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Keyword: nagasaki

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  • Every August the Ghouls Come Out

    08/08/2005 6:20:26 AM PDT · by PurpleMountains · 2 replies · 289+ views
    From Sea to Shining Sea ^ | 8/08/05 | Purple Mountains
    I have always despised authors who write books outing dead people who can’t defend themselves. I feel the same way about the books that come out every August castigating President Truman for the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Once again, let’s review some facts. Truman was facing intelligence estimates that an invasion of Japan would cost a million American and many more than a million Japanese casualties. These estimates were based on known plans of Japanese defenders and the bloody results of the invasions of Iwo Jima and Okinawa. Okinawa, a home island of Japan, resulted in more than...
  • The Rising Sun Of A New Age: Dropping the Atomic Bombs On Japan.

    08/06/2005 11:09:20 PM PDT · by Brutus1964 · 1 replies · 641+ views
    http://brutus1964.blogspot.com ^ | 8/6/2005 | Ken Bingham
    August 6, 1945, a bomb was dropped on the Japanese city of Hiroshima. Three days later a second bomb was dropped on the City of Nagasaki, thus marking the end of the bloodiest war in human history. In all there were 60 million military and civilian casualties from all countries involved. Germany had been defeated and Hitler had committed suicide in his bunker, however in the Pacific war raged on with no end in sight. The Japanese Emperor Hirohito vowed not to surrender as long as there was a single Japanese standing. The only other way to defeat Japan was...
  • Remembering Hiroshima- August 6,1945

    08/06/2005 4:37:17 PM PDT · by genefromjersey · 14 replies · 916+ views
    The Morning Paper - Special Edition | 08/06/05 | vanity
    REMEMBERING HIROSHIMA : AUGUST 6, 1945 All over the world today, people are coming together to tell us how awful it was we dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. They have their memories – and I have mine. Sixty years ago, I was with my Dad and my brothers : haying in the hot August sun. We had a portable radio with us, and we stopped work to listen to the broadcaster – who spoke of a bomb – hotter than the sun – that had been dropped on, and that had utterly destroyed the entire city of Hiroshima....
  • Rush Limbaugh: Media Suppression (60th Anniversary of Atomic Bomb)

    08/05/2005 6:54:22 PM PDT · by wagglebee · 38 replies · 984+ views
    RushLimbaugh.com ^ | 8/5/05 | Rush Limbaugh
    Reuters reports: “As the world prepares to mark the 60th anniversary of the dropping of the 1st atomic bomb on Saturday, some American media experts see uncomfortable echoes between the suppression of images of death and destruction then, and coverage of the war in Iraq today.” Reuters cites an article in Editor & Publisher by Greg Mitchell, claiming American officials seized film after the “atomic attacks” on Hiroshima and Nagasaki to prevent us from seeing the devastation. Mitchell compares this to Iraq: “The chief similarity is that Americans are still being kept at a distance from images of death, whether...
  • 60 Years Later

    08/05/2005 9:33:00 AM PDT · by neverdem · 18 replies · 1,009+ views
    NRO ^ | August 05, 2005 | Victor Davis Hanson
    E-mail Author Author Archive Send to a Friend Version August 05, 2005, 7:14 a.m. 60 Years Later Considering Hiroshima. For 60 years the United States has agonized over its unleashing of the world’s first nuclear weapon on Hiroshima on August 6, 2005. President Harry Truman’s decision to explode an atomic bomb over an ostensible military target — the headquarters of the crack Japanese 2nd Army — led to well over 100,000 fatalities, the vast majority of them civilians. Critics immediately argued that we should have first targeted the bomb on an uninhabited area as a warning for the Japanese...
  • WSJ: Hiroshima - Nuclear weapons, then and now.

    08/05/2005 5:08:42 AM PDT · by OESY · 218 replies · 2,495+ views
    opinionjournal.com ^ | August 5, 2005 | Editorial
    Today--or August 6 in Japan--is the 60th anniversary of the dropping of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima, which killed outright an estimated 80,000 Japanese and hastened World War II to its conclusion on August 15. Those of us who belong to the postwar generations tend to regard the occasion as a somber, even shameful, one. But that's not how the generation of Americans who actually fought the war saw it. And if we're going to reflect seriously about the bomb, we ought first to think about it as they did. ...No surprise, then, that when news of the bomb reached...
  • US bishops mark anniversary of atomic bombings, condemn ‘total war’

