Keyword: neolithic

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  • Israel: 7,500-year-old lost Neolithic village discovered off coast of Haifa

    12/13/2014 6:43:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    IBTimes ^ | December 10, 2014 | Sanskrity Sinha
    A prehistoric water well hinting at the existence of a thriving Neolithic settlement has been excavated under water at Israel's East Mediterranean coast. The 7,500-year-old water well, currently under five metres of water, was submerged following prehistoric rise in sea level. Maritime archaeologist Ehud Galili of the Israel Antiquities Authority led the excavation at Kfar Samir site in collaboration with experts at Flinders University in South Australia and University of Haifa in Israel. Archaeologists said that the well which was a source of fresh water for the village dwellers was abandoned as the sea level rose. "Water wells are valuable...
  • Alpine melt reveals ancient life [ Schnidejoch glacier ]

    08/26/2008 5:51:59 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies · 250+ views
    BBC News ^ | Sunday, August 24, 2008 | Imogen Foulkes
    Melting alpine glaciers are revealing fascinating clues to Neolithic life in the high mountains... Everyone knows the story of Oetzi the Ice Man, found in an Austrian glacier in 1991. Oetzi was discovered at an altitude of over 3,000m. He lived in about 3,300 BC, leading to speculation that the Alps may have had more human habitation than previously suspected. Now, more dramatic findings from the 2,756m Schnidejoch glacier in Switzerland have confirmed the theory. It all started at the end of the long hot summer of 2003, when a Swiss couple, hiking across a melting Schnidejoch, came across a...
  • Neolithic site dating back 5,000 yrs discovered in C China

    08/30/2014 2:37:03 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    China Daily ^ | Friday, August 29, 2014 | Xinhua
    Archaeologists in Central China's Henan province have excavated a large neolithic settlement complete with moats and a cemetery. The Shanggangyang Site covers an area of 120,000 square meters and sits along a river in Zhengzhou, capital of Henan, dating 5,000 to 6,000 years back to the Yangshao culture, which was widely known for its advanced pottery-making technology. The site features two defensive moats surrounding three sides. Researchers have found relics of three large houses as well as 39 tombs, the large number suggesting several generations resided there, archaeologist Gao Zanling, a member of the Zhengzhou Administration of Cultural Heritage, said....
  • Violence and climate change in prehistoric Egypt and Sudan

    07/21/2014 10:50:52 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    British Museum ^ | Monday, July 14, 2014 | Renée Friedman, curator
    Among the most exciting of the new acquisitions are the materials from the site of Jebel Sahaba, now in northern Sudan, which were donated to the Museum by Dr Fred Wendorf in 2002. Excavating here in 1965–66, as part of the UNESCO-funded campaign to salvage sites destined to be flooded by the construction of the Aswan High Dam, Dr Wendorf found a cemetery (site 117) containing at least 61 individuals dating back to about 13,000 years ago. This discovery was of great significance for two reasons. First, as a designated graveyard, evidently used over several generations, it is one of...
  • Archaeologists say Stonehenge was "London of the Mesolithic" in Amesbury investigation

    05/10/2014 2:20:13 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 27 replies
    Culture 24 ^ | May 6, 2014 | Ben Miller
    Giant bull, wild boar and red deer bones left at a settlement a mile from Stonehenge prove that Amesbury is the oldest settlement in Britain and has been continually occupied since 8820 BC, according to archaeologists who say the giant monuments were built by indigenous hunters and homemakers rather than Neolithic new builders. Carbon dating of aurochs – a breed twice the size of bulls – predates the settlers responsible for the massive pine posts at Stonehenge, suggesting that people had first lived in Wiltshire around 3,000 years before the site was created in 3000 BC. Experts had previously thought...
  • UK's Oldest town revealed: Amesbury dates back more than TEN millenia

    05/07/2014 6:42:45 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Express (UK) ^ | Thursday, May 1, 2014 | Emily Fox
    Carbon dating from an archaeological dig by the university shows that the parish of Amesbury has been continually occupied for every millennia since 8,820BC. The origins of Amesbury have been discovered as a result of carbon dating bones of aurochs - twice the size of bulls, wild boar and red deer - following a dig at Vespasian's Camp, Blick Mead, a mile-and-a-half from Stonehenge. It dates the activities of the people who were responsible for building the first monuments at Stonehenge, made of massive pine posts, and show their communities continuing to work and live in the area for a...
  • Mound excavation reveals transition from hunting to herding in Neolithic settlement

