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Keyword: origins

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  • The last 15 years of Saddam Hussein's regime are crucial to understanding ISIS

    09/28/2015 8:58:19 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 16 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 09/28/2015 | Kyle Orton, Now Lebanon
    American intelligence analysts have been pressured into giving a more positive assessment of the progress of the war against ISIS, it has been reported, confirming what was obvious to everyone not subject to influence from the White House: the anti-ISIS campaign is failing. To devise an effective strategy involves understanding where ISIS came from, and that involves examining the Saddam Hussein regime. Saddam is commonly regarded as the quintessential secularist, and he was initially. But the Saddam regime Islamized over its last 15 years, effectively creating a religious movement under Saddam's leadership, giving additional space and power to the non-governmental...
  • Scientists dispute ‘new’ species discovery: Critics say Lead Researcher's claim jumps the gun

    09/18/2015 6:52:32 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 30 replies
    WORLD ^ | 09/11/2015 | DANIEL JAMES DEVINE
    Deep inside a cave 30 miles from Johannesburg, South Africa, a tight crevasse guards the passageway to what was, until recently, the grave of at least 15 human-like individuals. Their bones and teeth—more than 1,500 fragments in all—lay in a heap in the bottom of a pitch-black chamber for ages, until two skinny spelunkers with flashlights squeezed into the earth deep enough to find them. Now those bones are in the hands of scientists who say they belong to a new species of prehumans, with a mix of features typically associated with modern man or fossils belonging to Australopithecina, a...
  • New Species of Human Relative Discovered in South African Cave (Homo Naledi)

    09/10/2015 6:00:52 AM PDT · by blam · 34 replies
    September 10, 2015 JOHANNESBURG—The discovery of a new species of human relative was announced today (Sept. 10) by the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits University), the National Geographic Society and the South African Department of Science and Technology/National Research Foundation (DST/NRF). Besides shedding light on the origins and diversity of our genus, the new species, Homo naledi, appears to have intentionally deposited bodies of its dead in a remote cave chamber, a behaviour previously thought limited to humans. The finds are described in two papers published in the scientific journal eLife and reported in the cover story of the October...
  • Homo naledi: New species of human ancestor discovered in South Africa

    09/10/2015 5:12:13 AM PDT · by ilovesarah2012 · 42 replies ^ | September 10, 2015 | David McKenzie and Hamilton Wende
    Rising Star Cave, South Africa (CNN)When an amateur caver and university geologist arrived at Lee Berger's house one night in late 2013 with a fragment of a fossil jawbone in hand, they broke out the beers and called National Geographic. Berger, a professor at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa, had unearthed some major finds before. But he knew he had something big on his hands. What he didn't know at the time is that it would shake up our understanding of the progress of human evolution and even pose new questions about our identity. Two years...
  • A scholar in the desert {Hagarism: the origins of Islam} - Patricia Crone

    08/07/2015 12:18:56 AM PDT · by Cronos · 25 replies
    The Economist ^ | 1 August 2015 | the Economist
    ISLAM arose with remarkable speed and mystery. Patricia Crone’s well-stocked mind, clear prose and unflinching intellectual honesty were devoted to explaining why. She had little time for Islam’s own accounts of its origins: “debris” as far as historians were concerned, and hopelessly inconsistent. Far better, she reckoned, to fill the gap with contemporary sources and knowledge of other cultures, from messianic Maoris to Icelanders. That required both personal and intellectual bravery. The central beliefs of Islam, such as the way the Koran took shape, the life of Muhammad and Islam’s relations with other religions, are sensitive subjects. Outside scrutiny can...
  • 'How the Yardbirds revolutionized rock live on the BBC'

    07/30/2015 10:25:43 AM PDT · by the scotsman · 52 replies
    Rolling Stone ^ | 24th July 2015 | Colin Fleming
    'If you wish to launch a humdinger of an argument – and one you might win – sidle up to just about any 1960s rock fan and offer the opinion that it was not the Beatles, the Stones, Pink Floyd, Hendrix, the Velvet Underground or the Byrds who were the key sonic inventors of the decade. Nope: wasn't any of those collectives of aural innovation who did quite what the Yardbirds did in terms of overhauling sound, never mind that they couldn't keep a steady lineup and were pretty much unclassifiable, save as the dudes who influenced everybody else and...
  • The Origins of Political Correctness

