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Keyword: oldkingdom

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  • Mysterious Inscription on the Great Pyramid

    01/29/2005 9:57:01 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 128 replies · 2,172+ views
    RobertSchoch.net ^ | 2004 | Robert Schoch
    The inscription shown below occurs above the original entrance of the Great Pyramid.  I don't think it is original, but it could be relatively old.  If you have any idea what it may mean, I would greatly appreciate hearing from you.
  • Secret of the Great Pyramid...hidden chamber is set to be revealed by an inflatable robotic blimp...

    12/14/2017 7:38:52 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 71 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | Thursday, December 14th 2017 | Harry Pettit
    The device enters rooms and chambers through a 3.5 centimetre hole drilled through a wall by researchers outside. It is made up of two robots, a tubular machine equipped with a high definition camera and a probe that explores the structure via a small, inflatable blimp. After the first robot has taken a series of reconnaissance images, the drone is pushed through the drilled hole before inflating itself within the chamber. Packed with an array of sensors and cameras, the remote-controlled device collects data and takes photos or video without causing damage to the fragile building. After it has completed...
  • Maltese claims extraordinary discovery in Sahara desert

    12/29/2007 8:01:23 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 74 replies · 176+ views
    Independent Online ^ | Saturday, December 29, 2007 | unattributed
    Mark Borda and Mahmoud Marai, from Malta and Egypt respectively, were surveying a field of boulders on the flanks of a hill deep in the Libyan desert some 700 kilometres west of the Nile Valley when engravings on a large rock consisting of hieroglyphic writing, Pharaonic cartouche, an image of the king and other Pharaonic iconography came into view. Mr Borda would not reveal the precise location in order to protect the site... "The consensus among Egyptologists is that the Egyptians did not penetrate this desert any further than the area around Djedefre's Water Mountain. This is a sandstone hill...
  • Great Pyramid of Giza Is Slightly Lopsided

    06/21/2016 12:59:52 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 117 replies
    www.livescience.com ^ | June 20, 2016 07:30am ET | By Owen Jarus
    Built for the pharaoh Khufu about 4,500 years ago, the Great Pyramid at Giza is considered a wonder of the ancient world. Credit: Nina Aldin Thune, CC Attribution 2.5 Generic ================================================================================================== The Great Pyramid of Giza may be a Wonder of the Ancient World, but it's not perfect: Its base is a little lopsided because its builders made a teensy mistake when constructing it, new research reveals. The west side of the pyramid is slightly longer than the east side, scientists have found. Although the difference is very slight, it's enough that a modern-day research team, led by engineer Glen...
  • Teen Illegally Scales Egypt's Great Pyramid

    01/31/2016 7:51:54 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 63 replies
    Newser ^ | Arden Dier,
    Though climbing the oldest and largest of the three pyramids could result in a three-year jail term, or something far worse if he lost his footing, "I thought the photos would be worth it," Ciesielski says, per the Telegraph. Armed with a GoPro camera, "I just started climbing." He took the first few steps quickly "so nobody would follow me and take me down," he tells Business Insider. It wasn't until he was about halfway up the 455-foot structure that police finally spotted him. Ciesielski kept climbing and reached the top in about eight minutes. Spectacular images on his blog...
  • Before Hatshepsut: Early Egyptian Queen Revealed in Hieroglyphs

    01/19/2016 11:23:30 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Live Science ^ | January 19, 2016 | Owen Jarus
    About 60 drawings and hieroglyphic inscriptions, dating back around 5,000 years, have been discovered at a site called Wadi Ameyra in Egypt’s Sinai Desert. Carved in stone they were created by mining expeditions sent out by early Egyptian pharaohs archaeologists say. They reveal new information on the early pharaohs. For instance, one inscription the researchers found tells of a queen named Neith-Hotep who ruled Egypt 5,000 years ago as regent to a young pharaoh named Djer. Archaeologists estimate that the earliest carvings at Wadi Ameyra date back around 5,200 years, while the most recent date to the reign of a...
  • Did Egypt's Old Kingdom Die -- or Simply Fade Away?

    12/28/2015 4:46:55 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    National Geographic ^ | December 24, 2015 | Andrew Lawler
    For nearly a millennium, Egypt's early pharaohs presided over a prosperous and wealthy state that built countless temples and palaces, enormous public works, and the famous Giza pyramids. Much of that prosperity depended on the regular inundations of the Nile River in a country that otherwise would be only desert. Then, around 2200 B.C., ancient texts suggest that Egypt's so-called Old Kingdom gave way to a disastrous era of foreign invasions, pestilence, civil war, and famines severe enough to result in cannibalism. In the past decade, climate data revealed that a severe and long-term drought afflicted the region during this...
  • Ancient megadrought entombed dodos in poisonous fecal cocktail

