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Keyword: neutrinos

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  • Strange Particles Shape-Shift From One Flavor to Another

    07/23/2013 9:35:29 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 16 replies
    Live Science ^ | 07/23/2013
    Exotic particles called neutrinos have been caught in the act of shape-shifting, switching from one flavor to another, in a discovery that could help solve the mystery of antimatter. Neutrinos come in three flavors — electron, muon and tau — and have been known to change, or oscillate, between certain flavors. Now, for the first time, scientists can definitively say they've discovered muon neutrinos changing into electron neutrinos. The discovery was made at the T2K neutrino experiment in Japan, where scientists sent a beam of muon neutrinos from the J-PARC laboratory in Tokai Village on the eastern coast of Japan,...
  • Are Neutrinos Their Own Antiparticles?

    07/20/2013 4:35:01 PM PDT · by neverdem · 14 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 16 July 2013 | Edwin Cartlidge
    Enlarge Image Shining example. The GERDA experiment at the Gran Sasso lab in Italy has all but ruled out earlier claims for neutrinoless double-beta decay. Credit: The University of Tübingen A long-standing controversy among particle physicists looks to be settled—in the less exciting way—thanks to new data from an ultrasensitive particle detector deep underground. Physicists operating the GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) 1400 meters down in Italy's Gran Sasso National Laboratory say that they see no signs of a hypothesized type of nuclear decay called neutrinoless double-beta decay that, were it conclusively observed, would almost certainly merit a Nobel Prize....
  • Former APA Pres. Dr. Cummings Discusses Gay Change,Epigenetics,Neutrinos,& Political Correctness

    03/15/2013 10:43:49 AM PDT · by Maelstorm · 2 replies
    RPVNetwork ^ | March 15, 2013 | F.R Newbrough
    Former APA Pres. Dr. Nicolas Cummings Discusses Gay Change, Epigenetics, Neutrinos, & Political Correctness. - RPVNetwork
  • Einstein Avenged: Neutrinos Bow to Light Speed Laws ("E=MC2, Dammit!")

    06/08/2012 8:33:17 PM PDT · by presidio9 · 107 replies
    TechNewsWorld ^ | 06/08/12 | Richard Adhikari
    Eight months after the multinational Opera research team caused an uproar among physicists with its findings that some neutrinos appeared to travel faster than light, its findings have been officially refuted. CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, on Friday said that four experiments have found that neutrinos actually travel no faster than the speed of light. Opera's original measurements can be attributed to a faulty element of its experiment's fiber optic timing system, CERN said. The findings were announced at the 25th International Conference on Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics in Kyoto, Japan, by CERN research director Sergio Bertolucci. Life...
  • Results From South Pole Support Einstein’s Cosmological Constant

    04/04/2012 1:05:17 AM PDT · by lbryce · 5 replies
    R & D ^ | April 2,2012 | Staff
    Analysis of data from the National Science Foundation-(NSF) funded 10-m South Pole Telescope (SPT) in Antarctica provides new support for the most widely accepted explanation of dark energy, the source of the mysterious force that is responsible for the accelerating expansion of the universe. The results begin to hone in on the tiny mass of the neutrinos, the most abundant particles in the universe, which until recently were thought to be without mass. The SPT data strongly support Albert Einstein's cosmological constant—the leading model for dark energy—even though researchers base the analysis on only a fraction of the SPT data...
  • New Experiment Shows Neutrinos Do Not Travel Faster Than Light

    03/17/2012 11:21:01 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 13 replies
    Forbes ^ | 3/18/2012 @ 12:17AM | Alex Knapp
    There was definitely some excitement in the physics world last Fall when the OPERA Collaboration in Gran Sasso, Italy, announced that they had measured neutrinos traveling faster than the speed of light. I’ve been skeptical of this announcement since the first day, and in the intervening months since, things have been looking worse for the measurement. This culminated last month when the OPERA Collaboration admitted that the faster-than-light measurement may have been due to a simple measurement error. Now, in what may well be the final nail in the coffin for the claim that neutrinos travel faster than light, scientists...
  • North Carolina Researchers communicate without wires through 240 meters of solid rock.