    04/30/2014 5:04:50 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Phy dot org ^ | Tuesday, April 29, 2014 | Bob Yirka
    A team of researchers with members from several countries has found evidence of the birth of pre-ceramic Neolithic populations in a region of what is now Turkey. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describes how excavations of various levels at Aşıklı Höyük, reveal the history of the people that lived there... Aşıklı Höyük is the earliest known preceramic Neolithic mound site in Central Anatolia. The oldest Levels, 4 and 5, spanning 8,200 to approximately 9,000 cal B.C., associate with round-house architecture and arguably represent the birth of the Pre-Pottery Neolithic in the...
  • Community project focuses on Neolithic Whitehawk camp

    04/21/2014 10:26:10 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | Thursday, April 17, 2014 | unattributed
    This 5,500 year old Stone Age monument (a Neolithic Causewayed Enclosure) on Whitehawk Hill in Brighton, East Sussex is a rare type of ritual monument (predating Stonehenge by around 500 years) and marks the emergence of Britain’s first farming communities. It is the project’s aim to work with the local community to build understanding of the importance of the monument, engender a spirit of ownership and identity and actively work for the physical improvement of the site and its archive.
  • Iron Age remains hailed as crucial [ Inverness Scotland ]

    10/17/2006 11:40:40 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies · 315+ views
    Inverness Courier ^ | 17 October, 2006 | Gerard Burke
    The remains of a 2000-year-old city have been discovered under Inverness and it is being hailed as one of the most important recent discoveries in Scotland. The find near Inverness Royal Academy was uncovered by a team who spent almost a year excavating the remains of seven large roundhouses and almost a dozen iron kilns... the ancient city's "industrial estate" where iron was smelted, bronze was cast and glass was produced... Among the items found below a site near Inverness Royal Academy, now being developed by Tulloch Homes, were part of a bronze horse harness, an enamelled bronze brooch, dozens...
  • The world's oldest masks: 9,000-year-old stone 'portraits of the dead' go on show in Jerusalem

    03/08/2014 5:40:14 PM PST · by Renfield · 27 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 3-5-2014 | Sarah Griffiths
    A collection of rare 9,000-year old masks, which are considered among the most ancient human portraits, are to go on show in Jerusalem. The masks all originated from Israel and have the same striking features, perhaps to resemble the spirits of dead ancestors. It is thought they were used by in religious and social ceremonies and in rites of healing and magic. The exhibition at The Israel Museum is the result of a decade of investigative work into where the masks came from and it is the first time that the group of 12 Neolithic masks will be displayed together...
  • GEOPHYSICS: Ancient Cataclysm Marred the Med

    12/09/2006 2:24:21 PM PST · by Lessismore · 22 replies · 989+ views
    Science Magazine ^ | 2006-12-08 | Jacopo Pasotti
    It's a terrifying vision: A violent eruption of Italy's Mount Etna triggers a massive collapse of one flank of the volcano, sending 35 cubic kilometers of debris--the equivalent of 10,000 Cheops pyramids--hurtling at 400 kilometers an hour into the Ionian Sea. The Big Splash unleashes a 50-meter-tall wall of water that, within a few hours, wipes out coastal settlements across the Mediterranean. This catastrophe happened 8000 years ago--and a Mediterranean monster of similar magnitude could happen again. That's the scenario invoked in an analysis in last week's Geophysical Research Letters. "It was an extraordinary event, probably the largest tsunami unleashed...
  • Tsunami Or Melting Glaciers: What Caused Ancient Atlit To Sink?

    06/04/2008 12:58:10 PM PDT · by blam · 38 replies · 204+ views
    Haaretz ^ | 6-3-2008 | By Ofri Ilani
    Tsunami or melting glaciers: What caused ancient Atlit to sink? By Ofri Ilani At the bottom of the sea, some 300 meters west of the Atlit fortress, lies one of the greatest archaeological mysteries of the Mediterranean basin. About 20 years ago, archaeologists discovered a complex of ancient buildings and ancient graves with dozens of skeletons at the underwater site of Atlit-Yam. The team of marine archaeologists that excavated the site, headed by Dr. Ehud Galili of the Israel Antiquities Authority, came to the consclusion that an ancient settlement once existed there, but sank beneath the surface of the sea...
  • European Hunter-Gatherers, Blue Eyes and Dark Skin?

