Free Republic 4th Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $76,789
Woo hoo!! And now over 87%!! Less than $11.3k to go!! Thank you all very much!!

Keyword: navigation

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Who Were the First Americans?

    01/13/2002 7:51:38 AM PST · by sarcasm · 10 replies · 1+ views
    Scientific American ^ | September 2000 | Sasha Nemecek
    Images: Pamela Patrick MAMMOTH HUNTER OR FISH CATCHER? Archaeologists had concluded that the first inhabitants of the New World were fur-clad big-game hunters who swept across the Bering land bridge in pursuit of their prey. But recent evidence suggests that the first settlers may have been just as likely to hunt small game, catch fish or gather plants as they moved through more temperate environments. The leaf-shaped spearpoint I'm holding is surprisingly dainty--for a deadly weapon. I let my mind wander, trying to imagine life some 14,700 years ago in the marshes of southern Chile, where this relic was ...
  • Homo Erectus Crosses The Open Ocean

    05/15/2009 7:53:17 AM PDT · by BGHater · 23 replies · 2,373+ views
    Environmental Graffiti ^ | 06 May 2009 | Environmental Graffiti
    Imagine a group of Homo erectus, the earliest members of our family genus, living near a coastline on an Indonesia island and well aware of a lush island that is visible only a few miles offshore. One day while on the coast, a herd of elephants emerges from the nearby forest and crosses the beach. They enter the ocean and swim successfully to the offshore island. Could this be the experience that triggers a creative process in our ancestors who are watching nearby? Does their imagination and thinking include not only a desire to reach that island, but ideas about...
  • Ancient Trading Raft Sails Anew [ Thor Heyerdahl did it first ]

    05/15/2009 7:08:30 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 55 replies · 1,718+ views
    ScienceDaily ^ | May 13, 2009 | Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    For the first time in nearly 500 years, a full-size balsa-wood raft just like those used in pre-Columbian Pacific trade took to the water on Sunday, May 10. Only this time, instead of the Pacific coast between Mexico and Chile where such rafts carried goods between the great civilizations of the Andes and Mesoamerica as long as a millennium ago, the replica raft was floated in the Charles River basin. The faithful reproduction of the ancient sailing craft, built from eight balsa logs brought from Ecuador for the project, was created in less than six weeks by 30 students in...
  • Clues to Prehistoric Human Exploration Found in Sweet Potato Genome

    01/21/2013 8:39:59 PM PST · by Theoria · 25 replies
    Science ^ | 21 Jan 2013 | Lizzie Wade
    Europeans raced across oceans and continents during the Age of Exploration in search of territory and riches. But when they reached the South Pacific, they found they had been beaten there by a more humble traveler: the sweet potato. Now, a new study suggests that the plant's genetics may be the key to unraveling another great age of exploration, one that predated European expansion by several hundred years and remains an anthropological enigma. Humans domesticated the sweet potato in the Peruvian highlands about 8000 years ago, and previous generations of scholars believed that Spanish and Portuguese explorers introduced the crop...
  • Volcanic Soils Offer New Clues About The Emergence Of Powerful Chiefdoms In Hawaii

    06/11/2004 4:26:36 PM PDT · by blam · 17 replies · 263+ views
    Eureka Alert/Stanford University ^ | 6-11-2004 | Mark Shwartz
    Contact: Mark Shwartz 650-723-9296 Stanford University Volcanic soils yield new clues about the emergence of powerful chiefdoms in Hawaii When the first Europeans arrived in the Hawaiian Islands in 1778, they found a thriving, complex society organized into chiefdoms whose economies were based primarily on farming. On the islands of Kauai, O'ahu and Molokai, the principal crop was taro – a starchy plant grown in irrigated wetlands where the supply of water was usually abundant. But on Maui and the Big Island of Hawaii, the main staple was the sweet potato – a more labor-intensive crop planted in relatively...
  • Did the First Americans Come From, Er, Australia?

