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Keyword: mycenaean

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  • Archaeologists Excavate Lower City of Mycenae

    06/06/2014 5:53:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Monday, June 2, 2014 | unattributed
    Mycenae -- the ancient city of the legendary King Agamemnon, best known from Homer's Iliad and Odyssey and its iconic Lion Gate and cyclopean defensive walls, has long fascinated scholars and site visitors alike with the epic proportions of its imposing citadel remains... But there is another Mycenae -- one known for centuries from ancient historical documents -- which has nevertheless eluded the eyes of archaeologists, historians, and tourists. One might call it "Greater Mycenae", the Lower Town. It is invisible because most of it still lies undetected, unexcavated, below the surface. In its heyday it was a second millenium...
  • The Greek Age of Bronze -- Middle Helmets

    Outside the Greek mainland and Aegean Island a possible representation of Achaean warriors equipped with boar tusks helmets is from an Egyptian papyrus fragments from Tell el-Amarna, home of Amenhotep III's son, dated around 1350 BC (*2). In this papyrus some warriors are depicted with conical pale-yellow helmets which remaind in general design the typical Aegean boar tusks helmet. This identification is strengthened by the find of a piece of boar’s tusk, with perforations for attaching it to a leather frame, during excavations at Qantir, the site of the Ramesside capital Pi-ramesse in the eastern delta. It appears likely that...
  • Old Egypt investigator identifies to mysterious Hyksos kings [sic]

    03/28/2006 10:58:04 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies · 705+ views
    Rowley Regis Online ^ | Mon Feb 27, 2006 10:47 pm | mariafvp
    Georgeos Diaz-Montexano, scriptologist and Egyptologist amateur, has been able to identify the names of the Hyksos kings like pertaining to the group of languages and proto-Greek or Mycenaean's dialects. The true ethnic origin of the mysterious Hyksos that were able to take control of the power of a considerable part of Old Egypt, during centuries XVII to the XVI before Christ, has been always a true challenge for the Egyptologists. However, the generalized opinion more for a long time has been that the Hyksos would be Semitic towns, fundamentally coastal inhabitants of the strip Syrian-Palestine, that is, Canaanites or proto-Phoenicians....
  • Greece. They found the palace belonging to one of the Heroes of the Iliad? [Egyptian artifact, 2006]

    07/30/2010 3:23:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies · 3+ views
    Terra Antiquae 'blog ^ | March 2006 | Jose Luis Santos Fernandez
    Foto: (1) The central palace complex from a 3,200-year-old settlement on the island of Salamis, near Athens, Greece, is shown in an undated handout picture provided by excavator Yiannis Lolos. Lolos said on Wednesday, March 29, 2006 that he believes he has found the seat of the mythical King Ajax of Salamis, one of the heroes of the Trojan War. The hilltop site overlooks a small natural harbor. (AP Photo) (2) Hieroglyphs spelling the name of Egyptian Pharaoh Ramses II appear at the bottom of a bronze piece from an ancient mail shirt, in this undated handout picture provided by...
  • Archaeologist Links Ancient Palace, Ajax

    03/29/2006 5:35:29 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 8 replies · 148+ views
    AP on Yahoo ^ | 3/29/06 | Nicholas Paphitis - ap
    ATHENS, Greece - Among the ruins of a 3,200-year-old palace near Athens, researchers are piecing together the story of legendary Greek warrior-king Ajax, hero of the Trojan War. Archaeologist Yiannis Lolos found remains of the palace while hiking on the island of Salamis in 1999, and has led excavations there for the past six years. Now, he's confident he's found the site where Ajax ruled, which has also provided evidence to support a theory that residents of the Mycenean island kingdom fled to Cyprus after the king's death. "This was Ajax' capital," excavation leader Lolos, professor of archaeology at Ioannina...
  • Palace Of Homer's Hero Rises Out Of Myths

    03/28/2006 10:59:23 AM PST · by blam · 40 replies · 1,291+ views
    The Times (UK) ^ | 3-28-2006 | John Carr
    Palace of Homer's hero rises out of the myths From John Carr in Athens ARCHAEOLOGISTS claim to have unearthed the remains of the 3,500-year-old palace of Ajax, the warrior-king who according to Homer’s Iliad was one of the most revered fighters in the Trojan War. Classicists hailed the discovery, made on a small Greek island, as evidence that the myths recounted by Homer in his epic poem were based on historical fact. The ruins include a large palace, measuring about 750sq m (8,000sq ft), and believed to have been at least four storeys high with more than thirty rooms. Yannos...
  • Ancient Palace's Painted Floors Display Bronze-Age Creativity

