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  • Vikings may have predicted climate change on ancient stone carving

    01/21/2020 5:35:34 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 65 replies
    New York Post ^ | January 21, 2020 | Chris Ciaccia
    A startling message on a 1,200-year-old granite slab created by the Vikings appears to predict climate change, experts say. The research, published in Futharc: International Journal of Runic Studies, looks at the message that was written after Viking warrior Varin’s son died in battle in the 9th century, foreseeing a new “climate crisis,” similar to the weather conditions that happened nearly 300 years prior. “This study proposes instead that the inscription deals with an anxiety triggered by a son’s death and the fear of a new climate crisis similar to the catastrophic one after 536 [AD],” researchers, led by Per...
  • Study puts the 'Carib' in 'Caribbean,' boosting credibility of Columbus' cannibal claims

    01/11/2020 9:02:09 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | January 10, 2020 | Florida Museum of Natural History
    Christopher Columbus' accounts of the Caribbean include harrowing descriptions of fierce raiders who abducted women and cannibalized men - stories long dismissed as myths. But a new study suggests Columbus may have been telling the truth. Using the equivalent of facial recognition technology, researchers analyzed the skulls of early Caribbean inhabitants, uncovering relationships between people groups and upending longstanding hypotheses about how the islands were first colonized. One surprising finding was that the Caribs, marauders from South America and rumored cannibals, invaded Jamaica, Hispaniola and the Bahamas, overturning half a century of assumptions that they never made it farther north...
  • Dendrochronological evidence for long-distance timber trading in the Roman Empire

    12/26/2019 11:00:59 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies
    PLOS ^ | December 4, 2019 | Mauro Bernabei, Jarno Bontadi, Rossella Rea, Ulf Büntgen, Willy Tegel
    An important question for our understanding of Roman history is how the Empire's economy was structured, and how long-distance trading within and between its provinces was organised and achieved. Moreover, it is still unclear whether large construction timbers, for use in Italy, came from the widespread temperate forests north of the Alps and were then transported to the sparsely-wooded Mediterranean region in the south. Here, we present dendrochronological results from the archaeological excavation of an expensively decorated portico in the centre of Rome. The oak trees (Quercus sp.), providing twenty-four well-preserved planks in waterlogged ground, had been felled between 40...
  • Marco Polo, Islamic jihad, & the REAL reason Columbus sailed West

    12/12/2019 10:58:25 AM PST · by Perseverando · 15 replies
    American Minute ^ | October 10, 2019 | Bill Federer
    A case of misplaced blame. All those blaming Columbus for sailing west must turn one chapter back in the history books to find that it was actually Islamic jihad disrupting the land routes from Europe to India and China that resulted in Columbus looking for a sea route. Nearly two centuries before Columbus, the 17-years-old Marco Polo left Venice for India and China with his father, Niccolo Polo, and uncle, Matteo Polo, in 1271. Together they traveled 5,600 miles to the east to meet Kublai Khan, the grandson of Ghengis Khan. Kublai Khan was Emperor of China, Korea, North India,...
  • World's oldest cave art: Half-animal, half-human hybrids depicted on oldest discovered cave art

    12/12/2019 3:15:29 AM PST · by RoosterRedux · 25 replies
    CNN/msn.com ^ | Ashley Strickland
    Cave art depicting a hunting scene has been found in Indonesia dated to 44,000 years old, making it the oldest rock art created by humans. The painting itself is intriguing because it shows a group of figures that represent half-animal, half-human hybrids called therianthropes. The therianthropes are hunting warty pigs and dwarf buffaloes called anoas using spears and ropes. The abstract figures depict a story, which changes our view of early human cognition, according to a study published Wednesday in the journal Nature. The art could even show the foundation of human spirituality, given the supernatural scene depicted. "To me,...
  • Columbus' Miscalculation: How Far Around is the Round Earth?

    12/12/2019 11:11:38 AM PST · by Perseverando · 23 replies
    American Minute ^ | October 12, 2019 | Bill Federer
    Columbus was looking for a SEA route to India and China because 40 years earlier Muslim Turks conquered Constantinople in 1453 cutting off the LAND routes. A biography of Columbus was written by Washington Irving in 1828, titled A History of the Life and Voyages of Christopher Columbus. In it, Irving created an imaginative dialogue of Europeans arguing over whether the Earth was round or flat. His book was so popular, that people actually thought such a debate took place when it had not. Washington Irving was known for mixing entertainment with history and legend. He wrote Rip Van Winkle,...
  • Ancient Viking ship discovered buried next to church using breakthrough georadar technology

