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Keyword: paleoclimatology

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  • Pollen Study Points to Drought as Culprit in Bronze Age Mystery (Global Warming in Ancient Times)

    10/26/2013 6:42:44 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 17 replies
    NY Times ^ | 10/24/2013 | ISABEL KERSHNER
    More than 3,200 years ago, life was abuzz in and around what is now this modern-day Israeli metropolis on the shimmering Mediterranean shore. To the north lay the mighty Hittite empire; to the south, Egypt was thriving under the reign of the great Pharaoh Ramses II. Cyprus was a copper emporium. Greece basked in the opulence of its elite Mycenaean culture, and Ugarit was a bustling port city on the Syrian coast. In the land of Canaan, city states like Hazor and Megiddo flourished under Egyptian hegemony. Vibrant trade along the coast of the eastern Mediterranean connected it all. Yet...
  • Comets,Meteors & Myth: New Evidence For Toppled Civilizations And Bibical Tales

    08/11/2002 5:32:56 PM PDT · by blam · 19 replies · 3,661+ views
    Science Tuesday/Space.com ^ | 11-13-2002 | Robert Roy Brit
    Comets, Meteors & Myth: New Evidence for Toppled Civilizations and Biblical Tales By Robert Roy Britt Senior Science Writer posted: 07:00 am ET 13 November 2001 "...and the seven judges of hell ... raised their torches, lighting the land with their livid flame. A stupor of despair went up to heaven when the god of the storm turned daylight into darkness, when he smashed the land like a cup." -- An account of the Deluge from the Epic of Gilgamesh, circa 2200 B.C. If you are fortunate enough to see the storm of shooting stars predicted for the Nov. 18...
  • Eco-Ruin 'Felled Early Society'

    11/15/2007 5:05:57 PM PST · by blam · 16 replies · 44+ views
    BBC ^ | 11-15-2007
    Eco-ruin 'felled early society' The Argaric culture was an early urban society One of Western Europe's earliest known urban societies may have sown the seeds of its own downfall, a study suggests. Mystery surrounded the fall of the Bronze Age Argaric people in south-east Spain - Europe's driest area. Data suggests the early civilisation exhausted precious natural resources, helping bring about its own ruin. The study provides early evidence for cultural collapse caused - at least in part - by humans meddling with the environment, say researchers. It could also provide lessons for modern populations living in water-stressed regions. The...
  • Climate Change Not a Cause of Bronze Age Collapse

    11/25/2014 5:49:56 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Monday, November 17, 2014 | University of Bradford press release
    "Our evidence shows definitively that the population decline in this period cannot have been caused by climate change," says Ian Armit, Professor of Archaeology at the University of Bradford, and lead author of the study. Graeme Swindles, Associate Professor of Earth System Dynamics at the University of Leeds, added, "We found clear evidence for a rapid change in climate to much wetter conditions, which we were able to precisely pinpoint to 750BC using statistical methods." According to Professor Armit, social and economic stress is more likely to be the cause of the sudden and widespread fall in numbers. Communities producing...
  • Mark Steyn: Before the white man came? War

    07/18/2006 7:45:03 AM PDT · by Pokey78 · 208 replies · 6,262+ views
    Macleans ^ | 07/18/06 | Mark Steyn
    We've deluded ourselves into believing in the myth of the noble and peaceful primitive Nicholas Wade's Before The Dawn is one of those books full of eye-catching details. For example, did you know the Inuit have the largest brains of any modern humans? Something to do with the cold climate. Presumably, if this global warming hooey ever takes off, their brains will be shrinking with the ice caps. But the passage that really stopped me short was this: "Both Keeley and LeBlanc believe that for a variety of reasons anthropologists and their fellow archaeologists have seriously underreported the prevalence of...
  • Were Some Ancestral Puebloan People the Victims of Ethnic Conflict?