    01/06/2014 7:43:36 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    LiveScience ^ | January 06, 2014 | Denise Chow
    Emily Catherine Egan, a doctoral student at the University of Cincinnati in Ohio, studied the floor of the Throne Room at the Palace of Nestor, one of the best-preserved palaces of Mycenaean Greece, a civilization from the late Bronze Age. She found that the floors of the palace, located in the present-day Greek town of Pylos, were made of plaster, and were often painted with grids of bright patterns or marine animals. The creative decorations show how ancient Mycenaean artists used floors — together with painted ceilings and walls — to impress palace visitors, Egan said. "Mycenaean palatial floor paintings...
  • Ancient Tablet Found: Oldest Readable Writing in Europe

    03/31/2011 10:38:39 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 47 replies
    nationalgeographic.com ^ | Published March 30, 2011 | Ker Than
    Found at a site tied to myth, Greek tablet survived only by accident, experts say. Marks on a clay tablet fragment found in Greece are the oldest known decipherable text in Europe, a new study says. Considered "magical or mysterious" in its time, the writing survives only because a trash heap caught fire some 3,500 years ago, according to researchers. Found in an olive grove in what's now the village of Iklaina (map), the tablet was created by a Greek-speaking Mycenaean scribe between 1450 and 1350 B.C., archaeologists say. The Mycenaeans—made legendary in part by Homer's Iliad, which fictionalizes their...
  • Road Project Strikes Tomb (Mycenaean - Greece)

    02/15/2004 11:13:16 AM PST · by blam · 16 replies · 327+ views
    Kathimerini ^ | 2-15-2004
    Road project strikes tomb A new road project on the outskirts of Volos in central Greece has revealed what appears to be an intact, unplundered Mycenaean royal tomb, a report said yesterday. The subterranean tholos tomb was found along with four or five small, box-like cist tombs during construction of a new Volos ring road, according to the Ethnos daily. Archaeologists have not yet entered the tholos tomb — a monumental structure of the same type as the famous “Tomb of Atreus” at Mycenae, which would have contained the remains of a local ruler. The paper quoted local antiquities director...
  • Archaeology meets mythology in Mycenean Pylos (King Nestor)

    09/11/2009 6:02:06 AM PDT · by decimon · 28 replies · 1,295+ views
    Science Codex ^ | Sep 10, 2009 | Unknown
    Close-up of palace walls. Credit: University of Missouri-St.Louis Pylos drain. Credit: University of Missouri-St Louis Clearing thick brush from a mound at his archaeological dig site in Pylos, Greece, Michael Cosmopoulos found a real-life palace dating back to the mythical Trojan War. The palace is from the Mycenaean period (1600-1100 B.C.), famous for such mythical sagas as the Trojan War. It is thought to sit within one of the capital cities of King Nestor, a personality featured in the legends of the war. "We are thrilled, excited and fascinated at the prospect of continuing its excavation," said Cosmopoulos, the Hellenic...
  • Mycenaean warrior used 'imported sword'

    10/05/2008 3:49:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies · 913+ views
    Howrah News Service ^ | Saturday, October3, 2008 | NEWSX
    A Mycenaean warrior who died in western Greece over 3,000 years ago was the proud owner of a rare gold-wired sword imported from the Italian peninsula, a senior archaeologist said on Thursday. "This is a very rare discovery, particularly because of the gold wire wrapped around the hilt," archaeologist Maria Gatsi told AFP. "To my knowledge, no such sword has ever been found in Greece," said Gatsi, head of the regional archaeological department of Aetoloakarnania prefecture. Tests in Austria have confirmed that the bronze used in the 12th century BCE, 94-centimetre (37-inch) sword came from the Italian peninsula, she said....
  • Prehistoric Greek Water Works Found [ Mycenaean citadel of Midea ]

    08/26/2007 12:18:53 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies · 575+ views
    PhysOrg / AP ^ | August 25, 2007 | Nicholas Paphitis
    Dating to the mid-13th century B.C., the stone passage passed under the massive walls of the Mycenaean citadel of Midea and probably led to a nearby water source, authorities said Friday. The passage would allow the people of Midea, about 93 miles south of Athens, safe access to drinkable water even in times of enemy attack... Only three such networks - major engineering feats requiring intensive labor - from Mycenaean times have been found so far. Excavations in late June and July at Midea revealed cut rock steps leading to the triangular passage, whose entrance was covered with a large...
  • Debate Erupts Anew: Did Thera's Explosion Doom Minoan Crete?

    10/23/2003 2:47:33 PM PDT · by blam · 83 replies · 1,645+ views
    International Herald Tribune ^ | 10-23-2003 | William J. Broad
    Debate erupts anew: Did Thera's explosion doom Minoan Crete? William J. Broad Thursday, October 23, 2003 For decades, scholars have debated whether the eruption of the Thera volcano in the Aegean more than 3,000 years ago brought about the mysterious collapse of Minoan civilization at the peak of its glory. The volcanic isle (whose remnants are known as Santorini) lay just 110 kilometers from Minoan Crete, so it seemed quite reasonable that its fury could have accounted for the fall of that celebrated people. . This idea suffered a blow in 1987 when Danish scientists studying cores from the Greenland...
  • Mycenaean Port of Athens Found?

