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Keyword: norse

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  • The truth about the Vikings

    06/17/2015 10:53:33 AM PDT · by WesternCulture · 73 replies
    youtube.com ^ | 02/082015 | WarriorHistory
    I am of Viking ancestry. In my part of the World, things like fighting spirit, balls and an appetite for destuction matter much. We also dispose of some decent brain power. Bohr and Nobel both were Scandinavians. My tiny Sweden is furthermore the only nation that successfully has took Moscow (- in 1610 Swedish field marshal De la Gardie entered Moscow and was cheered by large crowds. Everyone knows Swedish rule equals law and order. We might be a boring bunch, but we wholeheartedly hate chaos, injustice, disorder and crime. Leave it to us, we'll fix it.) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z1w7e46pHuc
  • South Iceland Cave Made before Settlement

    04/20/2015 1:42:26 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Iceland Review ^ | April 17, 2015 | Eyglo Svala Arnarsdottir
    Archaeologist Kristján Ahronson has concluded that Kverkarhellir, a manmade cave between waterfall Seljalandsfoss and farm Seljaland in South Iceland, was partly created around 800 AD, before the settlement of Iceland, which, according to sources, began in 874... “Kverkahellir, along with Seljalandshellir, is remarkable as it is part of a number of cave sites in southern Iceland, manngerðir hellar [‘manmade caves’], that are marked by cross sculpture.” ... Ahronson would not state that theories that the crosses may have been made by papar, monks from the British Isles who were said to have lived in Iceland before the Norse settlers, may...
  • Iceland to build first temple to Norse gods since Viking age

    Icelanders will soon be able to publicly worship at a shrine to Thor, Odin and Frigg with construction starting this month on the island’s first major temple to the Norse gods since the Viking age. Worship of the gods in Scandinavia gave way to Christianity around 1,000 years ago but a modern version of Norse paganism has been gaining popularity in Iceland.
  • World War II Veteran Given Viking Funeral; U.S. Coast Guard Agreed to Norse Send-Off

    10/03/2014 10:18:42 AM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 24 replies
    The Washington Times ^ | Thursday, October 2, 2014 | Douglas Ernst
    (U.S. Coast Guard photo) WWII veteran given Viking funeral; Coast Guard agreed to Norse send-off World War II veteran Andrew Haines decided years ago that he wanted a Norse-inspired funeral upon his death, and the U.S. Coast Guard obliged. Mr. Haines, who emigrated from Norway in 1927, scaled down blueprints for a 100-foot ship to a few feet in the years before he died. It was then up to the Coast Guard to decide whether it would ignite the boat and send-off Mr. Haines‘ cremated remains in accordance with his wishes. “Oh, I was thrilled,” Mr. Haines’ son Andy...
  • Movie for a Sunday afternoon: "The Vikings"(1958)

    11/10/2013 11:57:21 AM PST · by ReformationFan · 35 replies
    You Tube ^ | 1958 | Richard Fleischer
  • Seal diet provides clue to disappearance of Norse from Greenland

    11/21/2012 5:18:33 AM PST · by Renfield · 33 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | 11-2012
    Greenland’s Viking settlers, the Norse, disappeared suddenly and mysteriously from Greenland about 500 years ago. Natural disasters, climate change and the inability to adapt have all been proposed as theories to explain their disappearance. But now a Danish-Canadian research team has demonstrated the Norse society did not die out due to an inability to adapt to the Greenlandic diet: an isotopic analysis of their bones shows they ate plenty of seals.“Our analysis shows that the Norse in Greenland ate lots of food from the sea, especially seals,” says Jan Heinemeier, Institute of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University. “Our analysis shows...
  • Vikings were successful at invading, alright, but did they also bring.. wisdom?

    02/08/2012 9:13:50 PM PST · by WesternCulture · 39 replies · 2+ views
    http://www.beyondweird.com/high-one.html ^ | 02/09/2012 | WesternCulture
    Our offspring and culture is the most successful feature of the History of Mankind. Ancient Rome and Greece have nothing on Scandinavia of today, nor what we did some centuries after Rome came down. No, I'm not a Racist - and I furthermore am more than a true friend of Italy and Greece. But I do not believe there's a point in denying the fact that Viking Culture has played a major role in shaping the World of today. Have a look at it. Britain, North America, Scandinavia, Germany, etc. in one way or another, all were formed by the...
  • Kimmirut site suggests early European contact [ Vikings ]