    09/27/2010 5:06:29 PM PDT · by Little Bill · 19 replies · 1+ views
    archaeology.org ^ | September 24, 2010 | Heather Pringle
    Not so very long ago that many archaeologists regarded the Ancestral Puebloan people–or the Anasazi, as researchers once called them–as a rather peaceful, mystical group of astronomers, artists, priests and farmers. They based this idea largely on their observations of modern Puebloan peoples: the Hopi, the Zuni and others who lived in traditional pueblos, such as Taos, and who often lived quiet lives of ritual and spirituality. In the early 90s, some Southwestern archaeologists began questioning this received wisdom. David Wilcox, an archaeologist at the Museum of Northern Arizona in Flagstaff, hypothesized that the rulers of Chaco Canyon, a massive...
  • True causes for extinction of cave bear revealed

    08/24/2010 6:46:14 AM PDT · by decimon · 66 replies
    The cave bear started to become extinct in Europe 24,000 years ago, but until now the cause was unknown. An international team of scientists has analysed mitochondrial DNA sequences from 17 new fossil samples, and compared these with the modern brown bear. The results show that the decline of the cave bear started 50,000 years ago, and was caused more by human expansion than by climate change. "The decline in the genetic diversity of the cave bear (Ursus spelaeus) began around 50,000 years ago, much earlier than previously suggested, at a time when no major climate change was taking place,...
  • Broken Ice Dam Blamed For 300-Year Chill

    01/10/2006 2:47:01 PM PST · by blam · 95 replies · 2,573+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 1-10-2006 | Kurt Kleiner
    Broken ice dam blamed for 300-year chill 14:21 10 January 2006 NewScientist.com news service Kurt Kleiner A three-century-long cold spell that chilled Europe 8200 years ago was probably caused by the bursting of a Canadian ice dam, which released a colossal flood of glacial meltwater into the Atlantic Ocean. Two new papers, using different computer models, show that the massive freshwater flood accounts for evidence of the sudden climate change, which cooled Greenland by an average of 7.4°C, and Europe by about 1°C. It was the most abrupt and widespread cool spell in the last 10,000 years. Evidence for the...
  • Drilling under the Dead Sea through four Ice Ages [ 500K years ]

    11/24/2010 6:45:44 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 39 replies
    Jerusalem Post ^ | Wednesday, November 24, 2010 | Ehud Zion Waldoks
    An int'l research team at urging of TAU, Hebrew U. professors will drill half a kilometer to study year-by-year climate change from 500,000 years ago... The International Continental Scientific Drilling Program chose the Dead Sea as the site of its next drilling at the urging of Tel Aviv University's Prof. Zvi Ben-Avraham and the Israel Geological Survey's Dr. Mordechai Stein... sponsored by the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities... "We will be taking out a vertical piece about half a kilometer long which will allow us to get a picture of climate change on a year-by-year basis going back 500,000...
  • China's Wars Driven by Climate

    07/16/2010 6:56:24 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Discovery News ^ | Wednesday, July 14, 2010 | Marlowe Hood, AFP
    Two millennia of foreign invasions and internal wars in China were driven more by cooling climate than by feudalism, class struggle or bad government... Food shortages severe enough to spark civil turmoil or force hordes of starving nomads to swoop down from the Mongolian steppes were consistently linked to long periods of colder weather, the study found. In contrast, the Central Kingdom's periods of stability and prosperity occurred during sustained warm spells, the researchers said... Chinese and European scientists led by Zhibin Zhang of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing decided to compare two sets of data over 1,900...
  • Climate Key To Sphinx's Riddle

    01/08/2007 11:27:02 AM PST · by blam · 44 replies · 1,890+ views
    Scotsman ^ | 1-7-2006 | Jeremy Watson
    Climate key to Sphinx's riddle JEREMY WATSON GLOBAL warming is one of the greatest threats to present day civilisation but work by a team of Scots scientists suggests the ancient Egyptians may have been earlier victims of climate change. The pharaohs ruled their empire for hundreds of years, spreading culture, architecture and the arts before it collapsed into economic ruin. Why that happened is one of the great mysteries of history. Now a team of scientists from Scotland and Wales believe the answer lies beneath the waters of Lake Tana, high in the Ethiopian Highlands, and the source of the...
  • Must Farm Bronze Age site: Archaeologists at work [ East Anglia, 3K yr old boat ]

    01/16/2012 6:05:48 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies · 3+ views
    Past Horizons ^ | Sunday, January 15, 2012 | unattributed
    Over three thousand years ago the inhabitants of a small southeast fenland community were skilled boat builders, enjoyed fishing, and practised a method of eel trapping still in use today in East Anglia. Mark Knight, senior project officer for Cambridge Archaeological Unit, said: "It's archaeology like it's never been preserved before." The incredibly detailed picture of Bronze Age life discovered on the River Nene, at Must Farm quarry, Whittlesey, has everything from well preserved boats, spears and swords to clothing and jewellery as well as carved bowls and pots still full of food, making it one of the most significant...
  • Global Cooling versus Global Warming: Cold is more deadly than heat.