    04/30/2015 7:13:19 AM PDT · by Utilizer · 55 replies
    AAAS ^ | 28 April 2015 5:15 pm | David Shultz
    Nine hundred kilometers off the east coast of Madagascar lies the tiny island paradise of Mauritius. The waters are pristine, the beaches bright white, and the average temperature hovers between 22°C and 28°C (72°F to 82°F) year-round. But conditions there may not have always been so idyllic. A new study suggests that about 4000 years ago, a prolonged drought on the island left many of the native species, such as dodo birds and giant tortoises, dead in a soup of poisonous algae and their own feces. The die-off happened in an area known as Mare aux Songes, which once held...
  • Climate change caused empire's fall, tree rings reveal

    05/31/2014 6:06:31 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 45 replies
    Cornell Chronicle ^ | May 14, 2014 | Linda B. Glaser
    A handful of tree ring samples stored in an old cigar box have shed unexpected light on the ancient world, thanks to research by archaeologist Sturt Manning and collaborators at Cornell, Arizona, Chicago, Oxford and Vienna, forthcoming in the June issue of the Journal of Archaeological Science. The samples were taken from an Egyptian coffin; Manning also examined wood from funeral boats buried near the pyramid of Sesostris III. He used a technique called “dendro radiocarbon wiggle matching,” which calibrates radiocarbon isotopes found in the sample tree rings with patterns known from other places in the world that have already...
  • The Ghost Empire - Climate Change, Global Warming, Drought and Desertification

    06/09/2013 7:45:49 AM PDT · by blam · 16 replies
    TMO ^ | 6-9-2013 | Richard Mills
    The Ghost Empire - Climate Change, Global Warming, Drought and Desertification Commodities / Climate Change June 08, 2013 - 07:29 PM GMT By: Richard Mills Drought is a normal recurring feature of the climate in most parts of the world. It doesn’t get the attention of a tornado, hurricane or flood. Instead, it’s a slower and less obvious, a much quieter disaster creeping up on us unawares. Climate change is currently warming many regions, overall warmer temperatures increase the frequency and intensity of heat waves and droughts. We can prepare for some climate change consequences with public education, water conservation...
  • Ancient City Mysteriously Survived Mideast Civilization Collapse

    07/30/2011 7:26:54 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    LiveScience ^ | Thursday, July 28, 2011 | Owen Jarus
    As ancient civilizations across the Middle East collapsed, possibly in response to a global drought about 4,200 years ago, archaeologists have discovered that one settlement in Syria not only survived, but expanded. Their next question is -- why did Tell Qarqur, a site in northwest Syria, grow at a time when cities across the Middle East were being abandoned? "There was widespread abandonment of many of the largest archaeological sites and ancient cities in the region and also large numbers of smaller sites," said Jesse Casana, a professor of anthropology at the University of Arkansas. "At Tell Qarqur and probably...
  • Comets And Disaster In The Bronze Age

    04/30/2007 4:38:09 PM PDT · by blam · 63 replies · 2,021+ views
    British Archaeology ^ | December 1997 | Benny Peiser
    Comets and disaster in the Bronze AgeCosmic impact is gaining ground as an explanation of the collapse of civilisations, writes Benny Peiser At some time around 2300BC, give or take a century or two, a large number of the major civilisations of the world collapsed. The Akkadian Empire in Mesopotamia, the Old Kingdom in Egypt, the Early Bronze Age societies in Israel, Anatolia and Greece, as well as the Indus Valley civilisation in India, the Hilmand civilisation in Afghanistan and the Hongshan Culture in China - the first urban civilisations in the world - all fell into ruin at more...
  • Climate Key To Sphinx's Riddle

    01/08/2007 11:27:02 AM PST · by blam · 44 replies · 1,890+ views
    Scotsman ^ | 1-7-2006 | Jeremy Watson
    Climate key to Sphinx's riddle JEREMY WATSON GLOBAL warming is one of the greatest threats to present day civilisation but work by a team of Scots scientists suggests the ancient Egyptians may have been earlier victims of climate change. The pharaohs ruled their empire for hundreds of years, spreading culture, architecture and the arts before it collapsed into economic ruin. Why that happened is one of the great mysteries of history. Now a team of scientists from Scotland and Wales believe the answer lies beneath the waters of Lake Tana, high in the Ethiopian Highlands, and the source of the...
  • Evidence for Major Impact Events in the late Third Millennium BC

    09/04/2002 4:48:54 PM PDT · by vannrox · 90 replies · 15,336+ views
    The Climax of a Turbulent Millennium: Evidence for Major Impact Events in the late Third Millennium BC Timo Niroma, Helsinki, Finland The First Intermediate PeriodThe Curse of AkkadTroy IIgThird Millennium BC Climate Change and Old World CollapseNatural Catastrophes during Bronze Age Civilisations Two separate cataclysmsSodom and GomorrahWhere did the impacts occur? The First Intermediate Period Selections from "The Egyptians" by C. Aldred (London 1987). "At this distance of time, the overthrow of the Old Kingdom at the end of the Sixth Dynasty has all the appearance of being sudden and complete. "Recent research has attributed the abrupt nature of...
  • Comets,Meteors & Myth: New Evidence For Toppled Civilizations And Bibical Tales

