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  • Lock of hair pins down early migration of Aborigines

    09/22/2011 7:36:33 PM PDT · by decimon · 32 replies
    BBC ^ | September 22, 2011 | Leila Battison
    A lock of hair has helped scientists to piece together the genome of Australian Aborigines and rewrite the history of human dispersal around the world.DNA from the hair demonstrates that indigenous Aboriginal Australians were the first to separate from other modern humans, around 70,000 years ago. This challenges current theories of a single phase of dispersal from Africa. An international team of researchers published their findings in the journal Science. While the Aboriginal populations were trailblazing across Asia and into Australia, the remaining humans stayed around North Africa and the Middle East until 24,000 years ago. Only then did they...
  • Sailing into antiquity: BU archeologist unearths clues about ancient Egypt's sea trade

    01/14/2010 7:20:32 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies · 466+ views
    Boston Globe ^ | Monday, January 11, 2010 | Colin Nickerson
    ...Boston University archeologist Kathryn Bard and her colleagues are uncovering the oldest remnants of seagoing ships and other relics linked to exotic trade with a mysterious Red Sea realm called Punt... the team led by Bard and an Italian archeologist, Rodolfo Fattovich, started uncovering maritime storerooms in 2004, putting hard timber and rugged rigging to the notion of pharaonic deepwater prowess. In the most recent discovery, on Dec. 29, they located the eighth in a series of lost chambers at Wadi Gawasis after shoveling through cubic meters of rock rubble and wind-blown sand... The reconnaissance of the room and its...
  • Ancient Greek 'computer' came with a user guide

    07/02/2016 1:00:20 AM PDT · by blueplum · 63 replies
    Fox News ^ | 28 June 2016 | Megan Gannon
    ....With the turn of a hand crank, the ancient Greeks could track the positions of the sun and the moon, the lunar phases, and even cycles of Greek athletic competitions. The 82 corroded metal fragments of the Antikythera mechanism contain ancient Greek text, much of which is unreadable to the naked eye. But over the past 10 years, new imaging techniques, such as 3D X-ray scanning, have revealed hidden letters and words in the text...
  • [Viking ship replica] Sea Stallion arrives in Inverie, Scotland

    07/31/2007 11:54:23 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies · 478+ views
    Sail World ^ | Saturday, July 28, 2007 | Tinna Damgard-Sorensen
    The Sea Stallion right before arrival to the Orkney Islands Pastime and cosy atmosphere. Sea Stallion taken from the support vessel 'Cable One' by the Viking ship And the further on, 4 hours of rowing in between the Orkney - Sea Stallion.
  • World's oldest sea-going boat to sail again - Dover team rebuilds Bronze Age boat with ancient tools

    03/07/2012 8:44:22 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | Tuesday, March 6th, 2012 | Rob Waugh
    The world's oldest sea-going boat, the Dover Bronze Age Boat is to sail again 3500 years after it crossed the English Channel. A new project, 'Boat 1550 BC' aims to rebuild the boat, which had lain hidden under the centre of Dover for 3,500 years until it was rediscovered in 1992 during the construction of an underpass. The oak-built boat sailed across the Channel at a time when Stonehenge was still in use, and before Tutankhamun became ruler of Egypt. The project aims to understand how people were able to cross the Channel in 1550 BC, using ancient boatbuilding techniques...
  • Viking longship to sail across North Sea - The Sea Stallion of Glendalough

    05/27/2007 7:36:50 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 29 replies · 3,185+ views
    AP on Yahoo ^ | 5/27/07 | Jan M. Olson - ap
    ROSKILDE, Denmark - On the skipper's command, deckhands haul in tarred ropes to lower the flax sail. Oars splash into the water. The crew, grimacing with strain, pull with steady strokes sending the sleek Viking longship gliding through the fjord. A thousand years ago, the curved-prow warship might have spewed out hordes of bloodthirsty Norsemen ready to pillage and burn. This time, the spoils are adventure rather than plunder. The Sea Stallion of Glendalough is billed as the world's biggest and most ambitious Viking ship reconstruction, modeled after a warship excavated in 1962 from the Roskilde fjord after being buried...
  • Replica Viking longship sets sail - Sea Stallion of Glendalough