    01/27/2014 8:44:03 AM PST · by Theoria · 39 replies
    The Unz Review ^ | 26 Jan 2014 | Razib Khan
    The headlines about this individual having dark skin are well founded, like the Luxembourg hunter-gatherer the sample has ancestral “non-European” copies of most of the major loci which are known to have large effect sizes (SLC24A5, which is now fixed in Europeans, SLC45A2, which is present at frequencies north of 80% in most of Europe, and KITLG, a lower frequency variant known to have a major impact on skin and hair). Additionally, this individual is related to the Ma’lta individual, just like the Swedish hunter-gatherers, but unlike the Luxembourg male (which did predate the Spanish samples by 1,000 years). Lots...
  • Neolithic Mural in Turkey May Illustrate Ancient Volcanic Eruption

    01/09/2014 2:21:41 PM PST · by Theoria · 6 replies
    Popular Archaeology Magazine ^ | 08 Jan 2014 | Popular Archaeology Magazine
    Study indicates a correlation between the ancient mural image and date of the Hasan Dagi volcanic eruption. First discovered and excavated in the 1960's by British archaeologist James Mellaart, the world-famous 9,000-year-old Neolithic site of Catälhöyuk in Central Anatolia, Turkey, has provided a unique window on the lives of humans at the transition from hunter-gatherer to settled agriculture societies. Among the spectacular finds was a mural or wall-painting dated to about 6600 BCE and described by its discoverer and others as depicting a volcanic eruption. Arguably regarded as the first map or graphical representation of a landscape, it featured "a...
  • The world’s first detailed prehistoric maps of Britain

    12/19/2013 5:05:23 PM PST · by Renfield · 21 replies
    Archaeology News Network ^ | 12-8-2013 | TANN
    The ABC Publishing Group has announced the publication of the world’s first prehistoric maps of Britain. These maps are based on the recently published book by Robert John Langdon titled ‘The Stonehenge Enigma’ which proves that Britain suffered massive ‘Post Glacial Flooding’ directly after the last Ice Age ten thousand years ago, and that mankind placed their ancient sites on the shorelines of these raised waterways. Stonehenge - surrounded by water on three sides[Credit: ABC Publishing Group] The maps are presented on the old ordnance survey first edition that shows the natural ancient environment to a higher degree of detail...
  • Archaeologists discover 'finest ever' piece of Neolithic art...3,500BC (Scotland)

    08/04/2013 8:36:09 AM PDT · by Renfield · 36 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 8-1-2013 | Mark Duell
    Archaeologists have found an astonishing piece of Neolithic artwork that was buried for 4,500 years. The stone creation - which is decorated on both sides and has been described as one of the ‘finest ever’ to be found in Britain - was uncovered last night on the Ness of Brodgar in Orkney, Scotland. It was found at the base of the south-west internal corner of the Neolithic ‘cathedral’ at the site, which covers 2.5 hectares and is believed to have been occupied from as early as 3,500BC....
  • Oldest Grave Flowers Unearthed in Israel

    07/01/2013 6:55:02 PM PDT · by Pharmboy · 20 replies
    livescience.com ^ | 7-1-13 | Tia Ghose
    The oldest example of grave flowers has been discovered in Israel. An ancient burial pit dating to nearly 14,000 years ago contained impressions from stems and flowers of aromatic plants such as mint and sage. The new find "is the oldest example of putting flowers and fresh plants in the grave before burying the dead," said study co-author Dani Nadel, an archaeologist at the University of Haifa in Israel. snip... Past evidence suggested that humans only started using flowers in graves more recently. (A 35,000-year-old Neanderthal burial site called Shanidar Cave in Iraq contained pollen, but subsequent research revealed that...
  • Swiss dolmen reveals rituals of the Neolithic

    02/13/2013 1:48:15 AM PST · by Renfield · 3 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | 2-10-2013
    In October 2011, specialists from the Archaeological Service of the Canton of Bern began investigation of the large granite slab weighing in at 7 tonnes. The glacial erratic measured 3 metres long, 2 metres wide and was nearly 1 metre thick – what they did not realise at first was that it still covered a grave belonging to a Neolithic community.The site was originally found when a farmer decided to try and remove the glacial boulder that he had to mow around when cutting grass in his field.The boulder is from the last glacial maximum – some 20,000 years ago...
  • Hundreds of Neolithic Artifacts Found at Koutroulou Magoula