    03/15/2012 6:48:40 AM PDT · by HenryArmitage · 27 replies
    tgDaily ^ | March 15, 2012 | Kate Taylor
    Scientists have for the first time sent a message using a beam of neutrinos, through 240 meters of solid stone. The team's not telling us how long the message - which said, simply, 'Neutrino', took to arrive. "Using neutrinos, it would be possible to communicate between any two points on Earth without using satellites or cables," says Dan Stancil, professor of electrical and computer engineering at North Carolina State University. "Neutrino communication systems would be much more complicated than today's systems, but may have important strategic uses." The most intriguing thing about using neutrinos to communicate is that they can...
  • Loose cable blamed for speedy neutrinos

    03/06/2012 1:16:25 AM PST · by U-238 · 41 replies
    Science News ^ | 2/23/2012 | Devin Powell
    Faulty wiring has been proposed as the glitch that caused a European physics experiment to clock particles flying faster than light. Scientists at Italy’s OPERA experiment reported in September that nearly weightless particles called neutrinos were apparently traveling from the CERN laboratory on the Swiss-French border to an underground detector in Italy, 730 kilometers away, faster than the speed of light. The apparent violation of Einstein’s theory of special relativity immediately produced a chorus of theorists offering reasons why neutrinos simply could not be going that fast (SN: 11/5/11, p. 10). “It was always clear to me that the results...
  • Official Word on Superluminal Neutrinos Leaves Warp-Drive Fans a Shred of Hope—Barely

    02/29/2012 4:45:22 PM PST · by neverdem · 13 replies · 1+ views
    ScienceInsider ^ | 24 February 2012 | Edwin Cartlidge
    The CERN particle physics laboratory in Geneva has confirmed Wednesday's report that a loose fiber-optic cable may be behind measurements that seemed to show neutrinos outpacing the speed of light. But the lab also says another glitch could have caused the experiment to underestimate the particles' speed. In a statement based on an earlier press release from the OPERA collaboration, CERN said two possible "effects" may have influenced the anomalous measurements. One of them, due to a possible faulty connection between the fiber-optic cable bringing the GPS signals to OPERA and the detector's master clock, would have caused the experiment...
  • Faster-Than-Light Neutrinos: OPERA Confirms and Submits Results, But Unease Remains

    11/19/2011 8:49:24 PM PST · by neverdem · 18 replies
    ScienceInsider ^ | 17 November 2011 | Edwin Cartlidge
    New high-precision tests carried out by the OPERA collaboration in Italy broadly confirm its claim, made in September, to have detected neutrinos travelling at faster than the speed of light. The collaboration today submitted its results to a journal, but some members continue to insist that further checks are needed before the result can be considered sound. OPERA (Oscillation Project with Emulsion-Tracking Apparatus) measures the properties of neutrinos that are sent through the Earth from the CERN particle physics laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland, and arrive in its detector located under the Gran Sasso mountain in central Italy. On 22 September,...
  • Finding puts brakes on faster-than-light neutrinos

    10/21/2011 10:47:39 AM PDT · by neverdem · 23 replies
    Nature News ^ | 20 October 2011 | Eugenie Samuel Reich
    An independent experiment confirms that subatomic particles have wrong energy spectrum for superluminal travel. The claim that neutrinos can travel faster than light has been given a knock by an independent experiment. On 17 October, the Imaging Cosmic and Rare Underground Signals (ICARUS) collaboration submitted a paper1 to the preprint server arXiv.org, in which it offered a rebuttal of claims2 to have clocked subatomic particles called neutrinos travelling faster than the speed of light. The original results were published on 22 September by the Oscillation Project with Emulsion-Tracking Apparatus (OPERA) experiment. Both experiments are based at Gran Sasso National Laboratory...
  • Particles Moved Faster Than Speed of Light?