    09/06/2004 8:04:53 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies · 1,189+ views
    Reuters ^ | Mon Sep 6, 2004 09:24 AM ET | staff
    Silvia Gonzalez from John Moores University in Liverpool said skeletal evidence pointed strongly to this unpalatable truth and hinted that recovered DNA would corroborate it... She said there was very strong evidence that the first migration came from Australia via Japan and Polynesia and down the Pacific Coast of America. Skulls of a people with distinctively long and narrow heads discovered in Mexico and California predated by several thousand years the more rounded features of the skulls of native Americans. One particularly well preserved skull of a long-face woman had been carbon dated to 12,700 years ago, whereas the...
  • Archaeologists Find Evidence Of Origin Of Pacific Islanders

    03/31/2008 1:56:50 PM PDT · by blam · 26 replies · 1,238+ views
    VOA News ^ | 3-31-2008 | Heidi Chang
    Archaeologists Find Evidence of Origin of Pacific Islanders By Heidi Chang Honolulu, Hawaii 31 March 2008 The origin of Pacific Islanders has been a mystery for years. Now archaeologists believe they have the answer. As Heidi Chang reports, they found it in China. The excavation of the Zishan site (Zhejiang Province) in 1996, where many artifacts from the Hemudu culture have been found China had a sea-faring civilization as long as 7000 years ago. Archaeologist Tianlong Jiao says, one day, these mariners sailed their canoes into the vastness of the Pacific Ocean, and stayed. He points out, "Most scientists, archaeologists,...
  • Move over Christopher Columbus, Admiral Zheng He is here

    03/11/2005 8:19:24 AM PST · by MikeEdwards · 38 replies · 1,266+ views
    CFP ^ | March 11, 2005 | Judi McLeod
    That’s the day when the United Nations will begin trying to convince the world that Christopher Columbus did not discover North America, a Chinese-Muslim explorer discovered us a half century before C.C. No, this is not science fiction. It is today’s cover story in Canada Free Press. That the Canadian government has been selling off our natural resources, including the Alberta tar sands to the Chinese government ought to be worry enough for any with the sovereignty of our nation in mind. Now we have a yet to be identified "respected Canadian architect" headed to the United Nations to tell...
  • Deep history of coconuts decoded (Colonization of the Americas?)

    06/24/2011 2:06:33 PM PDT · by decimon · 39 replies
    Washington University in St. Louis ^ | June 24, 2011 | Diana Lutz
    Written in coconut DNA are two origins of cultivation, several ancient trade routes, and the history of the colonization of the AmericasThe coconut (the fruit of the palm Cocos nucifera) is the Swiss Army knife of the plant kingdom; in one neat package it provides a high-calorie food, potable water, fiber that can be spun into rope, and a hard shell that can be turned into charcoal. What’s more, until it is needed for some other purpose it serves as a handy flotation device. No wonder people from ancient Austronesians to Captain Bligh pitched a few coconuts aboard before setting...
  • Aboriginal Female Hunters Aided By Dingoes

    10/24/2015 6:23:20 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    ScienceNetwork WA ^ | Friday, October 23, 2015 | Michelle Wheeler
    In modern society dogs are often referred to as "man's best friend" but according to an archaeological review early Aboriginal society sported a similar relationship between women and dingoes (Canis lupus dingo). The study by UWA and ANU suggests people formed close bonds with dingoes soon after the dogs' arrival on the mainland roughly 4000 years ago, with the dogs enabling women to contribute more hunted food. UWA archaeologist Jane Balme, who led the research, says it is thought the first dingoes arrived on watercraft with people from South East Asia. "What they're doing on the boat is not clear...
  • Rafters recover baffling stone tablet [Delaware River, PA]

    10/17/2015 8:10:25 AM PDT · by ETL · 67 replies
    TimesHerald-Record ^ | Oct 15, 2015 | Pat DeMono, For the Gazette
    On a rafting trip in early September, Christine Hutton, her husband, Richard, and a dozen of his corporate colleagues paddled to a flat, outcropped rock just a few miles from their push-off point at Jerry’s Three River Campground in Pond Eddy. The trip had been sluggish; the Delaware was at its lowest level in some 50 years, they’d been told. The group, in its triumvirate of rafts, stopped to have lunch. “One of our associates stepped out to a rock in the middle of the river, and picked up what looked like a stone tablet,” recalled Christine Hutton. It was...
  • US naval chief asserts navigation rights in contested South China Sea

    10/15/2015 11:47:35 AM PDT · by Brad from Tennessee · 13 replies
    Christian Science Monitor ^ | October 15, 2015 | By Robert Marquand
    A newly contentious phase appears to be under way in the South China Sea, where China has made expansive territorial claims, after the head of US naval operations said today in Tokyo that US vessels are free to travel “wherever international law allows." Echoing earlier remarks by US Defense Secretary Ashton Carter, John Richardson, the US chief of naval operations, stated that, "It should not come as a surprise to anybody that we will exercise freedom of navigation wherever international law allows.” He added that "I don't see how this can be interpreted as provocative." A Chinese spokesman responded by...
  • Stonemason James Vieira of Ashfield studies 'mound builders,' ancient stonework

