Keyword: navigation

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Most archaeologists think the first Americans arrived by boat.Now, they’re beginning to prove it

    08/16/2017 9:18:02 AM PDT · by Theoria · 19 replies
    Science/AAAS ^ | 10 Aug 2017 | Lizzie Wade
    IN CEDROS ISLAND IN MEXICO—Matthew Des Lauriers got the first inkling that he had stumbled on something special when he pulled over on a dirt road here, seeking a place for his team to use the bathroom. While waiting for everyone to return to the car, Des Lauriers, then a graduate student at the University of California, Riverside, meandered across the landscape, scanning for stone tools and shell fragments left by the people who had lived on the island in the past 1500 years. As he explored, his feet crunched over shells of large Pismo clams—bivalves that he hadn't seen...
  • Long March 11 launches pioneering X-ray pulsar navigation spacecraft

    11/10/2016 9:44:45 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 2 replies
    spaceflightinsider.com ^ | 11/10/2016 |
    China successfully launched a Long March 11 rocket with a group of five satellites, including XPNAV-1, an experimental X-ray pulsar navigation spacecraft. Liftoff took place at 7:42 a.m. China Standard Time Nov 10 (23:42 GMT; 6:42 p.m. EST on Nov. 9) from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in the Gobi Desert. Detailed information about preparations for the mission were kept under wraps by China. Furthermore, officials have not disclosed the exact flight profile for the Long March 11 booster. It was only revealed the vehicle targeted a Sun-synchronous orbit (SSO) for the release of its payload. The launch was expected...
  • Lock of hair pins down early migration of Aborigines

    09/22/2011 7:36:33 PM PDT · by decimon · 32 replies
    BBC ^ | September 22, 2011 | Leila Battison
    A lock of hair has helped scientists to piece together the genome of Australian Aborigines and rewrite the history of human dispersal around the world.DNA from the hair demonstrates that indigenous Aboriginal Australians were the first to separate from other modern humans, around 70,000 years ago. This challenges current theories of a single phase of dispersal from Africa. An international team of researchers published their findings in the journal Science. While the Aboriginal populations were trailblazing across Asia and into Australia, the remaining humans stayed around North Africa and the Middle East until 24,000 years ago. Only then did they...
  • Sailing into antiquity: BU archeologist unearths clues about ancient Egypt's sea trade

    01/14/2010 7:20:32 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies · 466+ views
    Boston Globe ^ | Monday, January 11, 2010 | Colin Nickerson
    ...Boston University archeologist Kathryn Bard and her colleagues are uncovering the oldest remnants of seagoing ships and other relics linked to exotic trade with a mysterious Red Sea realm called Punt... the team led by Bard and an Italian archeologist, Rodolfo Fattovich, started uncovering maritime storerooms in 2004, putting hard timber and rugged rigging to the notion of pharaonic deepwater prowess. In the most recent discovery, on Dec. 29, they located the eighth in a series of lost chambers at Wadi Gawasis after shoveling through cubic meters of rock rubble and wind-blown sand... The reconnaissance of the room and its...
  • Ancient Greek 'computer' came with a user guide

    07/02/2016 1:00:20 AM PDT · by blueplum · 63 replies
    Fox News ^ | 28 June 2016 | Megan Gannon
    ....With the turn of a hand crank, the ancient Greeks could track the positions of the sun and the moon, the lunar phases, and even cycles of Greek athletic competitions. The 82 corroded metal fragments of the Antikythera mechanism contain ancient Greek text, much of which is unreadable to the naked eye. But over the past 10 years, new imaging techniques, such as 3D X-ray scanning, have revealed hidden letters and words in the text...
  • [Viking ship replica] Sea Stallion arrives in Inverie, Scotland

    07/31/2007 11:54:23 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies · 478+ views
    Sail World ^ | Saturday, July 28, 2007 | Tinna Damgard-Sorensen
    The Sea Stallion right before arrival to the Orkney Islands Pastime and cosy atmosphere. Sea Stallion taken from the support vessel 'Cable One' by the Viking ship And the further on, 4 hours of rowing in between the Orkney - Sea Stallion.
  • World's oldest sea-going boat to sail again - Dover team rebuilds Bronze Age boat with ancient tools

    03/07/2012 8:44:22 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | Tuesday, March 6th, 2012 | Rob Waugh
    The world's oldest sea-going boat, the Dover Bronze Age Boat is to sail again 3500 years after it crossed the English Channel. A new project, 'Boat 1550 BC' aims to rebuild the boat, which had lain hidden under the centre of Dover for 3,500 years until it was rediscovered in 1992 during the construction of an underpass. The oak-built boat sailed across the Channel at a time when Stonehenge was still in use, and before Tutankhamun became ruler of Egypt. The project aims to understand how people were able to cross the Channel in 1550 BC, using ancient boatbuilding techniques...
  • Viking longship to sail across North Sea - The Sea Stallion of Glendalough

