanctuary of Olympian Zeus. At first, tourists visiting the Athenian temple thought they had stumbled on to a film set. It wasn't just that Peppa cut a dramatic figure with her flowing robes and garlanded hair. Or that she seemed to be in a state of near euphoria. Or even that the group of men and women accompanying her - dressed as warriors and nymphets in kitsch ancient garb - appeared to have stepped straight out of the city's Golden Age.To the...
  • Modern pagans honor Zeus in Athens

    01/24/2007 9:42:30 AM PST · by presidio9 · 24 replies · 593+ views
    AFP ^ | 01/22/07 | PARIS AYIOMAMITIS
    A clutch of modern pagans honored Zeus at a 1,800-year-old temple in the heart of Athens on Sunday — the first known ceremony of its kind held there since the ancient Greek religion was outlawed by the Roman empire in the late 4th century. Watched by curious onlookers, some 20 worshippers gathered next to the ruins of the temple for a celebration organized by Ellinais, a year-old Athens-based group that is campaigning to revive old religious practices from the era when Greece was a fount of education and philosophy. The group ignored a ban by the Culture Ministry, which declared...
  • Virgil's Demi-God City 'Found'

    04/07/2006 11:09:48 AM PDT · by blam · 17 replies · 1,861+ views
    ANSA ^ | 4-6-2006
    Virgil's demi-god city 'found'Castor and Pollux fought Aeneas at Amyclae (ANSA) - Rome, April 6 - Italian archaeologists believe they have found an ancient city where the demi-gods Castor and Pollux fought Aeneas, the Trojan hero whose descendants founded Rome . Lorenzo and Stefania Quilici of Bologna and Naples universities claim the large, massive-walled settlement dating from the VI to III Century BCE was the city of Amyclae, believed by Renaissance scholars to be somewhere near Lake Fondi between Rome and Naples . "The road there is a perfectly preserved stretch of the ancient Via Appia," said Lorenzo Quilici ....
  • By the power of Zeus, ancient gods are back (Greeks allowed to worship pagan gods)

    03/26/2006 6:37:32 AM PST · by Feldkurat_Katz · 66 replies · 1,994+ views
    Kathimerini ^ | 03/24/2006 | kathimerini
    By the power of Zeus, ancient gods are back Worship of the 12 gods of Mount Olympus associated with ancient Greece could, thanks to a decision by a first-instance court in Athens, become part of the country’s contemporary culture. In a ruling made public yesterday, the court allowed the formation of an association whose members claim to worship Zeus and the other 11 gods. “I support everybody’s right to practice their faith, whichever it may be, without hindrance,” said Apostolos Vrachiolidis, a journalist and one of the founding members of the association. Members of the group deny that they engage...
  • Pagans are reviving the polytheistic religions of the ancient Greeks,and other civilizations.

    08/15/2004 10:12:22 PM PDT · by missyme · 46 replies · 1,363+ views
    Beliefnet ^ | August 15th, 2003 | Kimberly Winston
    This year, Andrea Berman will watch the Olympics for the first time in her life. But she doesn't care who will jump the highest, run the farthest or swim the fastest. She'll be watching the games—being held this year in Greece, their ancestral home—for any mention of Zeus, Athena or Apollo. "I will watch it to see if anything even remotely resembles anything I would know as an ancient ritual and tradition," Berman said. "But I kind of have mixed feelings. On one hand it will be great to see ancient traditions represented. But on the other hand, I know...
  • Ancient Tomb Found On Greek Island

    03/05/2008 7:15:50 PM PST · by blam · 19 replies · 310+ views
    The Charlotte Observer ^ | 3-5-2008 | NICHOLAS PAPHITIS
    Ancient tomb found on Greek island By NICHOLAS PAPHITIS Associated Press WriterA partly demolished, 3,000-year-old tomb recently discovered on the western Greek island of Lefkada is seen in this undated hand out photo released by Greek Culture Ministry on Wednesday, March 5, 2008. Archaeologists said the beehive-shaped tomb, which contained several human skeletons and grave offerings, was the first major Mycenaean-era monument to be found on the island.ATHENS, Greece --Road construction on the western Greek island of Lefkada has uncovered and partially destroyed an important tomb with artifacts dating back more than 3,000 years, officials said on Wednesday. The find...
  • Barley and wheat residues in Neolithic cemeteries of Central Sudan and Nubia