    07/01/2007 12:16:55 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 14 replies · 1,153+ views
    AP on Yahoo ^ | 7/1/07 | Jan M. Olson - ap
    ROSKILDE, Denmark - A 100-foot-long replica of a Viking longship glided out of a Danish fjord Sunday with 65 crew members determined to sail across the North Sea to Ireland. Roughly 4,000 people watched the Sea Stallion of Glendalough begin the attempt to relive the perilous journey its Viking forebear made some 1,000 years ago. The ship is billed as the world's biggest and most ambitious Viking ship reconstruction. It was modeled after a warship excavated in 1962 from the Roskilde fjord after being buried in the seabed for nearly 950 years. "The Vikings are coming back. Be prepared," skipper...
  • Sea Stallion Steps Back In History

    05/27/2008 3:06:51 PM PDT · by blam · 13 replies · 794+ views
    Irish Examiner ^ | 5-25-2008 | Richard Collins
    Sea Stallion steps back in historyRichard Collins on a remarkable Danish replica ship. AT three o’clock next Thursday afternoon Dubliners will be treated to an extraordinary spectacle. The Viking ship Sea Stallion, which has been on display at the National Museum in Collins Barracks, will be lifted 50 metres into the air by a giant crane. Then the huge vessel will be swung out over the three-storey museum building and deposited in the nearby Croppy’s Acre. In the middle of the night it will be moved to the River Liffey, prior to its long sea journey back to Denmark. The...
  • Viking voyage: The crew's diary

    07/13/2007 7:40:37 AM PDT · by WesternCulture · 49 replies · 986+ views
    news.bbc.co.uk ^ | 07/12/2007 | Hans Jacob Andersen
    A replica Viking ship has set sail for Dublin from the Danish port of Roskilde. It is currently crossing the North Sea, in an attempt to recreate the voyages undertaken by early Norsemen. The volunteer crew on the 30m-long (100ft) Sea Stallion from Glendalough are recording their experiences on the journey. Bad weather is already proving a major challenge. Like the vikings the crew have no shelter from the weather, no cleaning facilities and no lavatories.
  • Real Viking Ship Completes North Atlantic Crossing

    06/30/2016 11:32:36 AM PDT · by Ketill Frostbeard · 44 replies
    GCaptain.com ^ | June 30, 2016 | GCaptain Staff
    The world’s largest viking ship has arrived in North America after crossing the North Atlantic Ocean on a journey from its homeport in Haugesund, Norway. The Viking ship, named Draken Harald Hårfagre, set sail from Norway with its approximately 32 crew members in late April and made stops in Iceland, Greenland and Newfoundland, Canada, before making its way through the Saint Lawrence Seaway to Toronto for the Tall Ships Challenge Great Lakes 2016 festival this weekend. Future stops for the Viking ship include Chicago, Green Bay and Duluth, before heading to U.S. east coast with stops in New York City...
  • Not Out Of Africa But Regional Continuity

    12/16/2005 11:03:02 AM PST · by blam · 28 replies · 5,700+ views
    Not Out of Africa but regional continuityA challenging idea about Human Evolution by Alan Thorne Mungo Lady Mungo Lady was delivered to Alan Thorne in a small cheap suitcase in 1968 when he was 28 years old. Her burned and shattered bones were embedded in six blocks of calcified sand. The field researchers who dug her up in a parched no-man's-land in southeastern Australia suspected that shewas tens of thousands of years old. 600 Bone Chips Almost every day for the next six months, he painstakingly freed her remains from the sand with a dental drill, prizing out more than...
  • New Age For Mungo Man, New Human History

    02/20/2003 3:51:29 PM PST · by vannrox · 34 replies · 692+ views
    Science Daily ^ | FR Post 2-18-03 | Editorial Staff
    New Age For Mungo Man, New Human HistoryA University of Melbourne-led study has finally got scientists to agree on the age of Mungo Man, Australia's oldest human remains, and the consensus is he is 22,000 years younger. A University of Melbourne-led team say Mungo Man's new age is 40,000 years, reigniting the debate for the 'Out of Africa' theory. The research also boosted the age of Mungo Lady, the world's first recorded cremation, by 10,000 years putting her at the same age as Mungo Man. It is the first time scientists have reached a broad agreement on the ages of...
  • Genes Help Identify Oldest Human Population

    01/08/2002 3:29:31 PM PST · by blam · 45 replies · 1,455+ views
    New York Times ^ | 0108-2002 | Nicholas Wade
    January 8, 2002 Genes Help Identify Oldest Human Population By NICHOLAS WADE Peering deep into the archive of population history that is stored in the human genome, a Stanford University biologist believes he has picked up a genetic signature of the ancestral human population. The signature, a pattern of genetic changes on the male or Y chromosome, is apparent in some present- day Ethiopians and in the Khoisan, click language speakers who now live in South Africa. The researcher, Dr. Peter A. Underhill of Stanford University, believes these people may include descendants of the ancestral human population that occupied the ...
  • Date For First Australians