    11/29/2012 1:04:15 PM PST · by Theoria · 17 replies
    MassLive ^ | 05 Sept 2012 | Cori Urban
    Many New England communities have within them dirt-covered stone “mounds,” dug into the earth and meticulously lined and covered with stones; some of the stones that cover the tops weigh tons. Some would say they are the remnants of root cellars, but an Ashfield man who for 15 years has studied the ancient stonework thinks otherwise. James E. Vieira, a stonemason, writer and Northeast Antiquities Research Association member, believes there is ample evidence that Ancient America was a melting pot of races from other lands, noting that other parts of the country have ancient stone ruins. He says the mound...
  • Judge Rules Sea Shepherd Wrongfully Sank Crippled ‘Whale Wars’ Vessel

    09/27/2015 2:15:44 PM PDT · by Timber Rattler · 15 replies
    Ecorazzi ^ | September 25, 2015 | MICHAEL DESTRIES
    The unfortunate drama surrounding the collision and sinking of the Ady Gil has finally reached a conclusion. An arbitrator last week ruled that the Sea Shepherd acted “wrongful” in their decision to scuttle the ship and not allow for proper salvage efforts. The trimaran, named for its benefactor and owner Ady Gil, a Hollywood TV businessman and animal activist, famously collided on January 7th, 2010 with a Japanese whaling vessel. The event, captured on film for Animal Planet’s “Whale Wars” reality series, drew international attention for both the conservation organization and its anti-whaling mission. While the Ady Gil was disabled...
  • Marine Archaeologists Excavate Greek Antikythera Shipwreck

    09/26/2015 2:47:40 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Heritage Daily ^ | September 25, 2015
    The shipwreck dates to circa 65 B.C., and was discovered by Greek sponge fishermen in 1900 off the southwestern Aegean island of Antikythera. They salvaged 36 marble statues of mythological heroes and gods; a life-sized bronze statue of an athlete; pieces of several more bronze sculptures; scores of luxury items; and skeletal remains of crew and passengers. The wreck also relinquished fragments of the world’s first computer: the Antikythera Mechanism, a geared mechanical device that encoded the movements of the planets and stars and predicted eclipses... The project is the first-ever systematic excavation of this shipwreck, relying on the precise...
  • Pottery, beads retrace close links between India and Bali

    08/03/2015 10:34:58 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    Znews ^ | Thursday, July 30, 2015 | IANS
    Remnants of ancient Indian pottery, beads and even Indian DNA found in human bones point to thriving trade and social contacts between India and Bali dating back to more than 2,000 years. Besides trade, Indian merchants brought with them their language -- Sanskrit -- and the influence of Hinduism and Buddhism... The major Indian port of connect with Bali in Indonesia and other places in Southeast Asia was Arikamedu, a thriving port located seven kilometres from Puducherry from where archaeologists have unearthed Roman artefacts too. The influence of Sanskrit and the ideology of Hinduism and Buddhism which the Indian traders...
  • MH370 search discovers a shipwreck not the missing plane

    05/13/2015 1:46:03 AM PDT · by naturalman1975 · 18 replies ^ | 13th May 2015
    THE $90 million search for MH370 has discovered “man made objects” almost four kilometres under the surface of the southern Indian Ocean, but they are not the missing Boeing 777. Instead the debris is thought to be from an ancient shipwreck, comprising an anchor and other items. Australian Transport Safety Bureau Operational Search Director Peter Foley said they were “obviously disappointed” the discovery was not the missing aircraft.
  • Britain Imported Wheat 2,000 Years Before Growing It

    02/26/2015 6:45:03 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 18 replies ^ | Cynthia Graber
    Early farming began in the Near East about 10,500 years ago. Farming first reached the Balkans in Europe some 8 to 9,000 years ago, and then crept westward. Locals in Britain, separated from the mainland by the relatively newly formed English Channel, did not start farming until about 6,000 years ago. But an analysis of sediment from a submerged British archaeological site called Bouldner Cliff found something unexpected. “Amongst our Bouldner Cliff samples we found ancient DNA evidence of wheat at the site, which was not seen in mainland Britain for another 2,000 years.” Robin Allaby of the University of...
  • The Diffusionists Have Landed

    02/22/2015 4:49:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    The Atlantic ^ | January 1st, 2000 | Marc K. Stengel
    The Norwegian archaeologists Helge and Anne Stine Ingstad's famous identification, in 1961, of a Viking settlement at L'Anse aux Meadows, Newfoundland, from just after A.D. 1000 is, of course, a notable exception, no longer in dispute. But that discovery has so far gone nowhere. The Norse settlers, who may have numbered as many as 160 and stayed for three years or longer, seem to have made no lasting impression on the aboriginal skraellings that, according to Norse sagas, they encountered, and to have avoided being influenced in turn. The traditions of the Micmac people, modern-day inhabitants of the area, have...
  • The Rosslyn Code

