Keyword: nature

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  • 4.8 magnitude earthquake felt throughout Kansas

    11/13/2014 5:28:10 PM PST · by SoFloFreeper · 25 replies
    KWCH-TV ^ | 11/12/14
    ....The U.S. Geological Survey has confirmed the epicenter of the quake as 8 miles south of Conway Springs, Kansas. According to Sumner County Emergency Manager, James Fair, a there are few structures with foundation damage. A tree with a diameter of 18-20 inches was uprooted and a propane tank was shifted off its foundation.
  • Climate Tools Seek to Bend Nature’s Path (olivine)

    11/10/2014 1:51:09 AM PST · by Libloather · 35 replies
    MSN ^ | 11/09/14 | HENRY FOUNTAIN
    **SNIP** Dr. Schuiling’s idea is one of several intended to reduce levels of CO2, the main greenhouse gas, so the atmosphere will trap less heat. Other approaches, potentially faster and more doable but riskier, would create the equivalent of a sunshade around the planet by scattering reflective droplets in the stratosphere or spraying seawater to create more clouds over the oceans. Less sunlight reaching the earth’s surface would mean less heat to be trapped, resulting in a quick lowering of temperatures. No one can say for sure whether geoengineering of any kind would work. And many of the approaches are...
  • Seeking Michigan (Part 1)

    10/25/2014 12:38:11 PM PDT · by cripplecreek · 34 replies
    Vimeo ^ | 2014 | Eric Hines
    Please watch in Fullscreen & HD with sound for best quality. To avoid skipping, please let the video fully load. Seeking Michigan is an ongoing personal project that I started work on in February 2013. Over the past year, I have been making trips around Michigan and up to the Upper Peninsula on a frequent basis to discover and explore the beauty of this state. Sleeping in the back of my car, walking through forests at night, getting lost on dirt roads, and driving for hours on end around this gorgeous place has been an incredible inspiration to me. So...
  • Charismatic Minifauna

    10/06/2014 11:13:08 PM PDT · by Utilizer · 6 replies
    W I R E D ^ | 10.06.14 8:00 am | Gwen Pearson
    W I R E D cannot be directly posted or excerpted from, but they have a somewhat relaxing article about something called "Nature Zen", in this case recordings about various birdcalls and songs in the early morning in Costa Rica and Queensland Australia (Bewdy!). Lots of links and recordings available at the site, and be careful you do not fall asleep listening to them. :) Ignore the link at the top of the thread, it only leads back to the FR index page -have you donated yet? Here is the link to the article: http://www.wired.com/2014/10/nature-zen-audio-library-of-nature/ Kind of graphics heavy due...
  • Blue whale's population rebounds to about 97% near US West Coast...

    09/06/2014 5:50:21 AM PDT · by SoFloFreeper · 23 replies
    inferse.com ^ | 9/6/14
    Researchers reveal that the population of California Recent data gathered by researchers show that the population of California Blue Whales is now in a healthy state with an estimate number of around 2,200 residing in the eastern side of the Pacific Ocean. This number reflects that it is around the 97% rate of its historical levels. This rate shows that the population has reached the capacity of what the ocean system can support....
  • Worldwide Rhino Horn Trade Continues Unabated

    09/03/2014 6:00:38 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 10 replies
    More rhinos were killed by poachers last year in Africa than ever before. In 2014 the dubious record looks set to be broken again. The black market price for rhino horn is now considerably higher than cocaine. Poachers from Mozambique's poorest villages sneak into South Africa, heavily armed under the cover of darkness. They are here to hunt rhinos. The money they make from just one rhino horn is enough to feed their families for months. It’s a payoff worth risking their lives for. Between 1990 and 2007 poachers killed on average 14 rhinos a year in South Africa. Last...
  • Columbia River dilemma: Kill cormorants to save fish?

