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Keyword: neuroscience

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  • New hope for people with tinnitus

    10/16/2015 9:16:24 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 58 replies
    http://www.consumeraffairs.com ^ | 09/25/2015 | By Mark Huffman & Georgetown University Medical Center
    People who have it say it can be excruciating. Tinnitus causes pain and a constant ringing in the ears that makes it almost impossible to concentrate or enjoy a social gathering. Worst of all, there's little they can do about it. There are treatments that can help, but no cure. Now, neuroscientists at Georgetown University Medical Center and colleagues in Germany say they've discovered the brain condition that causes it. It's not a cure, but researchers say it is the first step toward finding one. Writing in Trends in Cognitive Sciences, the scientists describe how the brain mechanisms that normally...
  • Donald Trump, Cognitive Realignment, and the Panic of the Speech Nazis

    07/09/2015 11:06:40 AM PDT · by AnonymousConservative · 17 replies
    Anonymous Conservative ^ | July, 8th, 2015 | Anonymous Conservative
    The biggest thing Donald Trump is doing is realigning public perceptions on immigration among the low-information voters, for whom being seen as moderate and reasonable is more important than issue analysis. Up until now, nobody has been able to force the ideas Trump has espoused into the mainstream media. As a result, the perception of what is moderate has drifted to the left, and we have been, up until now, unable to stop it. This part of this book has a good example of the cognitive principle that Trump's rhetoric is affecting in low information voters. P is less committed...
  • Obama's BRAIN Initiative yields first study results

    07/01/2015 12:03:19 PM PDT · by Lazamataz · 43 replies
    Reuters ^ | Thu Apr 30, 2015 12:05pm EDT | BY SHARON BEGLEY
    The mouse walked, the mouse stopped; the mouse ignored a bowl of food, then scampered back and gobbled it up, and it was all controlled by neuroscientists, researchers reported on Thursday. The study, describing a way to manipulate a lab animal's brain circuitry accurately enough to turn behaviors both on and off, is the first to be published under President Barack Obama's 2013 BRAIN Initiative, which aims to advance neuroscience and develop therapies for brain disorders. The point of the remote-control mouse is not to create an army of robo-rodents. Instead, neuroscientists hope to perfect a technique for identifying brain...
  • Scientists criticize Europe’s $1.6B brain project

    07/07/2014 12:52:22 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 10 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Jul 7, 2014 12:30 PM EDT
    Dozens of neuroscientists are protesting Europe’s $1.6 billion attempt to recreate the functioning of the human brain on supercomputers, fearing it will waste vast amounts of money and harm neuroscience in general. The 10-year Human Brain Project is largely funded by the European Union. In an open letter issued Monday, more than 190 neuroscience researchers called on the EU to put less money into the effort to “build” a brain, and to invest instead in existing projects. …
  • Neuroscientists find link between agenesis of the corpus callosum and autism

    05/16/2014 9:21:32 AM PDT · by neverdem · 23 replies
    Medical Xpress ^ | April 29, 2014 | Katie Neith
    MRI images from a neurotypical control (left) and an adult with complete agenesis of the corpus callosum (right). The corpus callosum is indicated in red, fading as the fibers enter the hemispheres in order to suggest that they continue on. The anterior commissure is indicated by light aqua. The image illustrates the dramatic lack of inter hemispheric connections in callosal agenesis. Credit: Lynn Paul/Caltech (Medical Xpress)—Building on their prior work, a team of neuroscientists at Caltech now report that rare patients who are missing connections between the left and right sides of their brain—a condition known as agenesis of...
  • Neuroscience: Map the other brain

    09/09/2013 4:10:37 PM PDT · by neverdem · 5 replies
    Nature News ^ | 04 September 2013 | R. Douglas Fields
    Glia, the non-neuronal cells that make up most of the brain, must not be left out of an ambitious US mapping initiative, says R. Douglas Fields. The Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative announced by US President Barack Obama in April seeks to map and monitor the function of neural connections in the entire brains of experimental animals, and eventually in the human cerebral cortex. Several researchers have raised doubts about the project, cautioning that mapping the brain is a much more complex endeavour than mapping the human genome, and its usefulness more uncertain. I believe that exploring...
  • The brain's GPS: Researchers discover human neurons linked to navigation in open environments

    08/06/2013 3:02:13 PM PDT · by neverdem · 9 replies
    Biology News Net ^ | August 5, 2013 | NA
    Using direct human brain recordings, a research team from Drexel University, the University of Pennsylvania, UCLA and Thomas Jefferson University has identified a new type of cell in the brain that helps people to keep track of their relative location while navigating an unfamiliar environment. The "grid cell," which derives its name from the triangular grid pattern in which the cell activates during navigation, is distinct among brain cells because its activation represents multiple spatial locations. This behavior is how grid cells allow the brain to keep track of navigational cues such as how far you are from a starting...
  • Atomic Bombs Help Solve Brain Mystery

