Free Republic 3rd Quarter Fundraising Target: $85,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $83,696
98%  
Woo hoo!! And now less than $1.4k to go!! We can do this!! Thank you all very much!

Keyword: oceanacidification

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Scripps blockbuster: Ocean acidification happens all the time — naturally

    10/05/2012 12:01:24 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 2 replies
    JoNova ^ | January 9th, 2012 | Joanne
    There goes another scare campaign.Until recently we had very little data about real time changes in ocean pH around the world. Finally autonomous sensors placed in a variety of ecosystems “from tropical to polar, open-ocean to coastal, kelp forest to coral reef” give us the information we needed.It turns out that far from being a stable pH, spots all over the world are constantly changing. One spot in the ocean varied by an astonishing 1.4 pH units regularly. All our human emissions are projected by models to change the world’s oceans by about 0.3 pH units over the next 90...
  • One vulnerable coral type adapts to ocean acidification in just 6 months

    10/04/2012 11:37:55 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 11 replies
    JoNova ^ | October 5th, 2012 | Joanne
    We already know that pH varies naturally across the oceans of the world. In some sites, it varies more in a single day than global oceans are likely to face in a century. But cold water corals live in deep water, are slow growing, and hard to study.Six years ago, experts in cold water corals were telling us how they would be likely to fall victim to ocean acidification first, and that they believed this for good reasons but with little experimental data. But about a year ago data came out (by one of those same experts) showing that rather...
  • Coral Reef Scientists Issue Call for Action (Agitprop alert!)

    07/11/2012 8:47:00 AM PDT · by neverdem · 12 replies
    ScienceInsider ^ | 10 July 2012 | Dennis Normile
    Enlarge Image Evidence of the dire condition of coral reefs around the world is being presented in abundance at the 12th International Coral Reef Symposium that got underway yesterday in Cairns, Australia. And scientists are calling for action to stop the losses: More than 2500 marine researchers and managers at the conference and around the world have signed a Consensus Statement on Climate Change and Coral Reefs that calls on "all governments to ensure the future of coral reefs, through global action to reduce the emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, and via improved local protection of...
  • A Rising Tide of Acid Off California

    06/25/2012 1:27:18 AM PDT · by neverdem · 69 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 14 June 2012 | Robert F. Service
    Foreboding. Animation of changes in ocean acidification over time in the California Current System. The left side shows the depth of aragonite saturation, and the right side shows the surface ocean pH. Courtesy of Nicolas Gruber and Claudine Hauri More Science News Videos Humanity's use of fossil fuels sends 35 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere every year. That has already begun to change the fundamental chemistry of the world's oceans, steadily making them more acidic. Now, a new high resolution computer model reveals that over the next 4 decades, rising ocean acidity will likely have...
  • Scripps blockbuster: Ocean acidification happens all the time — naturally

    01/08/2012 8:33:36 PM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 18 replies
    JoNova ^ | January 9th, 2012 | Joanne
    There goes another scare campaign.Until recently we had very little data about real time changes in ocean pH around the world. Finally autonomous sensors placed in a variety of ecosystems “from tropical to polar, open-ocean to coastal, kelp forest to coral reef” give us the information we needed.It turns out that far from being a stable pH, spots all over the world are constantly changing. One spot in the ocean varied by an astonishing 1.4 pH units regularly. All our human emissions are projected by models to change the world’s oceans by about 0.3 pH units over the next 90...
  • The fishes and the coral live happily in the CO2 bubble plume

    12/28/2011 11:03:41 AM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 18 replies
    watts up with that? ^ | December 28, 2011 | Anthony Watts
    Guest post by David ArchibaldWillis Eschenbach’s post on lab work on coral response to elevated carbon dioxide levels, and The Reef Abides, leads to a large scale, natural experiment in Papua New Guinea. There are several places at the eastern end of that country where carbon dioxide is continuously bubbling up through healthy looking coral reef, with fish swimming around and all that that implies.Coral Reef at Dobu Island with carbon dioxide bubbling through it (photo: Bob Halstead)What that implies is that ocean acidification is no threat at all. If the most delicate, fragile, iconic ecosystem of them all can...
  • The Ocean Is Not Getting Acidified

    12/28/2011 9:50:28 AM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 14 replies · 1+ views
    watts up with that? ^ | December 27, 2011 | Willis Eschenbach
    Guest Post by Willis EschenbachThere’s an interesting study out on the natural pH changes in the ocean. I discussed some of these pH changes a year ago in my post “The Electric Oceanic Acid Test“. Before getting to the new study, let me say a couple of things about pH.The pH scale measures from zero to fourteen. Seven is neutral, because it is the pH of pure water. Below seven is acidic. Above seven is basic. This is somewhat inaccurately but commonly called “alkaline”. Milk is slightly acidic. Baking soda is slightly basic (alkaline).Figure 1. pH scale, along with some...
  • Ocean Acidification: Chicken Little of the Sea Strikes Again (new Reason for Grant Studies)