    09/24/2011 6:19:59 AM PDT · by Lonesome in Massachussets · 56 replies
    National Geographic ^ | September 23, 2011 | Ker Than
    Neutrinos—ghostly subatomic particles—may have been observed traveling faster than the speed of light, scientists announced this week. If confirmed, the astonishing claim would upend a cardinal rule of physics established by Albert Einstein nearly a century ago. "Most theorists believe that nothing can travel faster than the speed of light. So if this is true, it would rock the foundations of physics," said Stephen Parke, head of the theoretical physics department at the U.S. government-run Fermilab near Chicago, Illinois.
  • Tiny Neutrinos May Have Broken Cosmic Speed Limit

    09/22/2011 9:54:37 PM PDT · by neverdem · 59 replies
    NY Times ^ | September 22, 2011 | DENNIS OVERBYE
    Roll over, Einstein? The physics world is abuzz with news that a group of European physicists plans to announce Friday that it has clocked a burst of subatomic particles known as neutrinos breaking the cosmic speed limit — the speed of light — that was set by Albert Einstein in 1905. If true, it is a result that would change the world. But that “if” is enormous. Even before the European physicists had presented their results — in a paper that appeared on the physics Web site arXiv.org on Thursday night and in a seminar at CERN, the European Center...
  • What keeps the Earth cooking?

    07/17/2011 3:00:13 PM PDT · by decimon · 27 replies · 1+ views
    Berkeley Lab scientists join their KamLAND colleagues to measure the radioactive sources of Earth's heat flowWhat spreads the sea floors and moves the continents? What melts iron in the outer core and enables the Earth's magnetic field? Heat. Geologists have used temperature measurements from more than 20,000 boreholes around the world to estimate that some 44 terawatts (44 trillion watts) of heat continually flow from Earth's interior into space. Where does it come from? Radioactive decay of uranium, thorium, and potassium in Earth's crust and mantle is a principal source, and in 2005 scientists in the KamLAND collaboration, based in...
  • One of the World's Biggest Telescopes Is Buried Beneath the South Pole

    12/17/2010 4:04:40 PM PST · by ColdOne · 40 replies · 1+ views
    FoxNews.com ^ | December 17, 2010 | Blake Snow
    Like exploding stars, black holes, dark matter? How about cosmic intrigue, deep space astronomy , or origins of the universe? Then you’re gonna love this. Researchers at the University of Wisconsin are putting the finishing touches on a giant underground telescope buried beneath the South Pole to help understand said phenomenon.
  • Search for microscopic black hole signatures at the Large Hadron Collider [String Theory Fails]

    12/16/2010 8:49:45 AM PST · by Fractal Trader · 18 replies · 1+ views
    CERN ^ | 15 December 2010
    The CMS experiment at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has completed a search for microscopic black holes produced in high-energy proton-proton collisions. No evidence for their production was found and their production has been excluded up to a black hole mass of 3.5-4.5 TeV (1012 electron volts) in a variety of theoretical models. Microscopic black holes are predicted to exist in some theoretical models that attempt to unify General Relativity and Quantum Mechanics by postulating the existence of extra “curled-up” dimensions, in addition to the three familiar spatial dimensions. At the high energies of the Large Hadron Collider, such theories...
  • Physicists Discover "Violation of a Fundamental Symmetry of the Universe"

    11/04/2010 12:31:54 PM PDT · by lbryce · 110 replies · 1+ views
    i09.com ^ | November 3, 2010 | Staff
    Today physicists announced that they may have found the key to explaining dark matter in the universe. It all has to do with the potential discovery of a "sterile neutrino." According to a release about the new study: Neutrinos are neutral elementary particles born in the radioactive decay of other particles. The known "flavors" of neutrinos are the neutral counterparts of electrons and their heavier cousins, muons and taus. Regardless of a neutrino's original flavor, the particles constantly flip from one type to another in a phenomenon called "neutrino flavor oscillation." An electron neutrino might become a muon neutrino, and...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day 8-03-03