    06/07/2013 11:41:33 PM PDT · by neverdem · 13 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 6 June 2013 | Emily Underwood
    Enlarge Image Nuclear fallout. Radioactive carbon-14 atoms released by atomic bombs are helping scientists determine the birthdays of new neurons in the hippocampus (inset). Credit: Spalding et al., Cell (2013);(inset) Weissman, Livet, Sanes, and Lichtman/Harvard University The mushroom clouds produced by more than 500 nuclear bomb tests during the Cold War may have had a silver lining, after all. More than 50 years later, scientists have found a way to use radioactive carbon isotopes released into the atmosphere by nuclear testing to settle a long-standing debate in neuroscience: Does the adult human brain produce new neurons? After working to...
  • Helicopter Operated By Pure Mind Control

    06/06/2013 1:47:46 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 18 replies
    MNT ^ | 06 Jun 2013 - 0:00 PDT | Christian Nordqvist
    Controlling the movements of a helicopter just with your mind sounds like something out of a science fiction movie, but scientists at the University of Minnesota have made it a reality. They have learned to use their thoughts to steer a model helicopter around a gym, making it dip, rise, turn, and even fly through a ring. The scientists have published their study in the Journal of Neural Engineering. The development of brain computer interfacing (BCI) is to provide the user with the ability to communicate with the world outside and manipulate objects through thought modulation. Achieving this is accomplished...
  • Who’s Brainwashed? Progress and hype in the world of neuroscience.

    06/05/2013 11:59:00 PM PDT · by neverdem · 3 replies
    National Review Online ^ | June 5, 2013 | Kathryn Jean Lopez
    You don’t have to be a brain surgeon to find the subject of how our brains work fascinating. As Sally Satel points out in an interview with National Review Online’s Kathryn Jean Lopez, because the “brain is a very attractive topic to both readers and journalists . . . the sheer numbers of articles present many opportunities for the dissemination of overwrought claims.” But when news about the brain becomes hype, it can become a disseminator of “false hope and false answers.” As we look at the mechanics of the brain, we shouldn’t “become too carried away with the notion...
  • Gene switches make prairie voles fall in love

    06/04/2013 10:28:00 PM PDT · by neverdem · 18 replies
    Nature News ^ | 02 June 2013 | Zoe Cormier
    Epigenetic changes affect neurotransmitters that lead to pair-bond formation. Love really does change your brain — at least, if you’re a prairie vole. Researchers have shown for the first time that the act of mating induces permanent chemical modifications in the chromosomes, affecting the expression of genes that regulate sexual and monogamous behaviour. The study is published today in Nature Neuroscience1. Prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster) have long been of interest to neuroscientists and endocrinologists who study the social behaviour of animals, in part because this species forms monogamous pair bonds — essentially mating for life. The voles' pair bonding, sharing...
  • Neuroscience: Method man - Karl Deisseroth is leaving his mark on brain science one technique at...

    05/31/2013 3:29:43 PM PDT · by neverdem · 4 replies
    Nature News ^ | 29 May 2013 | Kerri Smith
    Karl Deisseroth is leaving his mark on brain science one technique at a time. When Karl Deisseroth moved into his first lab in 2004, he found himself replacing a high-profile tenant: Nobel-prizewinning physicist Steven Chu. “His name was still on the door when I moved in,” says Deisseroth, a neuroscientist, of the basement space at Stanford University in California. The legacy has had its benefits. When chemistry student Feng Zhang dropped by looking for Chu, Deisseroth convinced him to stick around. “I don't think he knew who I was. But he got interested enough.” Deisseroth is now a major name...
  • Less is more for smart perception

    05/24/2013 12:54:32 PM PDT · by neverdem · 4 replies
    Science News ^ | May 23, 2013 | Bruce Bower
    Brains of high-IQ people automatically ignore the least relevant sights People with high IQs see the world in their own way. Their brains seamlessly separate the visual wheat from the chaff, allowing them to home in on the most relevant information, a new study finds. Using a simple visual exercise, a team led by psychologist Duje Tadin of the University of Rochester in New York found that high-IQ volunteers excelled at detecting the direction in which small objects moved but struggled at tracking large moving objects. That’s a useful trait, the scientists report May 23 in Current Biology. In many...
  • Trouble With Math? Maybe You Should Get Your Brain Zapped