    02/18/2003 3:58:38 PM PST · by blam · 7 replies · 319+ views
    BBC ^ | 2-18-2003
    Tuesday, 18 February, 2003, 16:57 GMT Date for first Australians The Mungo burials have cast doubt on "Out of Africa" A new analysis of Australia's oldest human remains suggests humans arrived on the continent about 50,000 years ago. The evidence is based on a re-examination of the so-called Mungo Man skeleton, unearthed in New South Wales (NSW) in 1974. Scientists say the individual was probably buried about 40,000 years ago, when humans had been living in the area for some 10,000 years. We find no evidence to support claims for human occupation or burials near 60 kyr ago James Bowler...
  • Did Australian Aborigines reach America first?

    09/30/2010 2:04:50 PM PDT · by Palter · 41 replies
    Cosmo Online ^ | 30 Sep 2010 | Jacqui Hayes
    Cranial features distinctive to Australian Aborigines are present in hundreds of skulls that have been uncovered in Central and South America, some dating back to over 11,000 years ago. Evolutionary biologist Walter Neves of the University of São Paulo, whose findings are reported in a cover story in the latest issue of Cosmos magazine, has examined these skeletons and recovered others, and argues that there is now a mass of evidence indicating that at least two different populations colonised the Americas.He and colleagues in the United States, Germany and Chile argue that first population was closely related to the Australian...
  • A DNA Search for the First Americans Links Amazon Groups to Indigenous Australians

    07/24/2015 6:56:41 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 20 replies
    www.smithsonianmag.com ^ | July 21, 2015 | By Helen Thompson
    The new genetic analysis takes aim at the theory that just one founding group settled the Americas =========================================================================================================== Brazil's Surui people, like the man pictured above, share ancestry with indigenous Australians, new evidence suggests. (PAULO WHITAKER/Reuters/Corbis) ==================================================================================================================== More than 15,000 years ago, humans began crossing a land bridge called Beringia that connected their native home in Eurasia to modern-day Alaska. Who knows what the journey entailed or what motivated them to leave, but once they arrived, they spread southward across the Americas. The prevailing theory is that the first Americans arrived in a single wave, and all Native American populations...
  • Genetics reveal 50,000 years of independent history of aboriginal Australian people

    02/27/2016 10:52:59 AM PST · by JimSEA · 2 replies
    Science Daily ^ | February 25, 2016 | Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute
    The first complete sequences of the Y chromosomes of Aboriginal Australian men have revealed a deep indigenous genetic history tracing all the way back to the initial settlement of the continent 50 thousand years ago, according to a study published in the journal Current Biology today (25th February 2016). The study by researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and collaborators at La Trobe University in Melbourne and several other Australian institutes, challenges a previous theory that suggested an influx of people from India into Australia around 4-5 thousand years ago. This new DNA sequencing study focused on the Y...
  • PHOTOS: Unusual Rock Art Trove Found in Australia

    10/23/2008 5:24:32 PM PDT · by Goonch · 57 replies · 1,498+ views
    October 22, 2008--Paintings of sailboats, ocean liners, and biplanes adorn newfound rock shelters in the remote Aboriginal territory of Arnhem Land in northern Australia. Researchers working with Aboriginal elder Ronald Lamilami discovered thousands of the paintings--including the largest rock-art site in Australia--during an expedition in August and September 2008. (See full story.) "It is the most important … rock art in the whole world" that shows contact with other cultures, said lead researcher Paul Tacon of Griffith University in Queensland, Australia.
  • Megafauna cave painting could be 40,000 years old

    05/31/2010 1:31:34 AM PDT · by Palter · 23 replies · 717+ views
    ABC ^ | 31 May 2010 | Emma Masters
    Scientists say an Aboriginal rock art depiction of an extinct giant bird could be Australia's oldest painting. The red ochre painting, which depicts two emu-like birds with their necks outstretched, could date back to the earliest days of settlement on the continent. It was rediscovered at the centre of the Arnhem Land plateau about two years ago, but archaeologists first visited the site a fortnight ago. A palaeontologist has confirmed the animals depicted are the megafauna species Genyornis. Archaeologist Ben Gunn said the giant birds became extinct more than 40,000 years ago. "The details on this painting indicate that it...
  • Arid Australian Interior Linked To Lanscape Burning By Ancient Humans