    08/08/2014 4:38:51 PM PDT · by Innovative · 26 replies
    Columbian ^ | Aug 2, 2014 | AP
    Now, the population of the cormorants on East Sand Island has burgeoned from about 100 breeding pairs to 14,900, and a federal agency wants to have thousands of the seabirds shot to protect the fish, including some that are protected or endangered. The birds eat lots of endangered wild fish, as well as hatchery stocks — an estimated 11 million a year — mainly in May as the young fish head for their years in the ocean. In June, the corps released its plan to kill 16,000 of the birds. A public comment period has been extended to Aug. 19....
  • Proprietary Primate: Wikipedia Says Monkey Owns Copyright to ‘Selfie’

    08/07/2014 2:34:38 PM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 38 replies
    The National Review ^ | 8-7-14 | Ian Tuttle
    Monkey business — or legitimate copyright claim? In Indonesia in 2011 a female crested black macaque hijacked the camera of British nature photographer David Slater and proceeded to snap hundreds of photos — among them several selfies, photos of himself, one of which made worldwide headlines and the animal’s Wikipedia page. Slater, citing royalty losses, has tried to have the photograph removed from the site. The Telegraph reports: The Gloucestershire-based photographer now claims that the decision is jeopardising his income as anyone can take the image and publish it for free, without having to pay him a royalty. He complained...
  • Mysterious lake in Tunisian desert turns from turquoise to green sludge

    08/01/2014 7:37:33 PM PDT · by Innovative · 13 replies
    The Guardian ^ | Aug 1, 2014 | Kim Willsher
    The stretch of water, dubbed the Lac de Gafsa, may be the result of a rupture in the rock above the local water table. The lake appeared in the Tunisian desert like a mirage; one minute there was nothing but scorching sand, the next a large expanse of turquoise water. Shepherds discovered the lake, thought to be up to 18 meters deep and covering one hectare, three weeks ago. Local geologists suspect seismic activity may have ruptured the rock above the water table sending the liquid to the surface.
  • Oil industry's wastewater wells blamed for triggering Oklahoma quakes [liberal lies]

    07/04/2014 8:32:02 PM PDT · by re_nortex · 10 replies
    Fortune ^ | July 3, 2014, 2:06 PM EDT | Michael Casey
    ...the study provides the strongest evidence yet that the upsurge quakes in the past decade across Central and mid-America is at least partially to be blamed on humans. More than 300 earthquakes have occurred from 2010 to 2012 compared to an average rate of 21 every year from 1967 to 2000, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. Most have ranged from 2.0 to 3.6 on the Richter scale but there have been exceptions, including a 5.6 event in central Oklahoma in November 2011 that destroyed 14 homes and injured two people.
  • US mayors to use nature to fight climate change

    06/22/2014 3:23:08 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 32 replies
    Yahoo! News ^ | 6/22/14 | RAMIT PLUSHNICK-MASTI - ap
    HOUSTON (AP) — Mayors from the GOP-dominated states of Texas and Arizona are calling on cities to use nature to fight the impacts of climate change, even while Republican governors and lawmakers repeatedly question the science that shows human-caused pollution contributes to global warming. As conservative governors criticize the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's new rules designed to cut greenhouse gas emissions from power plants, the mayors — many from cities already struggling with climate-change effects — are taking steps and spending money to stem the damage. Attendees of the U.S. Conference of Mayors will vote Monday on a resolution that...
  • Nature Today Is Anything but ‘Natural’: The Myth of the Wild

    05/01/2014 6:48:48 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 4 replies
    National Review ^ | 04/30/2014 | Jonah Goldberg
    The pristine natural world has been gone for a long time; get used to it. Nearly all of the earthworms in New England and the upper Midwest were inadvertently imported from Europe. The American earthworms were wiped out by the last Ice Age. That’s why when European colonists first got here, many forest floors were covered in deep drifts of wet leaves. The wild horses of the American West may be no less invasive than the Asian carp advancing on the Great Lakes. Most species of the tumbleweed, icon of the Old West, are actually from Russia or Asia. The...
  • Cardinals