    06/18/2015 1:21:42 PM PDT · by cblue55 · 49 replies
    Acuracy in Academia Address ^ | February 5, 2000 | Bill Lind
    An Accuracy in Academia Address by Bill Lind Variations of this speech have been delivered to various AIA conferences including the 2000 Consevative University at American University Where does all this stuff that you’ve heard about this morning – the victim feminism, the gay rights movement, the invented statistics, the rewritten history, the lies, the demands, all the rest of it – where does it come from? For the first time in our history, Americans have to be fearful of what they say, of what they write, and of what they think. They have to be afraid of using the...
  • Researchers May Have Solved 'Missing Link' Mystery in Origin of Life

    06/09/2015 8:54:48 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 96 replies
    How did life on Earth begin? It's been one of modern biology's greatest mysteries: How did the chemical soup that existed on the early Earth lead to the complex molecules needed to create living, breathing organisms? Now, researchers say they've found the missing link. Between 4.6 billion and 4.0 billion years ago, there was probably no life on Earth. The planet's surface was at first molten and even as it cooled, it was getting pulverized by asteroids and comets. All that existed were simple chemicals. But about 3.8 billion years ago, the bombardment stopped, and life arose. Most scientists think...
  • The Story of Earth: How Life and Rocks Co-Evolved

    03/31/2015 8:58:02 PM PDT · by onedoug · 27 replies
    Carnegie Institution for Science ^ | 29 JUL 2014 | Robert Hazen, Lecturer
    Incredible (IMHO) exposition of the co-dependence of "evolutionary" minerology and biology.
  • On the Origin, Essence and Purpose of Law

    03/10/2015 2:19:21 PM PDT · by NYer · 13 replies
    Integrated Catholic Life ^ | March 10, 2015 | STEVEN JONATHAN RUMMELSBURG
    Saint Thomas Aquinas, The Angelic Doctor The grammar of existence is bound up in the Law and it is and always has been for us to read reality rightly, to hear rightly, to speak rightly, and with human reason to discover the law by which we are to live if we are to live out our intended purpose. There is no conversation more necessary in the present age than the dialogue on the meaning of law. It is in manÂ’s nature to bind himself to principles in the form of rules that guide human action. These rules are the laws...
  • Libyan ambassador: International pullout after fall of Qaddafi allowed ISIS to 'get strong'

    02/17/2015 10:42:10 AM PST · by McGruff · 18 replies
    Fox News ^ | February 17, 2015
    The international community’s loss of interest in Libya after the fall of former ruler Muammar Qaddafi created the vacuum that allowed ISIS “to get strong,” its ambassador to the United Nations told Fox News Tuesday, following the release of an ISIS video in which 21 Egyptian Coptic Christians were beheaded on Libyan beaches. But in the meantime, the “most important thing right now is to lift the arms embargo on Libya so that the national army has the means to battle Daesh (the Arabic name for ISIS/Islamic State),” Dabbashi told Fox News.
  • HSBC Bank: Secret Origins To Laundering The World's Drug Money

    02/16/2015 9:30:43 AM PST · by Nachum · 11 replies
    zero hedge ^ | 2/16/15 | Tyler Durden
    Submitted by the Drug Trafficking & Narco-Terrorism Department of GreatGameIndia HSBC Bank : Secret Origins To 26/11 Mumbai Attacks#SwissLeaks what the media has termed it is a trove of secret documents from HSBC’s Swiss private banking arm that reveals names of account holders and their balances for the year 2006-07. They come from over 200 countries, the total balance over $100 billion. But nowhere has the HSBC Swiss list touched off a more raging political debate than in India.That’s why to obtain and investigate the Indian names, The Indian Express partnered in a three-month-long global project with the Washington-based International...
  • Scientists abandon highly publicized claim about cosmic find

    01/31/2015 6:03:42 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 26 replies
    AP ^ | 01/30/2015 2:17 PM
    Scientists who made headlines last March by announcing that they'd found long-sought evidence about the early universe are now abandoning that claim. New data show that their cosmic observations no longer back up that conclusion, they say. The original announcement caused a sensation because it appeared to show evidence that the universe ballooned rapidly a split-second after its birth, in what scientist call cosmic inflation. That idea had been widely believed, but researchers had hoped to bolster it by finding a particular trait in light left over from the very early universe. That signal is what the researchers claimed they...
  • US scientists may have resolved 'Darwin's dilemma'