    05/20/2011 7:48:16 AM PDT · by Palter · 11 replies · 1+ views
    Slate ^ | May 17 2011 | Chris Wilson
    The real mystery lurking in the chapel where Dan Brown set The Da Vinci Code. From the outside, the Rosslyn Chapel does not look like a suitable place to hide Jesus' head. It's not much bigger than a country church, standing inconspicuously on a small hill in the miniature Scottish town of Roslin, a few miles south of Edinburgh. Its Gothic pinnacles, flying buttresses, and pointed arches have been battered by 500 years of capricious weather, and for years it has been encased in an exoskeleton of scaffolding as restoration efforts plod along. Until recently, it was covered by a...
  • The many mysteries of Rosslyn Chapel (Another 'DNA of Jesus' story)

    11/01/2005 7:51:17 AM PST · by gobucks · 55 replies · 2,176+ views
    Scotsman ^ | 31 Oct 05 | DIANE MACLEAN
    AS A BUILDING, Rosslyn Chapel, on the outskirts of Edinburgh, is intriguing. The exterior features Gothic gargoyles and flying buttresses, while inside there are ornate pillars, carvings and an extraordinary ceiling. As a place of mystery, it is a magnet for those with exotic - some might say outlandish - theories. Built in the mid-15th century by some of the best stonemasons in Europe, the chiselled scenes and symbols would have been easily understood by their medieval audience but seem baffling to us today. The most striking example of their craft is the Apprentice Pillar, which is beautifully carved and...
  • Stone Age Columbus - Questions And Answers

    08/22/2004 12:06:57 PM PDT · by blam · 43 replies · 1,137+ views
    BBC ^ | 8-22-2004 | BBC
    Stone Age Columbus - questions and answersWhat was the Ice Age climate like in southern France/Spain? During the last glacial maximum around 20,000 years ago the climate was a lot colder and drier than now. In southern France one could expect summer temperatures of between 5-10°C and winter temperatures dropping below -20°C. Even so, there were three basic land types that had their own advantages and disadvantages for people: Wide coastal plain that was probably an open grass land with sparse vegetation Uplands that would have been much like the Arctic tundra today Inland valleys that were well sheltered and...
  • The First Americans May Have Come By Water

    12/10/2001 7:30:51 PM PST · by blam · 73 replies · 2,654+ views
    The First Americans May Have Come by Water by E. James Dixon If the foragers who created Clovis culture walked into North America, they had to pass through the long-described “ice-free corridor.” But a growing body of evidence indicates that pathway between the great glaciers of the last Ice Age was closed — in fact, the way south may have been blocked until centuries after the dawn of Clovis. If the first Americans could not walk into the New World, how did they get there? Coastal or ocean routes navigated by watercraft are the most likely explanation. No reliably dated ...
  • Ancient Celtic / Scottish Viking sites in New Zealand!(?)

    04/11/2006 9:19:16 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies · 524+ views
    Remains of a typical Scottish/Celtic homestead. (from 12th Century New Zealand?) A modern native NZ Scottish/Celt surveys the ruins. Drystone walls have been pushed out and over. The typical hearthstone, the rock for the family's patron saint, the rock on which the dwellings protective God would have sat, and others are all still in traditional and recogniseable positions. Other such remains abound. This site is now difficult to reach by sea and little known. The original boat access is much changed and boat access is best achieved from an adjacent bay. It is also in the vicinity of a...
  • Abandoned Anchors From Punic Wars Found Near Sicily

    07/03/2013 9:18:19 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | Wednesday, July 03, 2013 | from Discovery News
    More than 30 ancient anchors have been discovered near the small Sicilian island of Pantelleria. Leonardo Abelli of the University of Sassari says that the anchors were abandoned by the Carthaginians during the First Punic War more than 2,000 years ago. The Romans had captured the strategically located island with a fleet of more than 300 ships. “The Carthaginian ships that were stationing near Patelleria had no other choice than hiding near the northern coast and trying to escape. To do so, they cut the anchors free and left them in the sea. They also abandoned part of their cargo...
  • Work completed on historic sunken Yenikapı ships in Istanbul

