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Keyword: paleolithic

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  • 24,000-Year-Old Body Is Kin to Both Europeans and American Indians

    11/20/2013 2:33:43 PM PST · by mandaladon · 51 replies
    The New York Times ^ | 20 Nov 2013 | NICHOLAS WADE
    The genome of a young boy buried at Mal’ta near Lake Baikal in eastern Siberia some 24,000 years ago has turned out to hold two surprises for anthropologists. The first is that the boy’s DNA matches that of Western Europeans, showing that during the last Ice Age people from Europe had reached farther east across Eurasia than previously supposed. Though none of the Mal’ta boy’s skin or hair survive, his genes suggest he would have had brown hair, brown eyes and freckled skin. The second surprise is that his DNA also matches a large proportion — some 25 percent —...
  • 40,000-Year-Old Grindstone Unearthed In Western Galilee Cave

    06/30/2016 9:00:38 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Israel Hayom ^ | Tuesday June 28, 2016 | Yori Yalon, Daniel Siryoti and Israel Hayom Staff
    Despite the often oppressive heat, summer is the main season for... excavations... Tenth-grade students volunteering on an Israel Antiquities Authority dig at a stalactite cave near Moshav Manot in the Western Galilee earlier in June discovered a 40,000-year-old grindstone... Lerer said that the grindstone was basalt, "which is created when lava erupts out of a volcano and is not indigenous to the Western Galilee area. It looks like [either] the raw material or the tool itself was brought here from the Lower Galilee by residents of the cave." The stalactite cave where the dig is underway was discovered in 2008,...
  • Archaeologist: Many thousands of years ago life flourished in the Gobi desert

    06/23/2016 11:33:53 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Science & Scholarship in Poland ^ | June 10, 2016 | Szymon Zdziebiowski (PAP) [szz/zan/mrt]
    Many thousands of years ago life flourished in the Mongolian Gobi desert... Archaeologists found many traces of old camps... located on the shores of lakes - now dried. Based on the findings, researchers concluded that thousands of years ago richness of species of animals lived in the study area, benefiting the ancient inhabitants of the desert. Archaeologists discovered mainly stone tools and the waste associated with their production... The oldest finds are represented by a massive stone tools made by the Middle Palaeolithic communities (200 thousand - 40 thousand years ago). Archaeologists have also discovered smaller stone products from later...
  • 'Pristine' Landscapes Haven't Existed For Thousands Of Years Due To Human Activity

    06/18/2016 2:47:39 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | June 6th, 2016 | University of Oxford
    It draws on fossil evidence showing Homo sapiens was present in East Africa around 195,000 years ago and that our species had dispersed to the far corners of Eurasia, Australia, and the Americas by 12,000 years ago. This increase in global human populations is linked with a variety of species extinctions, one of the most significant being the reduction by around two-thirds of 150 species of 'megafauna' or big beasts between 50,000 and 10,000 years ago, says the paper, with their disappearance having 'dramatic effects' on the structure of the ecosystem and seed dispersal. ...second... the advent of agriculture worldwide,...
  • Cave art trove found in Spain 1,000 feet underground

    05/29/2016 10:15:47 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 9 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | May 27, 2016 | by Ciaran Giles
    This image released by the Diputacion Floral de Bizkaia on Friday May 27, 2016, shows a cave drawing. Spanish archaeologists say they have discovered an exceptional set of Paleolithic-era cave drawings that could rank among the best in a country that already boasts some of the world's most important cave art. Chief site archaeologist Diego Garate said Friday that an estimated 70 drawings were found on ledges 300 meters (1,000 feet) underground in the Atxurra cave, Berriatua, in the northern Basque region. He described the site as being in "the Champions' League" of cave art, among the top 10 sites...
  • Stunning cave paintings found 300 metres below Spain

    05/27/2016 1:19:50 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    The Local ^ | May 26, 2016 | Jessica Jones
    The cave joins that at Altamira as one of Spain’s most exciting and best-preserved set of cave paintings and for Garate, marks a career high. "Without doubt it is the most important discovery of my career," he told The Local. "I have been searching the caves of the Basque Country for ten years and have discovered lots of new caves but none as important as Atxurra. It could very well be the cave with the most animal figures in the Basque Country," he added. The Atxurra caves were originally discovered in 1929, but as the paintings are at a depth...
  • Migration back to Africa took place during the Paleolithic