    01/26/2005 12:28:52 PM PST · by blam · 52 replies · 1,327+ views
    University Of Colorado-Boulder ^ | 1-26-2005 | Gifford Miller/Jim Scott
    Contact: Gifford Miller gmiller@colorado.edu 303-492-6962 Jim Scott 303-492-3114 University of Colorado at Boulder Arid Australian interior linked to landscape burning by ancient humans The image of a controlled burn in the interior of Australia today, featured on the cover of the January 2005 issue of Geology, illustrates how Australia might have looked 50,000 years ago. Photo courtesy Gifford Miller, University of Colorado at Boulder Click here for a high resolution photograph. Landscape burning by ancient hunters and gatherers may have triggered the failure of the annual Australian Monsoon some 12,000 years ago, resulting in the desertification of the country's interior...
  • 'Fires wiped out' ancient mammals

    07/08/2005 9:39:15 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 33 replies · 967+ views
    BBC ^ | 7/8/05 | Helen Briggs
    The first humans to arrive in Australia destroyed the pristine landscape, probably by lighting huge fires, the latest research suggests.The evidence, published in Science magazine, comes from ancient eggshells. These show birds changed their diets drastically when humans came on the scene, switching from grass to the type of plants that thrive on scrubland. The study supports others that have blamed humans for mass extinctions across the world 10-50,000 years ago. Many scientists believe the causes are actually more complex and relate to climate changes during that period, but, according to Dr Marilyn Fogel, of the Carnegie Institution in Washington,...
  • Prehistoric giant animals killed by man, not climate: study (Tasmania)

    08/12/2008 4:53:23 AM PDT · by decimon · 36 replies · 114+ views
    AFP ^ | Aug 12, 2008 | Madeleine Coorey
    SYDNEY (AFP) - The chance discovery of the remains of a prehistoric giant kangaroo has cast doubts on the long-held view that climate change drove it and other mega-fauna to extinction, a new study reveals. < > He said that it was likely that hunting killed off Tasmania's mega-fauna -- including the long-muzzled, 120 kilogram (264 pound) giant kangaroo, a rhinoceros-sized wombat and marsupial 'lions' which resembled leopards. < > The finding of the latest study has already been contested, with Judith Field of the University of Sydney saying the idea that humans killed the giant creatures was "in the...
  • Human role in big kangaroo demise

    06/27/2009 9:09:29 PM PDT · by Fred Nerks · 15 replies · 1,633+ views
    BBC Science and Technology ^ | Monday, 22 June 2009 22:25 UK | By Jason Palmer Science and technology reporter, BBC News
    Debate has raged about the demise of “whopper hopper” P. goliah A fossil study of the extinct giant kangaroo has added weight to the theory that humans were responsible for the demise of “megafauna” 46,000 years ago. The decline of plants through widespread fire or changes toward an arid climate have also played into the debate about the animals’ demise. But an analysis of kangaroo fossils suggested they ate saltbush, which would have thrived in those conditions. The research is in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. There has long been dissent in the palaeontology community about the cause...
  • Aboriginal folklore leads to meteorite crater

    01/12/2010 9:59:26 AM PST · by Palter · 17 replies · 968+ views
    COSMOS ^ | 07 Jan 2010 | Aaron Cook
    SYDNEY: An Australian Aboriginal 'Dreaming' story has helped experts uncover a meteorite impact crater in the outback of the Northern Territory. Duane Hamacher, an astrophysicist studying Aboriginal astronomy at Sydney's Macquarie University, used Google Maps to search for the signs of impact craters in areas related to Aboriginal stories of stars or stones falling from the sky. One story, from the folklore of the Arrernte people, is about a star falling to Earth at a site called Puka. This led to a search on Google Maps of Palm Valley, about 130 km southwest of Alice Springs. Here Hamacher discovered what...
  • First Australians did not boost fire activity

    12/08/2010 7:23:50 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | Monday, December 6, 2010 | Bob Beale
    The arrival of the first people in Australia about 50,000 years ago did not result in significantly greater fire activity, according to a landmark new research report on the continent's fire history going back 70,000 years. Despite a widely held belief that the frequent use of fire by Aboriginal people resulted in vegetation change and other environmental impacts in prehistoric times, the most comprehensive study of Australian charcoal records has found they had no major impact on fire regimes... On large time scales, overall fire activity in Australia predominantly reflects prevailing climate, with less activity in colder glacial periods and...
  • 'Ancient Artefacts Brought Over By Egyptians, Not By Traders' (Malta)