    08/03/2003 12:21:03 AM PDT · by petuniasevan · 3 replies · 176+ views
    NASA ^ | 8-03-03 | Robert Nemiroff and Jerry Bonnell
    Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2003 August 3 Ice Fishing for Cosmic Neutrinos Credit: Robert Morse (U. Wisconsin) The Amanda II Collaboration Explanation: Scientists are melting holes in the bottom of the world. In fact, several holes have been melted near the South Pole, and they are now being used as astronomical observatories. Astronomers with the Antarctic Muon and Neutrino Detector Array (AMANDA) lower into each vertical lake a string knotted with basketball-sized...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day 6-23-03

    06/22/2003 10:41:21 PM PDT · by petuniasevan · 3 replies · 218+ views
    NASA ^ | 6-23-03 | Robert Nemiroff and Jerry Bonnell
    Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2003 June 23 KamLAND Verfies the Sun Credit: KamLAND Collaboration Explanation: A large sphere beneath Japan has helped verify humanity's understanding of the inner workings of the Sun. The KamLAND sphere, shown above during construction in 2001, fails to detect fundamental particles called anti-neutrinos that are known to be emitted by nearby nuclear reactors around Japan. This triumphant failure can best be explained by neutrinos oscillating between different...
  • Neutrino beam could neutralise nuclear bombs

    03/29/2004 5:04:19 PM PST · by vannrox · 51 replies · 956+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 18:51 14 May 03 | By Will Knight
    A super-powered neutrino generator could in theory be used to instantly destroy nuclear weapons anywhere on the planet, according to a team of Japanese scientists. If it was ever built, a state could use the device to obliterate the nuclear arsenal of its enemy by firing a beam of neutrinos straight through the Earth. But the generator would need to be more than a hundred times more powerful than any existing particle accelerator and over 1000 kilometres wide. "It is really quite futuristic," Alfons Weber, a neutrino scientist at Oxford University, UK, told New Scientist. "But the maths and physics...
  • GLOBAL TEAM OF PHYSICISTS UPENDS STANDARD MODEL WITH DISCOVERY OF NEUTRINO OSCILLATION, MASS

    07/09/2004 12:20:53 PM PDT · by PatrickHenry · 93 replies · 1,660+ views
    Boston University ^ | 08 July 2004 | News release staff
    A team of nearly 100 physicists from around the world have achieved results verifying that the elementary particle known as the neutrino exhibits a distinctive pattern of oscillation. This discovery shows that it is likely that the Standard Model, proposed in the 1970s to describe the fundamental forces and particles that make up all matter, is incomplete. The findings provide the needed confirmation to their previous discovery of neutrino oscillation and give the most precise measurement yet of neutrino mass. “These findings show that the Standard Model needs to be modified to better explain the fundamental forces that make up...
  • Ice Age coming into Focus!

    06/05/2004 2:32:35 PM PDT · by cureforcancer · 21 replies · 694+ views
    The Neutrino Report ^ | 1995, 2004 | Robert Texas Bailey(Tex)
    “In 1990 they found that the Earth goes through abrupt temperature changes from deep ice samples in Greenland of about 10,000 years ago the Earth’s temperature dropped 19 degrees” (research found by weather channel) taking 5-10 years (weather channel) but from analytical data, I intend to show this could take for the most part one year (Robert T Bailey) and more shocking a large part of the temperature change will happen this year! The End of the World as we known it is coming; an ice Age will change the face of the Earth. We have a crisis here. In...
  • Europe plans lab beneath the Alps

    07/09/2004 7:36:08 PM PDT · by FairOpinion · 9 replies · 433+ views
    BBC ^ | July 9, 2004 | Dr David Whitehouse
    French and Italian scientists are planning a large underground laboratory beneath the Alps designed to detect elusive particles from the Sun's core. It would consist of a huge tank filled with several hundred thousand cubic metres of ultra-pure water. Detectors lining the tank would be sensitive to flashes of light caused by the passage of sub-atomic particles. The lab would test theories in solar physics and help scientists understand the fundamental forces of nature. Sun stream It would be built adjacent to a road tunnel under the Frejus mountain near the French-Italian border. The ambitious project has entered its earliest...
  • New theory links neutrino's slight mass to accelerating universe expansion