    02/10/2015 12:15:00 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | February 9, 2015 | PLOS ONE
    A research team successfully identified ancient barley and wheat residues in grave goods and on teeth from two Neolithic cemeteries in Central Sudan and Nubia, showing that humans in Africa were already exploited domestic cereals 7,000 years ago and thus five hundred years earlier than previously known. Dr. Welmoed Out from Kiel University said, “With our results we can verify that people along the Nile did not only exploit gathered wild plants and animals but had crops of barley and wheat.” These types of crops were first cultivated in the Middle East about 10,500 years ago and spread out from...
  • Untouched Mycenaean Tomb Found in Central Greece

    02/10/2015 12:09:32 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Greek Reporter ^ | February 7, 2015 | Ioanna Zikakou
    An ancient Greek Mycenaean tomb was unearthed in Amfissa, central Greece, during an irrigation project that required excavation in the area. It is a unique finding, the first of its kind that has ever been found in West Locris and one of the few in central Greece. The preliminary archaeological study of the findings shows that the tomb was used for more than two centuries, from the 13th to the 11th century B.C.. Within the burial chamber archaeologists found a large amount of skeletal material, which had accumulated near the surrounding walls, while a few better preserved burials were also...
  • Who Really Discovered America?

    07/14/2002 2:08:47 PM PDT · by blam · 182 replies · 18,652+ views
    Who Really Discovered America? Did ancient Hebrews reach the shores of the North and South American continents thousands of years before Christopher Columbus? What evidence is there for Hebrew and Israelite occupation of the Western Hemisphere even a thousand years before Christ? Was trans-Atlantic commerce and travel fairly routine in the days of king Solomon of Israel? Read here the intriguing, fascinating saga of the TRUE DISCOVERERS OF AMERICA! William F. Dankenbring A stone in a dry creek bed in New Mexico, discovered by early settlers in the region, is one of the most amazing archaeological discoveries in the Western...
  • Mycenean artifacts found in Bodrum [Halicarnassus]

    11/15/2014 4:54:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Hürriyet Daily ^ | Saturday, November 15 2014 | Mugla -- Anadolu Agency
    New artifacts have been found during excavations in Bodrum’s Ortakent and Gümüşlük neighborhoods. The artifacts will shed light on the history of Bodrum Peninsula, according to officials. The Bodrum Underwater Archaeology Museum Director Emel Özkan said that they had discovered 49 artifacts from the Mycenean era. “The number of Mycenean artifacts increased to 248 with these ones. This made our museum the richest one in terms of Mycenean artifacts among the Turkish museums,” she said. Özkan said that the artifacts, which date back to 3,500 years ago, were very important for Anatolian history, adding, “The amphora and gifts found in...
  • Archaeologists Excavate Lower City of Mycenae

    06/06/2014 5:53:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Monday, June 2, 2014 | unattributed
    Mycenae -- the ancient city of the legendary King Agamemnon, best known from Homer's Iliad and Odyssey and its iconic Lion Gate and cyclopean defensive walls, has long fascinated scholars and site visitors alike with the epic proportions of its imposing citadel remains... But there is another Mycenae -- one known for centuries from ancient historical documents -- which has nevertheless eluded the eyes of archaeologists, historians, and tourists. One might call it "Greater Mycenae", the Lower Town. It is invisible because most of it still lies undetected, unexcavated, below the surface. In its heyday it was a second millenium...
  • The Greek Age of Bronze -- Middle Helmets

    Outside the Greek mainland and Aegean Island a possible representation of Achaean warriors equipped with boar tusks helmets is from an Egyptian papyrus fragments from Tell el-Amarna, home of Amenhotep III's son, dated around 1350 BC (*2). In this papyrus some warriors are depicted with conical pale-yellow helmets which remaind in general design the typical Aegean boar tusks helmet. This identification is strengthened by the find of a piece of boar’s tusk, with perforations for attaching it to a leather frame, during excavations at Qantir, the site of the Ramesside capital Pi-ramesse in the eastern delta. It appears likely that...
  • Old Egypt investigator identifies to mysterious Hyksos kings [sic]