    08/04/2005 7:21:02 PM PDT · by Coleus · 260 replies · 2,443+ views
    CNS ^ | 08.04.05
    US bishops mark anniversary of atomic bombings, condemn ‘total war’Washington DC, Aug. 04, 2005 (CNA) - The 60th anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki provides an opportunity to reflect on the lessons of the Second World War and to recommit to efforts for a lasting peace built on justice, said the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB). “Hiroshima and Nagasaki are permanent reminders to the entire human family of the grave consequences of total war,” said USCCB president Bishop William Skylstad yesterday in a letter to Bishop Augustinus Jun-ichi Nomura, president of the bishops’ conference of Japan.The...
  • Nagasaki, Mon Amour

    08/03/2005 1:05:28 PM PDT · by Siobhan · 40 replies · 1,600+ views
    FrontPageMag.com ^ | August 8, 2001 | Lowell Ponte
    EACH AUGUST THE DEBATE RETURNS, this year won masterfully by my Front Page Magazine brother columnist Ronald Radosh: Should the United States on August 6, 1945, have dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima?  Given that the alternative would have required invasion of Japan and the deaths of perhaps a quarter-million Americans, a million or more Japanese, and prolonged suffering on both sides, most moral people answer Yes, we should have dropped the bomb.  We had only three bombs, one to test and two to use and none to spare on a demonstration for the Emperor. But we should also ponder...
  • Kingdom Come

    08/03/2005 8:24:29 AM PDT · by Parmenio · 10 replies · 809+ views
    The Bulletin ^ | August 3, 2005 | Patrick Carlyon
    In August 1945, two atomic bombs fell on Japan, killing tens of thousands of people instantly. Yet all 24 Australian POWs in Nagasaki - close to ground zero - survived. Patrick Carlyon reports. The August sun hangs like a red balloon. Smoke smudges the sky, as it has since the American planes began dropping bombs. The Japanese expansion had spread like an angry tumour across Asia and the Pacific. Now, after 14 years, the aggressors are losing. An Allied invasion appears certain. In the hills of Nakama, a small Japanese mining town, Australian prisoners-of-war dig pits to store potatoes. They...
  • America - Champion for Peace

    08/02/2005 10:02:01 AM PDT · by Miami Vice · 1 replies · 281+ views
    Men's News Daily ^ | 8-2-05 | Michael P. Tremoglie
    How many nations could genuinely say that they had the real potential to conquer the world or destroy it? How many nations had an arsenal capable of obliterating any other nation without risking retaliation? How many nations, with an army and navy superior to any others, an industry and economy capable of producing more weapons and material than any other, with forces already deployed for conquest, how many nations would try to conquer the world while they had such advantages? Sixty years ago, this was exactly situation in which the United States of America found itself. American military forces were...
  • America - Champion of Peace

    08/02/2005 9:16:38 AM PDT · by Miami Vice · 140+ views
    Men's News Daily ^ | 8-2-05 | Michael P. Tremoglie
    How many nations could genuinely say that they had the real potential to conquer the world or destroy it? How many nations had an arsenal capable of obliterating any other nation without risking retaliation? How many nations, with an army and navy superior to any others, an industry and economy capable of producing more weapons and material than any other, with forces already deployed for conquest, how many nations would try to conquer the world while they had such advantages? Sixty years ago, this was exactly situation in which the United States of America found itself. American military forces were...
  • America Was Always the Best Hope for Peace

    08/02/2005 7:20:50 AM PDT · by hinterlander · 8 replies · 548+ views
    Human Events Online ^ | August 2, 2005 | Michael P. Tremoglie
    How many nations could genuinely say that they had the real potential to conquer the world or destroy it? How many nations had an arsenal capable of obliterating any other nation without risking retaliation? How many nations, with an army and navy superior to any others, an industry and economy capable of producing more weapons and material than any other, with forces already deployed for conquest, how many nations would try to conquer the world while they had such advantages? Sixty years ago, this was exactly situation in which the United States of America found itself. American military forces were...
  • Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    08/01/2005 7:21:44 PM PDT · by satchmodog9 · 147 replies · 3,351+ views
    Colorado Gold ^ | 8-1-2005 | Don
    Hiroshima and Nagasaki While most may not remember the details, they do know about that famous B-29 bomber which dropped two atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki Japan, for all practical purposes ending World War Two. The Smithsonian has completed a cosmetic restoration of the Enola Gay, the plane that dropped the bombs, and is now on display. As expected, a large sized hullabaloo has arisen over the way Harry Truman decided to end the war. Various old saws are paraded about, such as the hackneyed and untrue one that, "The Japanese had already sued for peace," "Atomic weapons shouldn't...
  • Hiroshima may decide 2005 Nobel Peace Prize