    11/27/2019 12:27:31 PM PST · by robowombat · 23 replies
    Keep the Faith ^ | Wednesday, November 27, 2019 | Harry Cockburn
    Ancient Viking ship discovered buried next to church using breakthrough georadar technology A Viking ship believed to be over 1,000 years old has been discovered buried next to a church in Norway. Archaeologists from the Norwegian Institute for Cultural Heritage Research (NIKU) announced they had found the ship, believed to have been used in a traditional ship burial, using “breakthrough” large-scale high-resolution georadar technology. The remains of the 17m vessel are buried just below the top-soil, at Edøy church on Edøya island in western Norway. Archaeologists have suggested parts of the structure may have been damaged by ploughing. The team...
  • Two UK treasure hunters sentenced for stealing Viking-era coins

    11/24/2019 10:44:51 AM PST · by lowbridge · 45 replies
    Fox News ^ | November 22, 2019 | Louis Casiano
    Two amateur treasure hunters were sentenced Friday to lengthy prison terms for stealing millions of dollars worth of 1,100-year-old coins. The coins date back to the period when the Anglo-Saxons were battling Vikings for control of England. British metal detectorists George Powell, 38, and Layton Davies, 51, dug up the 300 coins along with gold and silver jewelry in 2015 on farmland in central England but never reported it. That reporting is a legal requirement. Prosecutor Kevin Hegarty said the coins were estimated to be worth $3.9 million to $15.4 million. The archaeological wonders are believed to have been buried by a member of the Viking army that was being pushed across England...
  • Mysterious double Viking boat burial discovered

    11/22/2019 12:30:25 PM PST · by rdl6989 · 10 replies
    New York Post ^ | November 22, 2019 | James Rogers
    A mysterious double Viking boat burial has been discovered in Norway, intriguing experts. Last month archaeologists excavating a site at Vinjeroa in central Norway uncovered the boat grave of a woman who died in the second half of the 9th century. Shell-shaped gilded bronze brooches and a crucifix-shaped brooch fashioned from an Irish harness fitting were found in the grave, along with a pearl necklace, two pairs of scissors, part of a spindle and a cow’s skull, according to the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU).
  • Scientists turn migration theory on its head

    02/26/2010 10:41:37 AM PST · by Palter · 24 replies · 711+ views
    The Vancouver Sun ^ | 26 Feb 2010 | Randy Boswell
    U.S. anthropologists hypothesize that ancestors of aboriginal people in South and North America followed High Arctic route Two U.S. scientists have published a radical new theory about when, where and how humans migrated to the New World, arguing that the peopling of the Americas may have begun via Canada's High Arctic islands and the Northwest Passage -- much farther north and at least 10,000 years earlier than generally believed. The hypothesis -- described as "speculative" but "plausible" by the researchers themselves -- appears in the latest issue of the journal Current Biology, which features a special series of new studies...
  • The Battle of Brunanburh -- The Great Debate

    05/06/2012 8:18:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Wirral Learning Grid ^ | since 2004 | Prof Stephen Harding
    By 937 A.D. 35 years after the initial settlement, Wirral may have been the site of a huge battle between the Anglo Saxons coming from the South and Midlands and a combined army of Viking raiders coming from Dublin and their Scottish allies coming mainly from Strathclyde. No-one is quite sure where this battle took place, although the majority of experts favour Wirral. The main reason is that the contemporary record of the Battle -- the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle describes the battle having taking place (around Brunanburh) -- which happens to be the old name for Bromborough... The Chronicle also...
  • Sweyn Forkbeard: England's forgotten Viking king

    12/30/2013 6:09:05 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    BBC News ^ | David McKenna
    On Christmas Day 1013, Danish ruler Sweyn Forkbeard was declared King of all England and the town of Gainsborough its capital. But why is so little known of the man who would be England's shortest-reigning king and the role he played in shaping the early history of the nation? For 20 years, Sweyn, a "murderous character" who deposed his father Harold Bluetooth, waged war on England. And exactly 1,000 years ago, with his son Canute by his side, a large-scale invasion finally proved decisive. It was a brutal time, which saw women burned alive, children impaled on lances and men...
  • Rebirth of the Viking warship that may have helped Canute conquer the seas

    12/31/2012 10:31:40 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Guardian (UK) ^ | Thursday, December 27, 2012 | Maev Kennedy
    When the sleek, beautiful silhouette of Roskilde 6 appeared on the horizon, 1,000 years ago, it was very bad news. The ship was part of a fleet carrying an army of hungry, thirsty warriors, muscles toned by rowing and sailing across the North Sea; a war machine like nothing else in 11th-century Europe, its arrival meant disaster was imminent. Now the ship's timbers are slowly drying out in giant steel tanks at the Danish national museum's conservation centre at Brede outside Copenhagen... to be a star attraction at an exhibition in the British Museum. The largest Viking warship ever found,...
  • The Viking Torture Method So Grisly Some Historians Don’t Believe It Actually Happened