    04/24/2014 4:46:14 AM PDT · by Revski · 9 replies
    youtube post ^ | 4-24-2014 | revski
    Backyard, peaceful day. Posting this one again because the first seem to have a problem working. Thanks for viewing and hope you enjoy this back yard short video.
  • Centipede Eats Viper, From Inside Out

    04/19/2014 4:36:24 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 24 replies
    Emirates 24/7 ^ | Saturday, April 19, 2014
    Grisly fight for freedomThe picture as published in 'Ecologica Montenegrina' showing the centipede bursting out of the snake's stomach. (Pic courtesy: Ecologica Montenegrina) The picture is not for those with weak stomachs and the report itself is as creepy as its protagonist. However, if you are looking at the picture, then you may well be looking at the most famous centipede known to man. Also famous now is the Ecologica Montenegrina a hithertho Montenegro college journal of science that published the find. A viper is believed to have swallowed centipede alive. The centipede then fought back – and the paper...
  • The Coming Paradigm Shift on Climate: Evidence suggests that Nature rules the climate – not Man.

    03/27/2014 6:56:48 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 45 replies
    American Thinker ^ | 03/27/2014 | S. Fred Singer
    The just-published NIPCC reports may lead to a paradigm shift about what or who causes current climate changes. All the evidence suggests that Nature rules the climate – not Man. Watch for it: We may be on the threshold of a tipping point in climate history. No, I’m not talking about a tipping point in the sense that the Earth will be covered with ice or become hellishly hot. I’m talking about a tipping point in our views of what controls the climate -- whether it’s mainly humans or whether it’s mainly natural. It makes an enormous difference in climate...
  • Something is rotten in the state of science: How did computer generated gibberish get published?

    02/25/2014 6:54:42 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 19 replies
    American Thinker ^ | 02/25/2014 | Thomas Lifson
    Evidence is accumulating that quality control is a serious issue in academic publishing, which is the key to career advancement for scientists and other scholars. In an age when appeals to "peer reviewed" "settled science" have become standard operating procedure in efforts to impose radical increases in government control over our lives, corruption in the mechanisms for reviewing  scientific publications has very real consequences for all of us. Nature magazine tells us: Publishers withdraw more than 120 gibberish papers. Richard Van Noorden writes: The publishers Springer and IEEE are removing more than 120 papers from their subscription services after...
  • First ever video of a fish leaping out of the water to prey on flying birds

    01/10/2014 12:42:46 PM PST · by Rebelbase · 30 replies
    Kingsport Times News ^ | 1/10/14 | Video from Nature.com
    This video found on the web shows an African tigerfish leaping out of a lake and snatching a swallow out of mid air. It is the first confirmed record of a freshwater fish preying on a bird in flight, according to Nature.com Researches say they saw as many as 20 successful strikes during a research trip.Video at the article link.
  • Manatees flock to plant's warmer waters (Florida)

    01/09/2014 5:08:48 PM PST · by Islander7 · 20 replies
    MyFox 13 Tampa Bay ^ | Jan 5, 2014 | By: FOX 13 Staff
    APOLLO BEACH (FOX 13) - With temperatures dropping in both the air and the water, dozens of manatees have returned to one of their favorite spots for the winter: The warm waters of the TECO power plant in Apollo Beach. At least 100 manatees were visible Saturday in the canal alongside the Big Bend facility, where discharge saltwater from the power plant warms the water to summer-like temperatures. According to TECO, the manatees begin to arrive when water temperatures in the bay drop below 68 degrees. Thermometers on the site indicated the bay was at about 65 degrees this weekend,...
  • A Lament at the Secular World’s Rejection of Natural Law

    07/21/2012 1:08:40 PM PDT · by NYer · 20 replies
    Archdiocese of Washington ^ | July 19, 2012 | Msgr. Charles Pope
    One of the great losses to Western Culture is the increasing refusal to accept that there is a Natural Law to which we may commonly refer. This is especially problematic in pluralistic and secularist societies like the post-Christian West where reference to the sacred text of Scripture is not considered authoritative by many.Hence, it has been the long practice of the Church, even before secularizing trends to base her witness to the truth not only on Scripture but also on Natural Law. The recourse to such a basis for discussion is now largely impossible for us, as most secularists have...
  • What Is Natural, and Is It Better?