    01/10/2013 7:01:38 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Sci-News ^ | Tuesday, January 8th, 2013 | Enrico de Lazaro
    Koutroulou Magoula is located near the Greek village of Neo Monastiri, some 160 miles from Athens. The site was occupied from 5,800 to 5,300 BC by a community of a few hundred people. The archaeologists found clay figurines all over the site, with some located on wall foundations. They believe their purpose was to convey and reflect ideas about a community’s culture, society and identity. “Figurines were thought to typically depict the female form, but our find is not only extraordinary in terms of quantity, but also quite diverse – male, female and non-gender specific ones have been found and...
  • Art of cheese-making is 7,500 years old

    12/13/2012 11:49:12 AM PST · by Renfield · 18 replies
    Nature ^ | 12-12-2012 | Nidhi Subbaraman
    Traces of dairy fat in ancient ceramic fragments suggest that people have been making cheese in Europe for up to 7,500 years. In the tough days before refrigerators, early dairy farmers probably devised cheese-making as a way to preserve, and get the best use out of, milk from the cattle that they had begun to herd. Peter Bogucki, an archaeologist at Princeton University in New Jersey, was in the 1980s among the first to suspect that cheese-making might have been afoot in Europe as early as 5,500 bc. He noticed that archaeologists working at ancient cattle-rearing sites in what is...
  • Who stabbed Ginger in the back? Scan reveals 5,500-year-old murder mystery...

    11/17/2012 6:45:28 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | Friday, November 16, 2012 | Mark Prigg and Damien Gayle
    Daniel Antoine, the museum's expert on human remains, told The Times: ..."The force is such that the blade would have penetrated through his lung." ...Examinations also showed he was a young man, aged between just 18 and 20 when he was killed, and impressively muscled. Mr Antoine said he believes a lack of defensive wounds suggest Ginger was the victim of a surprise attack. A blade of copper or sharpened flint at least 5in long and 0.7in wide made the injury, he said... Professor Anders Persson of the Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV), a Forensic Radiology expert,...
  • Neolithic discovery: why Orkney is the centre of ancient Britain

    10/07/2012 2:56:45 AM PDT · by Renfield · 21 replies
    Guardian (UK) ^ | 10-06-2012 | Robin McKie
    Drive west from Orkney's capital, Kirkwall, and then head north on the narrow B9055 and you will reach a single stone monolith that guards the entrance to a spit of land known as the Ness of Brodgar. The promontory separates the island's two largest bodies of freshwater, the Loch of Stenness and the Loch of Harray. At their furthest edges, the lochs' peaty brown water laps against fields and hills that form a natural amphitheatre; a landscape peppered with giant rings of stone, chambered cairns, ancient villages and other archaeological riches. This is the heartland of the Neolithic North, a...
  • Stone bowl from Neolithic period found in Galilee

    09/24/2012 7:21:33 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Jerusalem Post ^ | Tuesday, September 25, 2012 [9 Tishri, 5773] | staff
    200 colored beads found in a bowl, and ostrich figures carved on a stone plate alongside animal figurines have been discovered on Sunday at the Ein Zippori national park, located in the Lower Galilee. Ahead of the widening of Highway 79, extensive archaeological excavations have been conducted by the Antiquities Authority. During the excavations, a variety of impressive prehistoric artifacts have been uncovered. Prehistoric settlement remains that range in date from the Pre-Pottery Neolithic period (c. 10,000 years ago) to the Early Bronze Age (c. 5,000 years ago) are at the Ein Zippori site, which extends south of Ein Zippori...
  • Neolithic Man: The First Lumberjack?

    08/27/2012 3:38:18 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Terra Daily ^ | Wednesday, August 15, 2012 | Staff Writers
    The use of functional tools in relation to woodworking over the course of the Neolithic period has not been studied in detail until now. Through their work at the archaeological site of Motza, a neighbourhood in the Judean Hills, Dr. Barkai and his fellow researchers, Prof. Rick Yerkes of Ohio State University and Dr. Hamudi Khalaily of the Israel Antiquity Authority, have unearthed evidence that increasing sophistication in terms of carpentry tools corresponds with increased agriculture and permanent settlements. The early part of the Neolithic age is divided into two distinct eras - Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA) and Pre-Pottery Neolithic...
  • Brewing Stone Age beer