    01/13/2007 3:08:47 PM PST · by blam · 21 replies · 597+ views
    Times Of Malta ^ | 1-13-2007 | Natalino Fenech
    'Ancient artefacts brought over by Egyptians, not by traders' Natalino Fenech The triad discovered at an abandoned archaeological site in Gozo in 1713. Two members of the Egyptological Society of Malta are promoting the theory that the many ancient Egyptian artefacts unearthed in Malta were brought over by the Egyptians themselves, and not, as commonly thought, by traders. In an article titled Did The Ancient Egyptians Ever Reach Malta?, published in the Egyptian Egyptological journal, Anton Mifsud and Marta Farrugia analysed Egyptian artefacts found here and went through old and recently published material on which to base their conclusions. Dr...
  • Ancient Seafarers' Tool Sites, Up to 12,000 Years Old, Discovered on California Island

    06/19/2016 5:35:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    Western Digs ^ | June 2, 2016 | Blake de Pastino
    On a rugged island just offshore from Ventura County, archaeologists have turned up evidence of some of the oldest human activity in coastal Southern California. On Santa Cruz Island, the largest of the Channel Islands, researchers have found three sites scattered with ancient tool-making debris and the shells of harvested shellfish. The youngest of the three sites has been dated to 6,600 BCE, but based on the types of tools found at the other two, archaeologists say they may be as much as 11,000 to 12,000 years old. The artifacts are traces of what's known as the Island Paleocoastal culture,...
  • 'Pristine' Landscapes Haven't Existed For Thousands Of Years Due To Human Activity

    06/18/2016 2:47:39 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | June 6th, 2016 | University of Oxford
    It draws on fossil evidence showing Homo sapiens was present in East Africa around 195,000 years ago and that our species had dispersed to the far corners of Eurasia, Australia, and the Americas by 12,000 years ago. This increase in global human populations is linked with a variety of species extinctions, one of the most significant being the reduction by around two-thirds of 150 species of 'megafauna' or big beasts between 50,000 and 10,000 years ago, says the paper, with their disappearance having 'dramatic effects' on the structure of the ecosystem and seed dispersal. ...second... the advent of agriculture worldwide,...
  • Underwater Remains of Ancient Naval Base Found

    06/15/2016 7:15:08 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 11 replies
    Seeker ^ | 16 Jun, 2016 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Danish and Greek archaeologists have discovered the remains of one of the largest building complexes of the ancient world -- a naval base that 2,500 years ago housed Athens's enormous fleet. Featuring massive harbor fortifications and sheds designed to hold hundreds of war ships called triremes, the base played a key role in the most decisive naval battle of antiquity. The remains lay hidden under the water of the Mounichia fishing and yachting harbor in the Piraeus. University of Copenhagen archaeologist Bjørn Lovén, who led the expedition as part of the Zea Harbor Project, identified and excavated six ship-sheds that...
  • Monumental Ancient Naval Bases Discovered in Athens' Piraeus Harbor

    06/13/2016 11:01:06 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Haaretz ^ | June 08, 2016 | Philippe Bohstrom
    After the Battle of Marathon ten years earlier, in 490 BCE, the Athenian statesman Themistocles outlined a military defensive program against the Persian invaders that was based entirely on sea power. As Plato put it, "Themistocles robbed his fellow-citizens of spear and shield, and degraded the people of Athens to the rowing-pad and the oar." Construction work in Piraeus had already begun in 493 BCE (also on Themistocles advice).  Now, recent underwater excavations conducted by ZHP Project, which combines land and underwater archaeology of the ancient Zea and Mounichia harbors in Piraeus, have uncovered naval bases and huge fortifications that...
  • The World's First Computer May Have Been Used To Tell Fortunes [Engraved text translation]

    06/10/2016 6:55:53 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 21 replies
    A ten-year project to decipher inscriptions on the ancient Greek “Antikythera mechanism” has revealed new functions, including the first hint that the device was used to make astrological predictions. The writings also lend support to the idea that the gadget, often called the world's first computer because of its ability to model complex astronomical cycles, originated from the island of Rhodes. Until now, scholars have focused on decoding the sophisticated array of gearwheels inside the 2000-year-old artifact. The new publication tackles instead the lettering squeezed onto every available surface. “It’s like discovering a whole new manuscript,” says Mike Edmunds, emeritus...
  • DNA Captured From 2,500-Year-Old Phoenician