    11/18/2013 7:15:18 PM PST · by Enza Ferreri · 13 replies
    Enza Ferreri Blog ^ | 19 November 2013 | Enza Ferreri
    The word “natural” is treated in a way peculiar in the extreme. This perhaps reflects our confused ideas about nature, or perhaps darker, more sinister misconceptions are at work. There is a strange dichotomy between the positive connotation of “natural” in one realm (that encompassing health, food, medicine, environmental management, and the like) and the negative connotation of “natural” in another realm (social and political organization). If you use the adjective “natural” in conjunction with objects of the first group, eg natural remedies, natural substances, natural environment, it is almost invariably taken as a virtue, a good qualitative appreciation....
  • Toxic waste seems to naturally vanish from Palos Verdes Shelf

    11/18/2013 2:17:51 AM PST · by Cincinatus' Wife · 30 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | November 17, 2013
    Decades after industrial waste dumping turned part of Southern California's seafloor into a toxic hot spot, scientists have dredged up a mystery. Chemicals fouling the ocean off the Palos Verdes Peninsula seem to be going away without being cleaned up. Samples taken from the sediment suggest more than 100 metric tons of the banned pesticide DDT and industrial compounds known as polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs, have vanished from one of the country's most hazardous sites, almost a 90% drop in just five years.
  • Extreme Antarctic Winds Shape Trees Into Beautiful Forms on Slope Point, New Zealand

    11/17/2013 9:27:48 AM PST · by Pan_Yan · 29 replies
    Bored Panda ^ | November 14, 2013
    As wonderful and useful as our modern technologies are, there are still plenty of places in this world where Mother Nature rules supreme. One such place is Slope Point in New Zealand. Slope Point is the southernmost tip of New Zealand’s South Island. It lies 4800 km (2982 mi) from the South Pole and 5100 km (3168 mi) from the equator, so it’s regularly exposed to unimaginable weather conditions. The air stream loops that travel over the Southern Ocean uninterrupted for 3200 km (2000 mi) make landfall at Slope Point, making for consistently extreme winds. And yet, even in this...
  • Smart Mouse!

    09/18/2013 2:18:33 AM PDT · by expat1000 · 6 replies
    Liveleak ^ | Sept 18, 2013 | -Carl Baribeau
    Take a break and enjoy a moment with some of the Creator's smaller creatures.
  • Blurry vision alert! Video for animal (bird) and nature lovers.

    08/23/2013 11:56:06 PM PDT · by expat1000 · 15 replies
    Liveleak ^ | Aug 13, 2013 | Juggernaut
    video link only
  • Nature in action - Epic struggle ends in death

    08/07/2013 6:48:36 PM PDT · by Baynative · 30 replies
    imgur website ^ | 7/7/13 | Baynative
    Mountain goat and lion found dead on a closed road in Glacier National park. It seems they both fell to their deaths when the cougar attacked the goat far up on the cliffs out of sight and to the right. (Not sure where to post this, but I think it was is interesting)
  • A True Map of Man's Miserable Estate by Nature

    07/20/2013 6:56:55 AM PDT · by HarleyD · 2 replies
    Puritan Sermons ^ | 1650 | Christopher Love
    [Christopher Love, minister of St. Laurence-Jewry in London, was beheaded at the age of 29 for treason during the Protectorate of Oliver Cromwell. Thomas Manton preached his funeral sermon. Among others accused, but not convicted or executed, were Thomas Watson and several other prominent London ministers. Love declared his innocence to the very end. The letters written between Christopher and his wife Mary, as he sat in the Tower of London awaiting his death in August, 1651, are full of love and poignant affection. If it pleases God to allow it, Soli Deo Gloria will begin work shortly be reprinting...
  • Mongolian neo-Nazis rebrand themselves as environmentalists