    08/05/2012 7:33:03 AM PDT · by Renfield · 50 replies
    sciencenordic.com ^ | 7-20-2012 | Asle Rønning
    Beer enthusiasts are using a barn in Norway’s Akershus County to brew a special ale which has scientific pretensions and roots back to the dawn of human culture. The beer is made from einkorn wheat, a single-grain species that has followed humankind since we first started tilling the soil, but which has been neglected for the last 2,500 years. “This is fun − really thrilling. It’s hard to say whether this has ever been tried before in Norway,” says Jørn Kragtorp. He started brewing as a hobby four years ago. He represents the fourth generation on the family farm of...
  • Inequality Dates Back to Stone Age

    05/30/2012 4:40:43 AM PDT · by Makana · 20 replies
    Science Daily ^ | May 28, 2012 | Professor Alex Bentley
    Hereditary inequality began over 7,000 years ago in the early Neolithic era, with new evidence showing that farmers buried with tools had access to better land than those buried without.
  • Neolithic farmers brought deer to Ireland

    05/14/2012 3:13:40 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Past Horizons Archaeology ^ | April 18, 2012 | School of Biology and Environmental Science, University College Dublin
    By comparing DNA from ancient bone specimens to DNA obtained from modern animals, the researchers discovered that the Kerry red deer are the direct descendants of deer present in Ireland 5000 years ago. Further analysis using DNA from European deer proves that Neolithic people from Britain first brought the species to Ireland. Although proving the red deer is not native to Ireland, researchers believe that the Kerry population is unique as it is directly related to the original herd and are worthy of special conservation status. Fossil bone samples from the National Museum of Ireland, some up to 30,000 years...
  • How the Cavemen Ate: Cookbook Reveals 77 Recipes Stretching Right Back to the Stone Age

    05/12/2012 11:02:10 AM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 19 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 4 May 2012 | Eddie Wrenn
    How the cavemen ate: Cookbook reveals 77 recipes stretching right back to the Stone Age (and they taste surprisingly good!) Fancy something new for dinner tonight? Well if you don't fancy a Chinese or a Thai, researchers have pulled together 77 recipes which were eaten during the Stone Ages. And the surprise is how delicious the recipes, some of them 16,000 years old, sound - with your typical Neolithic families spicing up their meals and using plenty of fresh fruit and herbs along with the simmering main dishes of game. A Culinary Journey Through Time can join Jamie Oliver and...
  • Origin of Ancient Jade Tool Baffles Scientists

    01/31/2012 8:11:46 PM PST · by Theoria · 16 replies
    LiveScience ^ | 26 Jan 2012 | Jennifer Welsh
    A composite photograph of the front and back of the jade gouge shown with a centimeter scale. CREDIT: Les O’Neil, University of Otago The discovery of a 3,300-year-old tool has led researchers to the rediscovery of a "lost" 20th-century manuscript and a "geochemically extraordinary" bit of earth. Discovered on Emirau Island in the Bismark Archipelago (a group of islands off the coast of New Guinea), the 2-inch (5-centimeters) stone tool was probably used to carve, or gouge, wood. It seems to have fallen from a stilted house, landing in a tangle of coral reef that was eventually covered over...
  • Complex Fish Traps Over 7,500 Years Old Found in Russia

    01/26/2012 8:28:46 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Wednesday, January 25, 2012 | unattributed
    An international team of archeologists, led by Ignacio Clemente, a researcher with the Spanish National Research Council, has discovered and documented an assemblage of fish seines and traps in the Dubna Basin near Moscow that are dated to be more than 7,500 years old. They say that the equipment, among the oldest found in Europe, displays a surprisingly advanced technical complexity. The finds illuminate the role of fishing among European settlements of the early Holocene (about 10,000 years ago), particularly where people did not practice agriculture until just before the advent of the Iron Age. Says Clemente: "Until now, it...
  • Iceman Autopsy

    10/29/2011 4:22:00 AM PDT · by Renfield · 31 replies
    National Geographic ^ | 11-2011 | Stephen S. Hall
    Shortly after 6 p.m. on a drizzling, dreary November day in 2010, two men dressed in green surgical scrubs opened the door of the Iceman's chamber in the South Tyrol Museum of Archaeology in Bolzano, Italy. They slid the frozen body onto a stainless steel gurney. One of the men was a young scientist named Marco Samadelli. Normally, it was his job to keep the famous Neolithic mummy frozen under the precise conditions that had preserved it for 5,300 years, following an attack that had left the Iceman dead, high on a nearby mountain. On this day, however, Samadelli had...
  • "Tomb of the Otters" Filled With Stone Age Human Bones

    07/10/2011 7:35:41 AM PDT · by Renfield · 19 replies
    7-7-2011 | James Owen
    Thousands of human bones have been found inside a Stone Age tomb on a northern Scottish island, archaeologists say. The 5,000-year-old burial site, on South Ronaldsay (map) in the Orkney Islands, was accidentally uncovered after a homeowner had leveled a mound in his yard to improve his ocean view. ~~~snip~~~ The underground grave consists of a 4- by 0.75-meter (13- by 2.5-foot) central chamber surrounded by four smaller cells hewn from sandstone bedrock. Capping the central chamber are large water-worn slabs supported by stone walls and pillars. At least a thousand skeleton parts belonging to a mix of genders and...
  • Neolithic men were prepared to fight for their women.