    07/27/2004 12:34:34 PM PDT · by PatrickHenry · 55 replies · 1,229+ views
    University of Washington News Office ^ | 27 July 2004 | Vince Stricherz
    Two of the biggest physics breakthroughs during the last decade are the discovery that wispy subatomic particles called neutrinos actually have a small amount of mass and the detection that the expansion of the universe is actually picking up speed. Now three University of Washington physicists are suggesting the two discoveries are integrally linked through one of the strangest features of the universe, dark energy, a linkage they say could be caused by a previously unrecognized subatomic particle they call the "acceleron." Dark energy was negligible in the early universe, but now it accounts for about 70 percent of the...
  • Neutrino ripples spotted in space; Universal lumpiness is imprinted in mysterious particles

    06/18/2005 2:47:19 PM PDT · by PatrickHenry · 58 replies · 1,265+ views
    Nature Magazine ^ | 17 June 2005 | Mark Peplow
    Astronomers have spotted a signature of neutrinos created just seconds after the Big Bang. The find supports current models of the origins of our Universe, and may provide a glimpse of its birth. The fundamental particles called neutrinos are difficult to study, because they interact so weakly with normal matter - trillions whizz straight through your body every second. But Roberto Trotta, an astrophysicist from Oxford University, UK, and his colleague Alessandro Melchiorri of the University of Rome 'La Sapienza', Italy, say that the signature of primordial neutrinos is written in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). These microwaves are the...
  • First measurements of Earth's core radioactivity

    07/27/2005 11:13:59 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 35 replies · 1,496+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 7/27/05 | Celeste Biever
    EARTH'S natural radioactivity has been measured for the first time. The measurement will help geologists find out to what extent nuclear decay is responsible for the immense quantity of heat generated by Earth. Our planet's heat output drives the convection currents that churn liquid iron in the outer core, giving rise to Earth's magnetic field. Just where this heat comes from is a big question. Measurements of the temperature gradients across rocks in mines and boreholes have led geologists to estimate that the planet is internally generating between 30 and 44 terawatts of heat. Some of this heat comes from...
  • Harlan: Welcome to the great neutrino rush of '06

    04/16/2006 7:25:14 AM PDT · by rellimpank · 10 replies · 468+ views
    Rapid City Journal ^ | 16 Apr 06 | Bill Harlan
    Physics giant Wolfgang Pauli told a friend in 1930, "I have done something very bad today." Pauli's sin was "proposing a particle that cannot be detected," which he lamented "is something no theorist should ever do." Three years later, Enrico Fermi christened Pauli's ghost particle the "neutrino." In 1951, physicists Frederick Reines and Clyde Cowen first detected man-made neutrinos in an experiment at a nuclear reactor in South Carolina. Later, researcher Ray Davis detected solar neutrinos at his famous experiment 4,850 feet underground in the Homestake gold mine in Lead. The Homestake rock shielded his detector from interfering cosmic rays....
  • New particle turns up in Japan

    11/15/2003 8:43:52 PM PST · by Diddley · 178 replies · 706+ views
    Physicsweb ^ | Nov 14, 2003 | Belle Dumé
    The Belle collaboration at the KEK laboratory in Japan has discovered a new sub-atomic particle which it is calling the "X(3872)". The particle does not fit into any known particle scheme and theorists are speculating that it might be a hitherto unseen type of meson that contains four quarks (arxiv.org/abs/hep-ex/0309032; Phys. Rev. Lett. to be published). The discovery has been confirmed by the CDF collaboration at Fermilab in the US, where the new particle is being called the "mystery meson". Mesons are particles that contain a quark and an antiquark that are held together by the strong nuclear force. Since...
  • Looking for ET's neutrino beam

    05/22/2008 3:13:44 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 8 replies · 193+ views
    Physics World ^ | 5/21/08 | Edwin Cartlidge
    For several decades scientists have been using telescopes to scan the heavens for unnatural-looking radio or optical transmissions coming from intelligent alien life. With this search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) having so far failed to pick up a single signal, however, researchers in the US now believe it is worth extending the search beyond electromagnetic waves and start paying attention to neutrinos. John Learned of the University of Hawaii and colleagues have worked out that advanced alien civilizations could send messages within the Milky Way using neutrinos, and that these messages could be picked up using neutrino detectors currently under...
  • Antarctic telescope delivers first neutrino sky map