    05/26/2016 11:59:38 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | May 26, 2016 | University of the Basque Country
    A piece of international research led by the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country has retrieved the mitogenome of a fossil belonging to the first Homo sapiens population in Europe. The Palaeogenomics study conducted by the Human Evolutionary Biology group of the Faculty of Science and Technology, led by Concepción de la Rua, in collaboration with researchers in Sweden, the Netherlands and Romania, has made it possible to retrieve the complete sequence of the mitogenome of the Pestera Muierii woman (PM1) using two teeth. This mitochondrial genome corresponds to the now disappeared U6 basal lineage, and it is from this lineage...
  • Archaeologists find world's oldest axe in Australia

    05/10/2016 11:24:38 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | May 10, 2016 | Australian National University
    Archaeologists from The Australian National University (ANU) have unearthed fragments from the edge of the world's oldest-known axe, found in the Kimberley region of Western Australia. Lead archeologist Professor Sue O'Connor said the axe dates back between 46,000 and 49,000 years, around the time people first arrived on the continent. "This is the earliest evidence of hafted axes in the world. Nowhere else in the world do you get axes at this date," said Professor O'Connor from the ANU School of Culture, History and Language. "In Japan such axes appear about 35,000 years ago. But in most countries in the...
  • Early human fossils unearthed in Ukraine

    06/20/2011 6:33:23 PM PDT · by decimon · 15 replies
    BBC ^ | June 20, 2011 | Jennifer Carpenter
    Ancient remains uncovered in Ukraine represent some of the oldest evidence of modern people in Europe, experts have claimed.Archaeologists found human bones and teeth, tools, ivory ornaments and animal remains at the Buran-Kaya cave site. The 32,000-year-old fossils bear cut marks suggesting they were defleshed as part of a post-mortem ritual. Archaeologist Dr Alexander Yanevich from the National Ukrainian Academy of Science in Kiev discovered the four Buran-Kaya caves in the Crimean mountains in 1991. Since then, roughly two hundred human bone fragments have been unearthed at the site. Among the shards of human bones and teeth, archaeologists have found...
  • Anthropologist suggests Mediterranean islands inhabited much earlier than thought

    11/16/2012 8:16:41 AM PST · by Renfield · 4 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | 11-16-2012 | Bob Yirka
    Modern science has held that islands such as Cypress and Crete were first inhabited by seafaring humans approximately 9,000 years ago by agriculturists from the late Neolithic period. Simmons writes that research over the past 20 years has cast doubt on that assumption however and suggests that it might be time to rewrite the history books. He cites evidence such as pieces of obsidian found in a cave in mainland Greece that were found to have come from Melos, an island in the Aegean Sea and were dated at 11,000 years ago as well as artifacts from recent digs on...
  • New insights on the wooden weapons from the Paleolithic site of Schoningen

    10/25/2015 6:07:47 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Friday, October 23, 2015 | editors
    The Paleolithic site of Schöningen in north-central Germany is famous for the earliest known, completely preserved wooden weapons or artifacts uncovered there by archaeologists under the direction of Dr. Hartmut Thieme between 1994 and 1998 at an open-cast lignite mine. Deposited in organic sediments at a former lakeshore, they were found in combination with the remains of about 16,000 animal bones, including 20 wild horses, whose bones featured numerous butchery marks, including one pelvis that still had a spear protruding from it. The finds are considered evidence that early humans were active hunters with specialized tool kits as early as...
  • Stone tools from Jordan point to dawn of division of labor

    06/17/2015 8:16:43 AM PDT · by Brad from Tennessee · 12 replies
    TerraDaily ^ | June 17, 2015 | Staff Writers
    Thousands of stone tools from the early Upper Paleolithic, unearthed from a cave in Jordan, reveal clues about how humans may have started organizing into complex social groups by planning tasks and specializing in different technical skills. The Journal of Human Evolution published a study of the artifacts from Mughr el-Hamamah, or Cave of the Doves, led by Emory University anthropologists Liv Nilsson Stutz and Aaron Jonas Stutz. "We have achieved remarkably accurate estimates of 40,000 to 45,000 years ago for the earliest Upper Paleolithic stone tools in the Near East," Aaron Stutz says. "Our findings confirm that the Upper...
  • Prehistoric stone tools bear 500,000-year-old animal residue

    03/21/2015 6:02:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 60 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | March 19, 2015 | American Friends of Tel Aviv University
    Tel Aviv University discovers first direct evidence early flint tools were used to butcher animal carcasses. Some 2.5 million years ago, early humans survived on a paltry diet of plants. As the human brain expanded, however, it required more substantial nourishment - namely fat and meat - to sustain it. This drove prehistoric man, who lacked the requisite claws and sharp teeth of carnivores, to develop the skills and tools necessary to hunt animals and butcher fat and meat from large carcasses. Among elephant remains some 500,000 years old at a Lower Paleolithic site in Revadim, Israel, Prof. Ran Barkai...
  • Nutrition and health in agriculturalists and hunter-gatherers