    05/28/2016 10:34:05 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 39 replies
    This is the first ancient DNA to be obtained from Phoenician remains. Known as “Ariche,” the young man came from Byrsa, a walled citadel above the harbor of ancient Carthage. Byrsa was attacked by the Roman general Scipio Aemilianus “Africanus” in the Third Punic War. It was destroyed by Rome in 146 B.C. Analysis of the skeleton revealed the man died between the age of 19 and 24, had a rather robust physique and was 1.7 meters (5’6″) tall. He may have belonged to the Carthaginian elite, as he was buried with gems, scarabs, amulets and other artifacts. Now genetic...
  • Roman-Era Shipwreck Yields Moon Goddess Statue, Coin Stashes

    05/17/2016 2:45:27 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Live Science ^ | May 16, 2016 | Stephanie Pappas
    One civilization's trash is another civilization's treasure. A ship in Israel's Caesarea Harbor was filled with bronze statues headed for recycling when it sank about 1,600 years ago. Now, thanks to a chance discovery by a pair of divers, archaeologists have salvaged a haul of statuary fragments, figurines and coins from the seafloor. The coins found in the wreckage date to the mid-300s A.D. Some show Constantine, who ruled the Western Roman Empire from A.D. 312-324, and who unified the Eastern and Western Roman Empire in A.D. 324; he ruled both until his death in A.D. 337. Other coins show...
  • Amateur archaeologist finds Denmark’s oldest crucifix

    05/17/2016 8:42:20 AM PDT · by smokingfrog · 14 replies
    cphpost.dk ^ | 5-17-16 | Christian W
    When amateur archaeologist Dennis Fabricius Holm got off work early last Friday and decided to spend a couple of hours searching a little field in Funen with his metal detector, little did he know he was about to make history. Holm stumbled across one of the most extraordinary finds in recent times near the little town of Aunslev when he discovered a crucifix that dates back about 1,100 years – Denmark’s oldest crucifix ever found. It could rewrite Danish history. “It’s a completely sensational find that dates back to the first half of the 900s,” Malene Refshauge Beck, a curator...
  • Ancient Irish musical history found in modern India

    05/15/2016 1:15:34 PM PDT · by Trumpinator · 10 replies
    business-standard.com ^ | May 15, 2016 Last Updated at 11:57 IST | Press Trust of India
    Ancient Irish musical history found in modern India Press Trust of India | Melbourne May 15, 2016 Last Updated at 11:57 IST Ancient Irish musical traditions, thought to be long dead, are alive and well in south India, according to a new study of musical horns from iron-age Ireland. The realisation that modern Indian horns are almost identical to many iron-age European artifacts shows a rich cultural link between the two regions 2,000 years ago, said PhD student Billy O Foghlu, from The Australian National University (ANU). "I was astonished to find what I thought to be dead soundscapes alive...
  • More evidence unearthed at ancient port of Muziris

    03/19/2010 4:40:01 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies · 403+ views
    The Hindu ^ | Sunday, March 14, 2010 | A. Srivathsan
    Pattanam, a small village located 25 km north of Kochi, is the new pilgrimage spot on the international archaeological map. This quiet place, archaeologists now confirm, was once the flourishing port known to the Romans as Muziris and sung in praise by the Tamil Sangam poets as Muciri. Every year since 2005, excavations have yielded artefacts, structures and even a canoe in one instance to confirm this conclusion. This year has also been productive for archaeologists. A figure of a pouncing lion carved in great detail on a semi precious stone and a bright micro metal object with intricate designs...
  • Pompeii Pottery May Rewrite History

    11/08/2004 11:40:27 AM PST · by blam · 20 replies · 1,296+ views
    ABC Net ^ | 11-8-2004 | Heather Catchpole
    Pompeii pottery may rewrite history Heather Catchpole ABC Science Online Monday, 8 November 2004 A broken plate is one of the pieces in the puzzle of how ancient cultures traded (Image: Jaye Pont) Archaeologists may need to change their view of Pompeii's role in trade and commerce, after a ceramics expert's recent discovery. Australian researcher Jaye Pont from the Museum of Ancient Cultures at Sydney's Macquarie University says people who lived in Pompeii bought their pottery locally and didn't import it. Pont said the find could "make waves" among archaeologists looking at trade in the Mediterranean. And she said researchers...
  • South Indians in Roman Egypt?