    06/13/2010 4:47:14 PM PDT · by Little Bill · 21 replies · 850+ views
    The London Telegraph ^ | 02 Jun 2008 | Roger Highfield, Science Editor
    Many archaeologists have argued that women have long motivated cycles of violence and blood feuds throughout history but there has really been no solid archaeological evidence to support this view. Now a relatively new method has been used to work out the origins of the victims tossed into a mass grave of skeletons, and so distinguish one tribe from another, revealing that neighbouring tribes were prepared to kill their male rivals to secure their women some 7000 years ago. .......
  • Swiss unearth 5,000-year-old door

    10/22/2010 7:10:25 PM PDT · by Islander7 · 28 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | Oct 20, 2010 | AP
    Archaeologists in Zurich have unearthed a 5,000-year-old door that may be one of the oldest ever found in Europe. The ancient poplar wood door is "solid and elegant" with well-preserved hinges and a "remarkable" design for holding the boards together, archaeologist Niels Bleicher said today.
  • How Middle Eastern Milk Drinkers Conquered Europe

    10/15/2010 7:56:47 AM PDT · by Palter · 30 replies
    Spiegel ^ | 15 Oct 2010 | Matthias Schulz
    New research has revealed that agriculture came to Europe amid a wave of immigration from the Middle East during the Neolithic period. The newcomers won out over the locals because of their sophisticated culture, mastery of agriculture -- and their miracle food, milk. Wedged in between dump trucks and excavators, archeologist Birgit Srock is drawing the outline of a 7,200-year-old posthole. A concrete mixing plant is visible on the horizon. She is here because, during the construction of a high-speed rail line between the German cities of Nuremberg and Berlin, workers happened upon a large Neolithic settlement in the Upper...
  • The Egtved Girl

    02/16/2010 5:21:19 PM PST · by Little Bill · 46 replies · 1,474+ views
    Gallica Co UK ^ | 2002 | Friedman
    The Egtved Girl In 1921 a burial mound at Egtved was excavated. In it was found a completely preserved coffin, and inside it lay a 16-18 year old girl about 160cm (5’4”) tall, slim, with long, loose blonde hair and carefully trimmed nails. For burial she had been laid in the coffin, fully dressed, on top of a cow-skin. Her upper body was clad in a loose bodice with elbow length sleeves and around her hips she wore a knee length skirt of string. On her braided woollen belt were a large, spiral-decorated bronze disk with a spike and a...
  • Settlement Site Hints at Mass Cannibalism [Germany 7,000 years ago]

    12/04/2009 1:19:44 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies · 802+ views
    Discovery News ^ | Friday, December 4, 2009 | Bruce Bower, Science News
    At a settlement in what is now southern Germany, the menu turned gruesome 7,000 years ago. Over a period of perhaps a few decades, hundreds of people were butchered and eaten before parts of their bodies were thrown into oval pits, a new study suggests. Cannibalism at the village, now called Herxheim, may have occurred during ceremonies in which people from near and far brought slaves, war prisoners or other dependents for ritual sacrifice, propose anthropologist Bruno Boulestin of the University of Bordeaux... A social and political crisis in central Europe at that time triggered various forms of violence, the...
  • Woman's Skeleton Found at Bottom of Prehistoric Well

    06/25/2009 7:21:15 AM PDT · by NCDragon · 46 replies · 1,854+ views
    FOXNews.com ^ | Wednesday, June 14, 2009 | AP via FOXNews.com
    NICOSIA, Cyprus — Archeologists have discovered a water well in Cyprus that was built as long as 10,500 years ago, and the skeleton of a young woman at the bottom of it, an official said Wednesday. Pavlos Flourentzos, the nation's top antiquities official, said the 16-foot (5-meter) deep cylindrical shaft was found last month at a construction site in Kissonerga, a village near the Mediterranean island nation's southwestern coast. After the well dried up it apparently was used to dispose trash, and the items found in it included the poorly preserved skeleton of the young woman, animal bone fragments, worked...
  • Ancient rock art baffles experts[UK]