    09/15/2008 8:58:05 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies · 124+ views
    Nunatsiaq News ^ | September 12, 2008 | Jane George
    Vikings - or perhaps other Europeans - may have set up housekeeping and traded with Inuit 1,000 years ago near today's community of Kimmirut. That's the picture of the past emerging from ancient artifacts found near Kimmirut, where someone collected Arctic hare fur and spun the fur into yarn and someone else carved notches into a wooden stick to record trading transactions. Dorset Inuit probably didn't make the yarn and tally sticks because yarn and wood weren't part of Inuit culture at that time, said Patricia Sutherland, an archeologist with the Canadian Museum of Civilization. Other artifacts from the area,...
  • DNA Tests Debunk Blond Inuit Legend

    10/31/2003 8:11:18 AM PST · by blam · 8 replies · 404+ views
    CBC News ^ | 10-28-2003 | CBC News staff
    DNA tests debunk blond Inuit legend Last Updated Tue, 28 Oct 2003 11:36:10 CAMBRIDGE BAY, NUNAVUT - Two Icelandic scientists have shot holes in the theory of the missing Norse tribes of the Arctic. Agnar Helgason and Gisli Palsson say their DNA tests have failed to find any evidence that Europeans mingled genetically with Inuit half a millennium ago. Agnar Helgason The scientists made the statement after a visit to Cambridge Bay last week. Rumours of blue-eyed, blond-haired Inuit have circulated through the Arctic since the turn of the century. They were thought to possibly descend from a group of...
  • DNA Study To Settle Ancient Mystery About Mingling Of Inuit, Vikings

    09/02/2003 11:38:57 AM PDT · by blam · 55 replies · 13,787+ views
    Cnews Canada ^ | 9-2-2003 | Bob Weber
    DNA study to settle ancient mystery about mingling of Inuit, Vikings By BOB WEBER (CP) - A centuries-old Arctic mystery may be weeks away from resolution as an Icelandic anthropologist prepares to release his findings on the so-called "Blond Eskimos" of the Canadian North. "It's an old story," says Gisli Palsson of the University of Iceland in Reykjavik. "We want to try to throw new light on the history of the Inuit." Stories about Inuit with distinct European features - blue eyes, fair hair, beards - living in the central Arctic have their roots in ancient tales of Norse settlements...
  • Inukpasuit, Inuit and Viking contact in ancient times

    02/18/2009 6:45:35 AM PST · by BGHater · 16 replies · 814+ views
    The Arctic Sounder ^ | 12 Feb 2009 | Ronald Brower
    There are many stories of ‘Qavlunaat,’ white-skinned strangers who were encountered in Inuit-occupied lands in times of old. Stories of contact between these foreign people and Inuit were passed down the generations and used mostly to scare children to behave “or the Qavlunaat will get them.” This sparked my curiosity to explore both sides of the encounters from written records and Inuit oral legends to see if some of these events can be correlated. One must recall that these legends were passed down orally in the Inupiaq language. Inuit myths and legends of contact with other people were passed from...
  • Strand of Ancient Yarn Suggests Early European Presence in Canada

    07/21/2004 10:54:03 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies · 483+ views
    New York Times ^ | May 8, 2001 | editors
    Patricia Sutherland, a Canadian archaeologist, announced that she had found a 10 foot strand of ancient yarn in a collection of Dorset artifacts from Northern Baffin Island that were lying uncataloged here at the Canadian Museum of Civilization, where she is a curator. Since the Dorset, forerunners of today's Inuit inhabitants of northern Canada, at the time dressed only in cut and stitched skins, the yarn implied contact with the Norse. Now, as she studies of Canadian collections of native artifacts, she says, "I am finding new Norse materials every couple of weeks. It suggests there was a significant...
  • 600-Year-Old American Indian Historical Account Has Old Norse Words

    03/06/2011 12:45:36 PM PST · by blam · 99 replies · 1+ views
    The Guard- blogspot ^ | 3-15-2007 | Larry Stroud
    600-Year-Old American Indian Historical Account Has Old Norse WordsBy Larry Stroud, Guard Associate EditorPublished on Thursday March 15, 2007 Vikings and Algonquins. The first American multi-culturalists? BIG BAY, Mich. — Two experts on ancient America may have solved not only the mysterious disappearance of Norse from the Western Settlement of Greenland in the 1300s, but also are deciphering Delaware (Lenape) Indian history, which they’re finding is written in the Old Norse language. The history tells how some of the Delaware’s ancestors migrated west to America across a frozen sea and intermarried with the Delaware and other Algonquin Indians. Myron Paine,...
  • On a mission to crack the Norse code [ Orkney ]