    10/23/2013 7:15:36 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 14 replies
    American Thinker ^ | 10/23/2013 | Jerold Levoritz
    It is well-established science that the cooling of the earth has been in the past and would be in the future more disruptive to human existence than atmospheric warming. If we are quite quiet, we may yet hear the sound of extreme irony laughing its head off at our efforts to lower carbon dioxide emissions and, thus, initiating or strengthening cooler weather conditions that would bring massive hunger and movements of populations, precisely the opposite condition wished for by the anthropogenic global warming crowd. However, no one may be able to spend their waking hours smirking if it turns out...
  • Tsunami Or Melting Glaciers: What Caused Ancient Atlit To Sink?

    06/04/2008 12:58:10 PM PDT · by blam · 38 replies · 204+ views
    Haaretz ^ | 6-3-2008 | By Ofri Ilani
    Tsunami or melting glaciers: What caused ancient Atlit to sink? By Ofri Ilani At the bottom of the sea, some 300 meters west of the Atlit fortress, lies one of the greatest archaeological mysteries of the Mediterranean basin. About 20 years ago, archaeologists discovered a complex of ancient buildings and ancient graves with dozens of skeletons at the underwater site of Atlit-Yam. The team of marine archaeologists that excavated the site, headed by Dr. Ehud Galili of the Israel Antiquities Authority, came to the consclusion that an ancient settlement once existed there, but sank beneath the surface of the sea...
  • Archaeologists Unearth 1,700 Year-Old Canal System Near Lake Okeechobee (Florida)

    06/07/2002 2:13:56 PM PDT · by blam · 117 replies · 4,771+ views
    Sun- Sentinel ^ | 6-6-2002 | Rhonda Miller
    Archaeologists unearth 1,700 year-old canal system near Lake Okeechobee By Rhonda Miller sun-sentinel.com Posted June 6 2002, 6:17 PM EDT ORTONA – Archaeologists on Thursday said they have uncovered a sophisticated 1,700 year-old canal system and a huge pond dug by ancient Indians near this tiny town, located west of Lake Okeechobee. The canal site is so important that it could rival the discovery four years ago of the mysterious Miami Circle ruins near downtown Miami, one expert said. Ortona, population 500, is located on Route 78 and is 13 miles west of Moore Haven. The town is sited just...
  • Ancient lakes of the Sahara

    01/21/2006 4:14:03 AM PST · by Tyche · 48 replies · 1,598+ views
    Innovations Report ^ | Jan 19, 2006 | University of Reading
    The Sahara has not always been the arid, inhospitable place that it is today – it was once a savannah teeming with life, according to researchers at the Universities of Reading and Leicester. Eight years of studies in the Libyan desert area of Fazzan, now one of the harshest, most inaccessible spots on Earth, have revealed swings in its climate that have caused considerably wetter periods, lasting for thousands of years, when the desert turned to savannah and lakes provided water for people and animals. This, in turn, has given us vital clues about the history of humans in the...
  • Ancient Egypt was destroyed by drought, discover Scottish experts

    08/04/2011 5:51:22 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 68 replies
    Scotsman, Tall and Handsome Built ^ | Tuesday, August 2, 2011 | Lyndsay Buckland
    ...the fall of the great Egyptian Old Kingdom may have been helped along by a common problem which remains with us now -- drought... a severe period of drought around 4,200 years ago may have contributed to the demise of the civilisation. Using seismic investigations with sound waves, along with carbon dating of a 100-metre section of sediment from the bed of Lake Tana in Ethiopia, the team were able to look back many thousands of years. They were able to see how water levels in the lake had varied over the past 17,000 years, with the sediment signalling lush...
  • Disaster That Struck The Ancients

    12/08/2001 2:51:43 PM PST · by blam · 206 replies · 13,091+ views
    BBC ^ | 7-26-2001 | Fekri Hassan
    Thursday, 26 July, 2001, 12:12 GMT 13:12 UK Disaster that struck the ancients The pharaohs of the Egyptian Old Kingdom had built the mightiest legacy of the ancient world - the pyramids at Giza. But after nearly a thousand years of stability, central authority disintegrated and the country collapsed into chaos for more than a 100 years. What happened, and why, has remained a huge controversy. But Professor Fekri Hassan, from University College London, UK, wanted to solve the mystery, by gathering together scientific clues. His inspiration was the little known tomb in southern Egypt of a regional governor, Ankhtifi. ...
  • Lost Cities of the Sahara