    01/15/2009 3:19:11 PM PST · by BGHater · 24 replies · 1,158+ views
    Telegraph ^ | 15 Jan 2009 | Matt Ford
    Matt Ford scours the countryside for enigmatic rock carvings left by our ancestors. While some people dream of the warm sun of southern Spain for their retirement, David Jones chose high fells, the sharp teeth of a gale and the quest to find 5,000-year-old artwork. "I decided to build a new life when I retired," says the former IT marketing specialist, as a bitter wind whips through his hair. "I wanted the last third to be quite different from the first two thirds. I walk a lot, I work with charities, and I do this." "This" is joining more than...
  • 12,000 year old Shaman unearthed in Israel

    12/11/2008 10:03:24 AM PST · by Natufian · 21 replies · 980+ views
    Time Online ^ | 11/11/08 | Ishaan Tharoor
    A new figure in humanity's history emerged last week when archaeologists announced the discovery of what could be one of the world's oldest known spiritual figures. After years of meticulous excavation just miles from Israel's Mediterranean coast, scientists from the Institute of Archaeology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem unearthed a 12,000-year-old grave that held the remains of a diminutive "shaman" woman.
  • Over 100 Neolithic Stone Carvings Found In Northumberland[UK]

    07/31/2008 10:46:50 AM PDT · by BGHater · 35 replies · 92+ views
    24 Hour Museum ^ | 31 July 2008 | 24 Hour Museum Staff
    Volunteers working in Northumberland and Durham have unearthed a remarkable collection of intricate rock art formations dating back 5,000 years. Over 100 of the extraordinary Neolithic carvings of concentric circles, interlocking rings and hollowed cups were uncovered in the region by a team of specially trained volunteers working on a four-year English Heritage backed project called the Northumberland and Durham Rock Art Project (NADRAP). Their findings have now been recorded and published online via a website called England’s Rock Art (ERA), which was launched today, Thursday July 3 2008, athttp://archaeologydataservice.ac.uk/era. © English Heritage (Above) Barningham Moor County Durham: Photographer R....
  • Neolithic Men Were Prepared To Fight For Their Women

    06/02/2008 8:41:45 PM PDT · by blam · 18 replies · 531+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 6-3-2008 | Roger Highfield
    Neolithic men were prepared to fight for their women By Roger Highfield, Science Editor Last Updated: 1:49AM BST 03/06/2008 Neolithic age men fought over women too, according to a study that provides the most ancient evidence of the lengths men will go to in the hunt for partners. Many archaeologists have argued that women have long motivated cycles of violence and blood feuds throughout history but there has really been no solid archaeological evidence to support this view. Now a relatively new method has been used to work out the origins of the victims tossed into a mass grave of...
  • Turkish Site A Neolithic 'Supernova'

    04/21/2008 3:24:52 PM PDT · by blam · 21 replies · 193+ views
    Washington Times ^ | 4-21-2008 | Nicholas Birch
    Turkish site a Neolithic 'supernova' By Nicholas Birch April 21, 2008 Archaeologist Klaus Schmidt was among the first to realize the significance of the Gobekli Tepe site, which is 7,000 years older than Stonehenge. URFA, Turkey - As a child, Klaus Schmidt used to grub around in caves in his native Germany in the hope of finding prehistoric paintings. Thirty years later, as a member of the German Archaeological Institute, he found something infinitely more important: a temple complex almost twice as old as anything comparable. "This place is a supernova," said Mr. Schmidt, standing under a lone tree on...
  • Archaeologists Uncover Unique Cremation Graves (Moravia)

    03/20/2008 2:35:01 PM PDT · by blam · 13 replies · 391+ views
    Prague Monitor ^ | 3-20-2008 | CTK
    Archaeologists uncover unique cremation graves By ÄŒTK / Published 20 March 2008 Prostejov, South Moravia, March 19 (CTK) - Czech archaeologists have uncovered unique cremation graves in Prostejov that date back to the Neolithic period of the Linear Pottery culture and that indicate that people believed in human soul's existence 7,000 years ago already, daily Mlada fronta Dnes wrote Wednesday. The graves were uncovered during construction of a new industrial zone on the eastern edge of the town. "This is the first cremation burial site of the Linear-Pottery-culture to be uncovered on Czech soil. Below it there are skeleton graves...
  • Older Than The Pyramids, Buried For Centuries - Found By An Orkney Plumber

