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Keyword: neutrinos

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  • Did Neutrinos Kill The Dinosaurs?

    03/25/2016 6:02:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 46 replies
    American Institute of Physics Bulletin of Physics News [PDF] ^ | January 11, 1996 | Phillip F. Schewe and Ben Stein
    Massive collapsing stars radiate most of their binding energy (about 10^53 ergs) in the form of neutrinos. The rate of such collapses in our galaxy is expected to be greater, perhaps by a large factor, than the supernova rate. John Bahcall estimates a rate of about one collapse every 11 years in our galaxy. Stellar collapses might not exhibit the conspicuous optical show of full-blown supernovas but can still be potent emitters of neutrinos. According to Juan Collar, recently of the University of South Carolina but now with the University of Paris, stellar-collapse neutrinos may have played a role in...
  • Earth's Clearest Skies Revealed [Ideal Telescope Site In Antarctica - Graphic On Comments Page]

    06/08/2009 11:59:30 PM PDT · by zeestephen · 10 replies · 961+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 06 June 2009 | Anil Ananthaswamy
    POSSIBLY the clearest skies on Earth have been found - but to exploit them, astronomers will have to set up a telescope in one of the planet's harshest climates...[Scientists] evaluated different factors that affect telescope vision, such as the amount of water vapour, wind speeds and atmospheric turbulence...The team found that the Antarctic plateau offers world-beating atmospheric conditions - as long as telescopes are raised 20 meters above its frozen surface...[The Antarctic air is] drier than the Atacama desert in Chile [where some of the best telescopes in the world are currently located].
  • Cosmologists Probe Mystery Of Dark Energy With South Pole Telescope

    04/05/2008 11:43:32 AM PDT · by RightWhale · 5 replies · 221+ views
    sciencedaily ^ | 3 Apr 08 | staff
    Cosmologists Probe Mystery Of Dark Energy With South Pole Telescope ScienceDaily (Apr. 3, 2008) — Something is pulling the universe apart. What is it, and where will it take us from here? Scientists at the Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, seek answers to those questions with the newly-commissioned South Pole Telescope. Frigid and bone-dry, with six straight months of night each year, the South Pole is a forbidding place to live or work. But for largely the same reasons, it’s one of the best spots on the planet for surveying the faint cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation...
  • Reactor Data Hint At Existence Of Fourth Neutrino

    03/22/2016 10:11:28 AM PDT · by blam · 14 replies
    MyInforms - Science News ^ | 3-22-2016 | Ron Cowen
    Ron Cowen 3-22-2016 In tunnels deep inside a granite mountain at Daya Bay, a nuclear reactor facility some 55 kilometers from Hong Kong, sensitive detectors are hinting at the existence of a new form of neutrino, one of nature’s most ghostly and abundant elementary particles.Neutrinos, electrically neutral particles that sense only gravity and the weak nuclear force, interact so feebly with matter that 100 trillion zip unimpeded through your body every second. They come in three known types: electron, muon and tau. The Daya Bay results suggest the possibility that a fourth, even more ghostly type of neutrino exists —...
  • Kajita becomes Nobel physics prize co-winner

    10/06/2015 5:20:48 AM PDT · by chajin · 9 replies
    NHK (Japan Broadcasting Company) ^ | October 6, 2015 | NHK
    A Japanese scientist has won this year's Nobel Prize in Physics. Takaaki Kajita proved that neutrinos have mass. The neutrino is an elementary particle consisting of matter. Kajita observed neutrinos at a facility deep underground. He was part of a team that detected that some of the particles change to different types of neutrino. That proved neutrinos have mass. The discoveries were revealed at an international conference in 1998. His work surprised researchers all around the world because it disproved the established theory that neutrinos do not have mass. Kajita is the 24th Nobel Prize winner born in Japan. And...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Distant Neutrinos Detected Below Antarctic Ice

    09/01/2015 4:19:10 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    NASA ^ | September 01, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: From where do these neutrinos come? The IceCube Neutrino Observatory near the South Pole of the Earth has begun to detect nearly invisible particles of very high energy. Although these rarely-interacting neutrinos pass through much of the Earth just before being detected, where they started remains a mystery. Pictured here is IceCube's Antarctic lab accompanied by a cartoon depicting long strands of detectors frozen into the crystal clear ice below. Candidate origins for these cosmic neutrinos include the violent surroundings of supermassive black holes at the centers of distant galaxies, and tremendous stellar explosions culminating in gamma ray bursts...
  • Scientists Confirm the Existence of Cosmic Neutrinos