    09/01/2013 7:42:47 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Hurriyet Daily News ^ | August 26, 2013 | Anadolu Agency
    The movement of 37 sunken vessels... unearthed during excavations carried out as part of the Istanbul Marmaray and metro projects, has finally been concluded. The head of Istanbul University’s Department of Marine Archaeology and the Yenikapı Sunken Ships Project, Associate Professor Ufuk Kocabaş, said works had continued for eight years. He added that the structures and tens of thousands of archaeological artifacts found in Theodosis Port, one of the most important ports in the city in the Middle Ages, represented the largest Middle Ages boat collection in the world. Kocabaş said scientific works were still ongoing on the sunken ships...
  • Stone Age skeletons uncovered during tube tunnel excavations

    08/11/2008 3:01:40 PM PDT · by decimon · 16 replies · 84+ views
    Turkish Daily News ^ | August 11, 2008 | Mustafa Kınalı
    Human skeletons, which experts say could be more than 8,000 years old, were found in four prehistoric graves recently unearthed at the Marmaray tunnel excavation site in the Yenikapı district of Istanbul. These graves reveal Istanbul used to be home to some of the earliest types of settlements during the Stone Age when people migrated from Anatolia to the European continent,� said Mehmet Özdoğan, professor of prehistory at Istanbul University. �They also show that the Marmara Sea used to be a small and shallow water in ancient times. Özdoğan said the graves, two of which were smaller than the others,...
  • 1,500-Year-Old Byzantine Port Discovered

    07/23/2006 10:52:01 AM PDT · by Clintonfatigued · 20 replies · 940+ views
    Associated Press ^ | July 22, 2006 | Benjamin Harvey
    It seems a typical scene of urban decay: abandoned buildings, crumbling walls, trash and broken wine bottles. Yet it's more than 1,500 years old. Engineers uncovered these ruins of an ancient Byzantine port during drilling for a huge underground rail tunnel. Like Romans, Athenians and residents of other great historic cities, the people of Istanbul can hardly put a shovel in the ground without digging up something important. But the ancient port uncovered last November in the Yenikapi neighborhood is of a different scale: It has grown into the largest archaeological dig in Istanbul's history, and the port's extent is...
  • DIGGING TO BYZANTIUM: Turkish Tunnel Project Unearths an Ancient Harbor

    05/10/2006 9:17:53 AM PDT · by a_Turk · 32 replies · 984+ views
    Der Spiegel ^ | 5/10/2006 | N/A
    Workers digging a railway tunnel under the Bosporus Strait have uncovered the remains of a major Byzantine harbor that archaeologists say is a trove of relics dating back to Roman Emperor Constantine the Great. The deepest underwater rail tunnel in the world will link Istanbul's Asian and European halves and ease bridge traffic across the Bosporus Strait. It may also be delayed by excited archaeologists. The tunnel, when it's finished, will end in a shining new railway station, the largest in Turkey -- a train and subway link surrounded by a 21st-century shopping center. Modern Turkish planners, though, weren't the...
  • Treasure (Archaeology) Dig Threatens Bosphorus Rail Link

    05/02/2006 11:44:06 AM PDT · by blam · 13 replies · 1,254+ views
    BBC ^ | 5-2-2006 | Sarah Rainsford
    Treasure dig threatens Bosphorus rail link By Sarah Rainsford BBC News, Istanbul The port has been uncovered at the site designated for a railway hub It's been called the project of the century: a mission to connect two continents with a $2.6bn rail-tunnel running deep beneath the Bosphorus Straits. The idea of linking the two sides of Istanbul underwater was first dreamt of by Sultan Abdul Mecit 150 years ago. See how the tunnel will cross the Bosphorus Now that Ottoman dream is finally being realised. But the modern version of that vision has hit a historical stumbling block. Istanbul...
  • Byzantine Shipwrecks Shed New Light On Ancient Ship Building

    01/03/2015 11:30:35 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    New Historian ^ | January 03, 2015 | Sarah Carrasco
    37 shipwrecks from the Byzantine Empire have been discovered as part of archaeological excavations that began in Turkey in 2004. The shipwrecks were discovered in Yenikapi, Istanbul, a port of the ancient city which was called Constantinople during the Byzantine period. The ships are in exceptionally good condition say the archaeologists, especially since they date back to between the fifth and eleventh centuries. Cemal Pulak, a study author from the Institute of Nautical Archaeology at Texas A&M University, stated, "Never before has such a large number and types of well preserved vessels been found at a single location." Eight of...
  • Intact 5th century merchant ship found in Istanbul