    11/16/2014 8:04:49 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 272 replies
    Fox News ^ | 11/15/2014 | By Matt Cantor
    Charles Darwin worried about a possible hole in his theory of evolution, but some American scientists may just have plugged it. For about a billion years after the dawn of life on Earth, organisms didn't evolve all that much. Then about 600 million years ago came the "Cambrian explosion." Everything changed relatively quickly, with all kinds of plants and animals emerging—which doesn't quite seem to fit with Darwin's theory of slow change, hence "Darwin's dilemma." Now, within a few days of each other, two new studies have appeared that could explain the shift, ABC News reports. One, by scientists at...
  • The Earliest Group Of Modern Humans To Branch Off Survived Until Just 2,300 Years Ago

    10/03/2014 8:26:08 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 17 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 10/03/2014 | STEPHEN LUNTZ, IFL SCIENCE
    Oxford Journals, Genome Biology and EvolutionBurial site and skeletal remains of the St. Helena marine forager, who was at least 50 years old when he died DNA from a 2,300-year-old skeleton suggests that the earliest known group of modern humans to branch off from the wider genetic population survived until astonishingly recently. The finding supports the case that southern, rather than eastern, Africa is humanity's ancestral home.Mitochondrial DNA, passed on only from the mother, demonstrates that all humanity is descended from a single ancestor around 200,000 years ago. Archaeological evidence points to the Omo Valley, where fossil evidence suggests that Homo sapiens roamed Africa 195,000...
  • Europeans drawn from three ancient 'tribes'

    09/21/2014 1:32:49 PM PDT · by Berlin_Freeper · 22 replies
    BBC ^ | 17 September 2014 | Paul Rincon
    ... Pigmentation genes carried by the hunters and farmers showed that, while the dark hair, brown eyes and pale skin of the early farmer would look familiar to us, the hunter-gatherers would stand out if we saw them on a street today. "It really does look like the indigenous West European hunter gatherers had this striking combination of dark skin and blue eyes that doesn't exist any more," Prof Reich told BBC News.
  • “Out of Africa” Theory Officially Debunked

    07/27/2014 9:49:37 AM PDT · by djf · 52 replies
    Scientific evidence refuting the theory of modern humanity’s African genesis is common knowledge among those familiar with the most recent scientific papers on the human Genome, Mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosomes. Regrettably, within mainstream press and academia circles, there seems to be a conspicuous – and dare we say it – deliberate vacuum when it comes to reporting news of these recent studies and their obvious implications.
  • Humans May Have Dispersed Out of Africa Earlier Than Thought

    04/21/2014 4:04:04 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 51 replies
    LiveScience ^ | April 21, 2014 | Charles Q. Choi
    Scientists have suggested the exodus from Africa started between 40,000 and 70,000 years ago. However, stone artifacts dating to at least 100,000 years ago that were recently uncovered in the Arabian Desert suggested that modern humans might have begun their march across the globe earlier than once suspected. Out of Africa models To help solve this mystery, Katerina Harvati, a paleoanthropologist at the University of Tübingen in Germany, and her colleagues tested four competing out-of-Africa models. one involved a route northward, up the Nile River valley and then eastward across the northern end of the Arabian Peninsula into Asiathe other...
  • On the Variability of the Dmanisi Mandibles

    03/04/2014 7:46:09 AM PST · by Renfield · 18 replies
    Plos One ^ | 2-20-2014 | Bermúdez de Castro JM et al
    Abstract The description of a new skull (D4500) from the Dmanisi site (Republic of Georgia) has reopened the debate about the morphological variability within the genus Homo. The new skull fits with a mandible (D2600) often referred as ‘big’ or ‘enigmatic’ because of its differences with the other Dmanisi mandibles (D211 and D2735). In this report we present a comparative study of the variability of the Dmanisi mandibles under a different perspective, as we focus in morphological aspects related to growth and development. We have followed the notion of modularity and phenotypic integration in order to understand the architectural differences...
  • Ancient Humans Had Sex With A Mystery Species (Not Neanderthals Or Denisovans)

    12/05/2013 6:33:43 AM PST · by blam · 130 replies
    BI/Live Science ^ | 12-4-2013 | Stephanie Pappas
    Ancient Humans Had Sex With A Mystery Species Stephanie Pappas Live Science Dec. 4, 2013, 3:33 PM A new, improved sequencing of ancient human relative genomes reveals that Homo sapiens didn't only have sex with Neanderthals and a little-understood line of humans called Denisovans. A fourth, mystery lineage of humans was in the mix, too. As reported by the news arm of the journal Nature, new genetic evidence suggests that several hominids — human relatives closer than humans' current living cousin, the chimpanzee — interbred more than 30,000 years ago. This group of kissing cousins included an unknown human ancestor...
  • New 'Human' Fossil Borders on Fraud (article)