    07/02/2013 10:34:18 PM PDT · by grundle · 14 replies
    Guardian ^ | July 2, 2013
    Members of the Mongolian neo-Nazi group Tsagaan Khass stand near a quarry where they questioned a worker. A Mongolian neo-Nazi group has rebranded itself as an environmentalist organisation fighting pollution by foreign-owned mines, seeking legitimacy as it sends swastika-wearing members to check mining permits. Based in an office behind a lingerie store in the Mongolian capital, the shaven-headed, jackbooted Tsagaan Khass stormtroopers launch raids on mining projects, demanding paperwork or soil samples to be studied for contaminants. "Before, we used to work in a harsh way, like breaking down doors," the group's leader, Ariunbold Altankhuum, 40, told Reuters. "But now,...
  • Scientists Offer Explanation For Why Men Ogle Women

    06/26/2013 11:04:08 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 88 replies
    Metro UK ^ | Wednesday 26 Jun 2013
    Yes dear, I am eyeing her up… it’s in my genes: Scientists offer explanation for why men ogle womenIf you catch your man’s eyes wandering when a beautiful stranger walks past, don’t blame him – it’s all the fault of evolution. Chaps are naturally drawn to people they have never seen before while women prefer familiar male faces, a study reveals. Men were shown pairs of photographs of women and asked to rate their attractiveness for the research at Scotland’s Glasgow and Stirling universities. When photos were produced for a second time alongside previously unseen images, they were distracted by...
  • Scientists Uncover "God's Bathtub"

    06/05/2013 3:24:22 PM PDT · by lbryce · 22 replies
    Eric Pfeifier ^ | June 4, 2013 | Eric Pfeifier
    Imagine a lake that's never been affected by climate change or any other man-made influences. Australian scientists say they have found just that—a remote lake whose crystal-clear waters seem to be in the same chemical state as they were about 7,500 years ago. "It's like God's bathtub," Dr. Cameron Barr told the Australian Associated Press of the body of water now named Blue Lake. "It is beautiful. It is absolutely beautiful." Barr and his team of researchers from the University of Adelaide say the lake—one of the largest on North Stradbroke Island off the south Queensland coast, according to the...
  • 'Crazy' ants driving out fire ants in southeast

    05/20/2013 5:39:08 AM PDT · by SoFloFreeper · 61 replies
    Fox ^ | 5/20/13 | Douglas Main
    Invasive fire ants have been a thorn in the sides of Southerners for years. But another invasive species, the so-called "crazy" ant that many describe as being worse has arrived and is displacing fire ants in several places. "When you talk to folks who live in the invaded areas, they tell you they want their fire ants back," said Edward LeBrun, a researcher at the University of Texas at Austin, in a statement from the school. "Fire ants are in many ways very polite. They live in your yard. They form mounds and stay there, and they only interact with...
  • Beaver Bites Man To Death In Belarus Attack

    04/11/2013 6:12:14 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 107 replies
    Sky.com ^ | 04-11-2013 | Staff
    The beaver pounced as a man went to take its photograph after spotting the animal on the side of a road during a fishing trip. A fisherman has been bitten to death by a beaver after trying to take its photograph. The man was on a fishing trip at Lake Shestakov in Belarus with two friends when they spotted the animal on the side of the road. He stopped so that he could take a picture but as he approached the beaver it pounced on him, biting him in the thigh. His friends attempted to stem the flow of blood...
  • Vultures Swarm N.C. Neighborhood

    02/16/2013 6:09:13 PM PST · by Redcitizen · 42 replies
    ABC News Blogs ^ | 02-16-2013 | By Alexis Shaw
    Thanks to a mild winter, swarms of turkey vultures have made themselves at home in Shelby, N.C., but town residents are wary of their neighbors. While the birds normally pass through the city while migrating south for the winter, the vultures have been sticking around this year, swarming lawns and making residents nervous. "We are just not getting cold enough to push them along," Kristen Duren, an intern with the North Carolina Cooperative Extension, the state agriculture service, told ABC's Charlotte, N.C. affiliate WSOC-TV. "What used to be five to 10 birds is going up to 150 birds."
  • The Conservative Environmentalist