    05/27/2007 7:36:50 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 29 replies · 3,185+ views
    AP on Yahoo ^ | 5/27/07 | Jan M. Olson - ap
    ROSKILDE, Denmark - On the skipper's command, deckhands haul in tarred ropes to lower the flax sail. Oars splash into the water. The crew, grimacing with strain, pull with steady strokes sending the sleek Viking longship gliding through the fjord. A thousand years ago, the curved-prow warship might have spewed out hordes of bloodthirsty Norsemen ready to pillage and burn. This time, the spoils are adventure rather than plunder. The Sea Stallion of Glendalough is billed as the world's biggest and most ambitious Viking ship reconstruction, modeled after a warship excavated in 1962 from the Roskilde fjord after being buried...
  • Replica Viking longship sets sail - Sea Stallion of Glendalough

    07/01/2007 12:16:55 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 14 replies · 1,153+ views
    AP on Yahoo ^ | 7/1/07 | Jan M. Olson - ap
    ROSKILDE, Denmark - A 100-foot-long replica of a Viking longship glided out of a Danish fjord Sunday with 65 crew members determined to sail across the North Sea to Ireland. Roughly 4,000 people watched the Sea Stallion of Glendalough begin the attempt to relive the perilous journey its Viking forebear made some 1,000 years ago. The ship is billed as the world's biggest and most ambitious Viking ship reconstruction. It was modeled after a warship excavated in 1962 from the Roskilde fjord after being buried in the seabed for nearly 950 years. "The Vikings are coming back. Be prepared," skipper...
  • Sea Stallion Steps Back In History

    05/27/2008 3:06:51 PM PDT · by blam · 13 replies · 794+ views
    Irish Examiner ^ | 5-25-2008 | Richard Collins
    Sea Stallion steps back in historyRichard Collins on a remarkable Danish replica ship. AT three o’clock next Thursday afternoon Dubliners will be treated to an extraordinary spectacle. The Viking ship Sea Stallion, which has been on display at the National Museum in Collins Barracks, will be lifted 50 metres into the air by a giant crane. Then the huge vessel will be swung out over the three-storey museum building and deposited in the nearby Croppy’s Acre. In the middle of the night it will be moved to the River Liffey, prior to its long sea journey back to Denmark. The...
  • Viking voyage: The crew's diary

    07/13/2007 7:40:37 AM PDT · by WesternCulture · 49 replies · 986+ views
    news.bbc.co.uk ^ | 07/12/2007 | Hans Jacob Andersen
    A replica Viking ship has set sail for Dublin from the Danish port of Roskilde. It is currently crossing the North Sea, in an attempt to recreate the voyages undertaken by early Norsemen. The volunteer crew on the 30m-long (100ft) Sea Stallion from Glendalough are recording their experiences on the journey. Bad weather is already proving a major challenge. Like the vikings the crew have no shelter from the weather, no cleaning facilities and no lavatories.
  • Real Viking Ship Completes North Atlantic Crossing

    06/30/2016 11:32:36 AM PDT · by Ketill Frostbeard · 44 replies
    GCaptain.com ^ | June 30, 2016 | GCaptain Staff
    The world’s largest viking ship has arrived in North America after crossing the North Atlantic Ocean on a journey from its homeport in Haugesund, Norway. The Viking ship, named Draken Harald Hårfagre, set sail from Norway with its approximately 32 crew members in late April and made stops in Iceland, Greenland and Newfoundland, Canada, before making its way through the Saint Lawrence Seaway to Toronto for the Tall Ships Challenge Great Lakes 2016 festival this weekend. Future stops for the Viking ship include Chicago, Green Bay and Duluth, before heading to U.S. east coast with stops in New York City...
  • Not Out Of Africa But Regional Continuity

    12/16/2005 11:03:02 AM PST · by blam · 28 replies · 5,700+ views
    Not Out of Africa but regional continuityA challenging idea about Human Evolution by Alan Thorne Mungo Lady Mungo Lady was delivered to Alan Thorne in a small cheap suitcase in 1968 when he was 28 years old. Her burned and shattered bones were embedded in six blocks of calcified sand. The field researchers who dug her up in a parched no-man's-land in southeastern Australia suspected that shewas tens of thousands of years old. 600 Bone Chips Almost every day for the next six months, he painstakingly freed her remains from the sand with a dental drill, prizing out more than...
  • New Age For Mungo Man, New Human History