    07/30/2003 10:36:25 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 1 replies · 163+ views
    Antarctic telescope delivers first neutrino sky map UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MADISON NEWS RELEASE Posted: July 30, 2003 A novel telescope that uses the Antarctic ice sheet as its window to the cosmos has produced the first map of the high-energy neutrino sky. The map, unveiled for astronomers at a meeting of the International Astronomical Union, provides astronomers with their first tantalizing glimpse of very high-energy neutrinos, ghostly particles that are believed to emanate from some of the most violent events in the universe -- crashing black holes, gamma ray bursts, and the violent cores of distant galaxies. The first map of...
  • Does The Earth Harbors a Huge, Natural Nuclear Reactor at its Core -New Discovery Proves "No"

    03/31/2010 12:51:24 AM PDT · by ErnstStavroBlofeld · 15 replies · 742+ views
    The Daily Galaxy ^ | 3/30/2010 | The Daily Galaxy
    Using a delicate instrument located under a mountain in central Italy, two University of Massachusetts Amherst physicists are measuring some of the faintest and rarest particles ever detected, geo-neutrinos, with the greatest precision yet achieved. The data reveal, for the first time, a well defined signal, above background noise, of the extremely rare geo-neutrino particle from deep within Earth. The small number of anti-neutrinos detected, however, only a couple each month, helps to settle a long-standing question among geophysicists and geologists about whether our planet harbors a huge, natural nuclear reactor at its core. Geo-neutrinos are anti-neutrinos produced in the...
  • 'Telescope' buried a mile under the Antarctic ice to find source of cosmic rays

    10/18/2010 6:44:01 AM PDT · by LucyT · 18 replies
    Telegraph.co.uk ^ | 18 Oct 2010 | Richard Gray, Science Correspondent
    A "telescope" buried deep under Antarctic ice has detected the first signals that scientists hope will allow them to identify the source of mysterious particles that bombard Earth from outer space. For the past ten years scientists have been planning and building an ambitious experiment to explain the mystery of what produces the cosmic rays and elusive particles known as neutrinos, which constantly pepper our planet. more at Telegraph.co.UK
  • Roman ingots to shield particle detector [ Italian neutrino experiment ]

    06/11/2010 4:45:54 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies · 629+ views
    Nature ^ | April 15, 2010 | Nicola Nosengo
    The 120 lead ingots, each weighing about 33 kilograms, come from a larger load recovered 20 years ago from a Roman shipwreck, the remains of a vessel that sank between 80 B.C. and 50 B.C. off the coast of Sardinia. As a testimony to the extent of ancient Rome's manufacturing and trading capacities, the ingots are of great value to archaeologists, who have been preserving and studying them at the National Archaeological Museum in Cagliari, southern Sardinia. What makes the ingots equally valuable to physicists is the fact that over the past 2,000 years their lead has almost completely lost...
  • Missing piece found in particle puzzle: scientists...

    06/01/2010 4:08:50 PM PDT · by TaraP · 23 replies · 707+ views
    Reuters ^ | June 1st, 2010
    Research scientists announced on Monday they had identified the missing piece of a major puzzle involving the make-up of the universe by observing a neutrino particle change from one type to another. Science The CERN physics research center near Geneva, relaying the announcement from the Gran Sasso laboratory in central Italy, said the breakthrough was a major boost for its own LHC particle collider programme to unveil key secrets of the cosmos. According to physicists at Gran Sasso, after three years of monitoring multiple billions of muon neutrinos beamed to them through the earth from CERN 730 kms (456 miles)...
  • Particles Larger Than Galaxies Fill the Universe?