    08/22/2015 5:57:13 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 13 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | August 20, 2015 | Maddie Stone and The Guardian
    A team of Antarctic scientists has just verified the existence of cosmic neutrinos — tiny, energetic particles that might hail from far reaches of the Milky Way and beyond. And these ghostly little flecks of matter could hold the key to some of the deepest mysteries of the cosmos. High-energy cosmic neutrinos are thought to be produced by some of the universe’s most violent agents, including black holes, supernovae, and the energetic cores of galaxies. Unchanged as they zip across space and time, these particles may represent something of an intergalactic breadcrumb trail, pointing us in the direction of any...
  • Strange Particles Shape-Shift From One Flavor to Another

    07/23/2013 9:35:29 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 16 replies
    Live Science ^ | 07/23/2013
    Exotic particles called neutrinos have been caught in the act of shape-shifting, switching from one flavor to another, in a discovery that could help solve the mystery of antimatter. Neutrinos come in three flavors — electron, muon and tau — and have been known to change, or oscillate, between certain flavors. Now, for the first time, scientists can definitively say they've discovered muon neutrinos changing into electron neutrinos. The discovery was made at the T2K neutrino experiment in Japan, where scientists sent a beam of muon neutrinos from the J-PARC laboratory in Tokai Village on the eastern coast of Japan,...
  • Are Neutrinos Their Own Antiparticles?

    07/20/2013 4:35:01 PM PDT · by neverdem · 14 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 16 July 2013 | Edwin Cartlidge
    Enlarge Image Shining example. The GERDA experiment at the Gran Sasso lab in Italy has all but ruled out earlier claims for neutrinoless double-beta decay. Credit: The University of Tübingen A long-standing controversy among particle physicists looks to be settled—in the less exciting way—thanks to new data from an ultrasensitive particle detector deep underground. Physicists operating the GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) 1400 meters down in Italy's Gran Sasso National Laboratory say that they see no signs of a hypothesized type of nuclear decay called neutrinoless double-beta decay that, were it conclusively observed, would almost certainly merit a Nobel Prize....
  • Former APA Pres. Dr. Cummings Discusses Gay Change,Epigenetics,Neutrinos,& Political Correctness

    03/15/2013 10:43:49 AM PDT · by Maelstorm · 2 replies
    RPVNetwork ^ | March 15, 2013 | F.R Newbrough
    Former APA Pres. Dr. Nicolas Cummings Discusses Gay Change, Epigenetics, Neutrinos, & Political Correctness. - RPVNetwork
  • Einstein Avenged: Neutrinos Bow to Light Speed Laws ("E=MC2, Dammit!")

    06/08/2012 8:33:17 PM PDT · by presidio9 · 107 replies
    TechNewsWorld ^ | 06/08/12 | Richard Adhikari
    Eight months after the multinational Opera research team caused an uproar among physicists with its findings that some neutrinos appeared to travel faster than light, its findings have been officially refuted. CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, on Friday said that four experiments have found that neutrinos actually travel no faster than the speed of light. Opera's original measurements can be attributed to a faulty element of its experiment's fiber optic timing system, CERN said. The findings were announced at the 25th International Conference on Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics in Kyoto, Japan, by CERN research director Sergio Bertolucci. Life...
  • Results From South Pole Support Einstein’s Cosmological Constant

    04/04/2012 1:05:17 AM PDT · by lbryce · 5 replies
    R & D ^ | April 2,2012 | Staff
    Analysis of data from the National Science Foundation-(NSF) funded 10-m South Pole Telescope (SPT) in Antarctica provides new support for the most widely accepted explanation of dark energy, the source of the mysterious force that is responsible for the accelerating expansion of the universe. The results begin to hone in on the tiny mass of the neutrinos, the most abundant particles in the universe, which until recently were thought to be without mass. The SPT data strongly support Albert Einstein's cosmological constant—the leading model for dark energy—even though researchers base the analysis on only a fraction of the SPT data...
  • New Experiment Shows Neutrinos Do Not Travel Faster Than Light

    03/17/2012 11:21:01 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 13 replies
    Forbes ^ | 3/18/2012 @ 12:17AM | Alex Knapp
    There was definitely some excitement in the physics world last Fall when the OPERA Collaboration in Gran Sasso, Italy, announced that they had measured neutrinos traveling faster than the speed of light. I’ve been skeptical of this announcement since the first day, and in the intervening months since, things have been looking worse for the measurement. This culminated last month when the OPERA Collaboration admitted that the faster-than-light measurement may have been due to a simple measurement error. Now, in what may well be the final nail in the coffin for the claim that neutrinos travel faster than light, scientists...
  • North Carolina Researchers communicate without wires through 240 meters of solid rock.