    11/14/2013 8:15:39 AM PST · by fishtank · 23 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | Nov. 13, 2013 | Brian Thomas
    New 'Human' Fossil Borders on Fraud by Brian Thomas, M.S. * An international team of paleoanthropologists reported discovering the earliest human fossils found outside Africa at a dig in the country of Georgia.1 The team told Science that one specimen, "skull 5," is so different from other humans that it significantly widens the range of variation within ancient mankind. The Guardian wrote that among the human remains in Dmanisi researchers found a "spectacular fossilised skull of an ancient human ancestor," but there is actually more proof against this claim.2 The team found clearly human skeleton parts, along with five skulls...
  • Human-like Fossil Menagerie Stuns Scientists (article)

    11/08/2013 10:07:54 AM PST · by fishtank · 17 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | Nov. 8, 2013 | Brian Thomas, M.S., & Frank Sherwin, M.A.
    Human-like Fossil Menagerie Stuns Scientists by Brian Thomas, M.S., & Frank Sherwin, M.A. * An international team of scientists made a stunning and controversial discovery from an archaeological site in Dmanisi, a small town in the country of Georgia, that is forcing some scientists to unlearn everything they knew about the story of human evolution. The results from the find appeared in an October issue of the journal Science.1 Among other human skeleton bones, the researchers found five skulls or partial skulls. Some of them looked human, though they were smaller than today's average skull size. But the biggest surprise...
  • An Incredible New Skull Is Forcing Us To Rethink The Evolution Of Early Humans

    10/17/2013 3:20:40 PM PDT · by blam · 76 replies
    BI ^ | 10-17-2013 | Dina Spector
    An Incredible New Skull Is Forcing Us To Rethink The Evolution Of Early Humans Dina Spector Oct. 17, 2013, 2:01 PM Photo courtesy of Georgian National Museum A 1.8-million-year-old skull combines a small braincase with a long face and large teeth, which is unlike any other Homo fossils on record. Researchers have traditionally used differences among fossilized remains of ancient humans to define separate species among the earliest members of our Homo genus — Homo erectus, Homo habilis, and Homo rudolfensis, for example. But an amazing new skull found in a republic of Georgia suggests that the specimens previously representing...
  • Skull discovery suggests early man was single species

    10/17/2013 3:19:23 PM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 22 replies
    AFP News ^ | October 17, 2013
    A stunningly well-preserved skull from 1.8 million years ago offers new evidence that early man was a single species with a vast array of different looks, researchers said Thursday. With a tiny brain about a third the size of a modern human's, protruding brows and jutting jaws like an ape, the skull was found in the remains of a medieval hilltop city in Scranton, Georgia, said the study in the journal Science.
  • Oldest Human Fossil in Western Europe Found in Spain

    08/03/2013 6:20:59 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Sat, Aug 03, 2013 | Journal of Human Evolution
    The find, a fossil tooth (molar) uncovered through excavations at the site of Barranco León in the Orce region of southeastern Spain, was dated to about 1.4 million years ago using several combined dating techniques, including Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) in combination with paleomagnetic and biochronological data... Researchers identified the lithic assemblage as characteristic of Oldowan technology, the earliest known stone tool industry, first discovered at Olduvai Gorge in East Africa by Louis Leakey in the 1930s. The same industry was found at Dmanisi in the country of Georgia, where early human fossils dated to about 1.8 million years ago...
  • Archaeologists Continue Searching for “First Humans” in Europe at Atapuerca Site in Spain

    07/27/2013 8:46:03 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Hispanically Speaking ^ | July 24, 2013 | unattributed
    Archaeologists in Spain are busy excavating the Gran Dolonia portion of the Atapuerca archaeological site for clues to the first humans that arrived in Europe. Many archaeological treasures have come from this northern Spain location known as the caves of the Sierra de Atapuerca. In 2007 human remains were found that date back one and a half million years, considered the oldest Europeans remains ever found. Human remains have also been found from the "Homo antecessor" dating back 850,000-to-950,000-years ago. The youngest remains found here date back a mere 5,000-years ago from the homo sapien species. The site is in...
  • Oldest primate fossil rewrites evolutionary break in human lineage