    06/05/2009 11:27:07 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 39 replies · 1,076+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | June 2, 2009 | Charles Q. Choi
    The oldest of the subatomic particles called neutrinos might each encompass a space larger than thousands of galaxies, new simulations suggest... According to quantum mechanics, the "size" of a particle such as a neutrino is defined by a fuzzy range of possible locations. We can only detect these particles when they interact with something such as an atom, which collapses that range into a single point in space and time. For neutrinos created recently, the ranges they can exist in are very, very small. But over the roughly 13.7-billion-year lifetime of the cosmos, "relic" neutrinos have been stretched out by...
  • Dark matter 'proof' called into doubt

    09/06/2006 12:18:33 PM PDT · by DaveLoneRanger · 12 replies · 1,725+ views
    EurekAlert! News ^ | September 6, 2006 | Staff
    When Douglas Clowe of the University of Arizona in Tucson announced on 21 August that his team had "direct proof of dark matter's existence", it seemed the issue had been settled. Now proponents of the so-called modified theories of gravity, who explain the motion of stars and galaxies without resorting to dark matter, have hit back and are suggesting that Clowe's team has jumped the gun. "One should not draw premature conclusions about the existence of dark matter without a careful analysis of alternative gravity theories," writes John Moffat, of the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada, who pioneered an...
  • Tohoku Univ. scientists find new neutrino

    12/07/2002 6:48:30 PM PST · by Lessismore · 32 replies · 623+ views
    Yomiuri Shimbun ^ | 2002-12-07
    An international team researching particle physics at Tohoku University has observed a new kind of neutrino--one of the building blocks of the universe--and almost certainly confirmed that the particles have mass, it was learned Tuesday. The neutrinos are different from the type detected by Tokyo University professor emeritus and Nobel laureate Masatoshi Koshiba and others, according to the researchers. Working at Tokohu University's Research Center for Neutrino Science neutrino observation facility, the researchers detected antielectron neutrinos, which are the antimatter of one of three types of neutrinos. They almost certainly confirmed that the neutrinos they detected had mass--just as the...
  • Florida Physicist Says Dark Matter, Extra Dimensions Related And Possibly Detectable

    05/20/2003 9:56:23 AM PDT · by RightWhale · 40 replies · 478+ views
    spacedaily.com ^ | 19 May 03 | staff
    Florida Physicist Says Dark Matter, Extra Dimensions Related And Possibly Detectable the universe is the "twilight zone" Gainesville -May 19, 2003 A team of scientists that includes a University of Florida physicist has suggested that two of the biggest mysteries in particle physics and astrophysics -- the existence of extra time and space dimensions and the composition of an invisible cosmic substance called dark matter -- may be connected. "For the most part, these two questions have been treated separately in the past, and for the first time we're making a direct link," said Konstantin Matchev, a UF assistant...
  • I've Got Your Big Bang--Cat-Style

    09/17/2008 7:22:58 AM PDT · by pharmamom · 161+ views
    WhenWeAreQueen ^ | September 17, 2008 | pharmamom
    Forget the superfast electrons or bosons or whateverinos and 17 miles of magnets. Just get yourself two cats at 10 pm; let them know that you are phenomenally tired, and go to bed. The only trick is to arrange their trajectories so that they are on a collision course. You’ll get your Big Bang. I guess you could call them mewons.
  • Physicists capture image of elusive neutrinos

    11/06/2007 8:58:29 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies · 88+ views
    Cosmos Magazine ^ | Wednesday, October 24, 2007 | Agence France-Presse
    European physicists have sent a neutrino on a 730-kilometre trip under the Earth's crust and taken a snapshot of the instant it slammed into lab detectors... In 2006, CERN started beaming neutrinos from its accelerator complex near Geneva, and have so far detected several hundred impacts in San Grasso. But the scientists have now taken the venture a step forward by starting to fill the San Grasso detector with small film plates which measure with high accuracy the cascade of particles that are produced when a neutrino impacts. These plates, called bricks, are each made of a sandwich of lead...
  • Sea floor records ancient Earth