    04/07/2010 7:37:05 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies · 574+ views
    Frontline, from the publishers of The Hindu ^ | Volume 27, Issue 8, April 10-23, 2010 | R. Krishnakumar
    One way to understand the implications of the archaeological discoveries at Pattanam is to delve into the amazing wealth of data from the excavations at the lost Ptolemic-Roman port city of Berenike, on Egypt's Red Sea coast. During the Ptolemic-Roman period (third century B.C. to sixth century A.D), Berenike served as a key transit port between ancient Egypt and Rome on one side and the Red Sea-Indian Ocean regions, including South Arabia, East Africa, India and Sri Lanka, on the other. This ancient port city was well-connected by roads from the Nile that passed through the Eastern Desert of Egypt...
  • Archaeologists Unearth Roman Era Artefacts In Kerala (India)

    03/25/2007 4:44:54 PM PDT · by blam · 28 replies · 942+ views
    Daily India ^ | 3-24-2007
    Archaeologists unearth Roman era artefacts in Kerala From our ANI Correspondent Pattanam (Kerala), Mar 23: What began as exploratory studies in Kerala, has thrown up enough artefacts and structures of two millennia old Indo-Roman trade era to delight archaeologists, who are looking for the lost port of Muziris. Archaeological teams in Pattanam village, near the port city of Kochi have been working on a site, which has yielded pottery, amphora, beads and other artefacts that are reminiscent of the ancient Romans. "The initial studies carried out in this region have amply indicated that there was a Roman presence. The Roman...
  • Evidence of 3,000-Year-Old Cinnamon Trade Found in Israel

    08/20/2013 9:55:09 AM PDT · by Renfield · 16 replies
    Live Science ^ | 8-20-2013 | Owen Jarus
    How far would you go to get your cinnamon fix? If you lived in the Levant 3,000 years ago (a region that includes modern day Israel), very far indeed new research indicates. Researchers analyzing the contents of 27 flasks from five archaeological sites in Israel that date back around 3,000 years have found that 10 of the flasks contain cinnamaldehyde, the compound that gives cinnamon its flavor, indicating that the spice was stored in these flasks. At this time cinnamon was found in the Far East with the closest places to Israel being southern India and Sri Lanka located at...
  • First century Spanish pottery found in Pattanam

    08/22/2013 4:04:17 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    India Today ^ | December 7, 2009 | M.G. Radhakrishnan
    Excavations in Pattanam have recovered besides pottery, large cache of gold coins, semi precious stones, remnants of a canoe and bollards etc. Carbon dating done at Georgia University in US has calculated the age of the canoe and bollard falling between 36 BC and 24 AD. The excavations in Pattanam have so far recovered the largest assemblage of Roman amphorae -1100 fragments- in India. However it was for the first time remnants of a Spanish pottery were being recovered from India's western coast. According to Roberta Tomber, a collaborating expert from British Museum and noted authority on Roman pottery the...
  • 'India's Pompeii' uncovered

    12/11/2006 9:17:06 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies · 449+ views
    Hindustan Times ^ | December 9, 2006 | Chitrangada Choudhury
    The first construction boom began about 2,000 years ago, when Ashoka the Great was founding the first Indian empire, when Julius Caesar reigned over Rome, when traders from the Mediterranean found their way to what is now an obscure Maharastra village... But another construction boom threatens the existence of an area they say could well reveal itself as "the Pompeii of India", the legendary Roman city buried by a volcano and lost for 1,600 years... A dusty village museum houses a treasure-trove of 23,852 pieces of stone and terracotta sculptures, replicas of Roman coins and lamps, miniature inkpots, jewellery and...
  • Indians first to ride monsoon winds

    04/24/2011 9:01:28 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Telegraph India ^ | Tuesday , April 19 , 2011 | G.S. Mudur
    New Delhi, April 18: Mariners from India's east coast exploited monsoon winds to sail to southeast Asia more than 2,000 years ago, an archaeologist has proposed, challenging a long-standing view that a Greek navigator had discovered monsoon winds much later. Sila Tripati at the National Institute of Oceanography (NIO), Goa, has combined archaeological, meteorological, and literary data to suggest that Indian mariners were sailing to southeast Asia riding monsoon winds as far back as the 2nd century BC. A 1st century AD Greek text, Periplus of the Erythreaean Sea, and a contemporary Roman geographer named Pliny have claimed that the...
  • Scientists Discover Ancient Sea Wharf (Marine Silk Road)

    12/30/2004 11:46:01 AM PST · by blam · 14 replies · 782+ views
    East Day.Com ^ | 12-30-2004
    Scientists discover ancient sea wharf 30/12/2004 7:32 Archeologists say that they have found the country's oldest wharf and it is believed to be the starting point of an ancient sea route to Central and West Asia. The discovery has reaffirmed the widespread belief that the ancient trade route started in Hepu County, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, archeologists said at yesterday's symposium on the nation's marine silk road. After three years of excavation, archeologists have unearthed a wharf that is at least 2,000 years old in Guchengtou Village, according to Xiong Zhaoming, head of the archeological team. At the same site,...
  • Search For India's Ancient City (Muziris - Roman)