    08/01/2005 5:51:58 PM PDT · by wagglebee · 16 replies · 525+ views
    Reuters ^ | 8/1/05 | Alister Doyle
    OSLO (Reuters) - Sixty years after the U.S. atomic bombing of Hiroshima, guardians of the Nobel Peace Prize could confirm a once-a-decade trend in 2005 by honoring work to prevent nuclear Armageddon. The five-member awards committee, which will hold several meetings before announcing the winner of what many see as the world's top accolade in October from a field of 199 candidates, declines even to give out names on its short-list. Yet if history is a guide, the anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima on Aug. 6 and of Nagasaki on Aug. 9 may help decide the winner. About 200,000...
  • Archives yield day-after Nagasaki aerial photos (If we are not vigilant we will see this here)

    07/26/2005 12:26:25 AM PDT · by LesbianThespianGymnasticMidget · 32 replies · 1,861+ views
    NAGASAKI (Kyodo) The Japan Map Center has found 29 negatives of aerial photographs of Nagasaki taken by the U.S. military a day after it dropped an atomic bomb on the city in 1945, in a discovery expected to help reveal the immediate effects of the attack. The pictures, taken by a U.S. reconnaissance plane flying over the devastated city Aug. 10, 1945, were found at the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration. They are believed to be the first aerial photos of Nagasaki taken a day after the bombing to be made public. The oldest such photos, taken Aug....
  • A Nagasaki Report

    06/19/2005 2:47:15 PM PDT · by ARealMothersSonForever · 9 replies · 749+ views
    Mainichi Daily News ^ | June 17, 2005 orig Sept 8, 1945 | George Weller
    American George Weller was the first foreign reporter to enter Nagasaki following the U.S. atomic attack on the city on Aug. 9, 1945. Weller wrote a series of stories about what he saw in the city, but censors at the Occupation's General Headquarters refused to allow the material to be printed. Weller's stories, written in September 1945, can be found below.
  • Atomic Weapons, The Humanitarian Peace Weapon!

    08/09/2004 11:10:48 PM PDT · by LifeTrek · 13 replies · 610+ views
    Life's Trek ^ | August 9, 2004 | David K. Kittel
    Today is the second atomic weapon was dropped on Nagasaki Japan - August 9, 1945. Yes, I proudly say Thank God! Yes, America is the only nation to ever use atomic weapons! And you should thank your God as well - no matter where you are from! Although there are many on the left who claim that using this weapon not necessary (let alone developing Atomic weapons in the first place) looking at the truth in the history will show that it's use was not only justified, warranted, but was a humanitarian move on the part of the United States....
  • Lessons of Nagasaki for fighting terrorism

    08/09/2004 1:19:46 PM PDT · by Lando Lincoln · 15 replies · 1,095+ views
    The Boston Globe ^ | 09 August 2004 | Graham Allison
    THE NUCLEAR bomb dropped on Hiroshima became an icon of the nuclear age, seared into the collective consciousness of postwar Americans by John Hersey's classic book. Fewer Americans remember much about the destruction of Nagasaki three days later on Aug. 9, 1945, and fewer still have reflected on lessons it offers for threats we face today. The bomb dropped on Nagasaki remains the single most powerful weapon ever used. Dubbed "Fat Man," it produced an explosion greater than all conventional bombs dropped by Allied forces on both Germany and Japan in the war. Within four months, the blast and thermal...
  • Happy Nagasaki Day

    08/08/2004 3:46:08 AM PDT · by Renegade · 53 replies · 1,144+ views
    opinion | 8/804 | Renegade
    Thank you Harry Truman for preventing my father from becoming a possible statistic in an invasion of the Japaneese mainland .
  • Maj. Charles Sweeney (Nagasaki Pilot) has died

    07/18/2004 11:15:43 AM PDT · by admiralsn · 11 replies · 624+ views
    FoxNews | 7-18-04 | admiralsn
    Fox News just reported that a great American hero, Major Charles Sweeney, has died. Maj. Sweney was the pilot who dropped the bomb on Nagasaki, Japan to help bring an end to WW2.