    12/26/2010 9:06:39 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 53 replies
    University of Leicester ^ | July 26, 2000 | Barbara Whiteman
    ...the Garamantes - a mysterious desert people of Greco-Roman date (broadly 500 BC AD 500)... Inhabiting a region that had already been for several thousand years a hyper-arid desert environment, with negligible rainfall, elevated summer temperatures and blistering expanses of barren sand and rock... have long been an enigma. They were depicted by Roman sources as ungovernable nomadic barbarians, who raided the settled agricultural zone and cities of the Mediterranean littoral. Following up earlier work by Daniels, the current project allows a different picture of the Garamantes to be drawn. Archaeological evidence shows them to have been a complex and...
  • Alpine melt reveals ancient life [ Schnidejoch glacier ]

    08/26/2008 5:51:59 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies · 250+ views
    BBC News ^ | Sunday, August 24, 2008 | Imogen Foulkes
    Melting alpine glaciers are revealing fascinating clues to Neolithic life in the high mountains... Everyone knows the story of Oetzi the Ice Man, found in an Austrian glacier in 1991. Oetzi was discovered at an altitude of over 3,000m. He lived in about 3,300 BC, leading to speculation that the Alps may have had more human habitation than previously suspected. Now, more dramatic findings from the 2,756m Schnidejoch glacier in Switzerland have confirmed the theory. It all started at the end of the long hot summer of 2003, when a Swiss couple, hiking across a melting Schnidejoch, came across a...
  • White Masters in the deserts of China?

    03/11/2009 5:30:22 PM PDT · by BGHater · 11 replies · 867+ views
    Philip Coppens ^ | 11 Mar 2009 | Philip Coppens
    The discovery of Caucasoid mummies in China shows that East and West might have been meeting since the Bronze Age. Do they validate some of the ancient legends? Cherchen Man mummy Christopher Columbus is said to have been the first who broke down the barrier that was the Atlantic Ocean, that body of water that separated two continents. But no such barriers – whether natural or ideological – existed between Europe and the East – one could travel over land. Nevertheless, the discovery of Caucasoid mummies has provided not only indisputable evidence that Europeans travelled very far East, it has...
  • The Cold Snap That Civilised The World

    02/23/2002 2:33:42 PM PST · by blam · 90 replies · 2,860+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 2-22-2002 | David Derbyshire
    The cold snap that civilised the world By David Derbyshire, Science Correspondent (Filed: 22/02/2002) A SUDDEN drop in temperatures 5,000 years ago ushered in the modern climate and may have encouraged the development of complex civilisations around the world. Researchers studying ancient fish bones off the coast of Peru say the temperature fall heralded El Nino, the periodical warming of the Pacific which brings unusual weather patterns every two to seven years. The rapidly changing weather, which followed several thousand years of post-Ice Age stability, triggered a new temple building culture in South America. Elsewhere, it may have forced Stone ...
  • The Dark Ages: Were They Darker Than We Imagined?

    06/08/2003 10:31:29 PM PDT · by blam · 109 replies · 6,406+ views
    The Universe ^ | 9-1999 | Greg Bryant
    The Dark Ages : Were They Darker Than We Imagined? By Greg Bryant Published in the September 1999 issue of Universe As we approach the end of the Second Millennium, a review of ancient history is not what you would normally expect to read in the pages of Universe. Indeed, except for reflecting on the AD 837 apparition of Halley's Comet (when it should have been as bright as Venus and would have moved through 60 degrees of sky in one day as it passed just 0.03 AU from Earth - three times closer than Hyakutake in 1996), you may...
  • Evidence for Major Impact Events in the late Third Millennium BC

    09/04/2002 4:48:54 PM PDT · by vannrox · 90 replies · 15,336+ views
    The Climax of a Turbulent Millennium: Evidence for Major Impact Events in the late Third Millennium BC Timo Niroma, Helsinki, Finland The First Intermediate PeriodThe Curse of AkkadTroy IIgThird Millennium BC Climate Change and Old World CollapseNatural Catastrophes during Bronze Age Civilisations Two separate cataclysmsSodom and GomorrahWhere did the impacts occur? The First Intermediate Period Selections from "The Egyptians" by C. Aldred (London 1987). "At this distance of time, the overthrow of the Old Kingdom at the end of the Sixth Dynasty has all the appearance of being sudden and complete. "Recent research has attributed the abrupt nature of...
  • Mesopotamian Climate Change (8,000 Years Ago)