    06/06/2013 2:14:27 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 60 replies
    ESRF (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility) ^ | June 6, 2013 | Kirstin Colvin
    The study of the world’s oldest early primate skeleton has brought light to a pivotal event in primate and human evolution: that of the branch split that led to monkeys, apes and humans (anthropoids) on one side, and living tarsiers on the other. The fossil, that was unearthed from an ancient lake bed in central China’s Hubei Province, represents a previously unknown genus and species named Archicebus Achilles. The results of the research were published on 6 June 2013 in Nature. Oldest primate fossil rewrites evolutionary break in human lineage The fossil, which is 55 million years old and dates...
  • Researchers Just Dug Up A Half-Million-Year-Old Human Jawbone

    02/07/2013 4:04:53 PM PST · by blam · 37 replies
    TBI - Live Science ^ | 2-7-2013 | Tia Ghose
    Researchers Just Dug Up A Half-Million-Year-Old Human Jawbone Tia Ghose, LiveScienceFebruary, 2013 . An ancient hominin jawbone unearthed in a Serbian cave may be more than half a million years old. Scientists have unearthed a jawbone from an ancient human ancestor in a cave in Serbia. The jawbone, which may have come from an ancient Homo erectus or a primitive-looking Neanderthal precursor, is more than 397,000 years old, and possibly more than 525,000 years old. The fossil, described today (Feb. 6) in the journal PLOS ONE, is the oldest hominin fossil found in this region of Europe, and may change...
  • Neanderthals were ancient mariners

    03/02/2012 7:31:23 AM PST · by Renfield · 55 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 2-29-2012 | Michael Marshall
    IT LOOKS like Neanderthals may have beaten modern humans to the seas. Growing evidence suggests our extinct cousins criss-crossed the Mediterranean in boats from 100,000 years ago - though not everyone is convinced they weren't just good swimmers. Neanderthals lived around the Mediterranean from 300,000 years ago. Their distinctive "Mousterian" stone tools are found on the Greek mainland and, intriguingly, have also been found on the Greek islands of Lefkada, Kefalonia and Zakynthos. That could be explained in two ways: either the islands weren't islands at the time, or our distant cousins crossed the water somehow....
  • Out of Africa? Data fail to support language origin in Africa

    02/20/2012 8:24:25 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 57 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | February 15, 2012 | Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat Munchen
    Last year, a report claiming to support the idea that the origin of language can be traced to West Africa appeared in Science. The article caused quite a stir. Now linguist Michael Cysouw from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich has challenged its conclusions, in a commentary just published in Science... Atkinson based his claim on a comparative analysis of the numbers of phonemes found in about 500 present-day languages. Phonemes are the most basic sound units -- consonants, vowels and tones -- that form the basis of semantic differentiation in all languages. The number of phonemes used in natural languages varies widely....
  • 'The Oldest (Neanderthal) Work Of Art Ever': 42,000-Year-Old Paintings Of Seals Found In Spain

    02/08/2012 10:36:42 AM PST · by blam · 89 replies · 1+ views
    The Daily Mail ^ | 2-7-2012 | Tom Worden
    'The Oldest (Neanderthal) Work Of Art Ever': 42,000-Year-Old Paintings Of Seals Found In Spanish Cave* Six paintings were found in the Nerja Caves, 35miles east of Malaga * They are the only known artistic images created by Neanderthal man By Tom Worden Last updated at 9:27 PM on 7th February 2012 Comments (38) Share The world's oldest works of art have been found in a cave on Spain's Costa del Sol, scientists believe. Six paintings of seals are at least 42,000 years old and are the only known artistic images created by Neanderthal man, experts claim. Professor Jose Luis Sanchidrian,...
  • Humans shaped stone axes 1.8 million years ago, study says

    09/02/2011 2:05:06 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 33 replies ^ | 08-31-2011 | Provided by Columbia University
    A new study suggests that Homo erectus, a precursor to modern humans, was using advanced toolmaking methods in East Africa 1.8 million years ago, at least 300,000 years earlier than previously thought. The study, published this week in Nature, raises new questions about where these tall and slender early humans originated and how they developed sophisticated tool-making technology. Homo erectus appeared about 2 million years ago, and ranged across Asia and Africa before hitting a possible evolutionary dead-end, about 70,000 years ago. Some researchers think Homo erectus evolved in East Africa, where many of the oldest fossils have been found,...
  • New finds in Caucasus suggest non-African origin for ancient Homo species

    06/07/2011 5:39:10 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 55 replies · 1+ views
    Science News ^ | Monday, June 6th, 2011 | Bruce Bower
    Early members of the genus Homo, possibly direct ancestors of people today, may have evolved in Asia and then gone to Africa, not vice versa... new evidence shows the species occupied a West Asian site called Dmanisi from 1.85 million to 1.77 million years ago, at the same time or slightly before the earliest evidence of this humanlike species in Africa, say geologist Reid Ferring of the University of North Texas in Denton and his colleagues... Evidence remains meager for the geographic origins of the Homo genus, says anthropologist Bernard Wood of George Washington University... and it's possible that humankind's...
  • Did first humans come out of Middle East and not Africa?...