    03/28/2006 10:58:04 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies · 705+ views
    Rowley Regis Online ^ | Mon Feb 27, 2006 10:47 pm | mariafvp
    Georgeos Diaz-Montexano, scriptologist and Egyptologist amateur, has been able to identify the names of the Hyksos kings like pertaining to the group of languages and proto-Greek or Mycenaean's dialects. The true ethnic origin of the mysterious Hyksos that were able to take control of the power of a considerable part of Old Egypt, during centuries XVII to the XVI before Christ, has been always a true challenge for the Egyptologists. However, the generalized opinion more for a long time has been that the Hyksos would be Semitic towns, fundamentally coastal inhabitants of the strip Syrian-Palestine, that is, Canaanites or proto-Phoenicians....
  • Greece. They found the palace belonging to one of the Heroes of the Iliad? [Egyptian artifact, 2006]

    07/30/2010 3:23:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies · 3+ views
    Terra Antiquae 'blog ^ | March 2006 | Jose Luis Santos Fernandez
    Foto: (1) The central palace complex from a 3,200-year-old settlement on the island of Salamis, near Athens, Greece, is shown in an undated handout picture provided by excavator Yiannis Lolos. Lolos said on Wednesday, March 29, 2006 that he believes he has found the seat of the mythical King Ajax of Salamis, one of the heroes of the Trojan War. The hilltop site overlooks a small natural harbor. (AP Photo) (2) Hieroglyphs spelling the name of Egyptian Pharaoh Ramses II appear at the bottom of a bronze piece from an ancient mail shirt, in this undated handout picture provided by...
  • Archaeologist Links Ancient Palace, Ajax

    03/29/2006 5:35:29 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 8 replies · 148+ views
    AP on Yahoo ^ | 3/29/06 | Nicholas Paphitis - ap
    ATHENS, Greece - Among the ruins of a 3,200-year-old palace near Athens, researchers are piecing together the story of legendary Greek warrior-king Ajax, hero of the Trojan War. Archaeologist Yiannis Lolos found remains of the palace while hiking on the island of Salamis in 1999, and has led excavations there for the past six years. Now, he's confident he's found the site where Ajax ruled, which has also provided evidence to support a theory that residents of the Mycenean island kingdom fled to Cyprus after the king's death. "This was Ajax' capital," excavation leader Lolos, professor of archaeology at Ioannina...
  • Palace Of Homer's Hero Rises Out Of Myths

    03/28/2006 10:59:23 AM PST · by blam · 40 replies · 1,291+ views
    The Times (UK) ^ | 3-28-2006 | John Carr
    Palace of Homer's hero rises out of the myths From John Carr in Athens ARCHAEOLOGISTS claim to have unearthed the remains of the 3,500-year-old palace of Ajax, the warrior-king who according to Homer’s Iliad was one of the most revered fighters in the Trojan War. Classicists hailed the discovery, made on a small Greek island, as evidence that the myths recounted by Homer in his epic poem were based on historical fact. The ruins include a large palace, measuring about 750sq m (8,000sq ft), and believed to have been at least four storeys high with more than thirty rooms. Yannos...
  • Ancient Palace's Painted Floors Display Bronze-Age Creativity

    01/06/2014 7:43:36 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    LiveScience ^ | January 06, 2014 | Denise Chow
    Emily Catherine Egan, a doctoral student at the University of Cincinnati in Ohio, studied the floor of the Throne Room at the Palace of Nestor, one of the best-preserved palaces of Mycenaean Greece, a civilization from the late Bronze Age. She found that the floors of the palace, located in the present-day Greek town of Pylos, were made of plaster, and were often painted with grids of bright patterns or marine animals. The creative decorations show how ancient Mycenaean artists used floors — together with painted ceilings and walls — to impress palace visitors, Egan said. "Mycenaean palatial floor paintings...
  • Ancient Tablet Found: Oldest Readable Writing in Europe

    03/31/2011 10:38:39 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 47 replies ^ | Published March 30, 2011 | Ker Than
    Found at a site tied to myth, Greek tablet survived only by accident, experts say. Marks on a clay tablet fragment found in Greece are the oldest known decipherable text in Europe, a new study says. Considered "magical or mysterious" in its time, the writing survives only because a trash heap caught fire some 3,500 years ago, according to researchers. Found in an olive grove in what's now the village of Iklaina (map), the tablet was created by a Greek-speaking Mycenaean scribe between 1450 and 1350 B.C., archaeologists say. The Mycenaeans—made legendary in part by Homer's Iliad, which fictionalizes their...
  • Road Project Strikes Tomb (Mycenaean - Greece)