    03/17/2008 8:45:12 AM PDT · by blam · 20 replies · 1,890+ views
    The Scotsman ^ | 3-14-2008 | Tristan Stewart-Robinson
    Older than the pyramids, buried for centuries – found by an Orkney plumber Tristan Stewart-Robertson A RARE piece of Neolithic art has been discovered on a beach in Orkney. The 6,000-year-old relic, thought to be a fragment from a larger piece, was left exposed by storms which swept across the country last week. Local plumber David Barnes, who found the stone on the beach in Sandwick Bay, South Ronaldsay, said circular markings had shown up in the late-afternoon winter sun, drawing his attention to the piece. Archeologists last night heralded the discovery as a "once-in- 50-years event". But they warned...
  • Green Party holds presidential debate in San Francisco (comic relief)

    01/16/2008 7:11:36 PM PST · by atomic conspiracy · 23 replies · 122+ views
    SFGATE ^ | 1-16-08 | Delfin Vigil
    Withdraw from Iraq immediately. Eliminate the No Child Left Behind law. Legalize marijuana. Those were just some of the goals stated by candidates at the Green Party presidential debate Sunday in San Francisco. About 800 people of varying ages, economic backgrounds and political parties attended the "Presidential Debate that Matters" at the Herbst Theatre, where the five Green presidential hopefuls spent more time agreeing with one another than actually debating. "We're not so much against each other as we are for each other," said one of the candidates, Kent Mesplay, an environmental engineer who also ran for the Green Party...
  • Stonehenge's huge support settlement

    11/05/2007 9:19:47 AM PST · by Renfield · 17 replies · 66+ views
    BBC News ^ | 11-05-07 | Sian Price
    Archaeologists working near Stonehenge have uncovered what they believe is the largest Neolithic settlement ever discovered in Northern Europe. Remains of an estimated 300 houses are thought to survive under earthworks 3km (2 miles) from the famous stone rings, and 10 have been excavated so far. But there could have been double that total according to the archaeologist leading the work. "What is really exciting is realising just how big the village for the Stonehenge builders was," says Professor Mike Parker Pearson of Sheffield University. Allowing four per house, he estimates there could have been room for more than 2,000...
  • Archaeologists Uncovers 11,000-Year-Old Artefacts In Syria

    10/23/2007 1:17:42 PM PDT · by blam · 32 replies · 38+ views
    Middle-East-Online ^ | 10-23-2007 | Talal el-Atrache
    Archaeologist uncovers 11,000-year-old artefacts in SyriaLatest discoveries in Syria date back to start of Neolithic era in Epipalaeolithic period. By Talal el-Atrache - DAMASCUSA small stone anthropomorphic Neolithic figurine Deep in the heart of northern Syria, close to the banks of the Euphrates River, archaeologists have uncovered a series of startling 11,000-year-old wall paintings and artefacts. "The wall paintings date back to the 9th millennium BC. They were discovered last month on the wall of a house standing two metres (6.6 feet) high at Dja'de," said Frenchman Eric Coqueugniot, who has been leading the excavations on the west bank of...
  • Orkney arrowheads find points to Scotland's earliest settlement

    10/08/2007 4:51:26 PM PDT · by Renfield · 7 replies · 174+ views
    The Scotsman ^ | 10-05-07 | John Ross
    THEY may look like just a collection of broken stones, but the finds made in a field in Orkney might be evidence of the earliest settlement in Scotland. Two flint "tanged points" or arrowheads found on the island of Stronsay are thought to have been used by hunters between 10,000 and 12,000 years ago, just after the Ice Age. The arrowheads were found among a collection of scattered artefacts, including bladed tools, on a farm by Naomi Woodward and a team of MA students on an archaeology course at Orkney College. The discoveries were made during a two-week research trip...
  • Burial chambers of the Neolithic

    10/05/2007 4:31:41 AM PDT · by Renfield · 8 replies · 296+ views
    Clava Burial chambers of the Neolithic In the Neolithic - the New Stone Age - the older you were, the more important you were, and thus logically the dead were the most important of all. Ancestor worship became the centre of people's lives, and great emphasis was placed on the burial of the dead. Magnificent tombs where therefore built as houses for the dead. Some of the finest of these are the Clava cairns, in North East Scotland, near Inverness. Here stone chambers were built, and then stones were built up around them to form a mound, and a long...