    12/27/2010 4:13:51 PM PST · by decimon · 44 replies · 4+ views
    Daily Mail ^ | December 27, 2010 | Matthew Kalman
    Scientists could be forced to re-write the history of the evolution of modern man after the discovery of 400,000-year-old human remains. Until now, researchers believed that homo sapiens, the direct descendants of modern man, evolved in Africa about 200,000 years ago and gradually migrated north, through the Middle East, to Europe and Asia. Recently, discoveries of early human remains in China and Spain have cast doubt on the 'Out of Africa' theory, but no-one was certain. The new discovery of pre-historic human remains by Israeli university explorers in a cave near Ben-Gurion airport could force scientists to re-think earlier theories.
  • 400,000 year old spears found in an German coal mine!

    10/11/2010 6:38:35 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 59 replies ^ | 07-04-2010 | Staff
    Researchers in Germany have unearthed 400,000 year old wooden spears from what appears to be an ancient lake shore hunting ground stunning evidence that human ancestors systematically hunted big game much earlier than believed. The three spears, each carved from the trunk of a spruce tree, are 6 feet to more than 7 feet long. They were found with more than 10,000 animal bones, mostly from horses, including many obviously butchered. That indicates the ancient hunters were organized enough to trap horses and strong enough to kill them by throwing spears, perhaps ambushing herds that showed up for water. “There’s...
  • Stone tools 'change migration story' (Out of Africa)

    09/19/2010 5:12:44 PM PDT · by decimon · 8 replies
    BBC ^ | September 19, 2010 | Katie Alcock
    A research team reports new findings of stone age tools that suggest humans came "out of Africa" by land earlier than has been thought. Geneticists estimate that migration from Africa to South-East Asia and Australia took place as recently as 60,000 years ago. But Dr Michael Petraglia, of Oxford University, and colleagues say stone artefacts found in the Arabian Peninsula and India point to an exodus starting about 70,000 to 80,000 years ago - and perhaps even earlier. Petraglia, whose co-workers include Australian and Indian researchers, presented his ideas at the British Science Festival, which is hosted this year at...
  • Hobbit debate goes out on some limbs

    04/23/2010 11:21:30 AM PDT · by decimon · 23 replies · 467+ views
    ScienceNews ^ | May 8, 2010 | Bruce Bower
    Two fossil hobbits have given what’s left of their arms and legs to science. That wasn’t enough, though, to quell debate over hobbits’ evolutionary status at the annual meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists on April 17. Since 2004, the discoverers of unusual “hobbit” fossils on the Indonesian island of Flores have attributed their find to a pint-sized species, Homo floresiensis, that lived there from 95,000 to 17,000 years ago. These researchers also suspect, on the basis of hobbit anatomy and recent stone tool discoveries on Flores, that H. floresiensis evolved from a currently unknown hominid species that...
  • Neanderthal may not be the oldest Dutchman [ 370,000 years B.P. ]

    03/30/2010 7:29:01 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies · 907+ views
    Radio Netherlands Worldwide ^ | Friday, March 26, 2010 | Henk-Sjoerd Oosterhoff
    People may well have been roaming the land we now call the Netherlands for far longer than was assumed until recently. There is evidence to suggest that the country was home to the forebears of the Neanderthals. Amateur archaeologist Pieter Stoel found materials used by the oldest inhabitants in the central town of Woerden. These artefacts were shown to be at least 370,000 years old, which takes us back to long before the time of the Neanderthals. Our ancient forebears are often described as cavemen but that is not entirely accurate. There were no caves in this environment, explains Pieter...
  • About Belgrade