    02/15/2004 11:13:16 AM PST · by blam · 16 replies · 327+ views
    Kathimerini ^ | 2-15-2004
    Road project strikes tomb A new road project on the outskirts of Volos in central Greece has revealed what appears to be an intact, unplundered Mycenaean royal tomb, a report said yesterday. The subterranean tholos tomb was found along with four or five small, box-like cist tombs during construction of a new Volos ring road, according to the Ethnos daily. Archaeologists have not yet entered the tholos tomb — a monumental structure of the same type as the famous “Tomb of Atreus” at Mycenae, which would have contained the remains of a local ruler. The paper quoted local antiquities director...
  • Archaeology meets mythology in Mycenean Pylos (King Nestor)

    09/11/2009 6:02:06 AM PDT · by decimon · 28 replies · 1,295+ views
    Science Codex ^ | Sep 10, 2009 | Unknown
    Close-up of palace walls. Credit: University of Missouri-St.Louis Pylos drain. Credit: University of Missouri-St Louis Clearing thick brush from a mound at his archaeological dig site in Pylos, Greece, Michael Cosmopoulos found a real-life palace dating back to the mythical Trojan War. The palace is from the Mycenaean period (1600-1100 B.C.), famous for such mythical sagas as the Trojan War. It is thought to sit within one of the capital cities of King Nestor, a personality featured in the legends of the war. "We are thrilled, excited and fascinated at the prospect of continuing its excavation," said Cosmopoulos, the Hellenic...
  • Mycenaean warrior used 'imported sword'

    10/05/2008 3:49:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies · 913+ views
    Howrah News Service ^ | Saturday, October3, 2008 | NEWSX
    A Mycenaean warrior who died in western Greece over 3,000 years ago was the proud owner of a rare gold-wired sword imported from the Italian peninsula, a senior archaeologist said on Thursday. "This is a very rare discovery, particularly because of the gold wire wrapped around the hilt," archaeologist Maria Gatsi told AFP. "To my knowledge, no such sword has ever been found in Greece," said Gatsi, head of the regional archaeological department of Aetoloakarnania prefecture. Tests in Austria have confirmed that the bronze used in the 12th century BCE, 94-centimetre (37-inch) sword came from the Italian peninsula, she said....
  • Prehistoric Greek Water Works Found [ Mycenaean citadel of Midea ]

    08/26/2007 12:18:53 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies · 575+ views
    PhysOrg / AP ^ | August 25, 2007 | Nicholas Paphitis
    Dating to the mid-13th century B.C., the stone passage passed under the massive walls of the Mycenaean citadel of Midea and probably led to a nearby water source, authorities said Friday. The passage would allow the people of Midea, about 93 miles south of Athens, safe access to drinkable water even in times of enemy attack... Only three such networks - major engineering feats requiring intensive labor - from Mycenaean times have been found so far. Excavations in late June and July at Midea revealed cut rock steps leading to the triangular passage, whose entrance was covered with a large...
  • Debate Erupts Anew: Did Thera's Explosion Doom Minoan Crete?

    10/23/2003 2:47:33 PM PDT · by blam · 83 replies · 1,645+ views
    International Herald Tribune ^ | 10-23-2003 | William J. Broad
    Debate erupts anew: Did Thera's explosion doom Minoan Crete? William J. Broad Thursday, October 23, 2003 For decades, scholars have debated whether the eruption of the Thera volcano in the Aegean more than 3,000 years ago brought about the mysterious collapse of Minoan civilization at the peak of its glory. The volcanic isle (whose remnants are known as Santorini) lay just 110 kilometers from Minoan Crete, so it seemed quite reasonable that its fury could have accounted for the fall of that celebrated people. . This idea suffered a blow in 1987 when Danish scientists studying cores from the Greenland...
  • Mycenaean Port of Athens Found?