    08/11/2002 5:32:56 PM PDT · by blam · 19 replies · 3,661+ views
    Science Tuesday/Space.com ^ | 11-13-2002 | Robert Roy Brit
    Comets, Meteors & Myth: New Evidence for Toppled Civilizations and Biblical Tales By Robert Roy Britt Senior Science Writer posted: 07:00 am ET 13 November 2001 "...and the seven judges of hell ... raised their torches, lighting the land with their livid flame. A stupor of despair went up to heaven when the god of the storm turned daylight into darkness, when he smashed the land like a cup." -- An account of the Deluge from the Epic of Gilgamesh, circa 2200 B.C. If you are fortunate enough to see the storm of shooting stars predicted for the Nov. 18...
  • Deconstructing the Walls of Jerico

    06/22/2002 5:13:53 AM PDT · by Seti 1 · 21 replies · 1,779+ views
    Following 70 years of intensive excavations in the Land of Israel, archaeologists have found out: The patriarchs' acts are legendary stories, we did not sojourn in Egypt or make an exodus, we did not conquer the land. Neither is there any mention of the empire of David and Solomon. Those who take an interest have known these facts for years, but Israel is a stubborn people and doesn't want to hear about it. This is what archaeologists have learned from their excavations in the Land of Israel: the Israelites were never in Egypt, did not wander in the desert, did...
  • Virtual explorers comb Egypt's ruins

    06/18/2007 10:00:11 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies · 225+ views
    Boston Globe ^ | Monday, June 18, 2007 | Pamela Ferdinand
    From the comfort of his study in Norwich, England, Colin Newton, a retired television repairman, explores rare Giza maps and expedition diaries in an effort to catalog all Old Kingdom tombs. Meanwhile, Laurel Flentye, an Egyptologist who specializes in art and archaeology, downloads excavation photos and roams inside subterranean chambers, zooming in on relief decorations in tombs around the Sphinx and Great Pyramid from her Cairo home... The Giza Archives Project, established by Boston's Museum of Fine Arts in January 2005, aims to become the world's central online repository for all archaeological activity at the necropolis, beginning with the major...
  • Great Pyramid may still contain Khufu's intact pharaonic tomb

    07/13/2005 9:56:38 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies · 1,229+ views
    Daily Star (Lebanon) ^ | Thursday, July 14, 2005 | Kyle Cassidy
    Both shafts terminate somewhere within the structure as there are no holes in the outside of the pyramid. In the past, scholars have speculated that because of their alignment with the North Star and constellation Orion, these shafts could be symbolic exits for King Khufu's ka, or soul. Many archaeologists today find this unlikely because these small openings are unique to this pyramid. At the time of Khufu's reign, false doors served as symbolic gateways to the afterlife. As to whether the shafts terminate in larger rooms or not are still anybody's guess.
  • The Rise and Fall and Rise of Zahi Hawass

    05/25/2013 6:49:06 AM PDT · by Renfield · 17 replies
    Smithsonian Magazine ^ | 6/2013 | Joshua Hammer
    Zahi Hawass doesn’t like what he’s seeing. Clad in his familiar denim safari suit and wide-brimmed bush hat, the famed archaeologist is standing inside the burial vault of the Step Pyramid of Djoser, a six-tiered, lopsided mound of limestone blocks constructed nearly 5,000 years ago. The huge, gloomy space is filled with scaffolding. A restoration and conservation project, at Saqqara outside Cairo, initiated by Hawass in 2002, has been shoring up the sagging ceiling and walls and staving off collapse. But the February 2011 revolution that toppled Hosni Mubarak—and also ended Hawass’ controversial reign as the supreme chief of all...
  • Ancient statesman skeleton found in Giza

    03/24/2014 12:12:37 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Egypt Independent ^ | Monday, March 24, 2014 | Edited translation from Al-Masry Al-Youm
    In collaboration with the Ministry of Antiquities, a Czech mission working in the area of Abu Seer in Giza discovered a skeleton of a senior statesman called Nefer who lived under rule of the King Nefer-ir-ka-Re of the fifth dynasty from ancient Egypt’s Pharaonic era. The team team was resuming studies on his tomb, which was discovered last year, when Nefer's skeleton was found inside the coffin, according to Minister of Antiquities Mohamed Ibrahim. Ali al-Asfar, head of the Egyptian antiquities sector, Nefer’s tomb was rocky and unfinished, located within mortuary complex for burial that consists of four corridors. The...