    01/14/2013 12:06:26 PM PST · by MichCapCon · 1 replies
    Michigan Capitol Confidential ^ | 1/10/2013 | Bruce Walker
    The moral high ground of environmentalism seemingly was ceded by free-market proponents a long, long time ago. There exists multiple reasons why this appears to be so, but perhaps the most often argued — if not the most persuasive — case employed against the free-marketers is the intrinsic “evil” ascribed to the profit motive of businesses and individuals alike. Nothing could be further from the truth, but urban mythology abounds with bad actors passing out carcinogens like Halloween candy while polluting groundwater, rivers, lakes and streams. This mythology is bolstered by the Hollywood subgenre of whistle-blower flicks of the past...
  • Mountain Man vs. Government

    01/13/2013 8:46:11 AM PST · by haffast · 48 replies
    Carolina Journal - The John Locke Foundation ^ | January 2013 | Don Carrington
    Primitive N.C. retreat a bit too primitive for Watauga officials Watauga County mountain man Eustace Conway’s passion for teaching primitive living came to a sudden halt in October when local government officials shut down his operation, citing safety and health concerns. After receiving a tip that Conway had built structures without a permit, Watauga County Planning and Inspections Director Joe Furman obtained an administrative search warrant to inspect the roughly two dozen buildings and structures at Turtle Island Preserve, Conway’s 500-plus acre retreat in the mountains east of Boone. In September, Furman assembled a team of building inspectors, health department...
  • The Law of the Wild (Received email - beautiful pics)

    09/22/2012 3:54:09 PM PDT · by Bikkuri · 20 replies
    Personal E-Mail
    Beautiful pictures that are Totally Unexpected... Will Surprise almost anyone!!!
  • Life imitates Chuck Norris joke: Nepali man bites snake to death in revenge attack

    08/23/2012 6:16:52 PM PDT · by Redcitizen · 22 replies
    National POst ^ | Aug 23, 2012 4:55 PM ET | Reuters
    KATHMANDU — A Nepali man who was bitten by a cobra snake bit it back and killed the reptile in a tit-for-tat attack, a newspaper said on Thursday. Nepali daily Annapurna Post said Mohamed Salmo Miya chased the snake, which bit him in his rice paddy on Tuesday, caught it and bit it until it died. “I could have killed it with a stick but bit it with my teeth instead because I was angry,” the 55-year-old Miya, who lives in a village some 200 km southeast of the Nepali capital of Kathmandu, was quoted by the daily as saying.
  • MILLER: Ryan is first on Second Amendment

    08/15/2012 6:12:20 AM PDT · by marktwain · 11 replies
    The Washington Times ^ | 14 August, 2012 | Emily Miller
    Gun owners now have one of their own on a presidential ticket. Rep. Paul Ryan recalled “deer camp over in Fairchild in Eau Claire County” in his remarks after being chosen as Mitt Romney’s vice-presidential running mate. The Wisconsin Republican is an avid hunter who’s been a strong supporter of Second Amendment rights. Mr. Ryan, who owns a rifle and a shotgun, is a member of the National Rifle Association (NRA). “I know firsthand Paul’s commitment to the Second Amendment,” said Chris W. Cox, executive director of the NRA's Institute for Legislative Action, to The Washington Times. “We’ve given him...
  • The Secrets of Hissing Trees(Methane,Hissing Seem Inextricably Intertwined Perhaps Cosmic By Design)

    08/13/2012 1:16:41 PM PDT · by lbryce · 30 replies
    New York Times ^ | August 10, 2012 | Joanne Foster
    Three years ago, a researcher collecting tree core samples in Connecticut was startled to see one of the trees begin to hiss and spit. Even more surprising, he found that the leaking gas could be set on fire. It’s been known since around the 1970’s that a relatively rare bacterial infection in trees responsible for the damaging rot known as wet wood can cause trees to emit methane, a greenhouse gas with 20 times the warming potential of carbon dioxide. Trees in wetland soils can also act as straws, sipping methane from soggy, oxygen-poor soil. Yale School of Forestry and...
  • Catholic Word of the Day: IDENTITY, 06-01-12