    02/15/2004 11:18:28 AM PST · by blam · 71 replies · 5,365+ views
    Geo Times ^ | 2-15-2004
    Mesopotamian climate change Geoscientists are increasingly exploring an interesting trend: Climate change has been affecting human society for thousands of years. At the American Geophysical Union annual meeting in December, one archaeologist presented research that suggests that climate change affected the way cultures developed and collapsed in the cradle of civilization — ancient Mesopotamia — more than 8,000 years ago. Archaeologists have found evidence for a mass migration from the more temperate northern Mesopotamia to the arid southern region around 6400 B.C. For the previous 1,000 years, people had been cultivating the arable land in northern Mesopotamia, using natural rainwater...
  • The Impact of Abrupt Climate Change around 2650 BP in NW-Europe, Evidence for Climatic Teleconnec...

    09/23/2010 6:01:49 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    knowledge.co.uk ^ | 11th-13th July 1997 | Bas van Geel and Hans Renssen
    A sudden and sharp rise in the 14C-content of the atmosphere, which occurred between ca 850 and 760 calendar years BC (ca 2750-2450 BP on the radiocarbon time scale), was contemporaneous with an abrupt climate change. In NW-Europe (as indicated by palaeoecological and geological evidence) climate changed from relatively warm and continental to oceanic (cooler and wetter). Archaeological and palaeoecological evidence for the abandonment of low-lying areas at the Bronze Age/Iron Age transition in The Netherlands is interpreted as the effect of a rise of the water table and the extension of fens and bogs. ... The discussed oscillation of...
  • Romans, Han Dynasty were greenhouse gas emitters: study

    10/04/2012 8:37:26 AM PDT · by jmcenanly · 24 replies
    Reuters.com ^ | Wed Oct 3, 2012 4:35pm EDT | Alister Doyle
    (Reuters) - A 200-year period covering the heyday of both the Roman Empire and China's Han dynasty saw a big rise in greenhouse gases, according to a study that challenges the U.N. view that man-made climate change only began around 1800. A record of the atmosphere trapped in Greenland's ice found the level of heat-trapping methane rose about 2,000 years ago and stayed at that higher level for about two centuries. Methane was probably released during deforestation to clear land for farming and from the use of charcoal as fuel, for instance to smelt metal to make weapons, lead author...
  • Comets And Disaster In The Bronze Age

    04/30/2007 4:38:09 PM PDT · by blam · 63 replies · 2,021+ views
    British Archaeology ^ | December 1997 | Benny Peiser
    Comets and disaster in the Bronze AgeCosmic impact is gaining ground as an explanation of the collapse of civilisations, writes Benny Peiser At some time around 2300BC, give or take a century or two, a large number of the major civilisations of the world collapsed. The Akkadian Empire in Mesopotamia, the Old Kingdom in Egypt, the Early Bronze Age societies in Israel, Anatolia and Greece, as well as the Indus Valley civilisation in India, the Hilmand civilisation in Afghanistan and the Hongshan Culture in China - the first urban civilisations in the world - all fell into ruin at more...
  • Archaeologists Return to Excavate Major 3,300-Year-Old Bronze Age Site in England

    03/17/2012 12:45:08 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | March 2012 | unattributed
    They had stumbled upon an archaeologist's gold mine. Dated to 1365-967 BC and now known as Flag Fen, excavations and research uncovered a monumental site which included a causeway composed of thousands of timber posts arranged in five 1-meter-long rows, and a small timber platform partway across the structure. Between the posts of the causeway, timbers had been built up horizontally in ancient times, providing a "bridge" or dry surface for transportation across the wet lowland upon which the timber structures were built, connecting a higher level land area on its east with a higher level area on its west....
  • Did Asteroids And Comets Turn The Tides Of Civilization?