    09/03/2011 12:13:20 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies · 1+ views
    Past Horizons ^ | Tuesday, August 30, 2011
    The excavations started in 2004 at the construction site and reached back 8,500 years into the history of Istanbul. Skeletons, the remains of an early chapel and even footprints, in addition to 35 shipwrecks, have been uncovered by archaeologists so far. The ship was loaded with pickled fry (a type of small fish) and almonds, walnuts, hazels, muskmelon seeds, olives, peaches and pine cones The 15 to 16-metre-long, six-metre-wide shipwreck loaded with dozens of amphorae found last May brings new historical data to life. The amphorae differ from previous finds. It is assumed that the ship was completely buried in...
  • Nautical Archaeology Takes A Leap Forward

    12/31/2007 7:53:57 AM PST · by blam · 10 replies · 163+ views
    Times Online ^ | 12-31-2007 | Institute Of Nautical Archaeology
    Nautical archaeology takes a leap forward For centuries the harbour of Ancient Constantinople, modern Istanbul, was the inlet of the Golden Horn, running north between the peninsula on which the city’s core stands and the commercial and foreign quarter of Galata and Pera to the east. A boom across the inlet protected the city from attack, although the Ottoman troops of Mehmet II stormed across the Golden Horn in 1453 to end the Byzantine Empire. A second, mainly commercial, harbour, in use from the 5th-10th centuries AD, has been found on the south shore of the peninsula, on the Sea...
  • Exotic weapons buried in field could have arrived in Wales by long-distance sea travel [Europe]

    12/26/2014 3:10:14 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    Culture24 ^ | Wednesday, December 24, 2014 | Ben Miller
    Archaeologists investigating a 2.5-kilogram hoard of sword blades, scabbards and knives found by a metal detectorist in January 2013 say the plough-disturbed artefacts could have been delivered to Wales by sea from southern England or northern France. Two blade fragments, a scabbard fitting, a multi-edged knife and six copper ingot fragments were discovered by Adrian Young a few metres apart from each other in the corner of a field in Marloes and St Brides . The Coroner for Pembrokeshire has now officially declared the hoard treasure, with archaeologists at National Museum Wales dating it to between 2,800 and 3,000 years...
  • Turkish Minister: Muslims Discovered the Earth is Round

    11/30/2014 3:19:26 PM PST · by Eleutheria5 · 74 replies
    Arutz Sheva ^ | 30/11/14 | Tova Dvorin
    The Turkish Science Minister has become the latest public figure to make outrageous claims over Islam's hand in science and technology, the Hurriyet Daily News reported Friday - this time, claiming that Muslims discovered that the world is round. "Some 700-800 years before Galileo, 71 Muslim scientists led by al-Khwarizmi convened by the order of the Caliph Al-Ma'mun and revealed that the Earth is a sphere," Minister Fikri stated on Thursday. Fikri further claimed that a copy of the original document proving Islam's role in astronomy is currently in the Museum of Islamic Science and Technology in Istanbul. The Earth...
  • Rising Turkish Menace: U.S. and NATO Ally Wants Islamic Advance in Latin America

    11/25/2014 8:01:53 AM PST · by juliosevero · 27 replies
    Last Days Watchman ^ | Julio Severo
    Rising Turkish Menace: U.S. and NATO Ally Wants Islamic Advance in Latin America By Julio Severo The president of Turkey has re-written history by claiming Muslim explorers, not Christopher Columbus, discovered America. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan Recep Tayyip Erdogan, chief of America’s NATO ally, said November 15 that Islamic sailors found the New World in 1178. He said, “Muslims discovered America in 1178, not Christopher Columbus.” Turkey is the only Islamic nation in the NATO. His theory — which is supported only by Islamic historians — came to light in a televised speech during an Istanbul summit of...
  • Erdogan says Muslims, not Columbus, discovered Americas

    11/15/2014 9:45:20 AM PST · by RoosterRedux · 78 replies
    Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said Saturday that the Americas were discovered by Muslims in the 12th century, nearly three centuries before Christopher Columbus set foot there. "Contacts between Latin America and Islam date back to the 12th century. Muslims discovered America in 1178, not Christopher Columbus," the conservative president said in a televised speech during an Istanbul summit of Muslim leaders from Latin America. "Muslim sailors arrived in America from 1178. Columbus mentioned the existence of a mosque on a hill on the Cuban coast," Erdogan said.
  • Columbus Trying to Recruit the Chinese Emperor to Liberate Jerusalem and Stumbled on America