    09/19/2014 3:27:29 PM PDT · by ckilmer · 6 replies
    proteinpower ^ | 2. April 2009, | Michael R Eades
    Nutrition and health in agriculturalists and hunter-gatherers 22. April 2009, 2:21 UhrLow-carb diets, Paleolithic diet, Paleopathologymreades139 comments 87 When I wrote the Overcoming the Curse of the Mummies chapter in Protein Power, I wrote mainly about the evidence of disease found in the mummies of ancient Egyptians and correlated this disease with their high-carbohydrate diet.  Along with all the material on mummies, which is the part everyone seems to remember, I wrote about a study done in the United States in the 1970s that persuasively demonstrated the superiority of the hunter diet as compared to an agricultural diet, which no...
  • Prehistoric hunting scenes unearthed in Spanish cave

    05/25/2014 8:52:16 AM PDT · by Renfield · 11 replies
    The Art Newspaper ^ | 5-23-2014 | Belén Palanco
    Antiquities and Archaeology Conservation News Spain Prehistoric hunting scenes unearthed in Spanish cave Threat of vandalism puts ancient paintings at risk By Belén Palanco. Web onlyPublished online: 23 May 2014 A cave painting of a bull, with colours accentuated by archaeologists. Credit: Courtesy of Ines Domingo A series of hunting scenes dating from 7,000 years ago have been found by archaeologists on the six-metre long wall of a small cave in the region of Vilafranca in Castellón, eastern Spain—but it is being kept a secret for now. A layer of dust and dirt covered ten figures, including bulls, two...
  • Is THIS Nessie? Apple maps satellite image spots 'creature swimming' below surface of Loch Ness

    04/18/2014 7:09:25 PM PDT · by 11th_VA · 105 replies
    The Mirror ^ | Apr 18, 2014 13:23 | David Colins
    The photographs were captured by two different amateur Nessie hunters scanning different satellites on their iPhone and iPads.
  • New Early Human Site Discovered in Israel

    01/01/2014 8:08:47 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Saturday, December 28, 2013 | Journal of Human Evolution
    A team of Israeli scientists have reported the discovery of a hominin (early human) occupation site near Nesher Ramla, Israel. The site, according to archaeologist Yossi Zaidner of the Zinman Institute of Archaeology at the University of Haifa and colleagues, presents evidence for human occupation or use during Middle Paleolithic times (about 300,000 to 40 - 50,000 years ago). Unearthed were numerous finds that comprised an 8-meter deep sequence of "rich and well-preserved lithic [worked stone tool artifacts] and faunal assemblages [animal and early human bones], combustion features [features evidencing use or presence of fire], hundreds of manuports [natural objects...
  • Archaeologists discovered a unique woman figurine in Silesia

    08/31/2013 7:03:47 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 39 replies
    PAP - Science and Scholarship in Poland ^ | August 28, 2013 | szz/ tot/ mrt/
    "This find is a sensation in the archaeological world, because so far only a few and small fragments of human figurines from this period have been discovered" - told PAP Jacek Pierzak from the Silesian Regional Office for the Protection of Monuments. The object was discovered during the survey of the planned flood reservoir Dolna Odra, conducted by the Archaeological Rescue Research Team at the Centre for Prehistoric and Medieval Studies of the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology PAS in Poznań. The figurine was dubbed "Venus of Racibórz" because it is similar to other finds of this type known from...
  • Two Basic Human Groups?

    Compared to other animals, humans have very little genetic diversity, e.g. http://humanorigins.si.edu/evidence/genetics/skin-color/modern-human-diversity-genetics People today look remarkably diverse on the outside. But how much of this diversity is genetically encoded? How deep are these differences between human groups? First, compared with many other mammalian species, humans are genetically far less diverse – a counterintuitive finding, given our large population and worldwide distribution. For example, the subspecies of the chimpanzee that lives just in central Africa, Pan troglodytes troglodytes, has higher levels of diversity than do humans globally, and the genetic differentiation between the western (P. t. verus) and central (P. t....
  • Stone Age technological and cultural innovation accelerated by climate

    06/23/2013 4:46:34 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | June 18, 2013 | Rainer Zahn
    The latest archaeological excavations in southern Africa have shown that technological innovation, linked to the emergence of culture and modern behaviour, took place abruptly... An international team of researchers has linked these pulses of innovation to the climate that prevailed in sub-Saharan Africa in that period... The researchers have pieced together how rainfall patterns varied in southern Africa over the last 100,000 years, by analysing river delta deposits at the edge of the continent, where every millimetre of sediment core corresponds to 25 years of sedimentation. The ratio of iron (dissolved from the rocks by the water during the rains)...