    07/11/2002 1:56:44 PM PDT · by blam · 89 replies · 12,100+ views
    Discovering Archaeology ^ | July/August 1999 | Mike Baillie
    Did Asteroids and Comets Turn the Tides of Civilization? By Mike Baillie The heart of humanity seems at times to have lost its cadence, the rhythmic beat of history collapsing into impotent chaos. Wars raged. Pestilence spread. Famine reigned. Death came early and hard. Dynasties died, and civilization flickered. Such a time came in the sixth century A.D. The Dark Ages settled heavily over Europe. Rome had been beaten back from its empire. Art and science stagnated. Even the sun turned its back. "We marvel to see no shadows of our bodies at noon, to feel the mighty vigor of...
  • BBC:Roman Rise, Fall 'Recorded in Trees' (Climate Change Led to Fall of Empire) BARF-A-GANZA!

    01/16/2011 9:19:55 AM PST · by lbryce · 60 replies · 1+ views
    BBC News ^ | January 14, 2010 | Mark Kinver
    An extensive study of tree growth rings says there could be a link between the rise and fall of past civilisations and sudden shifts in Europe's climate. A team of researchers based their findings on data from 9,000 wooden artifacts from the past 2,500 years. They found that periods of warm, wet summers coincided with prosperity, while political turmoil occurred during times of climate instability. The findings have been published online by the journal Science. "Looking back on 2,500 years, there are examples where climate change impacted human history," co-author Ulf Buntgen, a paleoclimatologist at the Swiss Federal Research Institute...
  • Climate Changes Linked to Fall of Roman Empire

    01/14/2011 5:02:29 AM PST · by Oldeconomybuyer · 42 replies · 1+ views
    Discovery News ^ | January 14, 2011 | By Emily Sohn
    A prolonged period of wet weather spurred the spread of the Bubonic plague in medieval times, according to a new study. And a 300-year spell of unpredictable weather coincided with the decline of the Roman Empire. Climate change wasn't necessarily the cause of these and other major historical events, researchers say. But the study offers the most detailed picture yet of how climate and society have been intertwined for millennia. Again and again, the data suggest, climate has impacted culture in dramatic ways. Unusually extreme and frequent shifts in weather patterns between 250 and 550, for example, coincided with a...
  • Global warming: What comes around goes around

    11/23/2008 12:30:43 PM PST · by kathsua · 18 replies · 806+ views
    The Hutchinson News ^ | 11/23/08 | Vance Ehmke
    Here's another way of looking at things: Global warming is good. And if there's any bad news at all about global warming, it's that it might be about over. The debate about global warming will go on forever. But while we may spend the rest of eternity trying to figure out where our weather is headed, one of the best ways of finding out where we're going is to simply look at where we came from. Some years ago I stumbled onto Charles Perry, with the U.S. Geological Survey in Lawrence, when I was trying to track down some information...
  • Ancient Greece's 'global warming'

    05/08/2009 6:39:00 PM PDT · by neverdem · 23 replies · 1,347+ views
    American Thinker ^ | May 08, 2009 | Ben-Peter Terpstra
    In Heaven + Earth (Global Warming: The Missing Science), Ian Plimer, Professor of Mining Geology at The University of Adelaide, Australia, asks us to embrace big-picture science views; for to recognize our limits is a sign of maturity. "Climate science lacks scientific discipline," says the pro-amalgamation Professor, and in order to see more clearly we need to adopt an interdisciplinary approach. This requires humbleness. In Chapter 2: History, Plimer travels back in time, thousands of years, in fact, to debunk Gore's catastrophic global warming myths. I particularly like his research on the ancient Greeks. For Plato (427-347 BC) advanced the...
  • Discovery of 1,800-year-old ‘Rosetta Stone’ for tropical ice cores

    04/04/2013 5:54:26 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 11 replies
    Watts Up With That? ^ | April 4, 2013 | by Anthony Watts
    > Will Lonnie Thompson archive THIS new ice core data? Posted on April 4, 2013 by Anthony Watts From the Ohio State University , taken with a grain of salt since Dr. Thompson and his wife Ellen are serial non archivers of ice core data (even when asked for it), which prevents other scientists from checking their work.Discovery of 1,800-year-old ‘Rosetta Stone’ for tropical ice coresFind offers the most complete picture of Earth’s low-latitude climate history to dateThis photo from a 1977 expedition to Quelccaya Ice Cap in Peru shows clearly defined annual layers of ice and dust visible in the...
  • Fall of Rome Recorded in Trees