    07/08/2009 5:44:29 AM PDT · by SJackson · 16 replies · 585+ views
    MEMRI ^ | 7-8-09
    Egyptian Writer Muhammad Ibrahim Mabrouk: Columbus Was Trying to Recruit the Chinese Emperor to the Liberation of Jerusalem When He Stumbled Upon America Following are excerpts from an interview with Egyptian writer Muhammad Ibrahim Mabrouk, which aired on Al-Majd TV on April 27, 2009.To view this clip on MEMRI TV, visit "Columbus Wanted to Liberate Jerusalem From the Muslims"Interviewer: "American society was not born and did not grow in the United States. It is a mixed society - a society of immigrants, of different nationalities. How can it be claimed that this society in its entirety was melted down...
  • The Muslim Brotherhood in American Schools

    11/29/2014 1:46:27 PM PST · by RetiredArmy · 83 replies ^ | November 28, 2014 | Tim Brown
    The Muslim Brotherhood in American Schools "I am waging a Bloodless Revolution in America's Public Schools..." - Shabbir Mansuri (Founder and Director of the Council on Islamic Education) . Brigitte Gabriel spoke earlier this year at First Conservative Baptist Church and informed the people there that the Muslim Brotherhood is in the process of infiltrating American public schools, just as they have the United States federal government. Gabriel, author of two New York Times Best Sellers, Because They Hate and They Must Be Stopped, and founder of Act for America, said that she is passionate about the subject because it...
  • The True Story of How Muhammad Discovered America

    11/17/2014 6:29:01 AM PST · by NOBO2012 · 9 replies
    Michelle Obama's Mirror ^ | 11-17-2014 | MOTUS
    actual photo h/t Blazing Cat FurIn eleven hundred and seventy eight Muhammad sailed through the Hormuz strait.He had three ships that left from Persia; Heading out and sailing further Than anyone had sailed before To land upon America’s shore. MOTUS, 2014And that, my friends, is the legend of how Muslims discovered America, 300 years before Columbus. And that’s great news, just in time for Thanksgiving! It means Western Imperialism is off the hook for stealing and raping the Indians’ land, brutally killing Native Americans with long guns and small pox and introducing everything from racism, sexism, anti-gay bigotry, and the class...
  • Archeology: Evidence scant for ancient Muslims in America

    11/08/2014 10:50:08 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 64 replies
    Columbus Post-Dispatch ^ | Saturday November 1, 2014 | Bradley Lepper
    Francaviglia does not dispute that Muslims could have beaten Columbus to the New World. They certainly possessed the technological expertise to have done so; but, so far, there is no reliable evidence that they did. There are, however, very good reasons for thinking that they didn't. Arab maps were the best in the world, but none of the existing early maps demonstrates any knowledge of the Americas. Arabs also were prolific writers. Francaviglia thinks it’s virtually impossible that Arab explorers discovered the Americas and made no mention of the fact. Why then is the supposed pre-Columbian Muslim discovery of America...
  • Greenfield: Goodbye Columbus, Goodbye America

    10/14/2013 4:48:41 AM PDT · by Louis Foxwell · 25 replies
    Daniel Greenfield @ the Sultan Knish blog ^ | Sunday, October 13, 2013 | Daniel Greenfield
    Sunday, October 13, 2013 Goodbye Columbus, Goodbye America Posted by Daniel Greenfield @ the Sultan Knish blog Columbus may have outfoxed the Spanish court and his rivals, but he is falling victim to the court of political correctness. The explorer who discovered America has become controversial because the very idea of America has become controversial. There are counter-historical claims put forward by Muslim and Chinese scholars claiming that they discovered America first. And there are mobs of fake indigenous activists on every campus to whom the old Italian is as much of a villain as the bearded Uncle Sam. Columbus...
  • US Textbooks: Muslims Discovered America

    01/22/2011 10:42:23 AM PST · by ventanax5 · 64 replies · 2+ views
    “This is a very disturbing video about how our high school students are being brainwashed by Moslems in favor of Islam because our textbook publishers, school principals and teachers do not have the knowledge about Islam to know what is true and what is false. The textbooks are loaded with false positive statements about Islam and false negative statements about Christianity and Judaism.”
  • (Hussein's) Likely Intel Pick: Muslims Were Here First ( Say what! )

    02/28/2009 11:39:48 AM PST · by kellynla · 41 replies · 1,640+ views ^ | February 25, 2009 | Aaron Klein
    TEL AVIV, Israel – The Obama administration's reported pick for a top intelligence post once peddled a book to U.S. public schools that falsely claims Muslims inhabited North America far before European explorers. The book, funded by Saudi Arabia, also contains widely inaccurate anti-Israel Arab propaganda. Charles "Chas" Freeman, the U.S. ambassador to Saudi Arabia during the first Gulf War, is slated to head the National Intelligence Council, according to multiple reports. Yesterday, it came to light Freeman has financial ties to the infamous bin Laden family – including dealings he defended after Sept. 11, 2001. Freeman served as president...
  • Did Muslims Visit America Before Columbus?