    06/01/2012 8:47:36 AM PDT · by Salvation · 2 replies
    CatholicReference.net ^ | 06-01-12 | Fr. John Hardon's Modern Catholic Dictionary
    Featured Term (selected at random):IDENTITY Quality of sameness. Absolute identity is total sameness, without any change or difference; relative identity is all other sameness, which allows of numerous differences in nature and degree. Only God is and remains absolutely identical eternally. Creatures have relative identity, inasmuch as they have already changed when first created out of nothing; they further change, depending on the relative stability of their natures and (among angels and men) their persons; and they differ among themselves in myriad ways, but mainly in that each is a separate substance and, in human beings, a distinct and incommunicable...
  • 10 Weapons That Animals Use

    04/19/2012 7:34:25 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 17 replies
    IO9 ^ | Mar 9, 2012 | Esther Inglis-Arkell
    10 Weapons That Animals Use We've come a long way from thinking that what separates us from the animals is, say, using a rock to bash in the skull of our competitors. It turns out that there are a lot of creatures out that that re-purpose tools to make their personal world better and someone else's world a lot worse. Take a look at the world's craziest and most intimidating weapons wielded by animals. 10. The Herring Gull's Bread This bird has learned how to use bread to construct a trap. Herring gulls live in large colonies in the urban...
  • Just have more sex!

    02/07/2012 7:31:00 PM PST · by Vigilanteman · 135 replies
    Get Physical Today ^ | 7 February 2011 (from archives) | Gwen
    You can’t argue with the research… Researchers have long known that people who have frequent sex are generally healthier Most health benefits seem to be linked to penile-vaginal intercourse Frequent sex may also bring longer life, fewer coronary events, lower blood pressure Researchers have long known that not only is sex fun (when done with the right person, of course), but that people who have frequent sex tend to live longer and have healthier hearts and lower rates of certain cancers. These studies also show that men with an active sex life have healthier sperm, and sexually active women have...
  • World’s biggest ‘prawn’ discovered as scientists find ELEVEN INCH crustacean in deep sea

    02/02/2012 7:00:24 AM PST · by C19fan · 31 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | February 2, 2012 | Julian Gavaghan
    A British expedition to one of the deepest parts of the ocean has discovered an enormous species of crustacean that looks like a prawn and is 11ins long. The so-called ‘supergiant’ – a type of amphipod - was discovered more than four miles below the surface in waters north of New Zealand. Most amphipods are usually 0.8in-1.2in long. But the new specimen, found by a team from the University of Aberdeen, was ten times the size.
  • Red Rock Canyon

    11/23/2011 5:04:11 AM PST · by moneyrunner · 13 replies
    The Virginian ^ | 11/23/2011 | Moneyrunner
  • All-white 6-point buck spotted near Port Washington

    11/20/2011 5:26:58 PM PST · by afraidfortherepublic · 109 replies
    JS Online ^ | 11-20-11 | Lee Bergquist
    Amy Mattson of Mequon was driving south of Port Washington earlier this month when she spied an all-white buck standing in a field. The nose of the 6-point buck appears to be pink in the photos that she and a friend shot. A pink nose and presumably pink eyes - a deer bereft of any color - means the two appeared to be observing a rare albino deer, according to the state Department of Natural Resources. "It was very pretty," Mattson said Saturday, the first day of Wisconsin's traditional nine-day gun season. In the dim light of late afternoon, "it...
  • Senator Doug Whitsett E-Newsletter

    09/17/2011 7:36:31 AM PDT · by Twotone
    Sen. Doug Whitsett E-Newsletter ^ | August 12, 2011 | Senator Doug Whitsett
    Natural systems endure an ever evolving cycle of growth and deterioration. The deterioration accumulates and dominates whenever we fail to put the growth to productive use. Too often, failure to manage and utilize the productive growth results in catastrophic destruction through disease and wildfire. This boom and bust cycle is the natural way. We recently returned from a road trip through four western states. Throughout the trip we observed the stark difference in the management of private and public lands. In general, private lands show the pride of ownership while public lands demonstrate the widespread deterioration inherent in failure to...
  • Nature Journal of Science Discredits Man-made Global Warming