    02/20/2003 3:51:29 PM PST · by vannrox · 34 replies · 692+ views
    Science Daily ^ | FR Post 2-18-03 | Editorial Staff
    New Age For Mungo Man, New Human HistoryA University of Melbourne-led study has finally got scientists to agree on the age of Mungo Man, Australia's oldest human remains, and the consensus is he is 22,000 years younger. A University of Melbourne-led team say Mungo Man's new age is 40,000 years, reigniting the debate for the 'Out of Africa' theory. The research also boosted the age of Mungo Lady, the world's first recorded cremation, by 10,000 years putting her at the same age as Mungo Man. It is the first time scientists have reached a broad agreement on the ages of...
  • Genes Help Identify Oldest Human Population

    01/08/2002 3:29:31 PM PST · by blam · 45 replies · 1,455+ views
    New York Times ^ | 0108-2002 | Nicholas Wade
    January 8, 2002 Genes Help Identify Oldest Human Population By NICHOLAS WADE Peering deep into the archive of population history that is stored in the human genome, a Stanford University biologist believes he has picked up a genetic signature of the ancestral human population. The signature, a pattern of genetic changes on the male or Y chromosome, is apparent in some present- day Ethiopians and in the Khoisan, click language speakers who now live in South Africa. The researcher, Dr. Peter A. Underhill of Stanford University, believes these people may include descendants of the ancestral human population that occupied the ...
  • Date For First Australians

    02/18/2003 3:58:38 PM PST · by blam · 7 replies · 319+ views
    BBC ^ | 2-18-2003
    Tuesday, 18 February, 2003, 16:57 GMT Date for first Australians The Mungo burials have cast doubt on "Out of Africa" A new analysis of Australia's oldest human remains suggests humans arrived on the continent about 50,000 years ago. The evidence is based on a re-examination of the so-called Mungo Man skeleton, unearthed in New South Wales (NSW) in 1974. Scientists say the individual was probably buried about 40,000 years ago, when humans had been living in the area for some 10,000 years. We find no evidence to support claims for human occupation or burials near 60 kyr ago James Bowler...
  • Did Australian Aborigines reach America first?

    09/30/2010 2:04:50 PM PDT · by Palter · 41 replies
    Cosmo Online ^ | 30 Sep 2010 | Jacqui Hayes
    Cranial features distinctive to Australian Aborigines are present in hundreds of skulls that have been uncovered in Central and South America, some dating back to over 11,000 years ago. Evolutionary biologist Walter Neves of the University of São Paulo, whose findings are reported in a cover story in the latest issue of Cosmos magazine, has examined these skeletons and recovered others, and argues that there is now a mass of evidence indicating that at least two different populations colonised the Americas.He and colleagues in the United States, Germany and Chile argue that first population was closely related to the Australian...
  • A DNA Search for the First Americans Links Amazon Groups to Indigenous Australians

    07/24/2015 6:56:41 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 20 replies
    www.smithsonianmag.com ^ | July 21, 2015 | By Helen Thompson
    The new genetic analysis takes aim at the theory that just one founding group settled the Americas =========================================================================================================== Brazil's Surui people, like the man pictured above, share ancestry with indigenous Australians, new evidence suggests. (PAULO WHITAKER/Reuters/Corbis) ==================================================================================================================== More than 15,000 years ago, humans began crossing a land bridge called Beringia that connected their native home in Eurasia to modern-day Alaska. Who knows what the journey entailed or what motivated them to leave, but once they arrived, they spread southward across the Americas. The prevailing theory is that the first Americans arrived in a single wave, and all Native American populations...
  • Genetics reveal 50,000 years of independent history of aboriginal Australian people

    02/27/2016 10:52:59 AM PST · by JimSEA · 2 replies
    Science Daily ^ | February 25, 2016 | Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute
    The first complete sequences of the Y chromosomes of Aboriginal Australian men have revealed a deep indigenous genetic history tracing all the way back to the initial settlement of the continent 50 thousand years ago, according to a study published in the journal Current Biology today (25th February 2016). The study by researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and collaborators at La Trobe University in Melbourne and several other Australian institutes, challenges a previous theory that suggested an influx of people from India into Australia around 4-5 thousand years ago. This new DNA sequencing study focused on the Y...
  • PHOTOS: Unusual Rock Art Trove Found in Australia

    10/23/2008 5:24:32 PM PDT · by Goonch · 57 replies · 1,498+ views
    October 22, 2008--Paintings of sailboats, ocean liners, and biplanes adorn newfound rock shelters in the remote Aboriginal territory of Arnhem Land in northern Australia. Researchers working with Aboriginal elder Ronald Lamilami discovered thousands of the paintings--including the largest rock-art site in Australia--during an expedition in August and September 2008. (See full story.) "It is the most important … rock art in the whole world" that shows contact with other cultures, said lead researcher Paul Tacon of Griffith University in Queensland, Australia.