    03/15/2012 6:48:40 AM PDT · by HenryArmitage · 27 replies
    tgDaily ^ | March 15, 2012 | Kate Taylor
    Scientists have for the first time sent a message using a beam of neutrinos, through 240 meters of solid stone. The team's not telling us how long the message - which said, simply, 'Neutrino', took to arrive. "Using neutrinos, it would be possible to communicate between any two points on Earth without using satellites or cables," says Dan Stancil, professor of electrical and computer engineering at North Carolina State University. "Neutrino communication systems would be much more complicated than today's systems, but may have important strategic uses." The most intriguing thing about using neutrinos to communicate is that they can...
  • Loose cable blamed for speedy neutrinos

    03/06/2012 1:16:25 AM PST · by U-238 · 41 replies
    Science News ^ | 2/23/2012 | Devin Powell
    Faulty wiring has been proposed as the glitch that caused a European physics experiment to clock particles flying faster than light. Scientists at Italy’s OPERA experiment reported in September that nearly weightless particles called neutrinos were apparently traveling from the CERN laboratory on the Swiss-French border to an underground detector in Italy, 730 kilometers away, faster than the speed of light. The apparent violation of Einstein’s theory of special relativity immediately produced a chorus of theorists offering reasons why neutrinos simply could not be going that fast (SN: 11/5/11, p. 10). “It was always clear to me that the results...
  • Official Word on Superluminal Neutrinos Leaves Warp-Drive Fans a Shred of Hope—Barely

    02/29/2012 4:45:22 PM PST · by neverdem · 13 replies · 1+ views
    ScienceInsider ^ | 24 February 2012 | Edwin Cartlidge
    The CERN particle physics laboratory in Geneva has confirmed Wednesday's report that a loose fiber-optic cable may be behind measurements that seemed to show neutrinos outpacing the speed of light. But the lab also says another glitch could have caused the experiment to underestimate the particles' speed. In a statement based on an earlier press release from the OPERA collaboration, CERN said two possible "effects" may have influenced the anomalous measurements. One of them, due to a possible faulty connection between the fiber-optic cable bringing the GPS signals to OPERA and the detector's master clock, would have caused the experiment...
  • Faster-Than-Light Neutrinos: OPERA Confirms and Submits Results, But Unease Remains

    11/19/2011 8:49:24 PM PST · by neverdem · 18 replies
    ScienceInsider ^ | 17 November 2011 | Edwin Cartlidge
    New high-precision tests carried out by the OPERA collaboration in Italy broadly confirm its claim, made in September, to have detected neutrinos travelling at faster than the speed of light. The collaboration today submitted its results to a journal, but some members continue to insist that further checks are needed before the result can be considered sound. OPERA (Oscillation Project with Emulsion-Tracking Apparatus) measures the properties of neutrinos that are sent through the Earth from the CERN particle physics laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland, and arrive in its detector located under the Gran Sasso mountain in central Italy. On 22 September,...
  • Finding puts brakes on faster-than-light neutrinos

    10/21/2011 10:47:39 AM PDT · by neverdem · 23 replies
    Nature News ^ | 20 October 2011 | Eugenie Samuel Reich
    An independent experiment confirms that subatomic particles have wrong energy spectrum for superluminal travel. The claim that neutrinos can travel faster than light has been given a knock by an independent experiment. On 17 October, the Imaging Cosmic and Rare Underground Signals (ICARUS) collaboration submitted a paper1 to the preprint server arXiv.org, in which it offered a rebuttal of claims2 to have clocked subatomic particles called neutrinos travelling faster than the speed of light. The original results were published on 22 September by the Oscillation Project with Emulsion-Tracking Apparatus (OPERA) experiment. Both experiments are based at Gran Sasso National Laboratory...
  • Particles Moved Faster Than Speed of Light?

    09/24/2011 6:19:59 AM PDT · by Lonesome in Massachussets · 56 replies
    National Geographic ^ | September 23, 2011 | Ker Than
    Neutrinos—ghostly subatomic particles—may have been observed traveling faster than the speed of light, scientists announced this week. If confirmed, the astonishing claim would upend a cardinal rule of physics established by Albert Einstein nearly a century ago. "Most theorists believe that nothing can travel faster than the speed of light. So if this is true, it would rock the foundations of physics," said Stephen Parke, head of the theoretical physics department at the U.S. government-run Fermilab near Chicago, Illinois.
  • Tiny Neutrinos May Have Broken Cosmic Speed Limit

    09/22/2011 9:54:37 PM PDT · by neverdem · 59 replies
    NY Times ^ | September 22, 2011 | DENNIS OVERBYE
    Roll over, Einstein? The physics world is abuzz with news that a group of European physicists plans to announce Friday that it has clocked a burst of subatomic particles known as neutrinos breaking the cosmic speed limit — the speed of light — that was set by Albert Einstein in 1905. If true, it is a result that would change the world. But that “if” is enormous. Even before the European physicists had presented their results — in a paper that appeared on the physics Web site arXiv.org on Thursday night and in a seminar at CERN, the European Center...