    01/18/2011 10:49:18 PM PST · by neverdem · 38 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 13 January 2011 | Andrew Curry
    Enlarge Image Preserved. Climate changes recorded in tree rings correlate with important events in European history, such as the Black Death. Credit: Wikimedia When empires rise and fall and plagues sweep over the land, people have traditionally cursed the stars. But perhaps they should blame the weather. A new analysis of European tree-ring samples suggests that mild summers may have been the key to the rise of the Roman Empireā€”and that prolonged droughts, cold snaps, and other climate changes might have played a part in historical upheavals, from the barbarian invasions that brought about Rome's collapse to the Black...
  • Last Ice Age happened in less than year say scientists

    08/02/2008 2:28:28 PM PDT · by Renfield · 74 replies · 261+ views
    The Scotsman ^ | 8-02-08 | angus howarth
    THE last ice age 13,000 years ago took hold in just one year, more than ten times quicker than previously believed, scientists have warned. Rather than a gradual cooling over a decade, the ice age plunged Europe into the deep freeze, German Research Centre for Geosciences at Potsdam said. Cold, stormy conditions caused by an abrupt shift in atmospheric circulation froze the continent almost instantly during the Younger Dryas less than 13,000 years ago – a very recent period on a geological scale. The new findings will add to fears of a serious risk of this happening again in the...
  • Climate Cycles in China as Revealed by a Stalagmite from Buddha Cave(Journal Review)

    07/08/2003 3:48:19 PM PDT · by PeaceBeWithYou · 58 replies · 1,131+ views
    CO2 Science Magazine ^ | July 08, 2003 | Staff
    Reference Paulsen, D.E., Li, H.-C. and Ku, T.-L. 2003. Climate variability in central China over the last 1270 years revealed by high-resolution stalagmite records. Quaternary Science Reviews 22: 691-701. What was done In the words of the authors, "high-resolution records of š13C and š18O in stalagmite SF-1 from Buddha Cave [33°40'N, 109°05'E] are used to infer changes in climate in central China for the last 1270 years in terms of warmer, colder, wetter and drier conditions." What was learned Among the climatic episodes evident in the authors' data were "those corresponding to the Medieval Warm Period, Little Ice Age and...
  • Middle Ages were warmer than today, say scientists

    04/05/2003 7:38:26 PM PST · by Prince Charles · 75 replies · 2,747+ views
    London Daily Telegraph ^ | 4-6-03 | Robert Matthews
    Middle Ages were warmer than today, say scientists By Robert Matthews, Science Correspondent (Filed: 06/04/2003) Claims that man-made pollution is causing "unprecedented" global warming have been seriously undermined by new research which shows that the Earth was warmer during the Middle Ages. From the outset of the global warming debate in the late 1980s, environmentalists have said that temperatures are rising higher and faster than ever before, leading some scientists to conclude that greenhouse gases from cars and power stations are causing these "record-breaking" global temperatures. Last year, scientists working for the UK Climate Impacts Programme said that global temperatures...
  • Computer Models Forecast Sharp Increase In Temperature If Heat-trapping Emissions Continue To Rise

    02/17/2003 2:20:55 PM PST · by boris · 36 replies · 373+ views
    LINK Source: American Association For The Advancement Of Science Date: 2003-02-17 Computer Models Forecast Sharp Increase In Temperature If Heat-trapping Emissions Continue To Rise DENVER, CO –- Powerful computer models predict that winter temperatures in the polar regions of the world could rise as much as 10 degrees centigrade in the next hundred years, if no efforts are made to control production of carbon dioxide, methane and other gasses. “With projections to the year 2100, we can show what will happen if we continue with business as usual—if we don’t do anything to curb emissions of greenhouse gasses,” said Warren...
  • Methane And Mini-horses: Fossils Reveal Effects Of Global Warming

    03/04/2003 6:01:54 AM PST · by Junior · 31 replies · 1,470+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 2003-02-19
    DENVER, Colo. --- How will global warming affect life on Earth? Uncertainties about future climate change and the impact of human activity make it difficult to predict exactly what lies ahead. But the past offers clues, say scientists who are studying a period of warming that occurred about 55 million years ago.In a joint project of the University of Michigan, the University of New Hampshire and the Smithsonian Institution, researchers have been analyzing fossils from the badlands of Wyoming found in a distinctive layer of bright red sedimentary rock that was deposited at the boundary between the Paleocene and Eocene...