    04/29/2005 9:40:45 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 3 replies · 423+ views
    Kathimerini ^ | 4-28-2005
    Archaeologists in the capital’s southern coastal suburb of Palaio Faliro have uncovered what appear to be traces of ancient Athens’s first port before the city’s naval and shipping center was moved to Piraeus, a report said yesterday. A rescue excavation on a plot earmarked for development has revealed artifacts and light structures dating, with intervals, from Mycenaean times to the fifth century BC, when the port of Phaleron — after which the modern suburb was named — was superseded by Piraeus, according to Ta Nea daily. “This is a port associated with two myths — Theseus and the Argonauts —...
  • Mycenaean Port Of Athens Found

    04/28/2005 11:00:05 AM PDT · by blam · 20 replies · 843+ views
    Kathimerini ^ | 4-28-2005
    Mycenaean port of Athens found? Archaeologists in the capital’s southern coastal suburb of Palaio Faliro have uncovered what appear to be traces of ancient Athens’s first port before the city’s naval and shipping center was moved to Piraeus, a report said yesterday. A rescue excavation on a plot earmarked for development has revealed artifacts and light structures dating, with intervals, from Mycenaean times to the fifth century BC, when the port of Phaleron — after which the modern suburb was named — was superseded by Piraeus, according to Ta Nea daily. “This is a port associated with two myths —...
  • The Linear B Tablets and Mycenaean Social, Political, and Economic Organization

    08/29/2004 8:19:46 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies · 1,656+ views
    Lesson 25, The Prehistoric Archaeology of the Aegean ^ | Revised: Friday, March 18, 2000 | Trustees of Dartmouth College
    KO-RE-TE, PO-RO-KO-RE-TE [koreter, prokoreter] -- Such officials are known at both Knossos and Pylos. The titles bear a suspiciously close resemblance to the Latin terms curator and procurator ("guardian" and "manager, imperial officer/governor" respectively). The Linear B evidence suggests that the koreter was a local official in charge of one of the sixteen major administrative units within the Pylian kingdom, and the prokoreter was evidently his deputy.
  • The Search For Atlantis 'Ends At Ayia Napa' (Cyprus)

    09/27/2003 5:01:50 PM PDT · by blam · 86 replies · 4,413+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 9-28-2003 | Fiona Govan
    The search for Atlantis 'ends at Ayia Napa' By Fiona Govan (Filed: 28/09/2003) It may be the answer generations of experts on the ancient world have been looking for. New research claims that the fabled ancient civilisation of Atlantis is located close to Cyprus. After nearly 10 years of research using ocean mapping technology and accounts from ancient texts, an American explorer says he has evidence that Atlantis lies beneath the deep blue waters off the southern tip of the island.Robert Sarmast, a self-proclaimed mythologist and expert on the ancient world, makes this claim in his book, Discovery of Atlantis...
  • New Ice-Core Evidence Challenges the 1620s age for the Santorini (Minoan) Eruption

    07/29/2004 12:25:45 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 65 replies · 4,057+ views
    Journal of Archaeological Science, Volume 25, Issue 3, March 1998, Pages 279-289 ^ | 13 July 1997 | Gregory A. Zielinski, Mark S. Germani
    Determining a reliable calendrical age of the Santorini (Minoan) eruption is necessary to place the impact of the eruption into its proper context within Bronze Age society in the Aegean region. The high-resolution record of the deposition of volcanically produced acids on polar ice sheets, as available in the SO42-time series from ice cores (a direct signal), and the high-resolution record of the climatic impact of past volcanism inferred in tree rings (a secondary signal) have been widely used to assign a 1628/1627 age to the eruption. The layer of ice in the GISP2 (Greenland) ice core corresponding to...
  • Dig Unearths Mycenaean 'Homeric Capital'

    04/17/2002 6:28:25 PM PDT · by blam · 13 replies · 268+ views
    IOL ^ | 4-16-2002
    Dig unearths Mycenaean 'Homeric capital' April 16 2002 at 06:35PM Athens, Greece - An archaeologist thinks he may have found the ancient Mycenaean capital of Salamis, the island where one of the greatest recorded battles of antiquity took place. Archaeologist Yannos Lolos said on Tuesday that he found two buildings and uncovered several small hamlets scattered around the ancient acropolis of old Salamis, now known as Kanakia. The ancient town is on the south-western part of the island, located in the Saronic Gulf. Lolos, assistant professor of archaeology at the University of Ioannina in northern Greece, has been digging at...