    03/17/2010 4:43:47 AM PDT · by Stilmat · 9 replies · 279+ views
    Infostar ^ | 17.03.2010 | Aleksandar
    Belgrade, city of very tumultuous history, one of the oldest in Europe. Its history has lasted for 7000 years. The area around the large rivers was inhabited in the Paleolithic period. From the older stone age, came the remains of human bones and skulls of Neanderthals, found in a quarry near Leštane, in a cave in the vicinity of the Cukarica Bajloni market. Remains of late Stone Age culture were found in Vinca, Zarkovo and Upper Town, above the confluence of the Sava and Danube. This indicates that the area of Belgrade has been continually inhabited and that the intensity...
  • French find puts humans in Europe 200,000 years earlier

    12/16/2009 6:22:20 AM PST · by decimon · 15 replies · 649+ views
    AFP ^ | Dec 15, 2009 | Unknown
    PARIS (AFP) – Experts on prehistoric man are rethinking their dates after a find in a southern French valley suggested our ancestors may have reached Europe 1.57 million years ago: 200,000 years earlier than we thought. What provoked the recount was a pile of fossilised bones and teeth uncovered 15 years ago by local man Jean Rouvier in a basalt quarry at Lezignan la Cebe, in the Herault valley, Languedoc. In the summer of 2008, Rouvier mentioned his find to Jerome Ivorra, an archaeological researcher at France's National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS). The subsequent dig uncovered a large variety...
  • Georgia fossil suggests key stage of human evolution was in Europe [not Africa]

    09/09/2009 9:20:25 PM PDT · by bruinbirdman · 42 replies · 1,357+ views
    The Times ^ | 9/9/2009 | Mark Henderson
    A key stage in human evolution may have taken place on the fringes of Europe and not in Africa as has generally been thought, scientists said yesterday. Fossils of an ancient human relative, or hominin, from Georgia dated from 1.8 million years ago suggest that the first of our ancestors to walk upright could have done so in Eurasia, the British Science Festival was told. David Lordkipanidze, director of the Georgian National Museum, said the skulls, fossils and limb bones found at Dmanisi in 1999 and 2001 raise the possibility that Homo erectus, a forerunner of modern humans, evolved in...
  • The Mystery Ape of Pleistocene Asia [ from Longgupo in Sichuan province ]

    06/25/2009 2:52:53 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies · 777+ views
    Nature 459, 910-911 ^ | Wednesday, June 17, 2009 | Russell L. Ciochon
    Fossil finds of early humans in southeast Asia may actually be the remains of an unknown ape. Russell Ciochon says that many palaeoanthropologists -- including himself -- have been mistaken. Fourteen years ago, a Nature paper by my colleagues and I described a 1.9-million-year-old human jaw fragment from Longgupo in Sichuan province, China1. The ancient date in itself was spectacular. Previous evidence had suggested that human ancestors arrived in east Asia from Africa about 1 million years ago, in the form of Homo erectus. Longgupo nearly doubled that estimate. But even more exciting -- and contentious -- was our claim...
  • Revealed: Face of first European as fragments of 35,000-year-old skull are made flesh

    05/04/2009 9:13:34 AM PDT · by yankeedame · 74 replies · 2,656+ views ^ | 04th May 2009 | Daily Mail Reporter
    Revealed: Face of first European as fragments of 35,000-year-old skull are made flesh This is the face of the first early European human which has been painstakingly constructed by scientists from bone fragments. The man or woman - it is still not possible to determine the sex - lived 35,000 years ago in the Carpathian Mountains that today are part of Romania. Their face was rebuilt in clay based on an incomplete skull and jawbone discovered in a cave where bears hibernated. Forensic artist Richard Neave made the model based on his measurements of the pieces of bone and his...
  • A Tiny Hominid With No Place on the Family Tree

    04/27/2009 9:45:55 PM PDT · by rdl6989 · 17 replies · 827+ views
    NY Times ^ | April 27, 2009
    STONY BROOK, N.Y. — Six years after their discovery, the extinct little people nicknamed hobbits who once occupied the Indonesian island of Flores remain mystifying anomalies in human evolution, out of place in time and geography, their ancestry unknown. Recent research has only widened their challenge to conventional thinking about the origins, transformations and migrations of the early human family. Indeed, the more scientists study the specimens and their implications, the more they are drawn to heretical speculation. ¶Were these primitive survivors of even earlier hominid migrations out of Africa, before Homo erectus migrated about 1.8 million years ago? Could...
  • Rewriting 'Out of Africa' theory [ 1.83 million years ago in Malaysia ]