    06/11/2006 6:55:04 PM PDT · by blam · 9 replies · 818+ views
    BBC ^ | 6-12-2006
    Search for India's ancient city Roman amphora pieces abound in Pattanam Archaeologists working on India's south-west coast believe they may have solved the mystery of the location of a major port which was key to trade between India and the Roman Empire - Muziris, in the modern-day state of Kerala. For many years, people have been in search of the almost mythical port, known as Vanchi to locals. Much-recorded in Roman times, Muziris was a major centre for trade between Rome and southern India - but appeared to have simply disappeared. Now, however, an investigation by two archaeologists - KP...
  • The Shipwreck at Assarca Island, Eritrea

    10/17/2004 9:22:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies · 549+ views
    Institute of Nautical Archaeology ^ | Revised January 1996 | Ralph K. Pedersen, M.A.
    It is not known whether the wood fragments were wreck material, or if they were associated with the remains of a Stalin's Organ lying nearby. No other artifacts, including anchors, were found despite the digging of several small test pits approximately 15 cm. deep to determine the extent of the wreck. It is probable more artifacts lie under the sand, as well as concreted into the coral. My original opinion of the date of the pottery was 7th century...I believed, however, a date a few centuries earlier or later was also possible. Research has revealed that my initial dating...
  • Tamil Trade

    09/11/2004 8:07:01 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies · 1,393+ views
    INTAMM ^ | 1997 | Xavier S. Thani Nayagam
    Whatever study has been made so far of the Tamil texts side by side with comparable data available in Strabo, Pliny, the Periplus Maris Erythraei and Ptolomey, and with the archaeological and numismatic finds in Southern India, has shown that the Tamil texts contain illuminating corroborative evidence. Discussions of Roman Tamil trade made by Jean Filliozat, Mortimer Wheeler, Pierre Meile, E.H. Warmington and M.P. Charlesworth have taken into consideration the tests interpreted by V. Kangasabai Pillai in his book the "Tamils one thousand eight hundred years Ago". 1904.
  • The Voyage around the Erythraean Sea

    09/12/2004 7:55:44 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies · 858+ views
    Silk Road ^ | 2004 | William H. Schoff
    The Periplus Maris Erythraei (or "Voyage around the Erythraean Sea") is an anonymous work from around the middle of the first century CE written by a Greek speaking Egyptian merchant.  The first part of the work (sections 1-18) describes the maritime trade-routes following the north-south axis from Egypt down the coast of East Africa as far as modern day Tanzania.  The remainder describes the routes of the East-West axis running from Egypt, around the Arabian Peninsula and past the Persian Gulf on to the west coast of India.  From the vivid descriptions of the places mentioned it is generally...
  • When In Vietnam, Build Boats As The Romans Do

    04/21/2006 11:03:33 AM PDT · by blam · 26 replies · 1,154+ views
    Science Magazine ^ | 3-26-2006 | Richard Stone
    When in Vietnam, Build Boats as the Romans Do Richard Stone INDO-PACIFIC PREHISTORY ASSOCIATION CONGRESS, 20-26 MARCH 2006, MANILA In December 2004, researchers drained a canal in northern Vietnam in search of ancient textiles from graves. They found that and a whole lot more. Protruding from the canal bank at Dong Xa was a 2000-year-old log boat that had been used as a coffin. After a closer look at the woodwork, archaeologists Peter Bellwood and Judith Cameron of Australia National University in Canberra and their colleagues were astounded to find that the method for fitting planks to hull matched that...
  • The Relationship Between The Basque And Ainu

    06/25/2004 3:44:16 PM PDT · by blam · 90 replies · 11,728+ views
    High Speed Plus ^ | 1996 | Edo Nyland
    THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN BASQUE AND AINU INTRODUCTION The language of the Ainu bear-worshippers of Northern Japan has generally been considered a language-isolate, supposedly being unlike any other language on earth. A few researchers noticed a relationship with languages in south-east Asia, others saw similarity with the Ostiak and Uralic languages of northern Siberia. The Ainu look like Caucasian people, they have white skin, their hair is wavy and thick, their heads are mesocephalic (round) and a few have grey or blue eyes. However, their blood types are more like the Mongolian people, possibly through many millennia of intermixing. The Ainu...