    01/11/2011 6:36:04 AM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 19 replies
    Watts Up With That? ^ | January 10, 2011 | David Middleton
    Guest Post by David MiddletonIntroductionAs global warming morphs into climate change and global climate disruption and anthropogenic CO2 emissions give way to stochastic variability, clouds, the Sun, cosmic rays and our oceans as the primary drivers of climate change, environmental extremists are raising a new CO2-driven ecological disaster scenario to hysterical levels: Ocean acidification. Claims have been made that oceanic pH levels have declined from ~8.2 to ~8.1 since the mid-1700′s. This pH decline (acidification) has been attributed to anthropogenic CO2 emissions – This should come as no surprise because the pH estimates are largely derived from atmospheric CO2 concentrations (Orr et al.,...
  • Jellyfish are taking over the oceans: ( Population surge due to rising acidity of world’s seas...)

    12/06/2010 10:59:00 AM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 41 replies
    EPOCA ^ | Monday, 6 December 2010 | EPOCA
    Jellyfish are taking over the oceans: Population surge as rising acidity of world’s seas kills predators Britain’s beaches could soon be inundated with records numbers of jellyfish, marine experts warned today.Scientists say the number of jellyfish are on the rise thanks to the increasing acidity of the world’s oceans.The warning comes in a new report into ocean acidification – an often overlooked side effect of burning fossil fuel.Studies have shown that higher levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere doesn’t just trigger climate change but can make the oceans more acid.Since the start of the industrial revolution, acidity levels of...
  • EPA to allow states address rising ocean acidity

    03/11/2010 4:47:41 PM PST · by I got the rope · 55 replies · 1,567+ views
    Yahoo News ^ | 11 Mar 10 | GENE JOHNSON
    EPA to let states address rising ocean acidity By GENE JOHNSON, Associated Press Writer Gene Johnson, Associated Press Writer – 1 hr 22 mins ago SEATTLE – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says it will consider ways the states can address rising levels of carbon dioxide in oceans. The agency on Thursday settled a lawsuit filed last year by the Center for Biological Diversity in San Francisco. The problem stems from oceans absorbing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and results in the rising acidity of the water. It seriously threatens shellfish and other marine life. The lawsuit accused the EPA...
  • Copenhagen climate conference: Ocean acidification could leave one billion people hungry (Huh?)

    12/14/2009 11:21:06 AM PST · by markomalley · 48 replies · 1,024+ views
    The Telegraph ^ | 11/14/2009 | Louise Gray
    As the world struggles to reach an agreement on global warming, the UK Environment Secretary said pollution is having a particularly damaging effect on the two thirds of the world covered by oceans. He explained that carbon dioxide is being absorbed at a faster rate than at any time in the previous 21 million years, causing ocean acidification. The process dissolves the shells and skeletons of key marine life and is in danger of destroying whole ecosystems. “Why should we worry about this?” he asked “Because there is marine life that is affected by that change. In particular animals and...
  • CO2 a threat under Clean Water Act? - EPA agrees to study acidic seas; move adds to regulation...

    04/14/2009 8:11:59 PM PDT · by neverdem · 11 replies · 856+ views
    msnbc.com ^ | April 14, 2009 | NA
    EPA agrees to study acidic seas; move adds to regulation momentum The Obama administration took another step toward regulating carbon dioxide, issuing a notice Tuesday that the Environmental Protection Agency will review whether those emissions should fall under the Clean Water Act. The EPA earlier this year determined that C02 should be regulated under the Clean Air Act due to its impact on temperatures. But Tuesday's notice — soliciting scientific data as to what extent seas are made more acidic by C02 — could extend regulation out to U.S. waters. The notice was in response to a petition filed by...
  • Biological Effects of "Ocean Acidification"

    02/03/2009 2:49:11 PM PST · by neverdem · 19 replies · 663+ views
    co2science.org ^ | 4 February 2009 | Sherwood, Keith and Craig Idso
    As the atmosphere's CO2 content continues to rise, the pH of the world's oceans is expected to decline, driving a phenomenon described by climate alarmists as ocean acidification, to which they are already ascribing a host of imminent catastrophic consequences. Writing in the introduction to a special "theme section" of the journal Marine Ecology Progress Series, however, Vézina and Hoegh-Guldberg (2008) state that "without an understanding of how such a slow and continuous decline in pH is likely to affect ocean ecosystems, we may miss important aspects of this global ocean pH change," and that "to compound this uncertainty, recent...