    04/29/2005 9:40:45 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 3 replies · 423+ views
    Kathimerini ^ | 4-28-2005
    Archaeologists in the capital’s southern coastal suburb of Palaio Faliro have uncovered what appear to be traces of ancient Athens’s first port before the city’s naval and shipping center was moved to Piraeus, a report said yesterday. A rescue excavation on a plot earmarked for development has revealed artifacts and light structures dating, with intervals, from Mycenaean times to the fifth century BC, when the port of Phaleron — after which the modern suburb was named — was superseded by Piraeus, according to Ta Nea daily. “This is a port associated with two myths — Theseus and the Argonauts —...
  • Mycenaean Port Of Athens Found

    04/28/2005 11:00:05 AM PDT · by blam · 14 replies · 843+ views
    Kathimerini ^ | 4-28-2005
    Mycenaean port of Athens found? Archaeologists in the capital’s southern coastal suburb of Palaio Faliro have uncovered what appear to be traces of ancient Athens’s first port before the city’s naval and shipping center was moved to Piraeus, a report said yesterday. A rescue excavation on a plot earmarked for development has revealed artifacts and light structures dating, with intervals, from Mycenaean times to the fifth century BC, when the port of Phaleron — after which the modern suburb was named — was superseded by Piraeus, according to Ta Nea daily. “This is a port associated with two myths —...
  • The Linear B Tablets and Mycenaean Social, Political, and Economic Organization

    08/29/2004 8:19:46 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies · 1,656+ views
    Lesson 25, The Prehistoric Archaeology of the Aegean ^ | Revised: Friday, March 18, 2000 | Trustees of Dartmouth College
    KO-RE-TE, PO-RO-KO-RE-TE [koreter, prokoreter] -- Such officials are known at both Knossos and Pylos. The titles bear a suspiciously close resemblance to the Latin terms curator and procurator ("guardian" and "manager, imperial officer/governor" respectively). The Linear B evidence suggests that the koreter was a local official in charge of one of the sixteen major administrative units within the Pylian kingdom, and the prokoreter was evidently his deputy.
  • The Search For Atlantis 'Ends At Ayia Napa' (Cyprus)

    09/27/2003 5:01:50 PM PDT · by blam · 86 replies · 4,413+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 9-28-2003 | Fiona Govan
    The search for Atlantis 'ends at Ayia Napa' By Fiona Govan (Filed: 28/09/2003) It may be the answer generations of experts on the ancient world have been looking for. New research claims that the fabled ancient civilisation of Atlantis is located close to Cyprus. After nearly 10 years of research using ocean mapping technology and accounts from ancient texts, an American explorer says he has evidence that Atlantis lies beneath the deep blue waters off the southern tip of the island.Robert Sarmast, a self-proclaimed mythologist and expert on the ancient world, makes this claim in his book, Discovery of Atlantis...
  • New Ice-Core Evidence Challenges the 1620s age for the Santorini (Minoan) Eruption

    07/29/2004 12:25:45 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 64 replies · 4,057+ views
    Journal of Archaeological Science, Volume 25, Issue 3, March 1998, Pages 279-289 ^ | 13 July 1997 | Gregory A. Zielinski, Mark S. Germani
    Determining a reliable calendrical age of the Santorini (Minoan) eruption is necessary to place the impact of the eruption into its proper context within Bronze Age society in the Aegean region. The high-resolution record of the deposition of volcanically produced acids on polar ice sheets, as available in the SO42-time series from ice cores (a direct signal), and the high-resolution record of the climatic impact of past volcanism inferred in tree rings (a secondary signal) have been widely used to assign a 1628/1627 age to the eruption. The layer of ice in the GISP2 (Greenland) ice core corresponding to...
  • Dig Unearths Mycenaean 'Homeric Capital'

    04/17/2002 6:28:25 PM PDT · by blam · 13 replies · 268+ views
    IOL ^ | 4-16-2002
    Dig unearths Mycenaean 'Homeric capital' April 16 2002 at 06:35PM Athens, Greece - An archaeologist thinks he may have found the ancient Mycenaean capital of Salamis, the island where one of the greatest recorded battles of antiquity took place. Archaeologist Yannos Lolos said on Tuesday that he found two buildings and uncovered several small hamlets scattered around the ancient acropolis of old Salamis, now known as Kanakia. The ancient town is on the south-western part of the island, located in the Saronic Gulf. Lolos, assistant professor of archaeology at the University of Ioannina in northern Greece, has been digging at...