    11/23/2018 8:05:31 PM PST · by vannrox · 72 replies
    All that's Interesting ^ | November 5, 2018 | William DeLong
    Viking sagas describe the ritual execution of blood eagle, in which victims were kept alive while their backs were sliced open so that their ribs, lungs, and intestines could be pulled out into the shape of bloody wings. PinterestA blood eagle execution. The Vikings didn’t come into towns walking on moonbeams and rainbows. If their sagas are to be believed, the Vikings cruelly tortured their enemies in the name of their god Odin as they conquered territory. If the suggestion of a blood eagle was even uttered, one left town and never looked back. Viking sagas define blood eagle as...
  • Genetic analysis reveals Vikings had a wide and diverse family tree

    11/03/2019 7:06:25 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 68 replies
    New Scientist ^ | July 30, 2019 | Michael Marshall
    "Viking genetics and Viking ancestry is used quite a lot in extremist right-wing circles," says Cat Jarman at the University of Bristol in the UK, who wasn't involved in the study. Many white supremacists identify with a "very pure Viking race of just people from Scandinavia, who had no influence from anywhere else".
  • Great Orme copper mine 'traded widely in Bronze Age' [Wales]

    10/31/2019 10:00:08 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    BBC ^ | October 29, 2019 | unattributed
    Great Orme copper found in Bronze Age artefacts "stretching from Brittany to the Baltic"North Wales was Britain's main source of copper for about 200 years during the Bronze Age, new research has found. Scientists analysed metal from the Great Orme, Conwy, and found it was made into tools and weapons, and traded across what is today's Europe. Historians once thought the Orme's copper mine - now a museum - had been a small-scale operation. Experts now believe there was a bonanza from 1600-1400 BC, with artefacts found in Sweden, France and Germany. The research, by scientists from the University...
  • The Basket Age

    10/21/2019 1:46:03 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Discover mag ^ | Monday, January 01, 1996 | Shanti Menon
    There are two reasons, according to Jim Adovasio, we don’t think of baskets or textiles when we think of the Stone Age. One is that stones and bones, being far more durable, are far more common at archeological sites than artifacts made of fiber... And yet it has been around a long time, as four small pieces of clay described by Adovasio this past year make clear. Found at a site called Pavlov in the Czech Republic, they are 27,000 years old--and impressed with patterns that could only have been created by woven fibers. These artifacts push back the date...
  • Scientists find early humans moved through Mediterranean earlier than believed

    10/20/2019 6:48:19 AM PDT · by Openurmind · 13 replies
    Science Daily/McMaster University ^ | Oct 16, 2019 | Michelle Donovan
    Scientists have unearthed new evidence in Greece proving that the island of Naxos was inhabited by Neanderthals and earlier humans at least 200,000 years ago, tens of thousands of years earlier than previously believed. The findings, published today in the journal Science Advances, are based on years of excavations and challenge current thinking about human movement in the region -- long thought to have been inaccessible and uninhabitable to anyone but modern humans. The new evidence is leading researchers to reconsider the routes our early ancestors took as they moved out of Africa into Europe and demonstrates their ability to...
  • Researchers: We may have found a fabled sunstone (Update)

    03/08/2013 11:05:59 AM PST · by Red Badger · 46 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 08 March 2013 | Raphael Satter
    A rough, whitish block recovered from an Elizabethan shipwreck may be a sunstone, the fabled crystal believed by some to have helped Vikings and other medieval seafarers navigate the high seas, researchers say. In a paper published earlier this week, a Franco-British group argued that the Alderney Crystal—a chunk of Icelandic calcite found amid a 16th century wreck at the bottom of the English Channel—worked as a kind of solar compass, allowing sailors to determine the position of the sun even when it was hidden by heavy cloud, masked by fog, or below the horizon. That's because of a property...
  • How Vikings May Have Navigated On Cloudy Days (More)

    03/02/2007 10:47:04 AM PST · by blam · 15 replies · 1,092+ views
    Live Science ^ | 3-2-2007 | Corey Binns
    How Vikings Might Have Navigated on Cloudy Days By Corey Binns Special to LiveScience posted: 02 March 2007 08:33 am ET Vikings navigated the oceans with sundials aboard their Norse ships. But on an overcast day, sundials would have been useless. Many researchers have suggested that the on foggy days, Vikings looked toward the sky through rock crystals called sunstones to give them direction. No one had tested the theory until recently. A team sailed the Arctic Ocean aboard the Swedish icebreaker Oden and found that sunstones could indeed light the way in foggy and cloudy conditions. Would have...