    03/23/2007 11:06:03 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 66 replies · 4,679+ views
    BBC ^ | Friday, 23 March 2007, 09:09 GMT | Jonathan Fildes Science and technology reporter, BBC News
    The ancient sea floor was discovered in southwest Greenland A sliver of four-billion-year-old sea floor has offered a glimpse into the inner workings of an adolescent Earth.The baked and twisted rocks, now part of Greenland, show the earliest evidence of plate tectonics, colossal movements of the planet's outer shell. Until now, researchers were unable to say when the process, which explains how oceans and continents form, began. The unique find, described in the journal Science, shows the movements started soon after the planet formed. "Since the plate tectonic paradigm is the framework in which we interpret all modern-day geology,...
  • Light shed on mysterious particle

    03/31/2006 6:04:35 AM PST · by The_Victor · 83 replies · 1,321+ views
    BBC ^ | 3/31/2006 | Rebecca Morelle
    Physicists have confirmed that neutrinos, which are thought to have played a key role during the creation of the Universe, have mass. This is the first major finding of the US-based Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (Minos) experiment. The findings suggest that the Standard Model, which describes how the building blocks of the Universe behave and interact, needs a revision. Neutrinos are believed to be vital to our understanding of the Universe. But scientists know frustratingly little about these fundamental particles. The findings build on work carried out by Japanese physicists. Different 'flavours' Neutrinos are sometimes described as "ghost particles"...
  • South Pole Detector Could Yield Signs of Extra Dimensions

    02/15/2006 9:30:32 PM PST · by Marius3188 · 67 replies · 1,527+ views
    Northeastern University ^ | 26 Jan 2006 | Newswise
    Newswise — Researchers at Northeastern University and the University of California, Irvine say that scientists might soon have evidence for extra dimensions and other exotic predictions of string theory. Early results from a neutrino detector at the South Pole, called AMANDA, show that ghostlike particles from space could serve as probes to a world beyond our familiar three dimensions, the research team says. No more than a dozen high-energy neutrinos have been detected so far. However, the current detection rate and energy range indicate that AMANDA's larger successor, called IceCube, now under construction, could provide the first evidence for string...
  • It's The Little Things That Matter - Neutrinos

    03/04/2005 6:57:57 AM PST · by wallcrawlr · 12 replies · 553+ views
    Star Tribune ^ | March 4, 2005 | Larry Oakes
    SOUDAN, MINN. -- How long does it take to get from Chicago to Soudan? For tiny subatomic bits called neutrinos, 2.5 milliseconds with never a weather delay. Among the smallest known particles in the universe, neutrinos can take shortcuts straight through the Earth. Scientists hope they'll also provide a shortcut to solving some of the most intriguing mysteries of the universe. Today, at the federal Fermilab outside Chicago, U.S. Rep. Jim Oberstar, D-Minn., and other dignitaries will dedicate a $180 million project that will involve flinging trillions of neutrinos through the Earth to a massive detector in Soudan. The 6,000-ton...
  • Sloan Digital Sky Survey: Dark Energy, Inflation, & Neutrino Mass News

    07/22/2004 11:10:10 AM PDT · by RightWingAtheist · 14 replies · 532+ views
    SDSS Website (via Fermilab) ^ | July 19, 2004 | U. Seljak, P.MacDonald, & G.S. Ruderman
    Using observations of 3,000 quasars discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), scientists have made the most precise measurement to date of the cosmic clustering of diffuse hydrogen gas. These quasars--100 times more than have been used in such analyses in the past--are at distances of eight to ten billion light years, making them among the most distant objects known. Filaments of gas between the quasars and the Earth absorb light in the quasar's spectra, allowing researchers to map the gas distribution and to measure how clumpy the gas is on scales of one million light years. The degree...
  • Two Americans, Japanese Win Nobel Physics Prize

    10/08/2002 6:45:16 AM PDT · by Physicist · 35 replies · 601+ views
    Fox News ^ | October 8, 2002 | Associated Press
    <p>STOCKHOLM, Sweden — A Japanese and two American astrophysicists won the Nobel Prize in physics Tuesday for using some of the most obscure particles and waves in nature to increase understanding of the universe.</p> <p>Riccardo Giacconi, 71, of the Associated Universities Inc. in Washington, D.C., will get half of the $1 million prize for his role in ``pioneering contributions to astrophysics, which have led to the discovery of cosmic X-ray sources.''</p>