    05/19/2013 5:14:27 PM PDT · by neverdem · 22 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 16 May 2013 | Emily Underwood
    Enlarge Image Primed for numbers. Random pulses of electrical current can accelerate math learning. Credit: Albert Snowball If you are one of the 20% of healthy adults who struggle with basic arithmetic, simple tasks like splitting the dinner bill can be excruciating. Now, a new study suggests that a gentle, painless electrical current applied to the brain can boost math performance for up to 6 months. Researchers don't fully understand how it works, however, and there could be side effects. The idea of using electrical current to alter brain activity is nothing new—electroshock therapy, which induces seizures for therapeutic...
  • Man wiggles rat's tail using just thoughts

    04/10/2013 11:32:06 AM PDT · by Jyotishi · 25 replies
    The Indian Express ^ | Wednesday, April 10, 2013 | PTI
    New York - Scientists have for the first time linked the brains of a human and a rat, enabling the man to use just his thoughts to wiggle the rodent's tail. This is the first case of a brain-to-brain interface between species, and the first example of a noninvasive brain-to-brain interface, researchers claimed. Earlier this year, scientists had linked together the brains of two rats.This first known instance of a brain-to-brain interface apparently helped the rodents share data to accomplish certain tasks, even across intercontinental distances, LiveScience reported. In the latest experiment, researchers from Harvard Medical School employed noninvasive techniques...
  • Magic mushroom drugs could treat severe depression

    04/07/2013 10:47:57 AM PDT · by Jyotishi · 46 replies
    DNA ^ | Sunday, April 7, 2013 | ANI
    Drugs made from magic mushrooms could help treat people with severe depression, a new study suggests. Scientists believe that the chemical psilocybin, the psychedelic ingredient in magic mushrooms, can turn down parts of the brain that are overactive in severely depressive patients, the Guardian reported. The drug appears to stop patients dwelling on themselves and their own perceived inadequacies. However, a bid by British scientists to carry out trials of psilocybin on patients in order to assess its full medical potential has been blocked by red tape relating to Britain’s strict drugs laws. Professor David Nutt, professor of neuropsychopharmacology at...
  • Proteins behind mad-cow disease also help brain to develop

    02/15/2013 1:15:08 AM PST · by neverdem · 3 replies
    Nature News ^ | 14 February 2013 | Mo Costandi
    When not misfolded, prions lend a hand in forming neuronal connections. Prions are best known as the infectious agents that cause ‘mad cow’ disease and the human versions of it, such as variant Creutzfeldt–Jakob Disease. But the proteins also have at least one known useful function, in the cells that insulate nerves, and are suspected to have more. Now researchers have provided the first direct evidence that the proteins play an important role in neurons themselves. The team reports in the Journal of Neuroscience1 that prions are involved in developmental plasticity, the process by which the structure and function of...
  • Red Brain, Blue Brain: Republicans and Democrats Process Risk Differently, Research Finds

    02/13/2013 5:27:09 PM PST · by neverdem · 38 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | February 13, 2013 | NA
    A team of political scientists and neuroscientists has shown that liberals and conservatives use different parts of the brain when they make risky decisions, and these regions can be used to predict which political party a person prefers. The new study suggests that while genetics or parental influence may play a significant role, being a Republican or Democrat changes how the brain functions. Dr. Darren Schreiber, a researcher in neuropolitics at the University of Exeter, has been working in collaboration with colleagues at the University of California, San Diego on research that explores the differences in the way the brain...
  • Neuroscience reveals brain differences between Republicans and Democrats

    11/03/2012 8:30:57 AM PDT · by ConservativeMind · 46 replies
    Univ. of South Carolline via MedicalXpress.com ^ | Nov. 1, 2012 | Jeff Stensland
    With the U.S. presidential election just days away, new research from the University of South Carolina provides fresh evidence that choosing a candidate may depend more on our biological make-up than a careful analysis of issues. That's because the brains of self-identified Democrats and Republicans are hard-wired differently and may be naturally inclined to hold varying, if not opposing, perceptions and values. The USC study, which analyzed MRI scans of 24 USC students, builds on existing research in the emerging field of political neuroscience. "The differences are significant and real," said lead researcher Roger D. Newman-Norlund, an assistant professor of...
  • Stress: The roots of resilience

    10/11/2012 12:44:29 PM PDT · by neverdem · 17 replies
    NATURE NEWS ^ | 10 October 2012 | Virginia Hughes
    On a chilly, January night in 1986, Elizabeth Ebaugh carried a bag of groceries across the quiet car park of a shopping plaza in the suburbs of Washington DC. She got into her car and tossed the bag onto the empty passenger seat. But as she tried to close the door, she found it blocked... --snip-- The most talked-about biological marker of resilience is neuropeptide Y (NPY), a hormone released in the brain during stress. Unlike the stress hormones that put the body on high alert in response to trauma, NPY acts at receptors in several parts of the brain...