    09/06/2011 5:31:32 PM PDT · by saganite · 58 replies
    biggovernment.com ^ | 6 Sep 2011 | Chriss W. Street
    Nature Journal of Science, ranked as the world’s most cited scientific periodical, has just published the definitive study on Global Warming that proves the dominant controller of temperatures in the Earth’s atmosphere is due to galactic cosmic rays and the sun, rather than by man. One of the report’s authors, Professor Jyrki Kauppinen, summed up his conclusions regarding the potential for man-made Global Warming: “I think it is such a blatant falsification.” The research was conducted by CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, which invented the World Wide Web, built the multi-billion dollar Large Hadron Collider, and now has...
  • The Myth of Pristine Nature - A review of Rambunctious Garden: Saving Nature in a Post-Wild World

    08/19/2011 6:01:05 PM PDT · by neverdem · 15 replies
    Reason ^ | August 16, 2011 | Ronald Bailey
    “Nature is almost everywhere. But wherever it is, there is one thing nature is not: pristine,” writes science journalist Emma Marris in her engaging new book Rambunctious Garden: Saving Nature in a Post-Wild World. She adds, “We must temper our romantic notion of untrammeled wilderness and find room next to it for the more nuanced notion of a global, half-wild rambunctious garden, tended by us.” Marris’ message will discomfort both environmental activists and most ecologists who are in thrall to the damaging cult of pristine wilderness and the false ideology of the balance of nature. But it should encourage and...
  • Sleeping Bear Dunes Voted 'Most Beautiful Place in America'

    08/17/2011 9:45:02 AM PDT · by Lakeshark · 128 replies
    ABC News/Travel ^ | 8/17/2011 | ALBERTO ORSO and SABRINA PARISE
    Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, tucked away in the northwest corner of Michigan's Lower Peninsula, won the title of "Good Morning America's" Most Beautiful Place in America. Tens of thousands of viewers voted online for this Michigan park, which is one of the nation's best-kept secrets. The hidden gem boasts 64 miles of beaches along Lake Michigan, two islands, 26 inland lakes, more than 50,000 acres of land, and the monumental sand dunes from which it gets its name. In June, "GMA" set out in search of the most beautiful places in America. Viewers nominated their favorite places online, sending...
  • Are you an envirnonmentalist or a conservationist?

    07/02/2011 9:56:50 AM PDT · by Gum Shoe · 40 replies
    Red State Zombie ^ | July 2, 2011 | Red State Zombie
    I remember taking a forestry class my freshman year of college. The curriculum, presented by a veteran instructor from the California Department of Forestry, covered several related topics that included ecology, biology, life cycles, wild-land fire control, conservation, and commerce based on those natural resources. I never heard the associate professor use the word "environment" or "environmentalist" during the course. Granted, it was years ago, and course outlines do change over time as new information on any given subject becomes available. But, the disconnect suggests the environmentalist movement is a recent concoction that has little basis in traditional resource management...
  • NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer Helps Confirm Nature of Dark Energy

    05/21/2011 6:38:05 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 10 replies
    NASA JPL ^ | 5/19/11 | Whitney Clavin
    PASADENA, Calif. -- A five-year survey of 200,000 galaxies, stretching back seven billion years in cosmic time, has led to one of the best independent confirmations that dark energy is driving our universe apart at accelerating speeds. The survey used data from NASA's space-based Galaxy Evolution Explorer and the Anglo-Australian Telescope on Siding Spring Mountain in Australia. The findings offer new support for the favored theory of how dark energy works -- as a constant force, uniformly affecting the universe and propelling its runaway expansion. They contradict an alternate theory, where gravity, not dark energy, is the force pushing space...