    01/30/2009 9:15:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies · 1,155+ views
    New Straits Times Online ^ | Friday, January 30, 2009 | Melissa Darlyne Chow
    Universiti Sains Malaysia's (USM) Centre for Archaeological Research Malaysia has found evidence of early human existence in the country dating back 1.83 million years... The evidence was obtained from the discovery of artefacts in Bukit Bunuh, Lenggong, Perak... included stone-made tools such as axes and chopping tools. The artefacts were found embedded in suevite rock, formed as a result of the impact of meteorite crashing down at Bukit Bunuh. The suevite rock, reputedly the first found in Southeast Asia, was sent to the Geochronology Japan Laboratory three months ago and carbon dated using the fission track dating method... Based on...
  • Balkan Caves, Gorges Were Pre-Neanderthal Haven

    06/27/2008 2:45:44 PM PDT · by blam · 24 replies · 217+ views
    Reuters ^ | 6-27-2008 | Ljilja Cvekic
    Balkan caves, gorges were pre-Neanderthal haven Fri Jun 27, 2008 11:25am EDT By Ljilja Cvekic BELGRADE (Reuters Life!) - A fragment of a human jaw found in Serbia and believed to be up to 250,000 years old is helping anthropologists piece together the story of prehistoric human migration from Africa to Europe. "This is the earliest evidence we have of humans in the area," Canada's Winnipeg University anthropology professor Mirjana Roksandic told Reuters. The fragment of a lower jaw, complete with three teeth, was discovered in a small cave in the Sicevo gorge in south Serbia. "It is a pre-Neanderthal...
  • Prehistoric Settlement Found In Qatar (700,000 YO)

    06/23/2008 1:38:41 PM PDT · by blam · 18 replies · 149+ views
    The Peninsular ^ | 6-23-2008
    Prehistoric settlement found in Qatar 6/23/2008 2:25:18 DOHA • A prehistoric settlement in what is now Qatar may confirm alternative theories on how early humans emigrated from the African continent, a report in a Danish newspaper said. Danish archaeologists have uncovered a settlement they believe may be over 700,000 years old, making it the oldest organised human community ever found, reported Berlingske Tidende newspaper. Eight dwellings in the desert region of Qatar indicate that an early human species crossed what is now the Red Sea to leave their origins in Africa, according to the scientists. There is still uncertainty within...
  • Human Ancestor Fossil Found in Europe (Spain)

    03/26/2008 12:10:28 PM PDT · by decimon · 50 replies · 1,050+ views
    Associated Press ^ | March 26, 2008 | DANIEL WOOLLS
    MADRID, Spain - A small piece of jawbone unearthed in a cave in Spain is the oldest known fossil of a human ancestor in Europe and suggests that people lived on the continent much earlier than previously believed, scientists say. The researchers said the fossil found last year at Atapuerca in northern Spain, along with stone tools and animal bones, is up to 1.3 million years old. That would be 500,000 years older than remains from a 1997 find that prompted the naming of a new species: Homo antecessor, or Pioneer Man, possibly a common ancestor to Neanderthals and modern...
  • Out of Africa, Not Once But Twice

    03/17/2008 8:35:50 AM PDT · by blam · 15 replies · 691+ views
    Discovery News ^ | 3-14-2008 | Jennifer Viegas
    Out of Africa, Not Once But Twice Jennifer Viegas, Discovery News Out of Africa March 14, 2008 -- Modern humans are known to have left Africa in a wave of migration around 50,000 years ago, but another, smaller group -- possibly a different subspecies -- left the continent 50,000 years earlier, suggests a new study. While all humans today are related to the second "out of Africa" group, it's likely that some populations native to Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, Australia, New Zealand and Indonesia retain genetic vestiges of the earlier migrants, according to the paper's author, Michael Schillaci. Schillaci, an...
  • Most Ancient Case Of Tuberculosis Found In 500,000-year-old Human; Points To Modern Health Issues

    12/07/2007 5:10:26 PM PST · by blam · 26 replies · 95+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 12-7-2007 | University of Texas at Austin.
    Most Ancient Case Of Tuberculosis Found In 500,000-year-old Human; Points To Modern Health IssuesView of the inside of a plaster cast of the skull of the newly discovered young male Homo erectus from western Turkey. The stylus points to tiny lesions 1-2 mm in size found along the rim of bone just behind the right eye orbit. The lesions were formed by a type of tuberculosis that infects the brain and, at 500,000 years in age, represents the most ancient case of TB known in humans. (Credit: Marsha Miller, the University of Texas at Austin)" ScienceDaily (Dec. 7, 2007) —...