    01/14/2010 7:37:32 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies · 545+ views
    Scot Herald ^ | Monday, January 11, 2010 | Gavin Francis
    The guide's voice began to conjure other shadows from the past. The neolithic people crept away as she switched on her torch and began to tell us about the runic writing on the walls, now known to have been written by Norse inhabitants of Orkney some time in the 12th century. The tension dissolved and laughter broke out as she translated: "Ingibjorg the fair widow; many a woman has had to lower herself to come in here, despite her airs and graces." "I bedded Thorni. By Helgi." And then some boasting about how well-travelled these Norsemen were: "These runes were...
  • Take a break: Gothenburg's Archipelago

    04/28/2008 3:17:54 PM PDT · by WesternCulture · 11 replies · 191+ views
    www.thelocal.se ^ | 04242008 | Matt O'Leary
    Just a hop, skip and a jump from the city, Gothenburg's archipelago is a great place to get away from it all, writes Matt O'Leary. Gothenburg’s archipelago (or, more accurately, archipelagos, as the islands form two clearly-defined and differently-named clusters) consists of dozens of islands which stretch into the sea next to the city’s coastline. Each of the main islands shares a few defining characteristics which make them attractive to first-time visitors and annually-returning guests alike; however, this isn’t to say that they’re indistinguishable. Far from it, in fact: many of the individual islands have charm and features galore to...
  • Ancient Greenland Mystery Has A Simple Answer, It Seems

    11/29/2007 10:26:32 AM PST · by blam · 79 replies · 651+ views
    Christian Science Monitor ^ | 11-29-2007 | Colin Woodward
    Ancient Greenland mystery has a simple answer, it seemsFirst: A reproduction of Tjodhilde's Church stands in Brattahlid, Greenland. It was the first Christian church in North America. Colin Woodard Did the Norse colonists starve? Were they wiped out by the Inuit – or did they intermarry? No. Things got colder and they left. By Colin Woodard | Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor from the November 28, 2007 edition Reporter Colin Woodard describes an ecumenical service at a Greenland church built by legendary Norseman "Erik the Red."QASSIARSUK, Greenland - A shipload of visitors arrived in the fjord overnight, so Ingibjorg...
  • The scale and nature of Viking settlement in Ireland from Y-chromosome admixture analysis

    09/10/2006 5:44:28 AM PDT · by CobaltBlue · 63 replies · 2,077+ views
    European Journal of Human Genetics ^ | September 6, 2006 | Brian McEvoy, Claire Brady, Laoise T Moore and Daniel G Bradley
    The Vikings (or Norse) played a prominent role in Irish history but, despite this, their genetic legacy in Ireland, which may provide insights into the nature and scale of their immigration, is largely unexplored. Irish surnames, some of which are thought to have Norse roots, are paternally inherited in a similar manner to Y-chromosomes. The correspondence of Scandinavian patrilineal ancestry in a cohort of Irish men bearing surnames of putative Norse origin was examined using both slow mutating unique event polymorphisms and relatively rapidly changing short tandem repeat Y-chromosome markers. Irish and Scandinavian admixture proportions were explored for both systems...
  • Vikings/Norse in Minnesota

    10/26/2004 10:34:20 AM PDT · by DoloresCobbPhifer · 3 replies · 574+ views
    Did the Vikings Stay... Vatican Files May Offer Clues. / How did the Swedes end up in Minnesota?
  • Vikings/Norse in Minnesota

    10/26/2004 10:23:31 AM PDT · by DoloresCobbPhifer · 12 replies · 890+ views
    Did the Vikings Stay... Vatican Files May Offer Clues. / How did the Swedes end up in Minnesota?
  • Norse Stone Authenticity Put To Test (Kensington Runestone)

    11/16/2003 9:57:09 PM PST · by blam · 38 replies · 2,338+ views
    AP ^ | 10-03-2003 | Travis Reed
    Posted on Fri, Oct. 03, 2003 ALEXANDRIA, MINN.Norse stone authenticity put to the test BY TRAVIS REED Associated Press Its authenticity may forever be in question, but the Kensington Runestone is on its way to Sweden, where a group of scientists will study it and lend their opinion to the question of whether the rock is really a centuries-old artifact or a 200-pound hoax. Scientists working with the Runestone Museum in Alexandria, Minn., are traveling with the stone and say they have new geologic findings that suggest it was buried far longer than anyone was settled in western Minnesota. The...