    05/09/2006 9:55:41 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 154 replies · 3,248+ views
    History News Network ^ | 5/8/06 | Rebecca Fachner
    Is it possible that there were Muslims in the Americas before Columbus? Some claim that Muslims came to America hundreds of years before Columbus arrived in the New World. Are the claims true? Every elementary school student knows the story of Christopher Columbus; that he set sail from Spain and mistakenly discovered America in 1492, landing on an island in the Caribbean. Columbus encountered native inhabitants of this new world, and thinking that he had landed in India, he called them Indians. While many of the details have been mythologized or fabricated over the ensuing 500 years, Columbus’s expedition represents...
  • Muslim Re-Education - coming soon to an elementary school near you

    10/20/2004 1:42:10 AM PDT · by kattracks · 72 replies · 2,960+ views ^ | 10/20/04 | Alexis Amory
    Coming soon to an elementary school near you: mandatory indoctrination in Islamic customs and practices. According to The Kansas City Star, third-, fourth- and fifth-graders in Herndon, Virginia, are to be given lessons in the three Rs: Reading, ‘Riting, and Ramadan. During this instruction, public school children will play act being Muslims, and, perhaps unwittingly, convert to Islam. Pupils from a nearby Muslim school will visit classes in the town’s public schools to educate their counterparts in Islam. They will be accompanied by something called “a multicultural trainer” named Afeefa Syeed. In Herndon, during this month of Ramadan (which began Friday),...
  • Your children may learn that Muslims discovered America

    04/16/2004 7:29:42 AM PDT · by veronica · 63 replies · 413+ views
    The American Thinker ^ | 4-16-04 | Ed Lasky
    Your children may learn that Muslims discovered AmericaApril 16th, 2004 A Native American tribe has forced distributors of an Arab studies guide for American teachers to remove an inaccurate and absurd passage that Muslim explorers preceded Columbus to North America, and eventually became Algonquin chiefs named Abdul-Rahim and Abdallah Ibn Malik! The Middle East Policy Council, a Washington advocacy group that promotes this curriculum to school districts in 155 U.S. cities have apparently been somewhat unresponsive and dismissive of complaints. Ridiculous as this example is, it is illustrative of a far more disturbing development: the placement of propaganda in our schools by...
  • The Muslims who discovered America

    10/10/2002 10:40:55 PM PDT · by swarthyguy · 79 replies · 8,365+ views
    WND ^ | 10.11.2002 | Joseph Farah
    In anticipation of Columbus Day, I've been educating myself on the Muslims who discovered America. You mean you didn't know that Muslims were in America before Columbus? You didn't know Muslim navigators took Columbus by the hand and led him to a little island in the Bahamas known as Guanahani, a settlement of Islamic Mandinkas from Africa? You hadn't heard about the Muslims from both Spain and West Africa who sailed to America at least five centuries before Columbus? Yes, this is the new uni-cultural rage with the U.S. Muslim community. There are seminars in major cities and mosques all...
  • Of Course The Chinese Didn't Discover America. But Then Nor Did Columbus

    01/20/2006 8:18:53 AM PST · by blam · 69 replies · 1,521+ views
    The Guardian (UK) ^ | 1-20-2006 | Simon Jenkins
    Of course the Chinese didn't discover America. But then nor did Columbus A map supporting claims that the admiral Zheng He reached the New World in the early 15th century is plainly a hoax Simon Jenkins Friday January 20, 2006 The Guardian (UK) We all know that a lie goes halfway round the world while truth is putting on its boots. But what if the lie goes the whole way? What if it claims to circumnavigate the globe? Last week came purported evidence that the Chinese admiral Zheng He sailed his great fleet of junks round the world a century...
  • As they say in Kentucky; "Cymru am bith".

    08/29/2002 9:51:38 AM PDT · by scouse · 63 replies · 1,787+ views
    News Wales (UK) ^ | 8/26/02 | Unknown
    Did the Welsh discover America? 26/8/2002 A team of historians and researchers announced today that Radio Carbon dating evidence, and the discovery of ancient British style artefacts and inscriptions in the American Midwest, provide the strongest indications yet" that British explorers, under the Prince Madoc ap Meurig, arrived in the country during the 6th Century and set up colonies there. Research team members have known the location of burial sites of Madoc's close relatives in Wales for some time, it emerged today; but they have decided to break their self-imposed silence in order that their research be fully known and...